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Old 09-12-2002, 11:39 PM
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Movies/TV Shows/etc moments that seem really dated now...


The cell phone thread got me to thinking about a comment my mom once made about "Seinfeld"- where Jerry is kvetching about a baseball player not having the time to call him- something that wouldn't really happen in this day and age, what with cell phones.

And watching older shows like "Leave it to Beaver" where Wally dates a girl who's a drop out, who <gasp> drinks beer appear really quaint today. As does the fact that dear Wally passes up the opportunity to neck with said girl...
Plus, the fact that in one other episode of the show, June advises Wally to order for his date. Oh yes, and the bitching about paying 80 cents for a bowl of soup. All VERY quaint today. (Or in some cases, downright sexist...)

What moments like this have occurred to you?
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Old 09-13-2002, 02:52 AM
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I think the whole movie "Saturday Night Fever" is really dated (albeit a good movie). The premise would never happen today (young man obsessed with disco dancing) . I don't think it would even happen if you switched disco to another type of music. If it does, it's not commonplace.
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Old 09-13-2002, 03:46 PM
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Any of the random musical numbers that used to appear in otherwise non-musical films. Found in films ranging from Stagecoach to The Pink Panther.

Anything involving Evil Godless Commie Soviets as the villains.

Anything with a white actor in black/red/yellowface.

The gratuitous rollerskating scene in The Hunger, complete with those clunky old-fashioned pre-rollerblade skates. As my friend said, "Were we supposed to think this was cool in the '80s?"
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Old 09-13-2002, 08:37 PM
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St. Elsewhere. The character stories are still engrossing, but the difference between what was considered to be cutting edge medical drama and what we have today is just a little discordant. I caught it on Bravo one afternoon and the doctors were conferencing over one patient... all i could think was "give him and MRI and find out." Then I realized they didn't have MRIs.
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Old 09-13-2002, 09:16 PM
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Re: Movies/TV Shows/etc moments that seem really dated now...


Quote:
Originally posted by Zoggie
Plus, the fact that in one other episode of the show, June advises Wally to order for his date. (Or in some cases, downright sexist...)
How exactly, is ordering for your date sexist?

Ratnor did it in Fast Times. It's not like you are choosing what your date is going to eat. Sheeesh.
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Old 09-13-2002, 09:45 PM
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I'm surprised how poorly All in the Family has aged. I just can't watch i nymore.

A lot of 1960s stuff has aged badly, too, but the thing is -- I was aware of it at the time. The late 60's seemed so proud of itself -- breaking free of old taboos, starting a new philosophy. Things did change (they alwas do), but not in the earth-shaking way they thought. "Consciousness III" and all that. "Future shock". I'm reading som Spider Robinson stuff right now, and it is painfully stuck in the early 1970s.



It's kind of odd to go back and re-read Neil Simon's old plays. In Come Blow Your Horn it is treated as shocking when the older brother's girlfriend suggests going to bed together. (She uses it as an ultimatum, and she had to get herself drunk to suggest it). Everyone skates ervously around the issue, and no one goes to bed with anyone.


Times has changed.
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Old 09-13-2002, 10:18 PM
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Early episodes of recent hit shows; first season episodes of "Friends", "Seinfeld" and others showcasing early 90s hairstyles and clothes (a little too close to the 80s for my tastes). Early "Friends" are particularly hard to watch, not because they're dated, but because they're so damned awful.

The truly great shows never feel dated. I don't feel like I'm watching a 60s show when I watch "The Andy Griffith Show," or "The Dick Van Dyke Show". Likewise with their respective decades for Barney Miller, Cheers and the latter-half Seinfeld.
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Old 09-13-2002, 11:25 PM
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In my quest to see all the Best Picture Oscar winners, I saw Ordinary People a while back. Apparently, it was rather revolutionary back in 1980 for (guess who?) ordinary people to see a psychiatrist. I mean, sure, psychiatrists weren't novel at that time or anything, but until then it seems that the entertainment media only showed psychiatrists dealing with people with obvious mental problems. The idea of regular folks going to a psychiatrist just to talk stuff out was, evidently, kinda new and strange.
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Old 09-13-2002, 11:40 PM
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There was one movie from the 50s--I think it was GENTLEMEN'S AGREEMENT--where one character was trying to entice Gregory Peck to come to a party he was throwing. "There'll be some people there. And some girls." That line got some hoots in my 1982 film class...

