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  #51  
Old 05-01-2018, 06:43 PM
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Intelligent smoke alarms might be even be better candidates for your watchdog function. My smoke alarm, the NEST, records if anyone passes it during the night, and sends a notice to an phone number you can program in. It could be worth it to install one in a corridor and have your kids check their NEST app every morning to see if someone passed underneath the NEST.
Puzzlegal, I asked the NEST people thru Facebook. They say the NEST is not equipped to do what I described. Yet. The technical potential is there, but they use it as a burglar alarm that detects movement when the owner is not at home, and then tells the owner thru the NEST app that movement has been detected. Nest has not adapted this possibility into a device against dying alone, yet. Maybe if more people asked them about it? https://www.facebook.com/nest/?ref=br_rs It's a pity. Most people are hesitant to set up some kind of alarm; it's just not pleasant to think about such stuff at all, so it feels nicer not to think about it. We're irrational beings. So it would be better if any security object would also have another, not stigmatizing function. Like a smartphone or a smoke alarm.

NEST answered me like this:
Quote:
The Nest Protect can't text you if it sees motion (unless your using some 3rd party app like IFTTT.
And to answer the other question, for seniors. No. We would recommend something like a google home, as you can set it up to make calls using your cell phone number.
The google home can be bought here: store.google.com. The 3rd party program called IFTTT can be found here: https://ifttt.com/discover

Last edited by Maastricht; 05-01-2018 at 06:47 PM.
  #52  
Old 05-01-2018, 07:15 PM
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A small, basic cellphone the person wears on themselves. If an elderly person is in a bad enough situation that they can't use a cellphone (e.g.: passed out), the odds of being saved by someone checking several hours later seem slim. I suppose they could be physically able but too confused. If you're liable to be too confused to use a basic cellphone, living on your own is going to end badly.

You could have several internet-linked cameras throughout the person's dwelling which could be checked periodically. I think most people would balk at this.

Last edited by MichaelEmouse; 05-01-2018 at 07:17 PM.
  #53  
Old 05-01-2018, 07:54 PM
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I bet the government has some stats on death in the manner we are talking about. As the boomers age up these numbers will no doubt rise. Come on tech people, there is money to be made here.
  #54  
Old 05-01-2018, 09:08 PM
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Actor Guy Williams(Zorro/John Robinson) died alone in his apartment in Argentina, and when found had been dead about a week.
  #55  
Old 05-01-2018, 11:05 PM
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I just got word from the people at Etsy that they don't want to make my custom easier version of this arm cuff phone carrier. Please, someone good with leather make these and become rich selling them ( Broomstick?)
I need to research things a bit and I'll get back to you on that. Did they say why they didn't want to make it?
  #56  
Old 05-02-2018, 12:10 AM
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I live alone on a small farm, so I made a deal with two of my kids that I would email them every morning so they'd know I made it through the night. I chose to send to two people because I figured it's hard to notice the lack of something, maybe one or the other would not notice, but not both on the same day. I couldn't stand the thought of my dogs starving to death. It would be weeks before anyone would realize I was gone if I didn't have the email thing going. I also wear a life alert button for something like a fall in the house, but that's no help working out on the land. I try to make the emails short, amusing or pithy.
  #57  
Old 05-02-2018, 03:53 AM
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You know, women's clothing REALLY has no pockets.
True, the gender politics of pockets. It's a thing.

I use a hip bag a bit like this. Sometimes.

I was thinking: an exercise watch could have an alarm system, couldn't it? You'd have to wear it all the time, of course. If it can count steps it can also count the lack of steps and send out an alarm signal. Some are quite small and subtle.
  #58  
Old 05-02-2018, 04:27 AM
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I need to research things a bit and I'll get back to you on that. Did they say why they didn't want to make it?
I suggested they'd sew a patch of velcro to the cuff, and I'd glue a patch of the other velcro part on the phone's case. But she didn't want to do that because she thought that velco wouldn't hold and then she'd be liable for phone that fell off the cuff and broke.


