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  #101  
Old 09-29-2019, 11:17 PM
nearwildheaven is offline
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Bumping this thread to say that over the weekend, I watched an animated movie called "Sgt. Stubby", inspired by a WWI Army mascot and was probably also the inspiration for Otto, the dog in the "Beetle Bailey" comic strip. Anyway, the main soldier character writes letters to his sister, and they show an envelope with a ZIP code on it. Those were not used until the mid 1960s.

https://www.imdb.com/title/tt5314190/?ref_=fn_al_tt_2
  #102  
Old 09-30-2019, 12:26 AM
BrickBat is offline
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Originally Posted by terentii View Post
Pearl Harbor may have been bad, but the Mother of All Such Films has to be Midway:

http://www.moviemistakes.com/film831

The end of the movie, with the angled-deck carrier, the crowd of obviously-not-1942-people gathered on the dock in the background, and Henry Fonda's "Maybe-we-really-aren't-better-than-the-Japs" speech, never fails to leave me laughing!
Another part of that movie made me roll my eyes: The USN pilots flying attack planes ( purportedly Douglas SBDs ) talking on the radio via a hand microphone that looks like it's from a late 1970s CB radio. In reality, they used throat mics. But then, the actor playing said pilot couldn't mug for the camera with a confident smirk as he spoke if he didn't have a hand mic to give him such a forum to do so.

I won't even get into the vintage stock film footage used showing later war US A/C in mid-1942.
  #103  
Old 09-30-2019, 09:11 AM
Patch is offline
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At the end of Into the Night, starring Jeff Goldblum and Michelle Pfeiffer, they're taken to a hotel room with two agents from an unknown government organization. As the camera switches back and forth between the agents and Jeff/Michelle, the hinges on the door behind the agents switch from the left side of the door, to the right, and back. I guess they did the shoot over more than one day and had to rebuild the set, and didn't notice that they hinged the door differently.
  #104  
Old 09-30-2019, 06:05 PM
nearwildheaven is offline
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Originally Posted by BrickBat View Post
Another part of that movie made me roll my eyes: The USN pilots flying attack planes ( purportedly Douglas SBDs ) talking on the radio via a hand microphone that looks like it's from a late 1970s CB radio. In reality, they used throat mics. But then, the actor playing said pilot couldn't mug for the camera with a confident smirk as he spoke if he didn't have a hand mic to give him such a forum to do so.

I won't even get into the vintage stock film footage used showing later war US A/C in mid-1942.
They may have thought it was "period" enough for them.

Does anyone here remember the National Enquirer's "TV Bloopers" column? I remember one where the show said an event happened on these dates, which were on those days of the week, and got a number of replies from people saying that the days of the week were incorrect, ranging from people who knew what day it was because they were born/married/some other big life event on one of those days, to someone who was a calendar savant and knew instantly that this was a blooper. It turned out that the writer just made up the dates because s/he didn't think it was important enough to go look it up.

(I mainly remember it because they would send t-shirts to anyone who sent in a blooper that they used in the magazine, and my brother did that when he was a tween and always had people walk up to him and ask what he sent in whenever he wore that shirt out in public.)
  #105  
Old 10-02-2019, 08:09 AM
Motorgirl is offline
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Originally Posted by nevadaexile View Post
There are so many that it could take a lifetime to go over them. I'm an aficionado of Westerns so here are a few of the ones which I have caught and always catch:
  1. Pane glass instead of wave glass - Pane glas wasn't invented until the late 19th century and wasn't commonly used until the 20th. Any Western which doesn't have wave glass windows is historically inaccurate.

Hijack: Can you explain more about pane glass vs wave glass? I've been googling but I haven't found a decent definition of these terms and how they differ.
  #106  
Old 10-02-2019, 08:32 AM
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I notice these all the time. Some hurt the movie, some add a little bit of fun when spotted.

E.g., in The Big Lebowski when the Dude is in the cab you see the cab pull over to the curb so the driver can throw the Dude out. But in the next shot the cab is one lane over from the curb.

Cool.
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