Also, the scene in MARNIE where Sean Connery forces sex on his new bride Tippi Hedren doubtless was filmed with very different intentions back then than what a modern viewer might read into it. Come to think of it, an awful lot of Sean Connery scenes where he manhandles the ladies as 007 have kind of an icky edge today.

Sinatra and Lawford smacking masseuse asses in OCEAN'S ELEVEN can draw hoots today.

---------------------------------------

As for ORDINARY PEOPLE, I think the Bob Newhart show broke a lot of ground for normal people in therapy in popular entertainmnet. The revolutionary thing about ORDINARY PEOPLE was that Mary Tyler Moore's character could be such a heavy, or that the matriarch of a "nice" family could mess her kid's mind up so badly. Laura Petrie and Mary Richards were still a recent memory for most people back then; it would be like watching Jennifer Aniston strangle a puppy or something today.
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Old 09-14-2002, 05:01 AM
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Tron. There are little people in my computer, riding motorcycles, throwing frisbees and wearing neon party hats? Come to think of it, this may well explain why the boards are so slow. Get back to work, ya little fucks!
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Old 09-14-2002, 10:40 AM
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the WORST example of TV datedness


MARY HARTMAN, MARY HARTMAN one year after the series ended.

At the time, my parents & I watched every episode & usually found it to be hilarious (and we're conservative Christians btw- we LOVED Loretta Hagers/Mary Kay Place), but after MHMH ran its course we
could never watch it in repeats again as it was so dated.

THE BEVERLY HILLBILLIES on the other hand! CLASSIC COMEDY FOR ALL GENERATIONS! Hell, when real-life Enterprises are traveling the galaxies, TBH will still be funny.
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Old 09-14-2002, 11:10 AM
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Quote:
Originally posted by Krokodil
As for ORDINARY PEOPLE, I think the Bob Newhart show broke a lot of ground for normal people in therapy in popular entertainmnet. The revolutionary thing about ORDINARY PEOPLE was that Mary Tyler Moore's character could be such a heavy, or that the matriarch of a "nice" family could mess her kid's mind up so badly. Laura Petrie and Mary Richards were still a recent memory for most people back then; it would be like watching Jennifer Aniston strangle a puppy or something today.
Well, I thought about that, but the few times I saw the old Bob Newhart Show, it seemed to me that his patients were, well, wingnuts. Wingnuts who didn't need to be committed, of course, but still, compulsive liars, kleptomaniacs, whatever. People with obvious problems, like I said earlier.
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Old 09-14-2002, 11:25 AM
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Originally posted by Lamia
The gratuitous rollerskating scene in The Hunger, complete with those clunky old-fashioned pre-rollerblade skates.
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Old 09-14-2002, 11:32 AM
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Originally posted by Ankh_Too
St. Elsewhere. . . all i could think was "give him and MRI and find out." Then I realized they didn't have MRIs.
I don't know if St. Eligius Hospital had MRIs, but MRIs were first demonstrated in 1980, and St. Elsewhere was on 1982-1988.
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Old 09-14-2002, 12:32 PM
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Somewhere around the mid-90s, it became unlawful to smoke in government buildings. If you ever see a cop show where the detectives smoke in the squad room (early "Homicide:LOTS"), it looks bizarre today. Speaking of TV cops, the '50s version of "Dragnet" pre-dated the 1966 Miranda ruling. Joe Friday didn't start reading suspects their rights until the revived "Dragnet" in 1967.

You'd think that "2001: A Space Odyssey" would seem dated, since it's now set in the past. Luckily, it seems so far removed from real-life that you're not conscious of the alleged year. "2010" on the other hand seems strange because of the tension between Russian and American astronauts. Little did they know we'd be sending joint crews to a space station.
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Old 09-14-2002, 12:41 PM
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The pretty-in-pastel Crockett and Tubbs in Miami Vice.

I don't know if I want them to catch a thief or redecorate my apartment.

