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Old 09-22-2019, 07:46 PM
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when did chicken for dinner get cheap enough for an everyday option?


inspired by comments in the "American food in an ethnic restaurant thread" https://boards.straightdope.com/sdmb...d.php?t=882468

I was born in the late 70s and remember until I was about 8 or 9 that chicken for dinner was a rare "Sunday dinner" occurrence (it was usually a whole stuffed chicken with au gratin potatoes and fancy frozen vegetables with biscuits" and usually pie

fried chicken was for special occasions like birthdays church picnics reunions ect or when someone brought KFC or pioneer home (lees famous in Indiana) because chicken was almost more expensive than steak


I know at some point chicken became so cheap that they couldn't give it away and instead of "yay!chicken!" it became "chicken again really?" but when and why?
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Old 09-22-2019, 08:14 PM
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I was born in 1955, and I can't remember a time when chicken was anything other than a common option for a meal. If it became more accessible and affordable at some point relative to another, I suspect it was after WWII, and the war probably had something to do with it (e.g., improved breeding and husbandry to feed the troops).

As noted elsewhere, the chicken we eat today is different (plumper, juicier, blander) from what they were eating 70+ years ago, presumably due to selective breeding. For that matter, so are turkey and (I believe) pork.
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Old 09-22-2019, 08:26 PM
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This article indicates that it was during WWII that chicken (as a meat) became commonplace, due to both the growth of industrialized chicken farming, and red meat being prioritized for sending overseas to the troops.

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The growth of Jewell's burgeoning poultry business coincided with the advent of World War II, when much of the country's meat and pork was being shipped to soldiers oversees. The market was ripe for chicken, a familiar meat that wasn't yet ready for shipping to soldiers but was suddenly more plentiful than it had been before.
It also notes that, as chicken became more common, at least one meat that declined was rabbit.

Last edited by kenobi 65; 09-22-2019 at 08:28 PM.
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Old 09-22-2019, 08:48 PM
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Yeah, I was surprised to learn that while red meat was rationed stateside during WWII, chicken wasn’t.

I would happily have cut way back on beef and eaten more chicken.
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Old 09-22-2019, 08:51 PM
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I was born in 1978, and chicken has always been the go-to meal. I can't imagine chicken ever being anything fancy or rare.
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Old 09-22-2019, 09:11 PM
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Born in 1960 (Australia) and chicken was indeed a very special meal, reserved for Xmas day and sometimes, if the family was flush, for a Sunday roast. The most common meal was lamb (chops or roast) as lamb was cheap and plentiful.

Nowadays it's the other way around, and you virtually need to take out a second mortgage to buy a leg of lamb or even some decent loin chops, whereas chicken is cheap and more versatile.

As to WHEN it happened? I'm thinking late 1970's, early 80's here in Australia.
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Old 09-22-2019, 09:21 PM
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I should have mentioned that I was born and raised in Minneapolis, Minnesota, right in the heart of the North American continent. Good farming country, if not much else.
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Old 09-22-2019, 09:34 PM
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There was a time when steak was cheaper than chicken?
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Old 09-22-2019, 09:39 PM
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City Chicken (which is not chicken, it’s pork) was super popular here in Cleveland when my mom was growing up in the 50s and 60s but we’ve discussed it and we can’t remember her ever serving it to us in the 80s. So chicken must have been the cheaper meat by the 80s.

Not that it probably wasn’t cheaper earlier. I just like to drop midwestern ethnic goodies into threads when I can
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Old 09-22-2019, 09:42 PM
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Originally Posted by nightshadea View Post
I was born in the late 70s and remember until I was about 8 or 9 that chicken for dinner was a rare "Sunday dinner" occurrence
OK, this is weird. I was born in '75, into a working class family, and chicken for dinner was the cheap option.
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Old 09-22-2019, 09:48 PM
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It also notes that, as chicken became more common, at least one meat that declined was rabbit.
I get the impression that many families, urban and otherwise, raised their own chickens and rabbits for food up to the WWII years. I know my dad's raised chickens in Milwaukee in the 1920s, and my mother's kept rabbits in rural Missouri in the 1930s.

