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Old 09-01-2019, 11:26 AM
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Khadaji's Whatcha Reading Thread - Sept. 2019 edition


Last month's thread: https://boards.straightdope.com/sdmb...d.php?t=879768

Thus the ninth month begins, and I hope you're enjoying your latest book(s)!

I'm about halfway through an audiobook of Robert A. Heinlein's Rocket Ship Galileo, a gee-whiz 1947 YA novel about a grownup astrophysicist and three teenage science nerds building a rocket to fly to the Moon. Quaint but good fun.

Set aside on the shelf for the moment: The New Jim Crow by Michelle Alexander, about mass incarceration and the American criminal justice system today, and The Seven-Per-Cent Solution by Nicholas Meyer, a pastiche in which Sherlock Holmes meets, and is treated for his cocaine addiction by, Dr. Sigmund Freud. Hope to get back to them soon.

-----

Khadaji was one of the earlier members of SDMB, and he was well-known as a kindly person who always had something encouraging to say, particularly in the self improvement threads. He was also a voracious, omnivorous reader, who started these threads way back in the Stone Age of 2013. Consequently when he suddenly and quite unexpectedly passed away, we decided to rename this thread in his honor and to keep his memory, if not his ghost, alive.
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Old 09-01-2019, 05:42 PM
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Three-fourths of the way through Here Be Dragons, by Sharon Kay Penman. Historical fiction covering the intrigue of 13th-century England and Wales. A little soap opera-ish but still very good. First of a trilogy.
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Old 09-01-2019, 10:04 PM
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Reading The Outcasts by Kathleen Kent. So far run of the mill western...
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Old 09-02-2019, 12:15 AM
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I started book 6 of The Pelbar Cycle today. This is a series of 7 books by Paul O. Williams. I originally read them when they were released in the 80s and later lent them to a friend who never returned them. I've been thinking about re-reading them for a few years and finally tracked them all down on ebay a few weeks ago.

The setting of the books is the U.S. 1000 years after a nuclear apocalypse. The story begins focused on a few groups living along the Heart River (the Mississippi). People are just starting to venture out and form relationships with other groups, most of whom they have been warring with for generations. Some are starting to realize that before the "time of fire" everyone belonged to the same society - they speak the same language, have similar "ancient wisdom" that has been passed down. In each successive book, people travel further across the country and start to begin the work of uniting the various tribes they encounter. With, of course, lots of conflict between the different cultures.

If you like post-apocalyptic fiction, I think you'd really enjoy this series.

Last edited by aurora maire; 09-02-2019 at 12:17 AM.
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Old 09-02-2019, 03:22 PM
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Just finished a re-read of The Mote in God's Eye by Larry Niven and Jerry Pournelle. When I read it back in the 1970-80's I thought it was one of the best-ever 'hard' SF novels ever. Now, while it is still quite enjoyable to read, I don't think quite as highly of it and think the sequel, The Gripping Hand is a better written book (albeit it makes no sense if you haven't read The Mote).
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Old 09-02-2019, 04:37 PM
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Originally Posted by The Stainless Steel Rat View Post
Just finished a re-read of The Mote in God's Eye by Larry Niven and Jerry Pournelle. When I read it back in the 1970-80's I thought it was one of the best-ever 'hard' SF novels ever. Now, while it is still quite enjoyable to read, I don't think quite as highly of it and think the sequel, The Gripping Hand is a better written book (albeit it makes no sense if you haven't read The Mote).
I've read them both several times, and still prefer Mote, but I admit it doesn't read quite as well as it did back when I was in college.
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Old 09-02-2019, 10:10 PM
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I've always felt that Larry Niven creates wonderful worlds and crafts terrific situations but never quit knows how to end his books o he kind of just stops. I've enjoyed everything of his I've read but the ending are never completely satisfying for me.

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Old 09-03-2019, 03:15 AM
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Conviction by Denise Mina. I really liked this, a lot. I've often been disappointed by an ending in a book I otherwise liked, but this one nailed it. Setup: Anna's been hiding something in her past, but secrets can't stay hidden forever--particularly when Anna's life blows up (again) and intersects with events outlined in a true-crime podcast. It's a thriller, but one with a lot of human interest, current social concerns, and humor.