*two snaps*

NYPD Blue they are NOT.
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Old 09-14-2002, 12:46 PM
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The cell phone thread reminded me of another. "The Sure Thing." 1985. Anthony Edwards is lounging by the pool, calling John Cusack on the phone. "I'm talking to you cordless!" he boasts. A phone without a cord! I'm hitching a ride cross-country for that!
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Old 09-14-2002, 01:51 PM
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Well, sure, WSLer, but it shouldn't be EXPECTED that he'll order for his date. He isn't a cad if his date finds herself having to converse with the waitstaff.

As for cigarettes- "The Exorcist" is dated iin that same way. A doctor lights up, and for a moment I knew something was wrong but couldn't put my finger on what...but then I realized. And according to my dad, some of the procedures they do in that movie are things that are needlessly painful now. And there's smoking in "Eye of the Beholder"- a Twilight Zone episodes, circa the 1950's.
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Old 09-14-2002, 02:53 PM
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My vote would go to pretty much any TV show from the 60s and how they depict women as, well, pretty much men's property. All I can say is that as a married adult male, I couldn't stand living like that (well, except for the cooking and cleaning part, maybe).

An easy example can be found right in the theme song to Green Acres

Him : "You are my wife."
Her : "Goodbye city life!"
Both : "Green Acres we are there!"

There was also quite a bit more sexism in the Flintstones that one would have expected from a cartoon. I can't remember a specific example, but there were many.

Speaking of the Flintstones and datedness, there's a rather amusing video making the rounds on the Internet right now. You may be able to find it with a certain file sharing program. It's a really old, black and white animated commercial for Winston cigarettes featuring Fred and Barney.

Choice lines from the commercial :

Fred : "That's right, Barney. Winston is the one filtered cigarette that delivers flavor 20 times a pack."

Barney : "Filter blend makes the big taste difference and only Winston has it, up front where it counts. Here, ahead of the pure white filter. Winston packs rich tobaccos specially selected and specially processed for good flavor and filter smoking."

Also dated are old, racist cartoons that never get shown on TV anymore. Here, again, the Internet is the only way to see what people were really watching back then. I have a WWII-era cartoon called "Bugs Bunny Nips the Nips." Terrible, but still interesting to watch just for the jaw-dropping affect it tends to have on me.

I also got a chuckle from an old Twilight Zone episode that featured an aspiring writer trying to get noticed in Hollywood. Someone told him something along the lines of "Hollywood is only looking for good, talented writers with original ideas." That practically made me spit my coke all over my desk.
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Old 09-14-2002, 03:02 PM
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There's a lot of television references, but I'll cite a movie.

2010: The Year we Make Contact (1984). Okay, you've got the big bad Soviets... um....
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Old 09-14-2002, 03:17 PM
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I cannot think of a specific example now, but how about some of those old 50's movies where the leading man will take a woman and spank her. A while back, while flipping through the channel I saw one of those scenes and I could just hear Tom Servo and Crow cracking up over it.
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Old 09-14-2002, 06:49 PM
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I suppose what really seems dated to me is how futuristic technology was portrayed in various movies. Sci-fi from the 50's and 60's always had space ships with fins on them, while in the 70's, it was all about space ships in strange shapes. In the 80's, it seemed like everything electronic or mechaical had to be in the shape of a cube. And let's not forget those super-computers sci-fi movies were always showing, those giant silver filing cabinets with flashing red lights on them. And the HUGE display screens.

I guess what really makes movies and TV shows dated is how big everything seems- look at the cutting edge cellular phones from the late 80's- they weigh about 10 pounds. Cars were huge, hair was huge. Sometime in the early 90's people figured out the wave of the future was to make everything smaller, not bigger. Now in movies you see tiny computers, tiny spy devices. Even old James Bond gadgets seem clunky compared to today. I imagine in twenty years we'll be having this discussion again and everything will still seem to be the wrong size in old movies and TV shows, either too big or small.

Social conventions can be jaw-droppingly dated, as well. Look at the crinoline 'house dresses' in shows like Donna Reed and Leave It To Beaver. It would have been sort of shocking to see women in pants on television then, I suppose. And the seperate beds for married couples! They were all over TV and movies until maybe the late 60's. The crazy thing is, nobody in real life who was married actually had double beds. But I guess seeing even straight, married couples with children in the same bed would have offended some people and been called 'indecent'.