Quote:
I would like to have a leather cuff for my upper arm. It needs to be able to be fastened with one hand, obviously. I'm thinking a simple leather band, about three fourths around the upper arm, opening on the body side and to have the leather strengthened by a steel or plastic springy flat band, like the ones used in the Netherlands to keep pants hems out of bicycle wheels. www.internet-bikes.com/fietskleding-kopen/ So that the cuff would very easily clip and hold on my upper arm without pincing my arm too much.
The cuff needs to sport, in the outside, velcro or some other way of attaching my I phone in its case to the cuff. I can turn the cuff around a little so the Iphone either faces my face enough to use it, or more to the side so it's out of my way and I have my hands free.
The style of the cuff needs to be neutral, maybe even elegant, so it is fitting for the office as well.
The length of the cuff must be as long as my Iphone.
Quote:
I think velcro could work, though. I don't want to use the arm cuff in sports, where indeed arm swinging puts too much force on the velcro. But just about for pottering around in the home. Then I think, velcro would do the trick very adequately.
Recently I heard about someone dying alone in her home of a stroke, immobilizing her so she could not move enough to get to her phone on the other floor. She would have survived if she had had her phone on her person. And to have the phone on the person, it needs to be stored in an attractive way. Women's clothing doesn't have pockets, and the little phone purses commercially available just swing in the way when you're busy. https://thephonepurse.com/

An upper arm cuff would be practical AND it would look good. Most middle aged women are self conscious anyway about their upper arms not being firm, and an stiff leather cuff would act, a bit, as an "upper arm corset" so it would be a very flattering thing to wear, especially if it can be made in a modern looking way and not too "renn faire style".
  #59  
Old 05-02-2018, 04:35 AM
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I just did this suggestion to https://thephonepurse.com/ as well.
  #60  
Old 05-02-2018, 04:54 AM
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My mother has a medical alert necklace; it's connected by RF to a machine which will ping its masters if she presses the button or if it's without current for more than five minutes. Other models track heartbeat (bracelets, I've never heard of a necklace with this feature). The medical alert company also call occasionally as a random check (they try her home phone first, and if she doesn't answer, the cell). She used to not want to get one (that's for old people!) but after breaking her ankle and spending a couple of hours on the floor a few years back, her first stop on the way out of the ER was getting the necklace.

I move so often that this kind of solution becomes highly complicated; probably should set up something along the lines of "whatsapp my brothers every morning".
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Last edited by Nava; 05-02-2018 at 04:56 AM.
  #61  
Old 05-02-2018, 07:00 AM
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My wife won't buy a dress without pockets. She's not up yet to check with, but I'm positive even her wedding dress had pockets.

And she wears jeans, they have pockets. I wear jeans exclusively (black jeans if I have to dress up... I get away with those and a black sportcoat to fancy dinners) -- my smaller iPhone fits in the outer side of a back pocket. If it starts to hurt, I know I need to lose weight.

If it's a case of "I'm overweight to the point where I can't wear jeans", heck, even sweatpants have pockets.
  #62  
Old 05-02-2018, 07:25 AM
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Thanks Maastricht. It's not that I'm looking for something to warn me in time to resuscitate her if she has a major heart attack or something. She's a frail old lady, and we all die eventually.

My great aunt had lung cancer, and a secondary tumor in her hip led to her falling and not being able to reach the phone. She lay there, alive and in pain, until my father and his sister couldn't reach her for their weekly phone call, and my dad went to check on her. If it had been another day, she would likely have died of thirst.

That's the fate I hope to avoid. My mom incapacitated by something not immediately deadly. Something that checked for normal activity once or twice a day would be fine. I love the rice cooker idea, but she doesn't eat rice often enough for it to work.

Last edited by puzzlegal; 05-02-2018 at 07:25 AM.
  #63  
Old 05-02-2018, 07:43 AM
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If it's a case of "I'm overweight to the point where I can't wear jeans", heck, even sweatpants have pockets.
No, it's a case of "nobody makes jeans with decent-sized pockets which won't cost more to make my size than I actually paid for the jeans in the first place." By US standards I'm a sylph. According to Levi's, my waist-to-hip ratio is just impossible: smaller than the type they don't bother sell in Europe because they think it's "black-woman's curves" (can someone please tell them there's black women here now?).
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  #64  
Old 05-02-2018, 07:44 AM
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In an acute medical emergency, seconds (much less minutes) can be the difference. The problem with some of the methodologies mentioned is that they are simply too slow in terms of response time. Personally, if I couldn't be found in time to prevent permanent brain damage/paralysis, I'd rather not be found until I was dead because quality of life is more important than just existing. Therefore, for me, it would have to be a technological solution that could elicit an immediate response.
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  #65  
Old 05-02-2018, 07:52 AM
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I suggested they'd sew a patch of velcro to the cuff, and I'd glue a patch of the other velcro part on the phone's case. But she didn't want to do that because she thought that velco wouldn't hold and then she'd be liable for phone that fell off the cuff and broke.
Because this is a bit of a tangent and not everyone is interested, but it might be useful for someone else thinking along similar lines I've spoilered my reply.

