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Old 10-08-2019, 12:29 PM
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You're on a day trip to NYC, on foot, what do you do?


Let's say you're dropped off somewhere in Manhattan and have to be back at the same spot in 10 hours or so. You've got six other people with you and nobody's ever been to NYC before. You have a budger of say $200 for the day for everyone. Where do you get dropped off? What do you do? What do you see? Looking for suggestions from people that have been there, but for somebody that's never been there. Thanks.
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Old 10-08-2019, 12:36 PM
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I've done it many times, by myself and with my wife. I do a food and drink tour -- eat breakfast at a diner or kosher deli, then walk around parks and/or museums, then eat lunch at X'ian Famous Foods, or Go Go Curry, or NY Pizza Suprema, then walk around a bit more and stop for drinks at a bar, then dinner at whatever unusual cuisine strikes my fancy, then back to the train station (or wherever). I've done it many times and it's never gotten old (I take the train to NYC early in the morning, then back home to DC at night).

That's if these people love to eat. If they're not big into food, then I'm not sure.
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Old 10-08-2019, 12:42 PM
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I'd recommend visiting either the American Museum of Natural History or the Metropolitan Museum of Art. There are several really good museums in NYC but those two are "can't miss".

A walk through Times Square is a good way to get a feel for the city.
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Old 10-08-2019, 12:45 PM
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7 people have to get by on $200 for 10 hours? Does that include meals? That's really going to limit what you can do.
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Old 10-08-2019, 12:50 PM
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Funny you should ask, I'm doing the same thing next month and am going to see the Guggenheim and the High Line, but then again I've been to NYC and have already seen Central Park and the Museum of Natural History. My hotel is across from MoMA but they are doing a grand re-opening around then so I am thinking it will be pretty crowded.

I've also never been to the places I'm going to see. The High Line might be for people who are able to walk at least a mile without tiring, but it's pretty distinctive because there are not a lot of those types of open walkways in the world.
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Old 10-08-2019, 12:56 PM
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7 people have to get by on $200 for 10 hours? Does that include meals? That's really going to limit what you can do.
Nope, that does not include meals. This is a budget trip, so looking for "free sightseeing stuff". Fancy Cuisine and Broadway shows are for another time.
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Old 10-08-2019, 12:58 PM
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Nope, that does not include meals. This is a budget trip, so looking for "free sightseeing stuff". Fancy Cuisine and Broadway shows are for another time.
It may be surprising, but NYC is a fantastic place for budget eating. You can easily get a very large, very tasty meal at the three restaurants I mentioned (and many more) for under $15 a person. Under $10 for Go Go Curry and NY Pizza Suprema.
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Old 10-08-2019, 12:59 PM
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If the weather is nice I'd walk the High Line to the World Trade Center museum. That's an amazing place that will take 2-3 hours to experience. Then a taxi up to Katz's Deli for lunch, then the Metro to Central Park and a visit to the Met. You might wish to stop at Times Square or Rockefeller Center along the way.
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Old 10-08-2019, 01:20 PM
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Grew up near New York, so I've done this countless times.

You can:

-- Go to the Big Museums (Natural History, Metropolitan Museum of Art, Museum of Modern Art)
--Go to any of a number of less well-known museums (Whitney, Guggenheim, Museum of the city of New York, New York Historical Society, The Cloisters, etc.)
-- Walk up and down Fifth Avenue, window-shopping, seeing t. Patrick's, visiting Rockefeller Center
-- Go to the Central Park Zoo
-- See if you can get cheap tickets to a Broadway show
-- Go to an off-Broadway show
-- Visit the Empire State Building or the Site of the World Trade Center, The Flatiron Building, the Chrysler Building or some such
-- Go to quasi-historical sites (Fraunces Tavern, Castle Clinton, etc.)
-- Walk around Central Park
-- Visit the Diamond District. Try not to piss off the armed guards
-- Walk the High Line
-- Visit the Cathedral of St. John the Divine, and try to imagine what it'll look like finished.