And the racist stereotypes! Holy shit! They were not only completely acceptable, they were believed! The madness! Things that many people would find utterly offensive today were displayed openly and without any reservation. Remember Three's Company? The whole premise of the show was John Ritter pretending to be gay so he could stay in the apartment with two women. And this was hilarious. Because being gay was so weird for mainstream America. It was so unheard of in mainstream circles that the show didn't even know how to stereotype gay people. (Which may actually have been a good thing.)

It seems like TV and movies made a complete reversal somewhere in the early 90's- sex, violence, and profanity became acceptable, but any sort of racial/religious/gender-based/sexual-orientation-based/ethnic stereotyping or mocking were completely unallowed. (Well, basically unallowed. I don't watch much TV anymore, but I'm sure there are stil offensive shows of this ilk out there somewhere.) It kind of boggles the mind. I wonder what will seem dated in five, ten, and twenty years?
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Old 09-14-2002, 07:05 PM
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TV Land had a mini Soap marathon on last night and it was pretty funny to realize that when it was originally on, some stations refused to air it because it was so shocking. A gay man! People having sex when they're not married! A woman having an affair with a priest!

Seeing it now, it's just so tame.
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Old 09-14-2002, 07:19 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by tetsusaru
Tron. There are little people in my computer, riding motorcycles, throwing frisbees and wearing neon party hats?
Along similar lines, I was just watching a Simpsons episode that had a KnightRider gag in it and I was thinking you'd never get a premise that stupid on TV today, no matter how badass the car. (Please, please tell me it'd never make it to TV today.) Yet at the time it was so wild and different and the car was so "cutting edge."
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Old 09-14-2002, 07:21 PM
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And let's not forget those super-computers sci-fi movies were always showing, those giant silver filing cabinets with flashing red lights on them.
One of the coolest examples of this is the film Silent Running. The effects are amazing, then you see the huge computers that Bruce Dern at one point reprograms using punch cards, and you laugh at the silliness of such ancient computers... until you realise that means the awesome effects you've been seeing were all done by hand!
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Old 09-14-2002, 07:29 PM
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Quote:
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Social conventions can be jaw-droppingly dated, as well. Look at the crinoline 'house dresses' in shows like Donna Reed and Leave It To Beaver. It would have been sort of shocking to see women in pants on television then, I suppose.
Not really. Lucy Ricardo wore pants often enough. And she smoked, too -- because Phillip Morris was their sponsor.

[/QUOTE]And the racist stereotypes! . . . Remember Three's Company? The whole premise of the show was John Ritter pretending to be gay so he could stay in the apartment with two women.[/QUOTE]

Gays are a race?
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Old 09-14-2002, 07:32 PM
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Along the lines of the gay thing....an episode of "Cheers" was actually really well done, and it portrays Norm pretending to be gay so that people will take him seriously as an interior decorator. Although they don't really come out and use the word "gay" until the end...something I was sort of wondering about. They're a lot more subtle about it than they would be on a TV episode around now. It wasn't offensive, just again, more subtle.
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Old 09-14-2002, 08:48 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by Walloon
TRADEMARKS ARE PROPER ADJECTIVES (AND THEREFORE CAPITALIZED) AND SHOULD BE FOLLOWED BY THE GENERIC TERMS THEY DESCRIBE.
You got a lot of Moxie to be jumping on this guy like he's a Trampoline. Did someone put Vaseline in your Cornflakes or Heroin in your Granola? Don't act like you got your Zipper caught in an Escalator. Take some Aspirin, slap on a Band-Aid and cry into a Kleenex, you Pablum puking Yo-Yo. Otherwise, I'll Mace you, beat you with a Phillips Screw driver, wrap you in Cellophane and Scotch Tape, dunk you in Kerosene, toss you into a Sytrofoam container with Dry Ice in the back on my Jeep and leave you in a Dumpster with some Sheetrock. Then we'll read about how you were turned into a Popsicle in some Tabloid.

No actual hositility is intended, I've just always wanted to do that.