The first time I had rabbit was on New Year's Day, 1992, as the guest of a Czech family in a small town outside of Prague. They too raised their own rabbits and had a big hutch in their back yard.
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Old 09-22-2019, 09:55 PM
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My paternal Grandparents had chicken houses. Some for meat and some laying houses. At their house it was fried chicken everyday, morning, noon and suppertime. Sometimes Granny did a roasted hen. Or chicken and dumplings (my fave) She canned chicken for the lean months.
I guess I don't have to tell you where all the chicken came from.
Yep. You're right.
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Old 09-22-2019, 09:56 PM
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In the 1960s and 70s, my family ate chicken breasts a couple of times a week. We were not at all affluent.
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Old 09-22-2019, 10:03 PM
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My mother always made chicken once a week, on Sundays, from our own chickens that were raised and butchered on the farm (until it became too much work); this was in South Dakota in the 1960's. It was either fried, or as chicken and dumplings.

She was a child of the depression, and recalled that chicken was a rare occurrence when she was growing up. Instead, lots of their meals were eggs and cheese and sausage. You don't kill the egg-laying chickens until they stopped being productive.
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Old 09-22-2019, 10:04 PM
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We would always buy whole chickens and cut them up at home and fry them. They were somewhat smaller back then, especially the breast parts. It wasn't fancy or expansive food — perhaps more expensive than the ground beef that back then was called "hamburger meat" (higher fat % than today's ground beef). Cheaper than prepackaged supermarket pork chops, not cheaper than pork if you bought a significant part of a pig and butchered it.
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Old 09-22-2019, 10:09 PM
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Between 1962 and 1968, I spent at least part of every summer at my dad's in West Virginia. It was there that I was first exposed to Colonel Sander's Kentucky Fried Chicken at the age of seven or eight. Really good stuff back then, much better than today's KFC. I'll never forget watching the scene in Goldfinger where Felix Leitner and his partner are stopped for a bite at Colonel Sander's. I was nine years old at the time, and it immediately transported me back east.
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Old 09-22-2019, 10:35 PM
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My mom was born in '49 in the Rockies, and being poor, chickens were her primary source of meat since they raised them, and even then it was mostly eggs. Her father would go fishing every day after work to hopefully add trout to the menu. Otherwise, the only time she got anything else was from donations around holidays or when she had to eat beef liver to treat her iron deficiency.

Wish my dad was alive, he was born in '32. I think he primarily ate pork when he ate meat at all.
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Old 09-22-2019, 11:02 PM
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Growing up in rural Pennsylvania in the '50s, chicken was a special Sunday dinner with guests. "City chicken" on skewers and (canned);salmon patties were more typical meals.

By the mid-60s, after a move to Pittsburgh, dinner from KFC became common.
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Old 09-22-2019, 11:50 PM
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I grew up between 1962 and 1980 in the Chicago area. Chicken was unremarkable, but definitely not every day in my first 10 years. Tuna casseroles and other food-stretchers were much more likely. Steak (cheap cuts on the grill, basically round steak) was not unheard of, but definitely a treat. I had two siblings, and my father was a research chemist, my mother a journalist. Probably solid middle or upper-middle class.
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Old 09-23-2019, 01:43 AM
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Originally Posted by squeegee View Post
I grew up between 1962 and 1980 in the Chicago area. Chicken was unremarkable, but definitely not every day in my first 10 years. Tuna casseroles and other food-stretchers were much more likely. Steak (cheap cuts on the grill, basically round steak) was not unheard of, but definitely a treat. I had two siblings, and my father was a research chemist, my mother a journalist. Probably solid middle or upper-middle class.
this was me except well we weren't middle class we lived on 45 bucks a week child support for 3 kids and state assistance....... but the grandparents were great depression kids .....
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Old 09-23-2019, 04:17 AM
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City Chicken (which is not chicken, it’s pork)...
Really? Here in the Chicago area I always heard that "city chicken" was pigeon.
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Old 09-23-2019, 05:42 AM
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My mother (now 85) deliberately avoids making or ordering chicken most of the time because it was the cheap meat of her younger days. I guess it holds unpleasant associations for her. I don't remember having it a lot as a kid - many meals were based on ground beef in my youth, so I saw that as cheap meat.