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Old 09-03-2019, 06:31 AM
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I'm almost half way through Gods of Jade and Silver by Silvia Moreno-Garcia and really enjoying it.
It's a fantasy, set in Mexico in 1927 and features a young girl enlisted as an assistant by an ancient Mayan god of death she's inadvertently freed!
He immediately starts scheming to regain his power and his Kingdom of the Dead from his very slightly younger twin brother. Great period feel, both to the rural sections and in Mexico City just as the swinging 20's are affecting fashion, music, architecture, etc. Also lots of Mayan mythology, which I'm happy to believe is broadly correct...
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Old 09-03-2019, 07:33 AM
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Currently reading Final Girls by Riley Sager, a novel about a woman who survived an attack by a serial killer. It's holding my interest although it has some implausibilities and I don't care for the main character.
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Old 09-03-2019, 08:20 AM
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Finished the Clive Cussler novel Treasure (the last of the "vacation" books I picked up).


Am now reading Theodore Sturgeon's Godbody (which I picked up mainly for the Heinlein intro, which I had not read before). It's his last work, published posthumously.

After that it's Dennis Piszkiewicz's The Nazi Rocketeers.

My wife has put Trevor Noah's Born a Crime on my nightstand. Both she and my daughter have read it, and putting it there implies that I should, too.

On audio I finished Steve Berry's The Lincoln Myth, and am re-reading Jules Verne's 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea. The Tantor Media edition uses the abysmal Mercier Lewis translation from the turn of the century, probably because it's free. But it still contains things like "The Disagreeable Country of South Dakota" when it should read "The Badlands of South Dakota", and gives the density of iron as "0.7 that of water". But I suppose that using a more modern, accurate translation would've cost too much. Nevertheless, I am pleasantly surprised -- the book "read" well, even with these howlers. Clever writer, that Verne.
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Old 09-03-2019, 08:44 AM
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I read When: The Scientific Secrets of Perfect Timing by Daniel Pink. It's a quick read, but interesting. I was particularly interested in learning about how to find your midpoint of sleep and what that tells you about your mood throughout the day.

I was a little hesitant to read Nickel and Dimed: On (Not) Getting by in Middle America by Barbara Ehrenreich, because the premise made it sound like a real downer of a book. The author decides to deliberately apply for low paying, manual labor jobs, and try to make a budget where she's not spending any more money than she's taking in. And while it is a bit of a downer, it's more engaging than I was expecting, and provides me with an interesting change from my typical perspective.

The Unseen by Katherine Webb was a book firmly in my comfort zone. It's a historical romance/mystery, and I'm a sucker for those; plus, I'd already read and liked two other books the author had written, so I was pretty confident I'd like this one, too. And I did. It examines the relationships between social classes in the early 1900s between the wealthy, the poor man, the servants, and the secretly-broke-upper-class. The story is inspired by the Cottingley Fairies incident that happened around a century ago.

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Old 09-03-2019, 09:03 AM
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Just finished Robert A. Heinlein's 1947 YA book Rocket Ship Galileo. Silly but fun, about an amateur, rather slapdash voyage to the Moon c. 1955 or so (although Heinlein never mentions the year) and finding and fighting a secret lunar colony of Nazis who escaped the fall of the Third Reich. Some nice details: there's passing reference to 51 US states and, when a character is looking at the face of the Moon from space, the first region he names is the Sea of Tranquility, where Apollo 11 of course made the first landing IRL.

Next up: Ian Fleming's 1955 James Bond novel Moonraker. I didn't consciously pick two Moon-related novels in a row, but there you have it.
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Old 09-03-2019, 09:28 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Elendil's Heir View Post
Just finished Robert A. Heinlein's 1947 YA book Rocket Ship Galileo. Silly but fun, about an amateur, rather slapdash voyage to the Moon c. 1955 or so (although Heinlein never mentions the year) and finding and fighting a secret lunar colony of Nazis who escaped the fall of the Third Reich. Some nice details: there's passing reference to 51 US states and, when a character is looking at the face of the Moon from space, the first region he names is the Sea of Tranquility, where Apollo 11 of course made the first landing IRL.

Next up: Ian Fleming's 1955 James Bond novel Moonraker. I didn't consciously pick two Moon-related novels in a row, but there you have it.
I've got Rocket Ship Galileo on audio, where it's read by Spider Robinson (who has a surprisingly good reading voice and style). Before I got that I hadn't re-read the book in a long time, but hearing it I caught things I had missed when I'd first read it in print. It's a better book than I had thought it, but you can see it's the first of his juveniles -- he got better quick.