SPOILER:
Attaching velcro can be tricky so if someone is concerned about doing so securely you might well be better off with a no than something that won't work.

My own concern is not about the velcro but rather the inner spring you propose, which is not something I have experience with so I'm not sure where I would get it from. Otherwise, it seems pretty straightforward to get some measurements, craft the leather cuff-cover from two pieces of thin leather, and attached the velcro. I'd probably use both a contact cement (similar to what I'd use for shoes, which are an item that get a lot of wear and tear) and some stitching. Attaching the velcro to the iPhone might be the most difficult bit, but that's a matter of finding a good adhesive. You need an adequate size of velcro pieces(s) on both the phone and the cuff to make sure it will hold. You'll wind up with an iPhone basically carpeted in velcro on one side but if that doesn't bother you it doesn't bother me.

There is velcro intended for outside use in all weather and with some impressive holding capacity, far in excess of the weight of an iPhone. You get it in the hardware part of a store, not the sewing part, and that's what I'd use. I think some crafters either don't know or forget that you can step outside the sewing department to get supplies.
  #66  
Old 05-02-2018, 09:50 AM
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There are telephones you can get that have fob with a button which will call preprogrammed numbers. As long as you could press the button, you could get help.

There are also tech companies that are coming up with solutions for monitoring elderly living alone. By having sensors throughout the house, the system learns your habits and can notice deviations. It can notice things like your shower is typically 10 minutes, but today you are still in the shower after 30 minutes and may have fallen. The system can also notice changes in your mobility. Through body-mapping technology (like with video games), the system can learn how you typically walk. If you start to favor one side or your gait changes, it can notice that as well. Tech like that will likely be common one day and will automatically call for help when it's needed.
  #67  
Old 05-02-2018, 10:17 AM
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In an acute medical emergency, seconds (much less minutes) can be the difference. The problem with some of the methodologies mentioned is that they are simply too slow in terms of response time. Personally, if I couldn't be found in time to prevent permanent brain damage/paralysis, I'd rather not be found until I was dead because quality of life is more important than just existing. Therefore, for me, it would have to be a technological solution that could elicit an immediate response.
There are lots of problems you might have that wouldn't lead to immediate brain damage, though. Like a broken hip, or some other awkward fall. That's why I'm interested in monitoring on a once or twice a day basis.
  #68  
Old 05-02-2018, 11:19 AM
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... I saw a William Holden movie last night and was reading a bit about him today. Slipped on a rug, hit his head on a table, and bled to death. He was only 63 at the time, but was a very heavy drinker and intoxicated at the time. There were signs that he was conscious. Don't know if he couldn't, or just chose not to call for help.
That tickled my funny bone (something I needed in the midst of this thread). "Chose not to call for help": I'm picturing tough guy William Holden lying there muttering "Yeah, I could get help, but that's what those busybody neighbors would like. Well, screw 'em all. I'm just gonna lie here."
  #69  
Old 05-03-2018, 02:12 AM
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Hey, when my aunt found my Grandma From Hell sitting in what a few hours before had been a puddle of her own urine*, Grandma "gave me her best 'I totally meant to spend the night here' look". Grandma complained for months about my aunt daring to pull her up "She just pulled me up!" What was aunt supposed to do, get a special permit from the Vatican? She checked the old woman wasn't broken and yes, pulled all of her 40 kilos up and into an armchair before calling for a doc-at-home visit.



* Gran had fallen on her way to the toilet

Last edited by Nava; 05-03-2018 at 02:15 AM.
  #70  
Old 05-03-2018, 03:09 AM
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You may say: “If I don’t show up at work, they’ll contact me”. But what if they call you on the phone, don’t reach you and… then what? They might notice your absence, but they may only shrug and plan to bitch at you when you show up again.
But do your co-workers have your house key, or do they know how to reach someone who does have a house key?
Everywhere I've worked whenever someone doesn't show up and doesn't call in, it's been taken seriously and HR will have friends' and/or relatives' numbers on file.

