View Poll Results: Do you use your Ovan's Broiler and Broiler Pan?
Never 32 19.63%
Only for cheese toast and that's on a baking sheet 22 13.50%
Yes - I love cooking steaks and Chops under the Broiler 34 20.86%
I use the Broiler very rarely for steaks and chops 41 25.15%
What's a broiler pan? 7 4.29%
Other 38 23.31%
Multiple Choice Poll. Voters: 163. You may not vote on this poll

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  #51  
Old 05-10-2012, 04:07 PM
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We primarily use the broiler for garlic bread but occasionally put steaks or chops on the broiler pan. Not using it at all now becuase the gas had to be shut off due to a leak inside the oven somewhere.

Last edited by Skywatcher; 05-10-2012 at 04:09 PM.
  #52  
Old 05-11-2012, 02:35 PM
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Only for cheese toast, or very close kin to it. There might also be garlic, onions, tomatoes, or various herbs involved, but basically cheese toast.
  #53  
Old 05-12-2012, 03:56 PM
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NEVER...That's what a BBQ Grill is for.

Last time I used a Broiler, I tried to make Steak...it made FIRE!

Last edited by Jamicat; 05-12-2012 at 03:59 PM.
  #54  
Old 05-13-2012, 06:34 PM
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We use a broiler pan about a third of the time for steaks etc (otherwise a fry pan or a outdoor grill). It feels like it's a lower-fat option.

As far as cleaning, add about a cup of water to the bottom of the pan before you start - it catches the drippings so they don't fall into a hot pan and make your kitchen smokey. Also keep the oven door open! We have a broiler pan with wire grids, so that's a lot easier to clean than one with just grooves and slots.
  #55  
Old 05-13-2012, 06:47 PM
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I have found the broiler is the best way to cook marinaded pork loins. I preheat the oven with a La Creuset enameled cast iron skillet to 400 degrees. When the skillet is hot, I add the pork loin, and turn on the broiler and broil until it starts to brown. Then I flip it and brown the other side, check the temp with an instant read thermometer, and pull it when it reaches 160 degrees. Let it rest in foil for 15 minutes, then slice against the grain.

Turns out moist and flavorful every time.
  #56  
Old 09-05-2019, 02:30 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pulykamell View Post
Why do you think anyone is arguing with you? As I said, many people here call those barbecues, too. It's okay, relax, nobody is telling anyone what words to use. I'm explaining the differences in American terminology because I thought you were interested in how people use the word. Likewise, MaltLiquor's post is interesting to me, as that's one distinction I haven't heard.
You are arguing with him. You're saying "ascenray is right," and means that other opinions are wrong, and you say you use the words precisely, implying that any other usage is mere slang. But other dialects of English don't use the words grill, broil and barbecue in the same way people in the US do.

What's confusing about the difference, though, is that the broiler shown on the links in this thread doesn't quite match up to anything I've seen in the UK. Our grills are always the top of the oven - if there is one at all - or they might be separate and in their own section over the hob (I'm not sure what a hob is in the US - a stovetop, maybe? The bit where you cook with saucepans) and they don't look like the broiler pan in the pictures. They're similar, but not quite the same.
  #57  
Old 09-05-2019, 03:06 PM
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Salmon. Pork ribs. Sometimes a burger.
Love the broiler.

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  #58  
Old 09-05-2019, 03:08 PM
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Yes. But not for cheese toast or steaks. So "other."
  #59  
Old 09-05-2019, 03:10 PM
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Insert joke about broiling zombies here.

Easy way to help keep things clean - cover the bottom of the broiler pan with aluminum foil. Discard after cooking, no clean up required. The top needs some, but it is seldom a big problem.
  #60  
Old 09-05-2019, 03:16 PM
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Originally Posted by SciFiSam View Post
You are arguing with him. You're saying "ascenray is right," and means that other opinions are wrong, and you say you use the words precisely, implying that any other usage is mere slang. But other dialects of English don't use the words grill, broil and barbecue in the same way people in the US do.
I think you're reading a lot into pulykamell's posts back in 2012. And anyway, as you point out, the words aren't used the same across all dialects of english. Why should acsenray and pulykamell defer to guanolad's preferred usage?
  #61  
Old 09-05-2019, 04:36 PM
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Note that SciFiSam did not bump this thread. That was done by a spammer, who has now been baked.
  #62  
Old 09-05-2019, 04:58 PM
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Not so much steaks and chops and I've never made cheese toast. However, I do use the broiler sometimes for chiles, garlic and tomatillos for a green salsa but also for salmon. I experimented with the broiler for searing burgers and sausage after sous vide but haven't done that in a while.
  #63  
Old 09-05-2019, 05:46 PM
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Originally Posted by Inner Stickler View Post
I think you're reading a lot into pulykamell's posts back in 2012. And anyway, as you point out, the words aren't used the same across all dialects of english. Why should acsenray and pulykamell defer to guanolad's preferred usage?
I didn't say they should defer to anyone's usage, just that they shouldn't claim to be "right."