I was just reading about Moonraker recently*, and the reviewer called it one of the "weaker" Bond novels. He seemed to prefer to ones in foreign locales. But I thought the novel pretty decent (and much better than the awful movie, which was obviously an attempt to cash in on "Star Wars". The interesting thing is that Drax, who is described in the book as a "Lonsdale type of character", was played by Michel Lonsdale.)




*I've also "read" it on audio, in addition to print.
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Old 09-03-2019, 09:38 AM
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I read Velocity Weapon a couple weeks ago. It was okay, passed the time, but felt a little bit like a low-rent [b]Ancillary Justice[/url]. I definitely recommend the latter over the former.

I'm reading Blue to my daughter, on the recommendation of another teacher. It's set in Hickory, NC--just down the road from us--during World War II and a polio outbreak. Holy shit, this book is grim. About halfway through the book,
SPOILER:
the protagonist's 4-year-old brother dies, and there's a whole chapter where his floppy corpse is on the porch and described in great detail.

The other teacher wants me to do this as a class read-aloud, but I'm noping out of that one.

I also read The First Rule of Punk, which I'm totally gonna do as a class read-aloud. A girl with a Mexican-American mom, who's SUPER into raising her daughter as una senorita, also has a white dad who owns a record store and loves old-school punk music; and the girl navigates these worlds. Zine culture is a big part of the book, and the protagonist's zines appear every few chapters. It's lively and funny and punk, and I love it, one of the better kid's books Iv'e read in awhile.

For adult reading I'm reading Killing Commendatore. It's not really my normal kind of book, but it's beautifully written, and I'm working my way through it slowly.
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Old 09-03-2019, 01:59 PM
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Finished And It Was Good: Reflections on Beginnings, by Madeleine L'Engle. It's the first in a nonfiction trilogy about the book of Genesis. I thought it was excellent.

Now I'm reading Bleak House, by Charles Dickens.
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Old 09-04-2019, 08:18 AM
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I finished Final Girls by Riley Sager, and I'm sorry to say it was poo. I actually should have known that going in, because there was a blurb from Stephen King on the cover.


Next up, The Best of Richard Matheson. I've no doubt read all these stories already, but I don't mind reading them again! Plus, I will likely not finish this book, as Stephen King's newest comes out next week.
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Old 09-08-2019, 08:43 AM
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Started Unearthly Neighbors by Chad Oliver.

Still reading Dickens' Bleak House.
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Old 09-08-2019, 03:36 PM
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I've got Rocket Ship Galileo on audio, where it's read by Spider Robinson (who has a surprisingly good reading voice and style)....

I was just reading about Moonraker recently*, and the reviewer called it one of the "weaker" Bond novels. He seemed to prefer to ones in foreign locales. But I thought the novel pretty decent....
Yes, I listened to the Robinson audiobook. He did well, I thought.

Moonraker is OK but not great, I'd say. Haven't read enough Fleming books to see how it compares to the others. Do you have a favorite 007 novel, Cal?
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Old 09-08-2019, 06:34 PM
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Finished Here Be Dragons, by Sharon Kay Penman. Welsh and English intrigue in the Middle Ages. Covering the years 1183-1240, the story centers on the politically expedient marriage of King John's illegitimate daughter Joanna to Lewellyn, an up-and-coming Welsh prince, a union that John eventually sours on. All major characters are historical along with most secondary ones. The Magna Carta is signed, although the book refers to it as just the "great charter" and one or two other terms. Doesn't seem like anyone at the time expected it to prove so momentous. King John seems to have expected the Pope would void it. It taught me a lot about the Angevin Empire and England's troubles with Wales, France and, to some extent, Scotland. A little soap opera-ish but good nonetheless. This is the first of Penman's Welsh Princes trilogy, and I plan to look for the other two as well as other medieval fiction the author has written. No dragons in the book -- the title comes from the practice among medieval cartographers of writing "Here Be Dragons" in the void beyond their geographic knowledge, which would probably include Wales at the time. Plus the national emblem of Wales is a winged red dragon.