Back on topic, Hawaii Five-O is a gold mine for dated material. I always enjoyed the scene where one of McGarrett's underlings was tailing a bad guy. When asked for an update he replied, in all seriousness: "He was last seen with three chicks. They were both very foxy." There was no charming pimp-like inflection to his voice. It was stated as if this was legitimate technical law-enforcement terminology that would stand the test of time.
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Old 09-15-2002, 02:55 AM
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I don't watch a lot of old TV, but I do like watching the old game shows on Game Show Network. Match Game in particular -- I don't know what's funnier, the outlandish 70's clothes or the porno theme music.

There was one question that literally made my jaw drop: "Max thinks his wife is a rug. Every night, he takes here out and _____'s her." The contestant's answer was "beat." Not only did this get a HUGE laugh from the crowd, but he matched 4 out of 6 panelists, who all made jokes about it! Man, that would NEVER fly today!!

Also on GSN, I saw an episode of the Dating Game with 3 pre-teen "bachelorettes" and a young Celebrity Bachelor, Danny Bonaduce (from the "Partridge Family" era.) Oh how cute, I thought -- until Danny started asking questions like, "If we were alone in your parents house and I wanted to make out, would you stop me?"
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Old 09-15-2002, 04:52 AM
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Quote:
Originally posted by KGS
There was one question that literally made my jaw drop: "Max thinks his wife is a rug. Every night, he takes here out and _____'s her." The contestant's answer was "beat." Not only did this get a HUGE laugh from the crowd, but he matched 4 out of 6 panelists, who all made jokes about it! Man, that would NEVER fly today!!
In the British version, the contestant would have said "shag".

Or maybe not . . .
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Old 09-15-2002, 05:08 AM
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Quote:
Originally posted by voguevixen
Along similar lines, I was just watching a Simpsons episode that had a KnightRider gag in it and I was thinking you'd never get a premise that stupid on TV today, no matter how badass the car. (Please, please tell me it'd never make it to TV today.) Yet at the time it was so wild and different and the car was so "cutting edge."
Has it already been 5 years since Team Knight Rider.



Not just TRON but almost anything with computers in it like Max Headroom. And anything where men wear little bitty shorts.
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Old 09-15-2002, 08:17 AM
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Quote:
Originally posted by Zoggie
As for cigarettes- "The Exorcist" is dated iin that same way. A doctor lights up, and for a moment I knew something was wrong but couldn't put my finger on what...but then I realized. And according to my dad, some of the procedures they do in that movie are things that are needlessly painful now. And there's smoking in "Eye of the Beholder"- a Twilight Zone episodes, circa the 1950's.
This reminds me of something that always makes me laugh in The Day the Earth Stood Still: After Klaatu is shot near the beginning, he is taken to a hospital. Two doctors who have just examined him are standing around, talking about the alien's incredible health; one of them says something like, "His life-span must be twice as long as ours,"--and they both light up cigarettes!

A couple of TV examples that make me think about how much things have changed sociologically:

There's an episode of Bewitched where a woman moves in next door to the Stevenses; she's moved to the suburbs to get away from her extremely jealous football-player boyfriend, who has threatened her if he ever sees her with another man. Darren expresses concern, but no one else seems worried, even the police, even when the football player shows up and finds Darren in her living room. It's all played for laughs, and in the end the woman goes back to her boyfriend.

On the Mary Tyler Moore show, there's an episode where Murray's 15-year-old daughter is working at the station. A college student (played by Bruce Boxleitner!) who also works there wants to date her. Murray is upset when the two go out, but this is seen as his being an overprotective worry-wart, and everyone else laughs off his concerns.
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Old 09-15-2002, 12:13 PM
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Another Telephone Moment

In the movie In and Out, "Cameron" (the Matt Dillon character) leaves his anorexic model girlfriend in a small motel in a mid-American town in Indiana. She threatens to call her agent and goes to the phone and stares at the rotary dial in perplexity, then makes ineffective button-pushing motions at the numbers in the holes and starts to cry. Cute and funny but ony to an audience that would know and appreciate that there was a time when the modern coastal cities and business establishments had push-button phones while homes and smaller-town businesses still had rotary phones, and that therefore the cosmpolitan-but-dumb city model wouldn't know how to operate a rotary phone...