And that's just in Manhattan.
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Old 10-08-2019, 01:30 PM
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Nope, that does not include meals. This is a budget trip, so looking for "free sightseeing stuff". Fancy Cuisine and Broadway shows are for another time.
Ok, no need to recommend bringing food with you. Otherwise I'd second the advice from Little Nemo, but you are bringing just enough money for the entrance fee to one of those, not both. $200 for 7 people doesn't go very far, you might prefer to spend it on souvenirs.
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Old 10-08-2019, 01:35 PM
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If it were just me (or maybe me and one other like-minded companion), I would simply spend the day wandering. Maybe take a stroll through Central Park; pop into a tavern that looks interesting and start a conversation; check out some no-name neighborhood diner when I got hungry; take a train to an unfamiliar neighborhood just to see what's there. I'd essentially go wherever the wind and my whim takes me. It's very hard to get bored in Manhattan.

However, with a group of six or more, you'll need a plan and you'll need everybody to commit to the plan; otherwise you'll spend 5 of your 10 hours discussing what to do next. So I realize I have no relevant advice to offer. Carry on.
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Old 10-08-2019, 01:37 PM
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One of my suggestions is always: take train to Brooklyn near the Brooklyn side of the Brooklyn Bridge. Walk across the bridge. It should be close to lunch time, so go to South Street Seaport for something to eat. Either walk or cab to the battery. Get on the Staten Island Ferry (it's free) going to Staten Island. Look at the Statue of Liberty as you go by it. Get off of the ferry, go upstairs, and get back on the Staten Island Ferry (it is still free). That should get you to mid-afternoon, and you can do any of the other ideas from this thread.
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Old 10-08-2019, 01:41 PM
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Thanks for the suggestions so far. How does this circuit sound?

1. Drop off at Penn station
2. Walk to the Empire State Building (7 minute walk according to google maps)
3. Walk to Chrysler Building (15 minute walk)
4. Walk to Rockefeller Center (15 minutes)
5. Walk to Time Square (9 minutes)
6. Walk back to Penn Station (15 minutes)

So that should give a good "Ooh look, places I've seen in movies" experience, in a fairly compressed area. But, would there be good places to check out/eat in between? If you weren't going to do that circuit, which would you do, specifically? We have a person in the group that probably couldn't handle much more than that in walking (not counting mulling around indoor places).

Last edited by Ashtura; 10-08-2019 at 01:43 PM.
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Old 10-08-2019, 03:37 PM
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Go ride the Staten Island Ferry. Its free and the view of the city (and the statute of Liberty) from the harbor is magnificent. Don't go during rush hour tho.
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Old 10-08-2019, 03:59 PM
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Old 10-08-2019, 04:20 PM
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That was my only trip to New York. My wife and I drove into Manhattan through the Holland Tunnel. We parked my truck near my friend's apartment on the Upper East Side, and just walked around. We walked around Central Park mostly. After a couple of hours, my friend called me that he was home from work, so we met up at his apartment. By then it was evening, so we walked to Koreatown and had some amazing food. We went to the roof of his apartment building after dinner and just enjoyed looking at the lights and the city until we finally crashed. The next morning my wife and I said goodbye to NYC as we had to continue on to Vermont. It was fun. I don't care to go back.
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Old 10-08-2019, 05:17 PM
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It may be surprising, but NYC is a fantastic place for budget eating. You can easily get a very large, very tasty meal at the three restaurants I mentioned (and many more) for under $15 a person. Under $10 for Go Go Curry and NY Pizza Suprema.
For super cheap food in NYC, head to Chinatown. I went to some little hole in the wall where you could get a plate of either chicken or pork with rice and vegetables for ridiculously cheap, like in the $2-$3 range. The portion wasn't huge, and it didn't come with a drink, but it was good and enough food for me. After a bit of Googling I'm 99% sure the place was Wah Fung No. 1 Fast Food. It looks like the price has gone up to $4.25 now (I was there over a decade ago).
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Old 10-08-2019, 05:27 PM
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--Go to any of a number of less well-known museums (Whitney, Guggenheim, Museum of the city of New York, New York Historical Society, The Cloisters, etc.)
Speaking of lesser known museums, I have to give a plug to the New York Transit Museum. It may not sound fun, but I thought it was actually quite interesting. It's got exhibits on the history of the construction of the subways, vintage subway cars, an old drawbridge control panel. But it's down in Brooklyn, so it's probably not something the OP can fit in in the time available.
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Old 10-08-2019, 05:36 PM
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MOMA.
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Old 10-08-2019, 05:52 PM
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Thanks for the suggestions so far. How does this circuit sound?