Didn't know it was a zombie thread though - sorry.
  #64  
Old 09-05-2019, 05:51 PM
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I use the broiler about equal to bake functions. The pan itself is another story. I do try to use alternatives like wrinkled Al foil. And foil lined pan. And will not hesitate from putting the pan when I use it into the dishwasher. All and all the broil function is essential, the pan is not, thus voting...

Other

Last edited by kanicbird; 09-05-2019 at 05:54 PM.
  #65  
Old 09-05-2019, 07:23 PM
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I answered "other."

When I had a stove that had the broiler element in the "ceiling" of the oven, and you could easily switch to "broil," I used it all the time.

Now I have a stove (gas) where the broiler is in a separate drawer at the bottom under the oven. It is a major PITA to use, not least because you have to get down on your hands and knees and sometimes use a flashlight to see what's going on in there. I hardly ever use it.
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  #66  
Old 09-06-2019, 06:44 AM
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I had to vote other, because while I don't cook chops with it, I do a lot more than cheesy toast. And I totally forgot that broiler pans were a thing.

I use the broiler for browning, which encompasses a hell of a lot of culinary tasks, e.g.:
  • Browning vegetables for salsas.
  • Browning croutons for salads or stuffing/dressing.
  • Making garlic bread/toast.
  • Browning meat after sous vide'ing it.
  • Browning the tops of things made in casserole-type dishes.

We cook nearly every dinner at home with actual ingredients (knock-on-wood, says the 47 year old father of a nearly 19 month old), so the broiler is an indispensable kitchen tool. I don't want to judge, but if the only use someone has is for cheese toasties...
  #67  
Old 09-06-2019, 06:57 AM
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I've got an Oster convection toaster oven that usually gets broiler-type duties. Heats up faster, uses less energy, easier to clean.
  #68  
Old 09-06-2019, 07:40 AM
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Originally Posted by Balthisar View Post
I don't want to judge,[...]
I would have believed that if you hadn't mentioned sous vide'ing.
  #69  
Old 09-07-2019, 12:58 PM
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We have steak, ribs, or chops pretty much every Friday night, and except when the weather is nice enough to use the outdoor BBQ gas grill, I use a broiler pan and my gas oven's broiler.

I line the bottom of the pan with tinfoil to catch the grease, and after discarding the foil and grease, it only needs a quick rinse with the dish brush. I find that if I clean the top part shortly after finishing dinner, it's not too hard to clean just with a dish brush, or sometimes a scrubber sponge. Of course, if you use BBQ sauce, you'll need an SOS pad to get the crystallized sauce off. That can be a bit of a pain. (I did it just last night, but the ribs were worth the effort.)
  #70  
Old 09-07-2019, 01:23 PM
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I use the broiler (upper element in my electric oven) fairly often, for steaks and chops but also for chicken, sometimes fish, sometimes french fries, sometimes vegetables, often combinations of those, and occasionally for melted cheese sandwiches (are those "cheese toast"?) if I'm making them for several people at once. If I only want one or two melted cheese I'll usually do those in a cast iron frying pan with a lid, on top of the stove.