Have started The Reckoning, by John Grisham. (Note: By coincidence, the final installment of Penman's aforementioned Welsh Princes trilogy is also entitled The Reckoning, but the one I'm reading is Grisham's latest, not the Penman book.)
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Old 09-08-2019, 10:39 PM
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A History of Western Philosophy, by Bertrand Russell. Russell is my favorite philosopher -- he made few original contributions to philosophy, but is without peer as a popular explainer. I have a better understanding of Kant now than I ever could have gleaned from Kant's own impenetrable prose.
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Old 09-08-2019, 10:41 PM
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A History of Western Philosophy, by Bertrand Russell. Russell is my favorite philosopher -- he made few original contributions to philosophy, but is without peer as a popular explainer. I have a better understanding of Kant now than I ever could have gleaned from Kant's own impenetrable prose.
I had an excellent philosophy professor at my undergrad uni who was big on Kant and a good explainer himself. I know exactly what you mean.
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Old 09-08-2019, 10:47 PM
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Just finished Comrades: 1917 -- Russia in Revolution, by Bryan Moynahan. There were two revolutions that year -- the February Revolution, which overthrew the tsar and set up a provisional government led (eventually) by Alexander Kerensky; and the October Revolution, which brought the Bolsheviks to power. (Actually in March and November by the Gregorian calendar, but Russia was still using the Julian calendar.) The February Revolution was a real popular uprising, which happened mainly because the people were sick of the tsar's mismanagement of the war with Germany. The October Revolution was more of a coup d'etat, but looks kind of like a revolution if you squint -- the Bolsheviks did not represent a majority, but they did have a lot of support on the ground. (For more on that, read John Reed's Ten Days that Shook the World.) At some point, there were enough Bolshevik sympathizers to arrest the provisional government and seize control of key government buildings in Petrograd.

Why did Lenin win, against what seemed overwhelming odds? I think it was because:

1. Lenin was heartless. He mentally divided the world into friends and foes, and, unlike Kerensky, he had no compunction at all about killing his foes.

2. Lenin was certain. He was a True Believer in his unorthodox version of Marxism (allowing for proletarian revolution in an underdeveloped agrarian country); he was untroubled by doubts that he represented the real wave of history.

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Old 09-08-2019, 11:02 PM
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The excellent 1983 miniseries Reilly, Ace of Spies includes several episodes on the Russian Revolution as seen by a British operative who may or may not have been a double agent. Good stuff.
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Old 09-09-2019, 06:33 AM
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Yes, I listened to the Robinson audiobook. He did well, I thought.

Moonraker is OK but not great, I'd say. Haven't read enough Fleming books to see how it compares to the others. Do you have a favorite 007 novel, Cal?
I don't know. I've got mixed feelings about Bond, even though I've read each of the Fleming novels multiple times(and every pastiche at least once). I think his later ones are better overall. So On Her Majesty's Secret Service is good (and is one of the few cases where the movie actually follows the book, and is arguably better. It also is the only book to slyly refer to the movies -- Bond sees Ursula Andress skiing and remarks on her tan. This was written right after she co-starred in Dr. No). Also, despite its rough edges (Fleming died before he could edit the manuscript) and its absurdities, I liked The Man with the Golden Gun. (which is definitely better than the film of the same name, which adopted very little from the book.)
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Old 09-09-2019, 06:36 AM
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I finished treasure, and am now reading Dennis Piszkiewicz's The Nazi Rocketeers, which contains lots of information I hadn't previously encountered.

On audio, I just finished 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea, and started Earth by the folks at The Daily Show.
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Old 09-09-2019, 01:03 PM
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Thanks, Cal! Didn't know that.
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Old 09-10-2019, 10:41 AM
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I finished the 007 novel Moonraker which, despite its preposterous ending (including a coverup of an underwater nuclear detonation in the North Sea), I mostly liked.

Just started Thomas Harris's 1981 serial-killer novel Red Dragon, which I hadn't read in quite awhile. Still a very effective thriller.

I'm also enjoying Nicholas Meyer's 1974 Sherlock Holmes pastiche The Seven-Per-Cent Solution, in which a young Dr. Sigmund Freud helps Holmes kick his cocaine habit.
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Old 09-10-2019, 10:50 AM
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I finished the 007 novel Moonraker which, despite its preposterous ending (including a coverup of an underwater nuclear detonation in the North Sea), I mostly liked.

Just started Thomas Harris's 1981 serial-killer novel Red Dragon, which I hadn't read in quite awhile. Still a very effective thriller.

I'm also enjoying Nicholas Meyer's 1974 Sherlock Holmes pastiche The Seven-Per-Cent Solution, in which a young Dr. Sigmund Freud helps Holmes kick his cocaine habit.
I loved Seven per cent Solution, even though it's not even vaguely in Doyle's style*. The first sequel to it by Meyer, The West End Horror, is a bit of a stretch, but still pretty good. I wasn't fond of the second sequel, The Canary Trainer (in which Holmes meets The Phantom of the Opera), but that one's kind of hard to find, anyway.