1. Drop off at Penn station
2. Walk to the Empire State Building (7 minute walk according to google maps)
3. Walk to Chrysler Building (15 minute walk)
4. Walk to Rockefeller Center (15 minutes)
5. Walk to Time Square (9 minutes)
6. Walk back to Penn Station (15 minutes)

So that should give a good "Ooh look, places I've seen in movies" experience, in a fairly compressed area. But, would there be good places to check out/eat in between? If you weren't going to do that circuit, which would you do, specifically? We have a person in the group that probably couldn't handle much more than that in walking (not counting mulling around indoor places).
I would definitely add Grand Central Station to that circuit. It's literally just a few doors down from the Chrysler Building.

For food, I mentioned that place in Chinatown, but that's out of the way given the other stuff on your list, and it's probably not worth taking the subway down to Chinatown *just* for food. So I withdraw that recommendation unless you decide you really want to see Chinatown, and say just eat from whatever street cart or food truck strikes your fancy as you're walking around. You will definitely pass some.
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Old 10-08-2019, 06:03 PM
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The Staten Island ferry is free? How does it stay afloat?
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Old 10-08-2019, 06:31 PM
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Walk to the Empire State Building (7 minute walk according to google maps)
My feelings about the Empire State Building are mixed. If you go to it from street level, you're going to have a hard time appreciating its height. You can lean back and look up but you're not really going to be able to see it very well. If you go inside, it has a nice lobby but that's not really why it's a landmark.

Going up to the main deck isn't going to happen on your budget; tickets cost over forty dollars apiece.

So honestly, one of the best ways to view the Empire State Building is to go to New Jersey and look at the Manhattan skyline across the Hudson River.
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Old 10-08-2019, 06:33 PM
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Go to any of a number of less well-known museums (Whitney, Guggenheim, Museum of the city of New York, New York Historical Society, The Cloisters, etc.)
The Tenement Museum is really good.
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Old 10-08-2019, 06:41 PM
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Ok, no need to recommend bringing food with you. Otherwise I'd second the advice from Little Nemo, but you are bringing just enough money for the entrance fee to one of those, not both. $200 for 7 people doesn't go very far, you might prefer to spend it on souvenirs.
This is true. I had forgotten that museum tickets can get expensive. The American Museum of Natural History tickets are $23 and the Metropolitan Museum of Art tickets are $25. (Museum of Modern Art tickets are also $25.) And those are the basic adult admission tickets - it will cost more if they have any special exhibits you want to see. (But tickets for seniors or students will be less.)

Last edited by Little Nemo; 10-08-2019 at 06:42 PM.
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Old 10-08-2019, 06:43 PM
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Start off at The Transit Museum, walk across the Brooklyn Bridge visit The South Street Seaport, check out Wall St., see the World Trade Center memorial.
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Old 10-08-2019, 06:58 PM
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Grew up near New York, so I've done this countless times.

You can:
--Go to any of a number of less well-known museums (Whitney, Guggenheim, Museum of the city of New York, New York Historical Society, The Cloisters, etc.)
And that's just in Manhattan.
Might I suggest Mmuseumm and the Native American Museum?