I sometimes use a broiler pan as such (mine is porcelain on steel, an old solution to the minimum-sticking issue which doesn't wear off, wind up in your food, or need special handling), and sometimes a more general type of oven-usable pan. I'm puzzled by the huge difficulty some people have in washing them, and wonder whether the problem the OP was having was related to having a crappy quality pan. My technique: pour off any pools of grease after it's cooled some but while it's still liquid, or scrape out if it's solidified; if pan's still significantly greasy, wipe out with a paper towel (alternate methods may involve dogs and/or cats); then submerge in hot soapy water and go away and do something else for ten minutes to an hour. Come back and scrub out the pan with more hot water and if needed more soap. If there's still stubborn stuff attached, repeat the soak. Very rare for more than two soaks to be needed and often a single ten-minute soak is plenty. Depending on what was in it, the first two grease-removal steps may not be needed, either, because it may not be all that greasy.
  #71  
Old 09-07-2019, 01:37 PM
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I used to use the broiler all the time for steaks and chops, but I've mostly started using a cast iron frying pan. I think the broiler does a better job, but it IS a lot more trouble to clean. And no. I'm not willing to throw away a lot of aluminum foil for an everyday meal.

When the weather favors cooking outdoors, I use a grill, because it's easy to clean. It's a little fussier to cook on because the temperature varies from spot to spot.

The one thing I NEVER cook on it is grilled cheese, because I use the toaster oven for that. But in addition to steaks and chops, I use the broiler for chicken, for browning acorn squash (after cooking it mostly upside-down at lower temps) and generally for larger quantities of food I want to cook under direct heat.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sparky! View Post
...I agree about the mess, but usually I spend all of about 2 minutes cleaning the pan, say the hell with it, and put it away, dried/burnt grease and all. Sure, it's not perfectly clean, but it won't kill me to cook off of, either.
Yup. The broiler is a nuisance to clean, but I'm certainly not spending an hour doing that, nor will it be spotless when I'm done. I only use it to cook at high temps, it's not like I'm going to catch anything from it.

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Originally Posted by That Don Guy View Post
...Speaking of broilers, has anyone ever tried using it with the oven door closed?...
Mine is gas, so it's ventilated and I always leave the door closed. But I think electric ranges can overheat if you use the broiler with the door closed.
  #72  
Old 09-07-2019, 01:45 PM
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Other - use it (we call it the grill) all the time, but not for steaks and chops. But chicken, fish, blackening the skins of bell peppers...
  #73  
Old 09-07-2019, 02:13 PM
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Use the broiler often, especially in winter. Usually use a half-sheet pan lined with aluminum foil* and fitted with a stainless rack sprayed down with no-stick. I use a stiff brush to clean the rack, and deposit it in the dishwasher whenever we run the dishwasher. It's rare I'll pull out one of the broiler pans I've accumulated over the years because their raised racks don't allow for as much air circulation underneath the rack. The half-sheet pan/cooling rack is my go-to oven pan for almost all of my roasting needs.

*I buy wide aluminum foil at restaurant supply or big box stores. Cheaper than name-brand supermarket foil, if one has the room in the kitchen for it. Same for plastic wrap. Given the choice of scrubbing burnt-on grease from a half-sheet pan or throwing away a few pennies worth of foil, goodbye pennies. My time saved is more valuable than that. It's the equivalent of driving an extra 15 minutes out of one's way to save 2/gallon on gasoline. That ~30 savings does not make up for the time.
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  #74  
Old 09-07-2019, 02:16 PM
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Yes. It gets used fairly often.
  #75  
Old 09-07-2019, 02:37 PM
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It's not the money, aluminum foil is fairly energy-intensive to make, and I don't trust that it will actually be recycled. Yeah, based on my hourly wage and the cost of foil, I could completely justify using it.
  #76  
Old 09-07-2019, 02:52 PM
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I use it occasionally to roast peppers, or for broiled asparagus. For meat, I'm a fan of searing on the stove top and finishing at 400F in the oven. Works perfectly and without as much spatter in the oven.
  #77  
Old 09-07-2019, 03:40 PM
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We use it regularly, and the most frequent use recently has been to brown chickpea pancakes, although pepper roasting is another frequent use.
  #78  
Old 09-07-2019, 04:23 PM
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We aren't allowed a charcoal grill on our 2nd floor apartment balcony, so the broiler is used all the time.
We are content with "clean enough" in regards to the broiler pan. I had never heard of sheet pan/cooling rack combo. Since I don't have the right kind of cooling rack, we will continue as we have been.
  #79  
Old 09-07-2019, 06:17 PM
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I would have believed that if you hadn't mentioned sous vide'ing.
I'm not sure that I catch your meaning. And, of course, I do end up judging.
  #80  
Old 09-07-2019, 06:45 PM
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We have ALWAYS had a grill, so I didn’t use the broiler. When our grill needed replacing, I started using the broiler for chicken thighs, steak, etc., and liked it a LOT. I always knew the broiler would burn a lot hotter than a grill, so I appreciated the browning and quickly learned how to not overlook the meat.

