View Poll Results: That's a...
access road. 28 17.18%
frontage road. 72 44.17%
service road. 43 26.38%
feeder road. 2 1.23%
auxiliary road. 1 0.61%
parallel road. 1 0.61%
something else. 10 6.13%
I have no idea what you're talking about. 6 3.68%
Voters: 163. You may not vote on this poll

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  #1  
Old 02-07-2019, 07:15 PM
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What do you call this type of street?


There's a major, main, multi-laned, two way road in the center. On each side of this main road is another street running parallel to it, just one lane, sometimes with space for parallel parking, usually one-way, the same direction as the adjacent lane on the main road, often separated from the main with a curb.

What do you call those streets on the side of the main road?


.

Last edited by DCnDC; 02-07-2019 at 07:19 PM.
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Old 02-07-2019, 07:18 PM
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I've never called them anything. Is there a name for that sort of road other than the name of the road? I'm really only familiar with "frontage road" which generally applies to a road running parallel, and with access points, to a highway.

ETA: I answered before you posted the poll. Access and service roads, to me are roads that lead into a site that would not normally have access to, like a wilderness area with access road leading to a fire lookout.

Last edited by Rhiannon8404; 02-07-2019 at 07:22 PM.
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Old 02-07-2019, 07:24 PM
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Originally Posted by Rhiannon8404 View Post
I've never called them anything. Is there a name for that sort of road other than the name of the road? I'm really only familiar with "frontage road" which generally applies to a road running parallel, and with access points, to a highway.
It's my understanding this is a regionalism, and what you call them largely depends on where you're from, hence the question.

I've from the DC area, and I've always known them as "service roads."
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Old 02-07-2019, 07:40 PM
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Frontage road.
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Old 02-07-2019, 07:59 PM
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Frontage road if itís next to a freeway, otherwise access or service road are pretty much interchangeable terms in my book.

Are you specifically asking about K Street?
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Old 02-07-2019, 09:37 PM
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If we're talking about a freeway, then I would say frontage, but any of the first four options would work(except that feeder road is very Houston specific). If it's all surface roads with stop signs and traffic signals I would not use frontage or feeder, but either service or access would suffice.
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Old 02-07-2019, 09:39 PM
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Called a service road in Australia.
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Old 02-07-2019, 10:29 PM
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Service road, though I’ve also heard “access road.” Never heard “frontage” and would have no clue what that meant. New York/Long Island here.
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Old 02-07-2019, 10:31 PM
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Service road, though I’ve also heard frontage road. Grew up in NY state, lived 15 years in the Midwest.

Last edited by JKellyMap; 02-07-2019 at 10:32 PM.
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Old 02-07-2019, 10:52 PM
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I grew up in the St. Louis area. They were always service roads to me. I've heard frontage road, but it's wrong.
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Old 02-07-2019, 11:06 PM
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I've regularly heard the first four options. I tend to think of service or feeder as appropriate usage only for freeways, most notably the Texas model. (Most states passed laws in the 1950s so that freeways didn't have to allow access to abutting property, but Texas did not until about 20 years ago.)

On the other hand, frontage roads were frequently used in the Sunbelt in the 1950s and 1960s to allow residential subdivisions to front onto arterial roads. (Nowadays they design the subdivisions to have backyards along the arterials.) These have 19th century predecessors in the boulevards laid out in Chicago and Brooklyn, which were emulated in Kansas City, Dallas, Minneapolis, and other places during the early 20th century City Beautiful movement.
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Old 02-07-2019, 11:17 PM
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If we're thinking the same thing, my wife and I always called them "side roads" or "siding roads". Mostly we seem to hit them around Indiana along highways passing through more heavily commercial sections.
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Old 02-08-2019, 12:32 AM
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There aren't a lot in my area (central Ohio) but I'd call it a service road. I've heard "frontage road" enough to know what it is, though.
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Old 02-08-2019, 02:08 AM
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Ventweg (the Dutch name for exactly that kind of road)
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  #15  
Old 02-08-2019, 04:48 AM
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Service lane. Melb.vic.aus, and I didn't vote because I thought the statistics were more interesting without foreign interference.
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Old 02-08-2019, 06:14 AM
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I've learned them as service roads, and I believe the local traffic report back then used that term (as a alternate to the jammed up expressway). It was explained to me as a child that it is called that because the interstate has no services, and if you need food or gas you would take the service road.

Later I heard the term frontage road in a different part of the country, I accepted the term but the wording to me never made sense. There is no front of a highway.