Some that either weren't suggested or that I missed while skimming the thread:
Rent a Citibike to get around
Walk/bike the Brooklyn Bridge
Take the Staten Island Ferry
Take the Roosevelt Island tram

ETA: And I had the thread open so long that Biggirl snuck in and also suggested the Brooklyn Bridge. :P

Last edited by D_Odds; 10-08-2019 at 06:59 PM.
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Old 10-08-2019, 07:01 PM
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So honestly, one of the best ways to view the Empire State Building is to go to New Jersey and look at the Manhattan skyline across the Hudson River.
It's not as impressive these days since it's largely obscured by the Hudson Yards and all the new residential supertalls sprouting up all over the city.



You might want to check some of these various non-Central parks and their surrounding neighborhoods: Bryant Park (Midtown), Madison Square Park (Flat Iron), Union Square Park (Union Square), Washington Square Park (East Village), City Hall Park (Tribeca) and Battery Park (Lower Manhattan).
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Old 10-08-2019, 11:37 PM
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Some questions that would affect your agenda:

-How are you getting into Manhattan? Are you taking the PATH into Penn Station or are you getting dropped off? Does the drop off have to be at Penn Station? If you are getting picked up, does it have to be at the same place as the drop off? Remember, the PATH also stops at One World Center in Lower Manhattan.

-What day of the week would you be coming? Most museums are going to be out of your group budget, but many museums have certain periods when they are free (Friday from 4pm to closing, etc). Also, most museums are closed on Monday.

-What time would you be arriving/leaving? Also would you be taking this trip sooner (i.e. this month) or later. Locations like Rockefeller Center and Bryant Park are much more iconic closer to the holiday season, once the skating rinks, Christmas trees, and winter markets get set up.
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Old 10-08-2019, 11:48 PM
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In the meantime, here is a list of free admission NYC museums.
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Old 10-08-2019, 11:56 PM
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This is true. I had forgotten that museum tickets can get expensive. The American Museum of Natural History tickets are $23 and the Metropolitan Museum of Art tickets are $25. (Museum of Modern Art tickets are also $25.) And those are the basic adult admission tickets - it will cost more if they have any special exhibits you want to see. (But tickets for seniors or students will be less.)
The Museum of Natural History is actually "pay what you like", but you have to wait in the long line to get to the counter (can't use the ticket vending machines) and face the scorn of the cashier.

The Met (and its branches The Cloisters and the Met Breuer) are also "pay what you like", but only for NYS residents, or students from NJ, NY, and CT.
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Old 10-09-2019, 12:21 AM
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Take the Roosevelt Island tram
And, there is an inexpensive ferry which stops near Wall Street which goes to Roosevelt Island, Long Island City, Astoria, and I think 34th street. Well worth it.
You can walk all around Roosevelt Island, from the light house on one end to the UN Park on the other, and get a nice view of the UN. If you get tired there is a free bus. Then take the tram back.

When I was in NY last October I walked the High Line, and was disappointed. The weather was not great (I canceled my plans to walk the Brooklyn Bridge.) To a New Yorker all that space is great, but if you live in other places maybe not so much.
Check the museums before you go for special exhibitions which might be as much fun as the normal exhibitions, especially for the smaller ones.
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Old 10-09-2019, 08:07 AM
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I agree about the High Line. I thought it was a waste of time. Crowded, too. I also agree about seeing tall buildings close up. Much better to look at them from some distance. I'd walk from Penn Station to Rockefeller Center, then take a free tour of the library and go to Grand Central. Take a train from Grand Central down to the battery and take a ride on the Staten Island Ferry. Then back up to Greenwich Village and walk around. Maybe hit Washington Square Park before heading back to Penn Station. Fit in food/drinks when and where it's handy. If you have to see Times Square do it at the end of your day when it's dark.
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Old 10-09-2019, 08:13 AM
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Might I suggest Mmuseumm and the Native American Museum?
I really have to go and see the new Indiabn Museum. The old Indian Museum that used to be on Audubon Terrace (155th Street and Broadway) that I had gone to in the past closed in 1994 and moved out. This new one at Bowling Green in Lower Manhattan contains some of the old stuff in it.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nation...merican_Indian
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Old 10-09-2019, 08:33 AM
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7 people have to get by on $200 for 10 hours? Does that include meals? That's really going to limit what you can do.
We're assuming what... 2 meals in 10 hours? (lunch & dinner) for seven people? That's a total of 14 meals.