Personally, I like chicken and I make it frequently at home. I'll even order it occasionally when we go out (tho seafood is my go-to.)
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Old 09-23-2019, 07:36 AM
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The mass production of chickens really ramped up in the 50s. But it still took a bit for chicken to get really cheaper.

There was still a lot of holdover in mentality for quite a while where people considered chicken to be a "special" meat for (some) Sundays and such. But that had nothing to do with cost.

In particular, people who raised their own chickens would have had the "chicken for Sunday" attitude quite a bit. I remember watching my grandfather grab a chicken out of the coop and ... process ... it for Sunday dinner when we visited.
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Old 09-23-2019, 07:37 AM
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"A chicken in every pot" was a 1928 campaign slogan during Herbert Hoover's presidential campaign.



From here
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Prosperity. The phrase came from a newspaper advertisement by the Republican National Committee during Herbert Hoover's 1928 presidential campaign. The ad pointed out that the preceding administrations of presidents Warren Harding and Calvin Coolidge had “put the proverbial ‘chicken in every pot.' And a car in every backyard, to boot.” Although credited with the statement, Hoover never promised “a chicken in every pot.” In a similar vein, King Henry IV of France vowed on his coronation in 1589 that “if God grants me the usual length of life, I hope to make France so prosperous that every peasant will have a chicken in his pot on Sunday.” His assassination in 1610 at age fifty-seven stymied such a plan.
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Old 09-23-2019, 08:40 AM
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Born in 1960 (Australia) and chicken was indeed a very special meal
...
As to WHEN it happened? I'm thinking late 1970's, early 80's here in Australia.
I think a bit earlier than that.

Inghams (the Australian equivalent of Tysons) built it's first processing plant 1958 to become the first fully integrated poultry business here.

The first KFC restaurant opened in Sydney in 1968, so by that stage chicken had become mass produced, mass marketed and cheap.
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Old 09-23-2019, 08:56 AM
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I was born in the late 70s and remember until I was about 8 or 9 that chicken for dinner was a rare "Sunday dinner" occurrence (it was usually a whole stuffed chicken with au gratin potatoes and fancy frozen vegetables with biscuits" and usually pie
Was that "usually a whole stuffed chicken" more like "almost always"? I was born in the early 60s - but chicken for dinner wasn't a rare occurrence. A whole, roasted chicken was a rare Sunday dinner occurrence but fried chicken cutlets, or grilled /broiled chicken pieces were pretty common - the reason the whole roasted chicken was kind of rare was because 1) it took too long to cook on weekdays 2) my parents preferred roast beef ( which I'm pretty sure was more expensive than chicken ) on Sundays.
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Old 09-23-2019, 09:33 AM
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Factory farming of chicken overtook "barnyard" chicken in 1952, and general industrialization of chicken-rearing brought down the price and increased availability.

https://www.nationalchickencouncil.o...ustry/history/
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By 1952, specially bred meat chickens (“broilers”) surpassed farm chickens as the number one source of chicken meat in the United States.
https://www.thehappychickencoop.com/...y-of-chickens/
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1950-1960s: Chickens Stop Becoming a Luxury Food
These were the years that saw the most change for chickens.

Improvements in production capabilities and lower labor requirements saw the price of eggs plummet and many family-owned chicken farms went bankrupted. The vacuum was filled with larger industrial operations.

Chickens stopped being a ‘luxury’ food; almost every family could afford a chicken. Broilers were now the #1 source of poultry meat.

In 1950 the refrigeration was invented allowing produce to be stored at home for much longer.
Companies bought the feed mills, hatcheries etc. in order to control production.
The average flock sizes increased massively, however with this came issues of disease control and prevention, medicine and vaccinations.
I wasn't able to find a useful price history of chicken and beef, but I'd guess that was around when chicken got cheaper than beef in the US.

