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  #3201  
Old 05-19-2020, 04:57 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Urbanredneck View Post
Notre Dame University will have an interesting schedule. It will start early, have no breaks, and end by November. Hopefully when a new spike will occur.
I was just on a conference call with a colleague, who has two daughters in college. She said that both of her daughters just learned that their schools were going to be on that sort of schedule this fall. (We're in Chicago, so it's entirely possible that one of her daughters does, indeed, go to Notre Dame.)
  #3202  
Old 05-19-2020, 11:33 PM
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4,988,994 total cases
324,958 dead
1,959,149 recovered

In the US:

1,570,583 total cases
93,533 dead
361,180 recovered

Yesterday's numbers for comparison:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Snowboarder Bo View Post
4,894,098 total cases
320,180 dead
1,908,064 recovered

In the US:

1,550,294 total cases
91,981 dead
356,383 recovered
  #3203  
Old 05-19-2020, 11:46 PM
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A Chinese city, Shulan, has suddenly been placed on lockdown amid fears of a new Covid outbreak.
  #3204  
Old 05-20-2020, 01:09 AM
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Originally Posted by RickJay View Post
Your immune system isn't a muscle that you make stronger by working out every day. If it encounters a germ, you might gain immunity. If it doesn't, you won't.

If immune systems working out a lot helped you avoid infection, people with seasonal allergies would kick the shit out of COVID-19. After all, their immune systems work out harder than John Cena.
The flaw in that premise is the theory about why the "Spanish Flu" was so bad. I mean, hygiene was nowhere near modern standards a hundred years ago, so everybody should have had good immunity muscle.

It is thought that the "Spanish Flu" was so deadly because it generated a "cytokine storm", which occurs when the immune system goes ape with the antibodies. The blood/lymph systems have a finite space, much of which is used for metabolic stuff (oxygen, sugar, nutrients, booze and waste) and if you try to squeeze too many Y-shaped thingies in there, you end up with sludge that cannot move what needs to be moved to keep the working parts working.

Thus, there is a limit to how much we can fight off and how hard we can do it. It seems like it can take only a tiny nudge, sometimes, to hit that limit and go over.
  #3205  
Old 05-20-2020, 03:05 AM
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Taiwan's Central Epidemic Command Center (CECC) on Wednesday (May 20) announced zero new cases of Wuhan coronavirus (COVID-19), marking the 13th straight day without an imported case and 38 days without a new local infection.

The CECC announced that they received 224 reports of people with suspected symptoms on Tuesday (May 19). Since the outbreak began, Taiwan has carried out 69,876 COVID-19 tests, with 68,824 coming back negative.

Taiwan has now extended its streak of no new local infections to 38 days. Out of 440 total confirmed cases, 349 were imported, 55 were local, and 36 came from the Navy's "Goodwill Fleet."

Up until now, only seven patients have succumbed to the disease, while 402 have been released from hospital isolation. This leaves only 31 patients still undergoing treatment for COVID-19 in Taiwan.

Other news:
The suspension of all outbound and inbound tours imposed on Taiwanese travel agencies will be further extended until the end of June, as the COVID-19 pandemic continues to spread across the world, the Tourism Bureau said Tuesday.

The ban, which began on March 19, was originally scheduled to last until the end of April. It was then extended until May 31.

The further extension of the ban by one month is due to the still grave COVID-19 pandemic worldwide, the Tourism Bureau said.

Although Taiwan has seen no new COVID-19 cases for 12 consecutive days, the disease has infected more than 4.8 million people globally, and the death toll has surpassed 317,000.
  #3206  
Old 05-20-2020, 04:57 AM
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Why is no one talking about Iran? They seem to be experiencing the second wave.
  #3207  
Old 05-20-2020, 06:06 AM
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I found this: I imagine that most news services are too taken up with their own tragedies. It is NOT a competitive sport.

Quote:
JEDDAH/TEHRAN: Health chiefs in Iran warned on Sunday of a lethal “second wave” of coronavirus infections amid fears that lockdown restrictions have been eased too soon.

Current preventive measures cannot contain the spread of COVID-19 in Tehran, said virus task force member Ali Maher. “With businesses reopening, people have forgotten about the protocols. Maybe it was too soon.”

https://www.arabnews.com/node/1672551/middle-east
  #3208  
Old 05-20-2020, 06:13 AM
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A little funny, but demonstrates how seriously India has taken this pandemic and the nationwide lockdown.
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  #3209  
Old 05-20-2020, 08:30 AM
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Originally Posted by eschereal View Post
The flaw in that premise is the theory about why the "Spanish Flu" was so bad. I mean, hygiene was nowhere near modern standards a hundred years ago, so everybody should have had good immunity muscle.

It is thought that the "Spanish Flu" was so deadly because it generated a "cytokine storm", which occurs when the immune system goes ape with the antibodies. The blood/lymph systems have a finite space, much of which is used for metabolic stuff (oxygen, sugar, nutrients, booze and waste) and if you try to squeeze too many Y-shaped thingies in there, you end up with sludge that cannot move what needs to be moved to keep the working parts working.

Thus, there is a limit to how much we can fight off and how hard we can do it. It seems like it can take only a tiny nudge, sometimes, to hit that limit and go over.
I like the way you explain science. If you had been my high school science teacher, I might have enjoyed it. And learned something.
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  #3210  
Old 05-20-2020, 01:43 PM
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Originally Posted by eschereal View Post
..