200 / 14 = $14.28 per meal. Unless you're eating fast food or fast-casual, that's going to be tough to accomplish anywhere, especially NYC. And that's meals alone... some things cost money- the subway, etc...

If it was me, I'd spend my time foot-touring a few of the various famous neighborhoods and maybe Central Park. Wandering around the Bronx is a pretty interesting experience, as is the Bronx Little Italy on Arthur Avenue, for example. So is wandering the Upper West Side (where a lot of sitcoms are set).
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Old 10-09-2019, 08:41 AM
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Loudon Wainwright III has some suggestions:

Well, lets go fly a kite in Central Park
Go & see a Shakespeare play
Have a lot of fun at the planetarium
And museum all the blues away
Well, Rockefeller Center and the UN too
Baby don't make me wait
I want to elevate up & down with you
In the building of the Empire State
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Old 10-09-2019, 09:55 AM
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not quite within your budget of $200 for 7 people as it is $50.00 per person for an adult but i would do the hop on hop off bus tours. i found them entertaining. I bought the 3 day pass as part of a package deal with a bunch of other things on the City pass and often used the bus as a means of transportation to visit other things as sometimes the other public transportation didn't go where I wanted to go easily.

For instance, my hotel was on the west side of Central park and several museums I wanted to visit were on the east side. prior to activating my hop on bus pass I walked across Central park (and got terribly lost) in the morning but in the evening did not want to walk late at night even down a the brightly lit 86th street transverse late at night. I ended up riding the subway to Queens and then back to my hotels local stop. probably could have worked out a different subway route with a lot more train switches which would have taken about the same amount of time,

Once I had the pass, that bus went more directly to some museums I wanted to see.

The Tenement museum was very interesting but a little pricey. Loved the Met, the Cloisters, The Morgan Library, The MOMA. Also the Strand bookstore, did a shopping tour and a food tour that were a lot of fun. Visited Mood (fabric store that is always shown on Project Runway). I have been a couple of times for a week long visit.

a couple of years ago I was in NYC for a day just before Christmas, visited the Morgan Library, The Met museum, a couple of Christmas markets and road the city bus from the Met back down 5th avenue to see the shop windows decorated for Christmas. I am hoping to go back again this year if I can work out the transportation to NYC.
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Old 10-09-2019, 10:07 AM
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I really have to go and see the new Indiabn Museum. The old Indian Museum that used to be on Audubon Terrace (155th Street and Broadway) that I had gone to in the past closed in 1994 and moved out. This new one at Bowling Green in Lower Manhattan contains some of the old stuff in it.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nation...merican_Indian
This can be incorporated in my Transit Museum/Brooklyn Bridge walk.
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Old 10-09-2019, 11:05 AM
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Gennaro Lombardi's pizza, any major art museum, a movie on Times Square that hasn't released nationwide, Washington Square Park, a first-rate bookstore or toy store, hang around outside 30 Rock.
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Old 10-09-2019, 02:37 PM
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A walk through Times Square is a good way to get a feel for the city.
No, it's not. Times Square is a giant mall. A tourist trap with the same crap you'll see anywhere. You don't need to come to New York to eat at Applebee's.