Customs and habits lag economics, and I suppose that a lot of families still used chicken as a festive party food for a while after it became cheap and widely available. But I'd point out that if it was served at church picnics, it probably wasn't all that expensive. People usually try to make tasty-but-affordable food for events like that.

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Old 09-23-2019, 10:09 AM
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I was born in 1969 and for most of my life, chicken has been cheap enough to eat several times a week. But in the 1970s and '80s there were several periods when the relative prices of different animal proteins fluctuated wildly. I haven't noticed such wild fluctuations in recent decades, except for eggs. I remember one period of more than a year or more, probably sometime around 1978-82, when chicken was relatively expensive and beef relatively cheap. I don't know if chicken was literally cheaper per pound than beef, but the price differential was so low that my parents mostly bought beef, which they preferred. Over the course of one whole year we had chicken exactly once, on my birthday when I asked for it specifically. During this period I got so sick of beef that to this day, I eat it only a few times a year. Yet, in a different year when beef was expensive and chicken cheap, we had chicken almost every day and beef maybe once a week.
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Old 09-23-2019, 11:28 AM
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"In 1950 the refrigeration was invented allowing produce to be stored at home for much longer."

Say what? Home refrigerators (in contrast to iceboxes) were in use by the early 1920s, led by Kelvinator, Electrolux, Frigidaire, and General Electric.
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Old 09-23-2019, 11:44 AM
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City Chicken (which is not chicken, it’s pork) was super popular here in Cleveland when my mom was growing up in the 50s and 60s but we’ve discussed it and we can’t remember her ever serving it to us in the 80s. So chicken must have been the cheaper meat by the 80s.

Not that it probably wasn’t cheaper earlier. I just like to drop midwestern ethnic goodies into threads when I can
We got fed City Chicken on a regular basis when I was a Cleveland kid in the 1960s. Hated it; mom stuck it in the oven and it came out dry as the Kalahari. She never seemed to season it, either.

In those days it was made out of VEAL. Wrap your head around THAT.

We never had chicken because my father hated it. He’s the only non-vegetarian I’ve ever known who didn’t like chicken.
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Old 09-23-2019, 11:45 AM
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"In 1950 the refrigeration was invented allowing produce to be stored at home for much longer."

Say what? Home refrigerators (in contrast to iceboxes) were in use by the early 1920s, led by Kelvinator, Electrolux, Frigidaire, and General Electric.
Yeah, I think that's when refrigerated TRUCKs became common, which changed the availability and price of a lot of foods. It's also when home refrigerators got a lot better. (My mom talks all the time about how much longer stuff keeps now than it used to, even though she's always had a kitchen fridge.) My guess is the site is better about chicken than about technology, but it's obviously not an ideal citation.

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Old 09-23-2019, 11:48 AM
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This article indicates that it was during WWII that chicken (as a meat) became commonplace, due to both the growth of industrialized chicken farming, and red meat being prioritized for sending overseas to the troops.



It also notes that, as chicken became more common, at least one meat that declined was rabbit.
That makes sense, as rabbit is similar. It's about the same size, it's a mildly flavored meat, and imo, it's not as good as chicken.
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Old 09-23-2019, 11:50 AM
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We got fed City Chicken on a regular basis when I was a Cleveland kid in the 1960s. Hated it; mom stuck it in the oven and it came out dry as the Kalahari. She never seemed to season it, either.

In those days it was made out of VEAL. Wrap your head around THAT.
In Minnesota, these were called "mock chicken legs." They were quite good when deep-fried.
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Old 09-23-2019, 11:58 AM
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Yeah, I think that's when refrigerated TRUCKs became common, which changed the availability and price of a lot of foods.
From the ABCO website:

Somewhere around 1930 the first commercially used versions of mechanically cooled trucks were beginning to hit the roads. These trucks were designed in many different variations but were not yet built as a separate truck and trailer that you see on the roads today. By the late 1930’s refrigerated trailers ranging from 38 to 40 feet were being introduced to the market. Modern reefer trailers are usually between 48 and 55 feet in length.