*For my money the best pastiche in Doyle's own style is The Exploits of Sherlock Holmes by Adrian Conan Doyle (Arthur's son) and John Dickson Carr. Carr wrote several of the stories in the collection, and I suspect he wrote most of the ones that are credited to the two of them. Good mysteries, and a good copy of the style.
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Old 09-10-2019, 12:03 PM
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I finished Killing With Confetti, the latest in the Inspector Diamond series by Peter Lovesey. The story, about Diamond's thankless assignment to provide security for the marriage between a well-know gangster's daughter and a Deputy Chief Constable's son, is certainly different, but overall the whole thing falls short of Lovesey's usual standard. Also, points subtracted for far too much of Assistant Chief Constable Georgina, Diamond's insufferable boss.

(As an aside, one of the few things I dislike about British crime novels is the complicated police rankings. I don't think I'll ever really understand the difference between a DS, a DCI, a CS, and a DAC.)
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Old 09-10-2019, 12:28 PM
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Finished Unearthly Neighbors by Chad Oliver. A first contact SF novel, 144 pages (published in 1960), and not bad, although it would've been better as a short story.

Includes the following, which I don't believe is used ironically:

"Despite his empty belly, he would have been completely content with his pipe. He had always loved the land, any land which had not been spoiled by the stinks of civilization."

Still reading Dickens' Bleak House.

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Old 09-10-2019, 04:06 PM
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I loved Seven per cent Solution, even though it's not even vaguely in Doyle's style....
I disagree; I think Meyer comes pretty close to the mark. The best Holmes pastiches I've ever read, though (other than my own!), are by the British author June Thomson. If someone had never read Conan Doyle, I think they'd be hard-pressed to tell her stories from his.

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Old 09-11-2019, 07:11 AM
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I'm 51 pages into Stephen King's new release, The Institute, happy as a pig in ...clover.



King's invented another new word, "cheesedog" used as an adjective. Appears to mean "seedy".
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Old 09-11-2019, 08:03 AM
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Finished Red Dragon, an abridged audiobook which didn't take too long. A great, creepy serial-killer novel. I remembered from the last time I read it some scenes that were shortened or omitted entirely, so I'll be going back to the hardcover to take another look at those.

And now for something completely different: I'm listening to an audiobook of Robert Heinlein's The Star Beast (1954), a lighthearted juvenile that still has some serious things to say about sentience, slavery and empire.
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Old 09-11-2019, 11:22 AM
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I am reading Because Internet by Gretchen McCulloch. It's an interesting linguist's take on the Internet and Language.
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Old 09-11-2019, 12:01 PM
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I disagree; I think Meyer comes pretty close to the mark. The best Holmes pastiches I've ever read, though (other than my own!), are by the British author June Thomson. If someone had never read Conan Doyle, I think they'd be hard-pressed to tell her stories from his.
And I disagree with your disagreement.

we'll probably have to leave it at that.

Hadn't heard of June Thomson. I'll have to check her out. I've read a LOT of bad Holmes pastiches. Surprisingly, some of the least Doyle-like are by accomplished authors. Philip Jose Farmer, whose other stuff I like, is arguably one of the worst. Stephen King also failed to capture Doyle's style. Maybe they just can't submerge their own style sufficiently.
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Old 09-11-2019, 02:13 PM
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Start with this one, CM: https://www.amazon.com/Secret-Files-...8229142&sr=1-1. If you don't like it (but I bet you will!), no need to go on.
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Old 09-11-2019, 04:49 PM
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The Moon: A History for the Future by Oliver Morton

A comprehensive look at how humans have understood the moon, from ancient times, to Leonardo and Galileo, and Apollo and SpaceX.

Mr. Morton seems quite certain that humans will return to the moon in the near future (i.e. the 2020s) I hope he's right.

Although the writing style was a bit flowery for my taste, I found the book enjoyable and informative.
  #39  
Old 09-15-2019, 01:54 PM
Dendarii Dame is online now
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Finished Bleak House, by Charles Dickens, which was excellent.

Now I'm reading Chesapeake Legends and Lore from the War of 1812, by Ralph E. Eshelman and Scott S. Sheads.
  #40  
Old 09-16-2019, 07:07 AM
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Finished The Nazi Rocketeers. Picked up a collection over the weekend, including The Old Leather Man by Dan DeLuca, about an anonymous wandering hermit who dressed entirely on leather, a suit of his own manufacture. He was pretty famous in the circuit he walked between Conecticut and New York, but no one ever learned his name, or where he was from.


https://www.amazon.com/Old-Leather-M...s=books&sr=1-1


I picked up a copy of Girlie Collectibles: Politically Incorrect Objets d'art by Leland and Crystal Payton. Fascinating photos of once-acceptable sexist pictures, statues, and the like. It'd be better without their continuous and annoying comments on political correctness.