Quote:
And anything where men wear little bitty shorts.
Fashion is different. In 2011, audiences will rent old DVDs from the turn of the century and laugh their heads off to see guys wearing shorts and cutoff jeans and swim trunks where the legs go nearly down to their knees. No one would be caught dead in anything so old-fashioned in 2011, except maybe Grandpa. And don't even get me started on those baggy-ass jeans!
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Old 09-15-2002, 02:40 PM
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"He was last seen with three chicks. They were both very foxy." There was no charming pimp-like inflection to his voice. It was stated as if this was legitimate technical law-enforcement terminology that would stand the test of time.
Um, three and both?
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Old 09-15-2002, 02:42 PM
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I saw Wall Street a few months ago and it looked very dated to me--Michael Douglas' clothes, and the cordless phone on the beach that was the size of a toaster oven, not to mention the gargantuan computer in his office...
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Old 09-15-2002, 03:01 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by KGS
There was one question that literally made my jaw drop: "Max thinks his wife is a rug. Every night, he takes here out and _____'s her." The contestant's answer was "beat." Not only did this get a HUGE laugh from the crowd, but he matched 4 out of 6 panelists, who all made jokes about it! Man, that would NEVER fly today!!
You reminded me of one that I've mentioned before in another thread: Card Sharks. You remember, the game where they surveyed 100 people, and you had to guess how many agreed or disagreed with the statement? Well, before they would make their guesses, the contestants were, I guess, encouraged to milk it a little and talk about why they're choosing the number they're choosing.

So, the question is, "How many people out of 100 said that they had slapped their own face?" And the contestant says, "Well, I know sometimes when you've been drinking you do that to wake yourself up before you drive home..." And no one was one bit shocked!
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Old 09-15-2002, 05:30 PM
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The other night, I caught the tail end of a movie on TCM called something like "First Yank into Tokyo." It was a very obvious propaganda film made in 1945 about, I don't know, the need to bomb the hell out of the Japanese. Even though I know we were at war with Japan and they committed atrocities in China, blah blah blah, it was still shocking how hateful and racist the movie was.

The lead character was an American spy who'd supposedly undergone extensive plastic surgery to look Japanese. Funny thing is, the first time I saw him on the screen I said, "Look, it's a guy in yellow face!" I still can't believe anyone would honestly think he'd fool anyone. Yet not only did he supposedly fool all his dumb gaijin compatriots (his girlfriend, played by Perry Mason's Barbara Hale, refused to believe it was him until he gave details of their history together that only he would know), but the Japanese General he was working under only recognized him as his old college roommate(!) because of his habit of clenching his fist when he was angry. And he tried so hard to have a "Japanese" accent, including mispronouncing all his Ls as Rs. But none of the real Japanese actors talked like that!

Speaking of the real Japanese actors, I can't believe the lines they were made to spout! Like ranting about how the Americans promulgate such backward ideas that women have value and are equal to men! And the General's description of a female American prisoner (Hale) whom he intended to have his way with, "She has the face of a gazelle, and the skin of a peach blossom." The only word of Japanese any of them spoke was "Bonsai!!!!"

Really, it was hilarious, and very easy to MST, too. But it was still shocking and cringe-inducing. It's hard to imagine Hollywood churning out obvious, stereotype filled war-mongering pieces like that today, even about Al-Qaeda and Bin Laden. Maybe if Ann Coulter ran Hollywood
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  #38  
Old 09-15-2002, 05:50 PM
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During my college days, Max, that's exactly what I had to do some times.

I used to love watching Match Game '77, which specialized in risque humor. I don't think it was only indicative of the times -- spousal abuse didn't have as high a profile in the media then -- as it was also a way of getting a rise out of the audience. It was a linear descendent of "The Newlywed Game," "The Dating Game," and a foreshadowing of "The Gong Show."

-- pesch
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  #39  
Old 09-15-2002, 07:27 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by KGS
I don't watch a lot of old TV, but I do like watching the old game shows on Game Show Network. Match Game in particular -- I don't know what's funnier, the outlandish 70's clothes or the porno theme music.

There was one question that literally made my jaw drop: "Max thinks his wife is a rug. Every night, he takes here out and _____'s her." The contestant's answer was "beat." Not only did this get a HUGE laugh from the crowd, but he matched 4 out of 6 panelists, who all made jokes about it! Man, that would NEVER fly today!!