As for access road, to me that is a road used to access the highway and not necessarily parallel to it, and usually short - or at least the part used to access the highway short. If someone said take the access road, I would assume they meant access the highway via the access road unless they clarified. Take the service road or frontage road would mean to drive on that road and not get on the highway.
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Old 02-08-2019, 06:56 AM
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I've only ever encountered them along limited-access freeways, and always seen them referred to as either frontage roads or marginal roads (which wasn't an option in the poll).
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Old 02-08-2019, 07:09 AM
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Originally Posted by kanicbird View Post
Later I heard the term frontage road in a different part of the country, I accepted the term but the wording to me never made sense. There is no front of a highway.
Frontage is the edge of a property along water or a road. Like how you might own lakefront property.

Last edited by Lord Feldon; 02-08-2019 at 07:12 AM.
  #19  
Old 02-08-2019, 08:28 AM
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Access road in New Jersey.
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Old 02-08-2019, 08:51 AM
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Wiki says the whole thing is a boulevard:
"A boulevard (French, from Dutch: Bolwerk Ė bulwark, meaning bastion), often abbreviated Blvd, is a type of large road, usually running through a city.

In modern American usage it often means a wide, multi-lane arterial thoroughfare, often divided with a median down the centre, and perhaps with roadways along each side designed as slow travel and parking lanes and for bicycle and pedestrian usage, often with an above-average quality of landscaping and scenery."

I would call the roads at the side "side roads".
  #21  
Old 02-08-2019, 09:05 AM
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It depends. If it is parallel to a limited access highway, I would call it a service road. But when my daughter lived in Stuyvesant Town in Manhattan and there was such a road parallel to and running along the north side of 14th St. between Ave. C and 1st Ave. It then turned right and continued up 1st Ave. It was often possible to park there. But I never heard of any name for it.
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Old 02-08-2019, 09:16 AM
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I remember travelling with my family as a child and wondering why so many cities had streets named "Frontage Road" and why we so often wound up on them.

This was in the Midwest.
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Old 02-08-2019, 09:32 AM
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I put 'frontage road', but I'd really only think of something as a 'frontage road' if it's separated from the main road by a grassy median. If it's separated from the main road only by a curb, I'd just call it a lane of the main road.
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Old 02-08-2019, 09:38 AM
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I chose "something else" because I use different terms in different situations.

If we're talking about a limited-access highway, and the purpose of the auxiliary road is to manage the flow of traffic entering and exiting the highway, it's a "feeder road."

If the purpose of the road is just to make it easier to access a row of businesses or industrial locations (such as in an industrial park), and the road is likely to be used by large commercial or construction vehicles, I'd call it a "service road."

If the auxiliary road is lined with residences, and the purpose is to make it easier for people who live there to get in and out of their driveways, I'd call it an "access road."
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Old 02-08-2019, 09:42 AM
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I answered frontage road but like others I only use it for a street parallel to a limited-access highway. I don't have a word for other situations, such as when a surface-road highway has a neighborhood street run parallel and very close to it for several blocks.
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Old 02-08-2019, 10:10 AM
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They're plentiful in northern and southern VA, and it seems like they're mostly called access roads. Sometimes I hear people say service roads. I hate them, as they make the car-centric suburban sprawl even worse.
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Old 02-08-2019, 12:42 PM
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The roads next to the highways trailing off to businesses are frontage roads.

The roads through parks and recreation areas that are off limits to the general public, and used by park employees, etc. are service roads.

The roads around a mall or industrial complex are access roads.

I've heard the short roads leading on and off the highway called feeder ramps, not feeder roads. I just call them ramps for on, exits for off.

I've heard of auxiliary roads, but I don't know what they're for. Sounds military, or possibly British.

Never heard of parallel roads.

Last edited by Two Many Cats; 02-08-2019 at 12:45 PM.
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Old 02-08-2019, 08:43 PM
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Here in the midwest, I've always heard them called frontage roads.
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Old 02-08-2019, 08:49 PM
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I consider them a waste of space that could be used for more freeway, unless there is a Cracker Barrel on the road in question. I have also been occaisionally confused when trying to get over there from here with too many roads in the way of each other.

I've really seen them only in D/FW, and they are called frontage roads there.
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Old 02-08-2019, 11:19 PM
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Quote:
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Wiki says the whole thing is a boulevard:
"A boulevard (French, from Dutch: Bolwerk Ė bulwark, meaning bastion), often abbreviated Blvd, is a type of large road, usually running through a city.

In modern American usage it often means a wide, multi-lane arterial thoroughfare, often divided with a median down the centre, and perhaps with roadways along each side designed as slow travel and parking lanes and for bicycle and pedestrian usage, often with an above-average quality of landscaping and scenery."

I would call the roads at the side "side roads".
There are occasional attempts to rename the things as boulevards here in Melb.vic.aus. Because French, right? And Paris gets lots of tourists, obviously because they call them boulevards, right?