I found another book examining the attractiveness of the James Bond mythos, but don't recall the title or author. Looks interesting.

The one I'm reading now is a Colored Man in Exeter by Michael Cameron Ward. It's the self-published book about the author's father, who moved from Brooklyn, NY to the very white town of Lee, New Hampshire. They were the first black family in the area. I got it at an author event several months ago from the author, who autographed it for me.


On audio, to my surprise, I'm reading Elizabeth Gilbert's Eat, Pray, Love. It was cheap, so I picked it up, thinking it sounded sort of self-indulgent. It's actually much better than I thought it would be (although a more accurate title would have been Learn Italian, Pray, Love, but that wouldn't have been as good. And she DID eat a lot in Italy.) I'm 2/3 of the way through now.
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Last edited by CalMeacham; 09-16-2019 at 07:08 AM.
  #41  
Old 09-16-2019, 01:40 PM
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Finished Chesapeake Legends and Lore from the War of 1812, by Ralph E. Eshelman and Scott S. Sheads. Not bad--some interesting and/or fun tales handed down in local families, most of which weren't true.

Now I'm reading Operation Time Search by Andre Norton. I haven't read anything by her since the 1980's. I haven't read this one at all.
  #42  
Old 09-16-2019, 02:09 PM
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Originally Posted by Dendarii Dame View Post
Still reading Dickens' Bleak House.
It took me a year and a half to get through Bleak House, putting it down and picking it up a couple dozen times.

Itís the damnedest novel Dickens ever wrote, and thatís saying something. Loved it, and may reread it some day, in one shot!
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  #43  
Old 09-16-2019, 02:11 PM
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Moonraker is OK but not great, I'd say. Haven't read enough Fleming books to see how it compares to the others. Do you have a favorite 007 novel, Cal?
Best 007 by far is Dr. No. Goldfinger would be #2. And Iím sorta fond of Live and Let Die.
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  #44  
Old 09-16-2019, 02:15 PM
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I’m about halfway through Dorothy L. Sayers 1931 Lord Peter Wimsey novel Five Red Herrings.. It’s kind of a slog, what with all the railway timetables and Scots dialect.

A copy of Walter de la Mare’s complete spook stories arrived in the mail yesterday. I’m going to take a break from Sayers (and lose track of all those fucking timetables, dammit) and dig into those.
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  #45  
Old 09-17-2019, 08:29 AM
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I finished Stephen King's newest, The Institute. It was neither his best nor his worst; I enjoyed the familiar journey. However, I also noticed the familiar bloat. There were too many characters, and it seemed a lot of time was taken up with logistics and unnecessary detail when I just wanted to know what was going to happen next!
It's not a horror novel, you will not be frightened; and though there are scenes of torture and violence, it wasn't too much for my squeamish self to handle. One moment was so moving, it brought tears to my eyes. All in all, a very decent ride.
  #46  
Old 09-18-2019, 08:47 AM
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Finished Operation Time Search by Andre Norton. Not recommended.

Now I'm reading Story of a Soul, by St. Therese of Lisieux.
  #47  
Old 09-19-2019, 08:24 AM
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Best 007 by far is Dr. No. Goldfinger would be #2. And Iím sorta fond of Live and Let Die.
Thanks!

I finished Harris's Red Dragon - as good as ever.

Now listening to an audiobook of Shirley Jackson's sometimes-creepy, sometimes-tedious 1962 novel We Have Always Lived in the Castle.

Next up: Patrick O'Brian's eighth Aubrey-Maturin novel, The Ionian Mission.
  #48  
Old 09-19-2019, 09:37 AM
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Is this for fiction only? because I don't read that. Just got a fascinating book called Trigger. Its almost 900 pages and I am halfway through since Friday.
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  #49  
Old 09-19-2019, 01:59 PM
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Is this for fiction only? because I don't read that. Just got a fascinating book called Trigger. Its almost 900 pages and I am halfway through since Friday.
Nope, it's for books you are reading, have read, plan to read......
  #50  
Old 09-19-2019, 02:02 PM
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Finished Story of a Soul, by St. Therese of Lisieux. Interesting.

Now I'm reading Pauline, by Margaret Storey.
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