Also, good for roasting peppers.
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  #81  
Old 09-08-2019, 01:25 AM
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Originally Posted by ThelmaLou View Post
I answered "other."

When I had a stove that had the broiler element in the "ceiling" of the oven, and you could easily switch to "broil," I used it all the time.

Now I have a stove (gas) where the broiler is in a separate drawer at the bottom under the oven. It is a major PITA to use, not least because you have to get down on your hands and knees and sometimes use a flashlight to see what's going on in there. I hardly ever use it.
The one I grew up with, and the oven I used in grad school had the broiler there, and I second the notion that it is a pain to use. Bending down was bad enough when I was young.
  #82  
Old 09-08-2019, 08:20 AM
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Originally Posted by SciFiSam View Post
I didn't say they should defer to anyone's usage, just that they shouldn't claim to be "right."

Didn't know it was a zombie thread though - sorry.
I think you misunderstood. GuanoLad replied to Acsenray that "your further claim that Barbecue is a cooking style and not a device also seems counter to all evidence." I was pointing out that in fact, Acsenray was correct that the word can and does refer to a cooking style in parts of the US, as well as many other things, depending on the dialect/region. It sounded to me like GuanoLad was contesting this usage of the word. "Acsenray is right" does not mean all other opinions are wrong. I thought I was being helpful in explaining the various ways the term "barbecue" is used, because it actually is pretty fascinating to me how different dialects use the term, and I thought it might be interesting for others, too. The term itself, I believe, comes from barbacoa, which is originally a cooking style where a pit is dug into ground, a fire is made, meat wrapped in leaves is put into it, and the pit is covered with dirt and the meat is left to cook for many hours. So it's pretty cool how the term has grown and come to mean all sorts of different things.


I tend to use the terms precisely because I'm a food nerd, not because I think other usages are "slang" or "incorrect" or anything like that. I certainly wasn't saying he should not use the word as he uses it (and I am fully aware of how the word is used elsewhere in the world, and I would adjust my terminology to reflect other usages based on the person I am talking to.) I certainly would not correct anyone's usage of the word "barbecue," but to me it sounded like there was doubt cast on whether "barbecue" the term can refer to a cooking style. It absolutely can. And it can mean lots of other things. It's actually pretty amusing to me how argumentative it can get here in parts of the US with what "barbecue" means, even down to the meat. Like I said in my post, there are parts of the US where "barbecue" even specifies the type of meat used, so a "barbecue sandwich" or getting "a pound of barbecue" means you are getting slow-cooked, smoked, pork.

Last edited by pulykamell; 09-08-2019 at 08:24 AM.
  #83  
Old 09-08-2019, 08:33 AM
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Heck, in some parts of the US, barbecue is not just a cooking style, but a religion.

Anyhow, seven years on, as far as the OP goes, it seems like I still use the broiler for the same sorts of things I did before: browning the tops of various foodstuffs (as a finishing step), or for roasting peppers before removing their skins (roasting chile peppers, steaming them in a bag or whatnot, and then peeling them is a common step for many Mexican dishes.) Wait, I guess every once in a long while I may broil other vegetables as a prep step, but most typically, its something like poblanos or anaheims/New Mexico peppers. But I'm also likely to do any of those on a conventional grill outside, now that I have a gas grill (which I didn't have seven years ago -- I was still charcoal-only at the time.)

Last edited by pulykamell; 09-08-2019 at 08:35 AM.
  #84  
Old 09-08-2019, 09:45 AM
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You limited it a lot by making the only options for using it Steaks and Chops or Cheese Bread. I voted other because I would never consider using it for Steak and Chops (those go on the grill outside). Cheese bread... sure, sometimes but that isn't the only thing. I use it to crisp up the top of lots of things.