In Melbourne, the whole thing would be a Parade, or a Freeway. A Boulevard would be a winding road that follows the crest of a rise, sort of like you could imagine a road along the top of a city wall.
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Old 02-08-2019, 11:27 PM
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Originally Posted by sps49sd View Post
I consider them a waste of space that could be used for more freeway, unless there is a Cracker Barrel on the road in question. I have also been occaisionally confused when trying to get over there from here with too many roads in the way of each other.

I've really seen them only in D/FW, and they are called frontage roads there.
Out here in SoCal (Los Angeles metropolitan area), there are business along that type of road, many of which provide support to construction companies (thus, they have materials yards in back, preventing any other access to the public-facing parts). So no, we canít just use the space for a couple of extra lanes on the freeway. The temptation to leave the freeway at rush hour and take advantage of their relatively lighter traffic can be overwhelming. Sometimes it even works.
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Old 02-09-2019, 03:14 PM
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Either frontage or service road. "Frontage Road" is the actual address for one such road where I live (Denver) and there is an East Frontage Road and a West Frontage Road, at least for a little while.

There is certainly not any sign of above-average landscaping and scenery, and pedestrians and bicyclists beware.

There are also a couple of areas where this kind of street runs parallel along a more major street, but not a highway. In those cases the side streets have the same name as the major street and it can be really hard to figure out where you need to be if you're looking for an address on that street. (They may have fixed this; I haven't had to go to the specific area for years.) There were also at one time a plethora of traffic lights, and it could be very confusing to figure out which one controlled which traffic position. All in all a good place to avoid.

Last edited by Hilarity N. Suze; 02-09-2019 at 03:15 PM.
  #33  
Old 02-09-2019, 03:30 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DCnDC View Post
There's a major, main, multi-laned, two way road in the center. On each side of this main road is another street running parallel to it, just one lane, sometimes with space for parallel parking, usually one-way, the same direction as the adjacent lane on the main road, often separated from the main with a curb.

What do you call those streets on the side of the main road?.
If the road in the center is an interstate, or a similar fast, limited-access road, I probably call it a service road. Or possibly an access road, depending on what you can get to from the side road.

But I also refer to the entrance ramp as a service road. Which, I guess, is consistent, since it, too, runs alongside the main road for a bit.

If the road in the center is an ordinary large city road, or a major suburban artery that isn't limited access, Then I completely agree with GaryM.
Quote:
Originally Posted by GaryM View Post
Wiki says the whole thing is a boulevard:
"A boulevard (French, from Dutch: Bolwerk Ė bulwark, meaning bastion), often abbreviated Blvd, is a type of large road, usually running through a city.

In modern American usage it often means a wide, multi-lane arterial thoroughfare, often divided with a median down the centre, and perhaps with roadways along each side designed as slow travel and parking lanes and for bicycle and pedestrian usage, often with an above-average quality of landscaping and scenery."

I would call the roads at the side "side roads".
Side roads, or even side lanes. Lanes because they aren't really a separate entity from the whole boulevard, just a part of it.
  #34  
Old 02-09-2019, 06:46 PM
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I answered "access road," although "service road" is synonymous here. In other parts of the country I've lived in, they have other names.
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Old 02-09-2019, 10:52 PM
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Bike path/sidewalk isn't an option? Until this thread, I'd never heard of a one way street physically separated from the main road. Around here, the roads along the sides are always two way streets/roads. In 40+ years of driving I can't recall seeing a one way road used like that. The two lane roads are referred to by signage and the locals vernacular as frontage roads.
Locations: Wisconsin and the upper Midwest
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  #36  
Old 02-10-2019, 07:39 AM
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Bike path/sidewalk isn't an option? Until this thread, I'd never heard of a one way street physically separated from the main road. Around here, the roads along the sides are always two way streets/roads. In 40+ years of driving I can't recall seeing a one way road used like that. The two lane roads are referred to by signage and the locals vernacular as frontage roads.
Locations: Wisconsin and the upper Midwest
We're talking about two different breeds of the same critter.

This is an inner-city version that I would call a service road(the one-way portions separated by the brick dividers). It is there so that people going to the businesses can get in and out of their vehicles/load purchases/etc. without worrying about the heavier and faster moving traffic. Going to street view might better illustrate this.