In 1939 Fred Jones was tasked with helping Joe Numero in adapting a refrigerated cooling process for the tractor-trailer. This invention later became known as the Thermo King and helped revolutionize the emergence of the supermarket we know today. This was the beginning of attaching a refrigeration unit to the outside of the trailer to cool the contents inside.

By 1940 there were over 18,000 refrigerated road vehicles being used with around 2,500 of those units being mechanically cooled. With the implementation of the interstate highway act of 1956, the trucking industry experienced rapid growth and continued to increase the number of reefer trucks on the road.


It looks like the Interstate highway system had a lot to do with the development of the refrigerated trucking industry.
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Old 09-23-2019, 12:31 PM
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My mother (now 85) deliberately avoids making or ordering chicken most of the time because it was the cheap meat of her younger days. I guess it holds unpleasant associations for her. I don't remember having it a lot as a kid - many meals were based on ground beef in my youth, so I saw that as cheap meat.
Before he died at the age of 79, my dad, who was born to Austro-Hungarian immigrants in Milwaukee in 1921, wrote that his childhood memories of family life consisted of "chicken paprikash and things that are best forgotten."
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Old 09-23-2019, 12:48 PM
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We got fed City Chicken on a regular basis when I was a Cleveland kid in the 1960s. Hated it; mom stuck it in the oven and it came out dry as the Kalahari. She never seemed to season it, either.

In those days it was made out of VEAL. Wrap your head around THAT.

We never had chicken because my father hated it. He’s the only non-vegetarian I’ve ever known who didn’t like chicken.
A friend's family were early adopters of the microwave oven! The only problem was that my friend's mom couldn't believe it could cook as fast as it did. A recipe said, "cook for five minutes" and she would scoff, cooking it for 15 minutes just to be sure. She made chicken that could pass as beef jerky.
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Old 09-23-2019, 01:55 PM
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Before he died at the age of 79, my dad, who was born to Austro-Hungarian immigrants in Milwaukee in 1921, wrote that his childhood memories of family life consisted of "chicken paprikash and things that are best forgotten."
Awwwww. I like chicken paprikash. I throw in a handful of mushrooms to sauté with the paprika and onions, making it a sort of “Stroganoff-paprikash.”

I see this kind of prejudice against peasant food all over Amerika. We did a weekend in Lancaster County, PA, in June, and stayed at a B&B. The innkeeper’s dad was hanging around — a worldly WASP-y neurosurgeon — and I asked him where to find a nice Amish restaurant for dinner.

“You don’t want to eat THAT shit.”
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Old 09-23-2019, 02:35 PM
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Awwwww. I like chicken paprikash. I throw in a handful of mushrooms to sauté with the paprika and onions, making it a sort of “Stroganoff-paprikash.”

I see this kind of prejudice against peasant food all over Amerika. We did a weekend in Lancaster County, PA, in June, and stayed at a B&B. The innkeeper’s dad was hanging around — a worldly WASP-y neurosurgeon — and I asked him where to find a nice Amish restaurant for dinner.

“You don’t want to eat THAT shit.”
FTR, I love it too. I don't think my dad was disparaging the dish itself, just the unhappy memories associated with it and his childhood.
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Old 09-23-2019, 03:22 PM
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I get the impression that many families, urban and otherwise, raised their own chickens and rabbits for food up to the WWII years. I know my dad's raised chickens in Milwaukee in the 1920s, and my mother's kept rabbits in rural Missouri in the 1930s.
My wife's grandfather, who grew up in Omaha, then in Chicago, in the 1920s, told us about the chicken coop that his family always had in the back yard. It was often his job to kill and pluck the chickens that would wind up on the family menu, and as a result, he had a distaste for chicken for the rest of his life.
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Old 09-23-2019, 03:45 PM
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A few of you have mentioned rabbit. Was eating rabbit meat common before World War II? Because is seems rare today.
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Old 09-23-2019, 03:46 PM
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...
By 1940 there were over 18,000 refrigerated road vehicles being used with around 2,500 of those units being mechanically cooled. With the implementation of the interstate highway act of 1956, the trucking industry experienced rapid growth and continued to increase the number of reefer trucks on the road.[/I]