Also on GSN, I saw an episode of the Dating Game with 3 pre-teen "bachelorettes" and a young Celebrity Bachelor, Danny Bonaduce (from the "Partridge Family" era.) Oh how cute, I thought -- until Danny started asking questions like, "If we were alone in your parents house and I wanted to make out, would you stop me?"
Pre-teen?!
I am pretty sure that was considered kind of weird even then.
  #40  
Old 09-15-2002, 07:59 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by Gr8Kat
Speaking of the real Japanese actors, I can't believe the lines they were made to spout.
That reminded me of The Pink Panther (already mentioned by someone). Not sure which film it was but Peter Seller's character Inspector Clouseau (sory, Chief Inspector) says "My little yellow friend", referring to his Japanese manservant Kato!

An example from a TV show that springs to mind is the episode The Germans from Fawlty Towers . Theres a piece of dialogue between Basil Fawlty and the Major about Indians and West Indians. Suffice to say the word "Ni---rs" was used. This would be unthinkable now.
  #41  
Old 09-15-2002, 10:05 PM
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When Michael J. Fox orders a Tab in Back To The Future I'm sure a lot of young'uns scratch their heads/
  #42  
Old 09-15-2002, 11:15 PM
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Hi Osiris, just watched all three Back to the Future flicks on DVD and was pleasantly suprised to see how well they've aged.
The Tab (and the Pepsi Free) that Marty orders needed to be drinks that were popular mid-80's but not exist in 1955 -- I guess it's odd that neither of them really survived the 80's either.

One of the things the commentary track brought out was how carefully the film makers had chosen some of the props/gags -- Pepsi was chosen over Coke as the '55 Coke logo and the '85 version were essentially the same, whereas the Pepsi logo had changed significantly in the 30 years.

Overall though, technology wasn't the focus (even though technically a sci-fi movie) and so doesn't look so badly dated as most sci-fi 15+ years on. And, IMHO at least, the DeLorean still looks great.

As to the OP, well I'm still a Star Trek fan, but boy has the original series dated. Partially its the clunky looking computers and gadgetry, but also the acting style and pacing, and the attitudes. Any scene with Kirk and a woman is likely to be especially cringeworthy.
  #43  
Old 09-15-2002, 11:43 PM
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True, true Apollyon. The only scene in the series that I would call dated was the Biff as step-dad scene in the second one which has an 80s Dice Clay vibe.

And you're bang on for Star Trek too. I see exactly 3 knobs and no sliding bits on my computer. I think we're doing better making futuristic things now though. For instance Flight of the Navigator of 1986 still looks good.

Logan's Run looks hilarious, although I still like story and it makes the movie worthwhile to watch. Clunky robots just don't cut it with me.
  #44  
Old 09-16-2002, 01:44 AM
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You know what else? All those 70s Hannah Barbara cartoons. Although it might just be they were always dated but nothing feels more lik the 70s then they do.
  #45  
Old 09-16-2002, 02:17 AM
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TV's Batman is horribly dated. C'mon, Batman, get yourself a pager or a cell phone! A Bat-laptop would be nice, too.
  #46  
Old 09-16-2002, 02:59 AM
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I was watching Henry V the other day, and everyone was running around hitting each other with swords! I mean, who uses swords anymore?
  #47  
Old 09-16-2002, 02:59 AM
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Quote:
Originally posted by ratty
I suppose what really seems dated to me is how futuristic technology was portrayed in various movies. Sci-fi from the 50's and 60's always had space ships with fins on them,
Uhh you do know that all of our space ships DO have fins on them right now? In real life even!
  #48  
Old 09-16-2002, 03:06 AM
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Why do spaceships have fins and streamlining?

Since space has no air,and therefore no resistance shouldn't a ship shaped as donald duck work just as well as a nice phallic rocket.

  #49  
Old 09-16-2002, 03:21 AM
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It's the getting to outer space, effac3d. Lots of atmosphere to plow through.
  #50  
Old 09-16-2002, 03:22 AM
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All of our ships still need to be manuverd in the atmosphere to GET into space. Any ship that is going to land on, or take off from a planet that has any atmosphere is going to need fins for manuvering unless we come up with some new technology or something.
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