Here is a typical freeway frontage road set-up. It is where the exit and entrance ramps go and is an integral part of the freeway system to provide access to arterial street-level roads. The businesses are there because of the traffic originating from the freeway(there is never parking on the road), whereas in the DC example(above) the access road is there because of the businesses and to provide parking.
  #37  
Old 02-12-2019, 12:54 AM
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. . . , frontage roads were frequently used in the Sunbelt in the 1950s and 1960s to allow residential subdivisions to front onto arterial roads. (Nowadays they design the subdivisions to have backyards along the arterials.) . . . .
Although most frontage roads are along highways, putting "frontage roads" along arterial streets was a fad that came and went. It took up a lot of space. The most obvious way to know that they are frontage roads, here in Stockton, is to look at their names. There are parallel streets called, for instance, West Lane Frontage Road. If you look in the police database, you'll find West Lane Frontage Road (E), West Lane Frontage Road (W), and West Lane Frontage Road (it's a cross street between WLFR (E) and West Lane. If you look at the street signs, all the frontages are named West Lane Frontage Road. It can be confusing. Oh, and the frontage roads are one lane in each direction, not one-way.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hapax Legomenon View Post
I put 'frontage road', but I'd really only think of something as a 'frontage road' if it's separated from the main road by a grassy median. If it's separated from the main road only by a curb, I'd just call it a lane of the main road.
Grassy medains are more expensive, especially more expensive to maintain. Ours are raised curb medians filled with either asphalt or gravel. Sometimes there's also a fence in the median.

Last edited by Yllaria; 02-12-2019 at 12:56 AM.
  #38  
Old 02-12-2019, 05:50 AM
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Bike path/sidewalk isn't an option? Until this thread, I'd never heard of a one way street physically separated from the main road. Around here, the roads along the sides are always two way streets/roads. In 40+ years of driving I can't recall seeing a one way road used like that. The two lane roads are referred to by signage and the locals vernacular as frontage roads.
Locations: Wisconsin and the upper Midwest
Yeah...I chose I don't know what you're talking about. I've never seen a one-way road as described in the OP. 100% of the one-way roads I've ever seen are side streets in urbanish areas, and they're regular roads with houses and/or businesses on them.

Service roads and access roads, on the other hand, are often unpaved and run into the woods. They get 'named' lazy things like "Fire road #11" and may occasionally have a summer cottage on them but may also be a scary trail to nowhere you want to go by car.
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Old 02-12-2019, 05:56 AM
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I call them service road, or access road, I’m from DC region.
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Old 02-12-2019, 06:01 AM
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Yeah...I chose I don't know what you're talking about. I've never seen a one-way road as described in the OP. 100% of the one-way roads I've ever seen are side streets in urbanish areas, and they're regular roads with houses and/or businesses on them.

Service roads and access roads, on the other hand, are often unpaved and run into the woods. They get 'named' lazy things like "Fire road #11" and may occasionally have a summer cottage on them but may also be a scary trail to nowhere you want to go by car.
This article has pictures of the type of road in question: https://ggwash.org/view/66387/a-shar...cleveland-park
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Old 02-12-2019, 08:29 AM
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I select "Something Else" because you can't select more than one...
Ironically the one I don't call it is the one that has been select most (at the time of me posting): "Frontage Road".

If someone said to me any of the following terms, they would match in my mind what you described:
access road
service road
feeder road.
  #42  
Old 02-12-2019, 01:13 PM
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I call them service road, or access road, Iím from DC region.
Bingo. From the same place, and while I call them access roads, I've also heard the term "service road" to describe them. I've never heard anyone use the term "frontage road."
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Old 02-12-2019, 01:16 PM
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I can't think of a single example around Atlanta of the road type described in the OP. We do have frontage roads along each side of some interstate highways, but those are for 2-way traffic and serve the purpose of easier access to businesses. I can't say that I have ever seen a setup with 1-way traffic roads on either side of a major thoroughfare.
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Old 02-12-2019, 01:32 PM
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Where I grew up, there was one actually signed "Frontage Road," so I call them that. However, I don't think I have ever seen one that didn't have one lane going in each direction.

In fact, there's a "Frontage Road" in downtown Oakland that runs alongside Interstate 880.
Here's a street sign with the name on it.
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Old 02-12-2019, 01:39 PM
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Service road in New York. I grew up on one of them - which became a service road when they demolished the houses across the street and dug an expressway.
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Old 02-12-2019, 02:30 PM
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Bingo. From the same place, and while I call them access roads, I've also heard the term "service road" to describe them. I've never heard anyone use the term "frontage road."
Yeah, theyíre pretty common in DC, itís a good place for cabs to drop off passengers and delivery trucks to stop without blocking the main road.
  #47  
Old 02-12-2019, 03:56 PM
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This article has pictures of the type of road in question: https://ggwash.org/view/66387/a-shar...cleveland-park
Okay. I looked at the picture. There's one street that sort of looks like this in near Huntington Avenue in Boston, but I don't think it's quite the same thing.
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Old 02-12-2019, 10:53 PM
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I call it a service drive, not a service road.
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Old 02-13-2019, 05:17 AM
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Nm

Last edited by Acsenray; 02-13-2019 at 05:17 AM.
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Old 02-13-2019, 06:43 AM
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Southern Ontario; they are called service roads, and in fact are often named that. Near here, running more or less parallel to the QEW/403 freeway, many businesses are located on North Service Road or South Service Road.
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