It looks like the Interstate highway system had a lot to do with the development of the refrigerated trucking industry.
Thanks. I knew that refrigerated trucks caught on during my parent's lifetime, but got the date a little wrong. Makes sense that they were influenced by the interstates.
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Old 09-23-2019, 03:47 PM
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Originally Posted by puzzlegal View Post
That makes sense, as rabbit is similar. It's about the same size, it's a mildly flavored meat, and imo, it's not as good as chicken.
Wild hare differs considerably from domesticated rabbit. It's a much leaner meat and has a stronger flavor. The family I stayed with in rural Scotland in the '70s always had a number of hare carcasses hung out to age, since the father was a groundskeeper who regularly shot the animals as part of his job. Being able to dine on them was one of his perks.
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Old 09-23-2019, 03:55 PM
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A few of you have mentioned rabbit. Was eating rabbit meat common before World War II? Because is seems rare today.
The Grapes of Wrath opens with Tom Joad and his buddies catching and roasting a rabbit (hare, actually), something with which Dust Bowl inhabitants were certainly familiar.

Eating rabbit was far more common than it is today, though the animals seem to be making a comeback. I see them often in supermarkets in both Canada and Russia. They're easy to raise at home, so long as you have a hutch out back. It's the butchering of them that would put me off keeping them.
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Old 09-23-2019, 04:29 PM
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A few of you have mentioned rabbit. Was eating rabbit meat common before World War II? Because is seems rare today.
From talking to my dad before he died I gather that it was. Note that both my parents were definitely city-people, from St. Louis. Animals like chickens, rabbits, and pigeons don't take much space and were livestock that city dwellers could keep.
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Old 09-23-2019, 05:30 PM
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A few of you have mentioned rabbit. Was eating rabbit meat common before World War II? Because is seems rare today.
It’s prevalent in Europe, but rare in America. Because Americans are fussy, prissy, squeamish pussies. “Oooooo, I can’t eat Bugs Bunny!!!!”

Neither do Americans eat much lamb, or duck or goose, or game or game birds, or offal. Because Americans are fussy, prissy, squeamish pussies.
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Old 09-23-2019, 05:36 PM
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I was born in 1955, and I can't remember a time when chicken was anything other than a common option for a meal...
Same here. (Born 1950, San Diego, lower middle-class.)
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Old 09-23-2019, 08:44 PM
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Growing up in rural Pennsylvania in the '50s, chicken was a special Sunday dinner with guests. "City chicken" on skewers and (canned);salmon patties were more typical meals.

By the mid-60s, after a move to Pittsburgh, dinner from KFC became common.
I have fond memories of tuna or salmon croquettes - I didn't get fresh tuna or salmon until I was something like 10 years old.
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Originally Posted by squeegee View Post
I grew up between 1962 and 1980 in the Chicago area. Chicken was unremarkable, but definitely not every day in my first 10 years. Tuna casseroles and other food-stretchers were much more likely. Steak (cheap cuts on the grill, basically round steak) was not unheard of, but definitely a treat. I had two siblings, and my father was a research chemist, my mother a journalist. Probably solid middle or upper-middle class.
We only had SOS [creamed chipped beef on toast] when my dad was away, he had been in the army and some bright wit decided to modify the huge trucks to be field kitchens, and they made anything that could be made with chipped beef, flour, dried eggs, dried milk - he had an intense dislike for SOS, french toast, scrambled eggs, pancakes ... he had some dislikes - tuna casserole was one so we rarely had it. I rather like it when made from scratch but being allergic to mushrooms makes eating casseroles based on canned soup gets tricky for me so I tend to avoid casseroles unless I know the ingredients.
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Originally Posted by ftg View Post
The mass production of chickens really ramped up in the 50s. But it still took a bit for chicken to get really cheaper.