Of course that still means you're SOL if you have a stroke on the weekend.
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Old 05-03-2018, 03:27 AM
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(double post)

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  #72  
Old 05-03-2018, 06:07 AM
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But it's hard to make a habit of carrying a phone at home. I often like to wear an apron when I'm pottering about the house, and the phone goes in my apron pocket. An apron has the added benefit of protecting my clothes. From spills, newspaper ink rubbing off, pet hair, and to keep my flowy scarves from hanging in food, or in the fire of candles and gas stoves. And aprons are comfortable, can be worn with anything and they don't make 't make me look fat or nerdy. Wearing an apron makes me look like I'm at home, at ease, perhaps baking something, which is a look I like to have
The more I think about it, the more I feel I answered my own question. I'm gonna be a permanent apron-wearer when I'm home alone, from now on. With my phone in my front pocket.

Men, feel free to carry suit with some stylish aprons for men. Real men.

Now, the idea for the upper arm cuff phone carrier, that's for an office solution.
  #73  
Old 05-03-2018, 07:39 AM
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Maastricht, feel free to slap me if the answer is "yes", but have you looked in sports stores? I've seen carriers similar to what you describe (velcro, yes; springs, no) and the best ones seem to be either from multi-brand telephone stores or sports ones. It's the kind of thing I prefer to shop for in person.

Last edited by Nava; 05-03-2018 at 07:42 AM.
  #74  
Old 05-03-2018, 08:13 AM
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The more I think about it, the more I feel I answered my own question. I'm gonna be a permanent apron-wearer when I'm home alone, from now on. With my phone in my front pocket.
Good for you! May you never need your Apron Phone (except to look up a recipe*).


*Ooh, and have it read the recipe to you (text-to-speech), as you're whisking something tasty.
  #75  
Old 05-03-2018, 08:25 AM
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Hmm. The thought had occurred to me about my Dad as he is in his 70s and lives alone since Mom passed away. I'm less than 2 hours away, but still too far to do daily pop-ins.

OTOH, he is healthy and pretty active, travels a bit and has a pretty active social life through a group of friends in town. So I don't think the risk is really any more or less than any other person who lives alone.
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Old 05-03-2018, 09:36 AM
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... So I don't think the risk is really any more or less than any other person who lives alone.
Exactly, but that fact works the other way around, as well. Anyone living alone runs this risk. And the risk is serious.

From the website "Stroke Facts: by the USA Center for Disease Control: https://www.cdc.gov/stroke/facts.htm

Quote:
- Stroke kills about 140,000 Americans each year—that’s 1 out of every 20 deaths.
- Someone in the United States has a stroke every 40 seconds. Every 4 minutes, someone dies of stroke.

- Every year, more than 795,000 people in the United States have a stroke. About 610,000 of these are first or new strokes

- About 185,00 strokes—nearly 1 of 4—are in people who have had a previous stroke.
- About 87% of all strokes are ischemic strokes, in which blood flow to the brain is blocked.
- Stroke costs the United States an estimated $34 billion each year. This total includes the cost of health care services, medicines to treat stroke, and missed days of work.
- Stroke is a leading cause of serious long-term disability.2 Stroke reduces mobility in more than half of stroke survivors age 65 and over.
And most chilling:
Quote:
- Stroke risk increases with age, but strokes can—and do—occur at any age.
- In 2009, 34% of people hospitalized for stroke were less than 65 years old.

Last edited by Maastricht; 05-03-2018 at 09:37 AM.
  #77  
Old 05-03-2018, 09:44 AM
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Maastricht, feel free to slap me if the answer is "yes", but have you looked in sports stores? I've seen carriers similar to what you describe (velcro, yes; springs, no) and the best ones seem to be either from multi-brand telephone stores or sports ones. It's the kind of thing I prefer to shop for in person.
Yes, sports stores sell these, but they have a specific purpose: to have the phone on your arm, securely so it doesn't fly off when you run. It is a PITA to have to get the phone out of the holder when you want to use it. And these things are very utilitarian and sporty looking, in black nylon and plastic. I would hate to wear them, so I wouldn't. Although this one is the only one where the phone is not covered in plastic.
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Old 05-03-2018, 09:46 AM
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Broomstick, thank you so much for thinking with me. I'll take your ideas to my local cobbler.
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Old 05-04-2018, 01:17 PM
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Broomstick, thank you so much for thinking with me. I'll take your ideas to my local cobbler.
I'm going to check with mine, too. I'm sure she'll be glad to give me advice... My cobbler's a peach.
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Old 05-04-2018, 01:37 PM
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Regarding a toilet-flush alarm:

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Hmmm. Would this work? Depends.
I see what you did there.
  #81  
Old 05-04-2018, 04:03 PM
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A friend of mine often trail rides alone, and her husband works in Europe quite a bit of the time. She has a phone app called Road ID that will alert someone if her GPS shows no movement for a set number of minutes. Not great if you're sitting watching TV, but if you're a runner or rider and injured, it could save your life.

StG
  #82  
Old 05-11-2018, 02:41 AM
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My wife won't buy a dress without pockets. She's not up yet to check with, but I'm positive even her wedding dress had pockets.

And she wears jeans, they have pockets. I wear jeans exclusively (black jeans if I have to dress up... I get away with those and a black sportcoat to fancy dinners) -- my smaller iPhone fits in the outer side of a back pocket. If it starts to hurt, I know I need to lose weight.

If it's a case of "I'm overweight to the point where I can't wear jeans", heck, even sweatpants have pockets.
It can be shockingly difficult to get women's slacks with usable pockets.

When I went jeans-shopping a while back, I slipped my phone into the pocket of each pair I was considering before I even took it off the rack. A very small percentage of them could hold my phone (admittedly a larger "phablet"-sized one).

Last fall I needed to get some dress slacks for work. I bought two identical pairs in different colors. The pockets were basted shut so I couldn't try that trick. And it turned out the pocket was far too shallow. I was able to partly wedge the phone in but only around the office; I would not have dared carry the phone that way out on the street. I returned the second pair.
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Old 05-11-2018, 03:39 AM
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The best thing to do is to have somebody with us always when we have a chronic illness or at least inform our closest friend or co-workers. Maybe, we could give them some personal instructions when an accident happens to us.
  #84  
Old 05-11-2018, 06:57 AM
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Originally Posted by Mama Zappa View Post
It can be shockingly difficult to get women's slacks with usable pockets.

When I went jeans-shopping a while back, I slipped my phone into the pocket of each pair I was considering before I even took it off the rack. A very small percentage of them could hold my phone (admittedly a larger "phablet"-sized one).

Last fall I needed to get some dress slacks for work. I bought two identical pairs in different colors. The pockets were basted shut so I couldn't try that trick. And it turned out the pocket was far too shallow. I was able to partly wedge the phone in but only around the office; I would not have dared carry the phone that way out on the street. I returned the second pair.
Life hack: if there's a pocket there, even one that's too shallow to use, you can usually get a tailor to replace the useless pocket with a useful one.

Effectively no women's pockets are deep enough. You want your cell phone to sit far enough down your leg that it's below the "bend" when you sit. You need pants that are loose in the front door that to work, but when it works, it's awesome. Doing this has revolutionized my life.
  #85  
Old 05-11-2018, 09:00 AM
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Life hack: if there's a pocket there, even one that's too shallow to use, you can usually get a tailor to replace the useless pocket with a useful one.....
Interesting trick - I had never thought of that. I'll have to look into it.

Continuing the pockets hijack: I bought a jacket recently, during a weekend trip to NYC. For various reasons, I needed to have things accessible, pocket-wise (versus stuck in my backpack). The jacket I got had 2 large patch pockets that snapped shut, regular slide-in pockets directly behind those, two breast pockets that also snapped shut, and two zippered pockets directly above the patch pockets.

Only.... I forgot to check those zippered pockets before I bought the jacket.

I got it back to my hotel, and attempted to use them.... and they were FAKE. Not "sewn shut because nobody wants to ruin the line of their clothing but you can rip out the basting stitches if you're one of those losers who values function over form".... they were completely "decorative". ARGH!!!!

The jacket is still quite useful - those large patch pockets are more than enough for the phone and charger and any other miscellany - but it's just that much less useful than it should have been.
  #86  
Old 05-11-2018, 10:55 AM
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In my mid 20s I lived on my own and overdid it in the garden one saturday. Managed to trap a nerve or something in my back and ended up lying on the floor unable to move for 24+ hours. My mobile was upstairs on charge and the landline was too far away.