As far as the broiler pan goes... I can't think of the last time I used that.
Funny... I didn't realize this was a zombie and was preparing to post exactly what I did seven years ago.
  #85  
Old 09-08-2019, 10:11 AM
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It's not the money, aluminum foil is fairly energy-intensive to make, and I don't trust that it will actually be recycled.
And if you're going to recycle it, you need to wash it off first. Washing aluminum foil, even to semi-clean, is harder than washing the pan.
  #86  
Old 09-08-2019, 10:22 AM
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I do keep aluminum foil in the house, and I use it for a couple of special dishes, or in small amounts to keep the turkey wings from burning, say. But I try to be conservative using it, and often reuse it if i can. I'm not going to use it every time i grill meat, which is a weekly thing.
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Old 09-08-2019, 12:10 PM
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puzzlegal, I'm pretty much doing that also; though I let my turkey wings take their own chances, and usually find them edible anyway. I roast turkey on relatively low heat, though.
  #88  
Old 09-08-2019, 12:13 PM
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I start my turkey on high heat, then drop the temp and finish it on low heat. I don't usually have to shield the wings, but sometimes I do. I only roast turkey for thanksgiving, and get a huge one, so it takes a lot of total heat to cook it.
  #89  
Old 09-08-2019, 12:18 PM
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And if you're going to recycle it, you need to wash it off first. Washing aluminum foil, even to semi-clean, is harder than washing the pan.
Not here (NYC). Glass, plastics, and metals go into the same bin, and some food remnants are acceptible. I think they realized that the tougher they made it on the end-user, the less was being recycled and going into landfills.
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  #90  
Old 09-08-2019, 03:43 PM
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Originally Posted by pulykamell View Post
I think you misunderstood. GuanoLad replied to Acsenray that "your further claim that Barbecue is a cooking style and not a device also seems counter to all evidence." I was pointing out that in fact, Acsenray was correct that the word can and does refer to a cooking style in parts of the US, as well as many other things, depending on the dialect/region. It sounded to me like GuanoLad was contesting this usage of the word. "Acsenray is right" does not mean all other opinions are wrong. I thought I was being helpful in explaining the various ways the term "barbecue" is used, because it actually is pretty fascinating to me how different dialects use the term, and I thought it might be interesting for others, too. The term itself, I believe, comes from barbacoa, which is originally a cooking style where a pit is dug into ground, a fire is made, meat wrapped in leaves is put into it, and the pit is covered with dirt and the meat is left to cook for many hours. So it's pretty cool how the term has grown and come to mean all sorts of different things.


I tend to use the terms precisely because I'm a food nerd, not because I think other usages are "slang" or "incorrect" or anything like that. I certainly wasn't saying he should not use the word as he uses it (and I am fully aware of how the word is used elsewhere in the world, and I would adjust my terminology to reflect other usages based on the person I am talking to.) I certainly would not correct anyone's usage of the word "barbecue," but to me it sounded like there was doubt cast on whether "barbecue" the term can refer to a cooking style. It absolutely can. And it can mean lots of other things. It's actually pretty amusing to me how argumentative it can get here in parts of the US with what "barbecue" means, even down to the meat. Like I said in my post, there are parts of the US where "barbecue" even specifies the type of meat used, so a "barbecue sandwich" or getting "a pound of barbecue" means you are getting slow-cooked, smoked, pork.
Fair enough - it was one of those occasions where it looked like correcting someone but that's not what you intended.
  #91  
Old 09-08-2019, 03:47 PM
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I picked other. I used to, when the broiler was at the top of the oven. But Hubby got a new oven and I have to practically lay down on the floor to use it. I do not bend as my back and knees do not allow it. So, I haven't used it in six months and can't see when I will again. Until the next oven.
  #92  
Old 09-08-2019, 05:10 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SciFiSam View Post

What's confusing about the difference, though, is that the broiler shown on the links in this thread doesn't quite match up to anything I've seen in the UK. Our grills are always the top of the oven - if there is one at all - or they might be separate and in their own section over the hob (I'm not sure what a hob is in the US - a stovetop, maybe? The bit where you cook with saucepans) and they don't look like the broiler pan in the pictures. They're similar, but not quite the same.
There are only a couple of differences between baking/roasting and broiling. One is that for broiling, the heat must come from above and the other is that broiling is a constant flame, unlike baking/or roasting which is a constant temperature. I've had two different types of broiler and the difference was basically the location of the heating element in the oven - This is a photo of a heating element at the top of the oven. My current oven is like this, and the broiler pan would go on the top rack closest to the flame. The other option is that the oven has the heating element at the bottom and the broiler is in a separate compartment like in these diagrams. I'm sure there are some stoves with a broiler over the cooktop where a second oven/microwave/convection is sometimes found, but I have personally never seen one.