Quote:
Originally Posted by CalMeacham View Post
-- Go to the Big Museums (Natural History, Metropolitan Museum of Art, Museum of Modern Art)
--Go to any of a number of less well-known museums (Whitney, Guggenheim, Museum of the city of New York, New York Historical Society, The Cloisters, etc.)
-- Walk up and down Fifth Avenue, window-shopping, seeing t. Patrick's, visiting Rockefeller Center
-- Go to the Central Park Zoo
-- See if you can get cheap tickets to a Broadway show
-- Go to an off-Broadway show
-- Visit the Empire State Building or the Site of the World Trade Center, The Flatiron Building, the Chrysler Building or some such
-- Go to quasi-historical sites (Fraunces Tavern, Castle Clinton, etc.)
-- Walk around Central Park
-- Visit the Diamond District. Try not to piss off the armed guards
-- Walk the High Line
-- Visit the Cathedral of St. John the Divine, and try to imagine what it'll look like finished.
All excellent suggestions.

Quote:
Originally Posted by zamboniracer View Post
Go ride the Staten Island Ferry. Its free and the view of the city (and the statute of Liberty) from the harbor is magnificent. Don't go during rush hour tho.
THis is a must.

Quote:
Originally Posted by WildaBeast View Post
Speaking of lesser known museums, I have to give a plug to the New York Transit Museum. It may not sound fun, but I thought it was actually quite interesting.
The Transit Museum is fantastic! Well worth a visit. And afterwards, you can walk across the Brooklyn Bridge.

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Originally Posted by Biggirl View Post
Start off at The Transit Museum, walk across the Brooklyn Bridge visit The South Street Seaport, check out Wall St., see the World Trade Center memorial.
Yep.
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Old 10-09-2019, 05:12 PM
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[Moderating]
While some things to do in NYC would fall under the gambit of "arts", many of them won't (especially on such a tight budget), so I think this thread will fare better in IMHO. Moving.
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Old 10-09-2019, 05:23 PM
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It hasn't been mentioned and it is a bit pricey, no doubt, but do NOT take the Circle Line tour. Most of New York's interesting things are on the interior, and the Staten Island Ferry and the East River ferry show you most of the good stuff for a lot less.
Assuming all of you are in good shape you can probably get to places faster on foot than on the hop-on hop-off bus.
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Old 10-09-2019, 10:08 PM
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Originally Posted by WildaBeast View Post
Speaking of lesser known museums, I have to give a plug to the New York Transit Museum. It may not sound fun, but I thought it was actually quite interesting. It's got exhibits on the history of the construction of the subways, vintage subway cars, an old drawbridge control panel. But it's down in Brooklyn, so it's probably not something the OP can fit in in the time available.
There's also a Fire Department museum. It's tiny, but it's a lot of fun. It's on Spring Street, in an old firehouse.

And there are pictures on the wall (sometimes -- I think they rotate them occasionally) of several relatives of mine (a couple of generations back). One Chief of Department, a couple of battalion chiefs. Lots of firefighters in the family, on one side, to this day (and cops on the other side -- how much more Irish-American New York can you get?).
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Old 10-09-2019, 10:41 PM
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I was wondering if this would be moved to IMHO.

When walking in Manhattan, the grid system works out to about 1 mile for 20 blocks going north-south and about 1mile for 6 blocks going east-west.
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Old 10-10-2019, 10:03 AM
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Awesome suggestions guys. Question: Does google maps work reliably in NYC? I've had some gps problems around a lot of tall building before.
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Old 10-10-2019, 10:08 AM
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Originally Posted by bmoak View Post
Some questions that would affect your agenda:

-How are you getting into Manhattan? Are you taking the PATH into Penn Station or are you getting dropped off? Does the drop off have to be at Penn Station? If you are getting picked up, does it have to be at the same place as the drop off? Remember, the PATH also stops at One World Center in Lower Manhattan.

-What day of the week would you be coming? Most museums are going to be out of your group budget, but many museums have certain periods when they are free (Friday from 4pm to closing, etc). Also, most museums are closed on Monday.