Shortly afterwards, a guy at work in his early 30s had an embolism in the shower and they found his very clean corpse a few days later.

Since those 2 events, my mobile has never been more than an arms reach away. Bad stuff can happen at any age.
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Old 05-11-2018, 01:05 PM
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Very true, Jacob Swan. Accidents need not be fatal, and a sprained back will happen at some point to most of us.

Another consideration is the possibility that a stroke might leave people disoriented. They might have a phone within arms reach, but be too disoriented to call a number.

I recommend everyone familiarize themselves with the symptoms of a stroke,( the FAST method. Learn it, teach it to others, and read about it anew every year on a set date). And with the symptoms of an heart attack. Especially in women, the symptoms of a heart attack are nothing like we're taught in the movies. Check out the resources at Go Red For Women. Especially this hilarious clip of Elisabeth Banks getting "just a little a heart attack"

Last edited by Maastricht; 05-11-2018 at 01:09 PM.
  #88  
Old 05-11-2018, 01:25 PM
Maastricht is offline
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.. and if you know the symptoms, and get something like those sympoms, then have the courage to call 911. Better be embarrassed then dead. If you don't do it for yourself, do it for your loved ones. How would they feel to know that you are dead, but might have lived, if only you had known about the symptoms and had called for help in time?

Strokes and heart attacks don't "pass" but might, depending on severity, impair your ability to call for help. You might have only a short window of time to call for help. Don't let that window close because you're embarassed.

Here's a stroke surviver talking about the experience. He went from "something is not right" to paralysed within a few minutes. His wife called 911. People living alone have to call 911 themselves.
  #89  
Old 05-11-2018, 01:51 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sabernode View Post
The best thing to do is to have somebody with us always when we have a chronic illness or at least inform our closest friend or co-workers. Maybe, we could give them some personal instructions when an accident happens to us.
Ahh yes, We'll just swing by the 'close friends, trustworthy coworkers, kind next-door-neighbors, and reliable local adult kids' store and pick up a couple of those to attach to ourselves every time we feel unwell or elderly. Once we've purchased one, do you think one of those leashes for kids would suffice, or should we actually velcro them directly to us so they don't get away?

You're not wrong. But that's not exactly helpfully phrased advice.
  #90  
Old 05-11-2018, 01:57 PM
Maastricht is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lasciel View Post
Ahh yes, We'll just swing by the 'close friends, trustworthy coworkers, kind next-door-neighbors, and reliable local adult kids' store and pick up a couple of those to attach to ourselves every time we feel unwell or elderly. Once we've purchased one, do you think one of those leashes for kids would suffice, or should we actually velcro them directly to us so they don't get away?

You're not wrong. But that's not exactly helpfully phrased advice.
Well....I sacrificed an office to make it a really nice guest room. (My desk is now in my living room). My dad can bunk there when he feels under the weather.

There are always people in need of living quarters, willing to pitch in with rent money, chores and help. And if you hand pick them, instead of having them foisted upon you, you ensure the best chance of a mutually beneficial match. And while the thought of a "stranger in the house" sounds unappealing, remember that it only takes a few weeks to get used to someone.

And unlike a marriage, when such a roommate doesn't work out, you both move on to a better match.

So, living alone quite likely means you have room to spare.

Last edited by Maastricht; 05-11-2018 at 01:58 PM.
  #91  
Old 05-11-2018, 09:19 PM
Bibliothecarius is offline
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Originally Posted by Maastricht View Post
The more I think about it, the more I feel I answered my own question. I'm gonna be a permanent apron-wearer when I'm home alone, from now on. With my phone in my front pocket.

Men, feel free to carry suit with some stylish aprons for men. Real men.
It's no secret.
  #92  
Old 05-12-2018, 08:48 AM
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Years ago I used to work at mortuary and after hours my friend and I did "removals". One call was for a guy who fell and hit his head on the fridge. He was in his t-shirt and underwear and the officer who found him said he probably died the night before. I don't remember who said it, but either my friend or the officer pointed out the business card for a girlie bar on the fridge and said, "Well at least he had a good night before he died."

I don't worry about dying alone, but I'm always aware of what I leave around when they come and get me!