And I use my broiler for neither cheese toast nor steaks and chops- except maybe a London broil. Mostly I broil chicken and vegetables.

Last edited by doreen; 09-08-2019 at 05:12 PM.
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Old 09-08-2019, 06:45 PM
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I said I use it constantly, even though it's never for chops or steaks. Usually I am browning cheese on an omelet or something, as I like it really toasty.

As for the OP's problem, what you need is borax. Make a paste of borax, fairy soap,and a little water, and spread it all over the browned parts on the pan. Leave overnight and in the morning wipe off. All the yuck should come off easily.
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Old 09-08-2019, 08:16 PM
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Originally Posted by SciFiSam View Post
...What's confusing about the difference, though, is that the broiler shown on the links in this thread a quite match up to anything I've seen in the UK. Our grills are always the top of the oven - if there is one at all - or they might be separate and in their own section over the hob (I'm not sure what a hob is in the US - a stovetop, maybe? The bit where you cook with saucepans) and they don't look like the broiler pan in the pictures. They're similar, but not quite the same.
I think what you call a "grill" is what we call a broiler, and it's usually at the top of the oven, but in cheaper gas ovens there is a compartment below the main oven, underneath a flame that's at the bottom of the oven but the top of the broiler compartment, for broiling. Higher-end gas ovens and all electric ovens (as far as I know) have a heating element at the top of the main oven compartment for broiling.

What you call a hob I would call a "burner". My stovetop has 5 burners, two medium-sized and round, a little one in the back for simmering, a large one in the front for bringing a big pot of water to boil faster (that I also use for the wok) and a long one in the middle, from front to back, that's designed for pancakes and such, I think (it comes with a large flat piece that can be heated atop it, that we call a grill or griddle) but I use it about twice a year to make gravy when i roast something large, and that's pretty much it.

On a gas stove the burner might also be called a flame. On an electric stove it might be called a heating element. (On an old electric stove it might be called a coil, but newer stoves don't usually have open coils any more.)
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Old 09-08-2019, 08:17 PM
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Originally Posted by doreen View Post
This is a photo of a heating element at the top of the oven. My current oven is like this, and the broiler pan would go on the top rack closest to the flame.
I'd just like to note that for accomplished home chefs, good results can be had by varying the difference from the heating element to the food. I've broiled chicken and fish on the bottom 2 racks with great results.
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Old 09-09-2019, 10:10 AM
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Not here (NYC). Glass, plastics, and metals go into the same bin, and some food remnants are acceptible. I think they realized that the tougher they made it on the end-user, the less was being recycled and going into landfills.
From what I've been reading, the problem with making it super easy on the individuals recycling is that the entire load is a lot more likely to wind up in the landfill, as not only the original item but other things mixed in with it may become too contaminated to clean easily.

For the specific instance of washing food waste off the aluminum, it undoubtedly depends on where you are what they'll accept. In my case, I get pickup once a week; holding unwashed pan liners in the house would attract critters and stink up the kitchen, and holding them outside would attract even more critters and probably result in the aluminum being dragged off into a field somewhere and torn into unrecoverable bits. As I understand it the recyclable materials, once picked up by the handler, also need to be held until they can be sorted, with the same sort of problems likely to occur at the holding site; so no, you're not supposed to have food waste mixed in with the recyclables here.


-- ETA: my current electric stove has both a high and a low heat setting for the broiler, which I think is very nice as it reduces the amount I have to move pans and/or racks around in order to broil items until done without burning them.

Last edited by thorny locust; 09-09-2019 at 10:12 AM.
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Old 09-09-2019, 10:23 AM
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Originally Posted by D_Odds View Post
I'd just like to note that for accomplished home chefs, good results can be had by varying the difference from the heating element to the food. I've broiled chicken and fish on the bottom 2 racks with great results.
It's all dependent on the arrangement of the heating elements, too. I won't go into the details of infrared energy and point sources and black body radiation, but here's a neat thing you can (and should) do:

Take the biggest sheet/jellyroll pan that you have that will fit in your oven, even if you have to leave the door open. Fill it with enough fine bread crumbs to make a complete layer. Put it under the broiler at the highest rack setting. Observe where the heat is concentrated. With fresh bread crumbs, repeat for each rack position in your oven.
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