-What time would you be arriving/leaving? Also would you be taking this trip sooner (i.e. this month) or later. Locations like Rockefeller Center and Bryant Park are much more iconic closer to the holiday season, once the skating rinks, Christmas trees, and winter markets get set up.
1. My plan is to book parking online somewhere (there's tons of places to do this). We won't be returning to the car until the end of the day.
2. Saturday.
3. Probably rolling in around 11 or so, have lunch somewhere. Leave time is flexible but probably around 7pm. Late this month, as the trees are turning.
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Old 10-10-2019, 12:36 PM
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Originally Posted by bmoak View Post
I was wondering if this would be moved to IMHO.

When walking in Manhattan, the grid system works out to about 1 mile for 20 blocks going north-south and about 1mile for 6 blocks going east-west.
The north-south distance is pretty much exact, while the east-west is more approximate.

The numbering east-west is about a hundred numbers to the block, but it's not exact, as it is in Salt Lake City.
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Old 10-10-2019, 10:51 PM
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Originally Posted by Saintly Loser View Post
No, it's not. Times Square is a giant mall. A tourist trap with the same crap you'll see anywhere. You don't need to come to New York to eat at Applebee's.
I once played guide for a family friend for a day trip to Manhattan. Two meals in the city, and she insisted on going to 1) The Hard Rock Cafe and 2). The frickin' Olive Garden in Times Square.

No real reason to go to Times Square during the day except to get discount Broadway tickets. After dark, you can do a walkthrough to see the neon and lights.
  #48  
Old 10-10-2019, 11:25 PM
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Originally Posted by Voyager View Post
And, there is an inexpensive ferry which stops near Wall Street which goes to Roosevelt Island, Long Island City, Astoria, and I think 34th street. Well worth it.
You can walk all around Roosevelt Island, from the light house on one end to the UN Park on the other, and get a nice view of the UN. If you get tired there is a free bus. Then take the tram back.
NYC Ferry charges$2.75 for a single ride, which is equal/cheaper than the subway. There are other ferry lines that have stops near Wall Street that are NOT inexpensive, such as NY Water Taxi. The ferry is wonderful in nice weather, and not so wonderful on a drizzly, windy November day with choppy waves

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Originally Posted by Voyager View Post
When I was in NY last October I walked the High Line, and was disappointed. The weather was not great (I canceled my plans to walk the Brooklyn Bridge.) To a New Yorker all that space is great, but if you live in other places maybe not so much.
I like the High Line, but I will admit it is not a pleasant experience in poor weather and overly crowded in peak hours during good weather. It's certainly nicer than walking over the same ground at street level. Rather than treat the High Line as a destination, think of it as a way to get from place to place. The south end has the Whitney and Chelsea Market, further up are the many art galleries in Chelsea. The north end used to be a kind of desert, but the brand-spanking new Hudson Yards.
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Old 10-10-2019, 11:49 PM
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The Tenement Museum is really good.
It is a very good museum, but the cheapest tour ticket is $27. Granted, you can go to the visitor center/gift shop gratis.

Keeping strictly to the parameters set with the OP is pretty difficult, and a lot of people don't seem to be paying much attention to them. Broadway shows? Movies in Times Square? The Guggenheim? The Central Park Zoo?

The OP has $200 for a party of seven. That is about $28.50 per person for a day that will include lunch and dinner. A one-way subway ride costs $3, so a round-trip for the entire party wil cost $42, or 1/5 of their budget. There is also a group member that cannot walk much more than wandering around midtown (Penn Station to Rock Center and back).
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Old 10-10-2019, 11:52 PM
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Originally Posted by Ashtura View Post
1. My plan is to book parking online somewhere (there's tons of places to do this). We won't be returning to the car until the end of the day.
2. Saturday.
3. Probably rolling in around 11 or so, have lunch somewhere. Leave time is flexible but probably around 7pm. Late this month, as the trees are turning.
Ummm....is the parking fee coming out of your $200 budget or is it separate? Parking for the day is going to cost a good chunk of change. If you can get into the city about two hours earlier, you would probably be able to park for free in lower Manhattan on a Saturday. (All the Wall St types and city government employees won't be around.)
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