There was still a lot of holdover in mentality for quite a while where people considered chicken to be a "special" meat for (some) Sundays and such. But that had nothing to do with cost.

In particular, people who raised their own chickens would have had the "chicken for Sunday" attitude quite a bit. I remember watching my grandfather grab a chicken out of the coop and ... process ... it for Sunday dinner when we visited.
mrAru, being career Navy would invite guys back to the farm for holidays, or to habg out on the weekend so they wouldn't be stuck in barracks. One festive Thanksgiving he brought a couple of the regulars and a new 'city boy' and when they asked, were told 'fresh not frozen turkey' so the city boy was totally caught unaware when they all trooped outside to catch and slaughter the bird He decided to come into the house and peel taters and do other mess crank duties.

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Originally Posted by Ukulele Ike View Post
Awwwww. I like chicken paprikash. I throw in a handful of mushrooms to sauté with the paprika and onions, making it a sort of “Stroganoff-paprikash.”

I see this kind of prejudice against peasant food all over Amerika. We did a weekend in Lancaster County, PA, in June, and stayed at a B&B. The innkeeper’s dad was hanging around — a worldly WASP-y neurosurgeon — and I asked him where to find a nice Amish restaurant for dinner.

“You don’t want to eat THAT shit.”
Mom was born Amish, to me that is my childhood comfort food =) I can cook most of her repertoire still =) my comfort food of choice is 'cabbage soup' that has sort of evolved from a soup found in an archeological dig at Halstadt's salt mines. You can look at the ingredients and see pretty much the waves of invading agriculture in the recipe changes [I tweaked the recipe to make it more food pyramid oriented, and I refuse to use salmon as the protein - tried it major yuck to me but a good hunk of speck is right down my alley!]

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ukulele Ike View Post
It’s prevalent in Europe, but rare in America. Because Americans are fussy, prissy, squeamish pussies. “Oooooo, I can’t eat Bugs Bunny!!!!”

Neither do Americans eat much lamb, or duck or goose, or game or game birds, or offal. Because Americans are fussy, prissy, squeamish pussies.
I will eat pretty much anything that doesn't eat me first, I have a liking for a good hunk of horse tenderloin - good lean meat, braises beautifully. Love rabbit, duck, goose, pheasant, venison, quail, pheasant ... grew up in a household that believed that if you shoot it, you eat it [except for stuff like predating dogs/coyotes/large cat] and never trophy hunt/fish. I have eaten dog [Korean friend took me home to dinner, it was a case of lets screw with the white girl. They were amazed that I ate it and asked for seconds even after finding out it was dog. Not bad, would eat dog as long as it wasn't someone pet.]
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Old 09-23-2019, 09:11 PM
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cat was unique but it was spiced and sauced so i couldnt get a true taste of it
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Old 09-23-2019, 11:37 PM
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Originally Posted by nightshadea View Post
the grandparents were great depression kids .....
I think there was some of that with my 30's-born parents: depression-thinking that limited food choices to truly cheap stuff so "luxury" chicken was off the menu, tuna casserole was on it all the time. I recall my mom would freeze (cheapest, not-even-good-fresh) sandwich bread well into the 90's.
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Old 09-23-2019, 11:53 PM
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Originally Posted by ZipperJJ View Post
City Chicken (which is not chicken, it’s pork) was super popular here in Cleveland when my mom was growing up in the 50s and 60s but we’ve discussed it and we can’t remember her ever serving it to us in the 80s. So chicken must have been the cheaper meat by the 80s.

Not that it probably wasn’t cheaper earlier. I just like to drop midwestern ethnic goodies into threads when I can
I think city chicken dates back to the Depression, when chicken really was more expensive. It's a thing here in Pittsburgh too, although it's never been one of my favorites.


(Can you make city chicken with actual chicken? Like, put pieces of chicken on the skewers and season it and such?)
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