Last edited by lingyi; 05-12-2018 at 08:49 AM.
  #93  
Old 05-12-2018, 11:53 AM
Maastricht is offline
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You should start a “ask the former employee of a mortuary”- thread, lingyi.
  #94  
Old 05-12-2018, 02:11 PM
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I worked in the office during the day so don't have a lot of stories to tell. But I did see people being embalmed and a nasty accident and suicide though. Don't want to give too many details as those I've told the stories to personally might know that lingyi is me.
  #95  
Old 10-22-2018, 02:57 PM
Maastricht is offline
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The Apple Watch now comes with a fall detection app.
Quote:
If Apple Watch Series 4 detects a significant, hard fall while you're wearing your watch, it taps you on the wrist, sounds an alarm, and displays an alert. You can choose to contact emergency services or dismiss the alert by tapping "I fell, but I'm OK" or by scrolling down and tapping "I did not fall."
If your Apple Watch detects that you're moving, it waits for you to respond to the alert and won't automatically call emergency services. If your Apple Watch detects that you're immobile for about a minute, it begins a 15-second countdown, while tapping you on the wrist and sounding an alert. The alert gets louder, so that you or someone nearby can hear it. When the countdown ends, your Apple Watch automatically contacts emergency services. Then it sends a message to your emergency contacts with your location letting them know that Apple Watch detected a hard fall and dialed emergency services.

Last edited by Maastricht; 10-22-2018 at 02:58 PM.
  #96  
Old 10-22-2018, 03:06 PM
Annie-Xmas is offline
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Author Richard Brau5itqn wasn't found until about a month after he died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound.

When I worked in real estate, I got a call from the daughter of a man who lived alone and whose house we had listed. The agent opened the house and the stench alone was enough for him to leave and call the police. They figured he had died in his wheelchair about a week prior to finding him.
  #97  
Old 10-23-2018, 10:26 AM
enipla is offline
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My Mom also has a medical alert necklace. She's very good about keeping it with her. She also carries a cell phone.

And, will it's not a great solution, she emails me every morning. If I don't hear by noon, I know something is up (she's never forgotten).
__________________
I don't live in the middle of nowhere, but I can see it from here.
  #98  
Old 10-23-2018, 10:50 AM
Mind's Eye, Watering is offline
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I've recently started to use Dead Man's Switch, a software solution that holds a (final) email message in storage until preset queries from the software go unanswered.

It makes me crazy to think that if I die, my pets might suffer too.

Here's the email message that I composed:
This message was sent from an internet software program that I set up called “Dead Man's Switch.”
This software is designed to notify you in case I am incapacitated (or worse). The software requires that I check in daily. If I miss a check in, the software will send this message.
If you have received this message, there’s a good chance that I AM incapacitated (or worse), and that (Pet 1) and (Pet 2) are alone and in danger.
PLEASE make an effort to contact me ASAP.

Thanks.


A Lifetime Premium Upgrade of $20 allows up to 100 recipients, 100 messages and custom interval setting.

I'm not alone very often, but when I am, this gives me a little peace of mind.
  #99  
Old 10-24-2018, 06:28 PM
Skyo is offline
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I signed up for this today.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Mind's Eye, Watering View Post
I've recently started to use Dead Man's Switch, a software solution that holds a (final) email message in storage until preset queries from the software go unanswered.......
I'm not sure if I've set it up properly to get a daily check. I also wonder what time of day they query me and how long I have to answer. Maybe I'll get my first check-in by tomorrow and will have a better idea of how it works. I'll still email my kids each morning but it's getting kind of old, maybe too routine after five years, so this additional safeguard is just what I've been looking for. Thanks for posting about it.
  #100  
Old 10-24-2018, 06:46 PM
Mind's Eye, Watering is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Skyo View Post
I'm not sure if I've set it up properly to get a daily check. I also wonder what time of day they query me and how long I have to answer. Maybe I'll get my first check-in by tomorrow and will have a better idea of how it works. I'll still email my kids each morning but it's getting kind of old, maybe too routine after five years, so this additional safeguard is just what I've been looking for. Thanks for posting about it.
If you are using the Free version, I think the intervals for a daily check are the same as the "Test" option, but I don't know if they continue indefinitely. I thought having more than 2 email addressees was worth the $20 for the Premium version, so I didn't mess with the free version.

As I wanted a daily check, the intervals are "1" and "2" (1,2) which is the same as the Test setting.

I did do some testing before I went live, and I found that the "1" interval is roughly equivalent to 24 hours.

The clock is reset any time you respond to a query, or when you log in to the site.
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