It is thought that the "Spanish Flu" was so deadly because it generated a "cytokine storm", which occurs when the immune system goes ape with the antibodies. ....
One Interesting theory as to why so many young and healthy people died is that Aspirin was new and people were taking like a whole bottle to stop the flu. In other words- the aspirin killed them, not the flu.
  #3211  
Old 05-20-2020, 04:30 PM
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Today in Austria:
  • Vienna's Tourist Association reports that overnight stays in April were down by 98.2%.

  • The Austrian Chamber of Labour has secured for its members (i.e., all three million employees in the country) a €10 million hardship fund for emergency loans. (Many members have had their salaries placed on hold while the government processes their employers' furlough applications.)

  • On my way home from work today, while passing the imperial palace, I encountered another anti-lockdown protest, this time organized by the country's far-right Freedom Party of Austria (FPÖ). There were about 500 people in attendance; immediately next to this protest, and separated by a double line of police officers, was a slightly smaller anti-fascist protest organized by various far-left groups.

    People at the FPÖ protest were carrying signs and shouting slogans like "Stop the corona madness!", "Protect your homeland, not your nose and mouth!", and "Get rid of the masks!" Hardly any of the protesters were wearing masks anyway. (Incidentally, the FPÖ are the same folks that fought tooth and nail against the smoking ban in restaurants, which was finally implemented in 2019, and who are now campaigning to repeal it.)

    Later on the news I saw some interviews with the protesters in the crowd, who variously claimed that the lockdown measures are too extreme (even in their current, much relaxed form), that the virus is not particularly dangerous, that the pandemic is a fiction invented by the big American banks as an excuse to rob the public of their money, and that the protesters are by no means tinfoil-hat-wearing conspiracy theorists.

  • Current statistics: 16,295 confirmed infections, 633 deaths, 14,882 recovered.

Last edited by psychonaut; 05-20-2020 at 04:33 PM.
  #3212  
Old 05-20-2020, 05:27 PM
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Originally Posted by Broomstick View Post
Their largest city, Reykjavik, has a population of about 131,000 people. By the standards of many continents that's a small city. The greater "metropolitan" region around it is about 223,000 people - which by many standards is still a small city.

Reykjavik's population density is 472/km2. Compared to, say, New York City at 27,750/km2.
The fact that there are more densely populated cities than the nation of Iceland does not actually indicate that Icelands population is not densely concentrated. New York may have been harder hit than most places due to population density. That does not actually mean that Icelands population density was a factor in its favor. It is possible not to be as dense as the densest cities on the planet and still be densely populated.

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Originally Posted by psychonaut View Post
But this "concentration" is still very small, on the order of a couple hundred thousand. Still nothing I would describe as a "major city". I've visited Iceland three or four times, in both summer and winter, both as a tourist and on business. I can attest that it is more than possible to go about daily life there, including using public transport and going shopping, without encountering large numbers of people in enclosed spaces. That's something I haven't been able to do in Vienna (which isn't even in the top 20 cities by population in the EU), even now that all the tourists are gone. (We get about 15 million tourist overnight stays per year.)
I think you may be confusing population size with population density, and its effects on epidemic disease.

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Originally Posted by Broomstick View Post
Except... that their "dense" is not very dense by the standards of most nations. Or did you completely ignore the point I made about that? And being an island is somewhat an advantage IF you close the borders soon enough. The downside being getting supplies from elsewhere - I'm assuming Iceland is not independently able to feed itself without imports because that's the case with most islands these days, but I could be wrong on that.

They have a huge fishing industry but it may be seasonal. However, I believe they started out with a very high percentage of the population infected compared to other nations. The ability to close your borders does you little good when you have the largest percentage of infected. (It is very good for any neighbors you might hav. Swedens attitude to closed borders compared to its neighbors is interesting as an example).

Iceland has had epidemics before, this one is not nearly as devastating to their population as past outbreaks of things like smallpox or measles.
No? Nor is it as lethal as the bubonic plague. Not sure how that affects the issue at hand.

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Originally Posted by Broomstick View Post
I'll also point out that one reason so many people in Iceland live in/near Reykjavik is because so much of the rest of the place is either ice or volcanoes. Quite a bit of the island is not really suitable to human habitation. But that doesn't mean their densest city is very dense by global standards. As I said, both by population and density on most continents Reykjavik would be a small city, and not that densely populated even if the greater "urban" area contains 2/3 of the island's population.
I am not sure what the relevance is. Yes, most of Iceland is pretty empty. Thats why the areas where everyone lives are densely populated. Yes, its a small city by global standards. The virus does not really care, it'll do the same harm percentagewise in 1000 people as it would in 10 000 000.

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Originally Posted by DSeid View Post
To put some numbers to it.

Reykjavik's population density and that of the capital area. Bolding mine.

In context the densest city is Mumbai at 29,650 per square kilometer but they are the outlier. London 5100. NYC 2050 (surprised me not more). Las Vegas 1750. Chicago 1500. Akron 700. You got to get down to Huntsville Alabama to get to 500 and Winston/Salem to get to the 450 of the city itself.

Broomstick's point is well made. One of my sons lives in Huntsville. "Rocket City." A dense urban environment it aint. But more than Reykjavik is!
I am not sure if you realize that you are comparing the population density of a country to that of a city and saying the country has an "extremely low population density" because its population density is not tha high for a city.

If two-thirds of the US lived in an conurbation with the density of Huntsville, would you refer to it as "low density"?

The population density of Lombardy is 420 ppl/sq km. Grand Est seems to be the worst hit part of France. Its 97 ppl/sq km. At a glance, it seems Castille La Mancha was the hardest hit in Spain, their population density is 26 ppl/sq km.

Last edited by Grim Render; 05-20-2020 at 05:31 PM.
  #3213  
Old 05-20-2020, 06:07 PM
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Density - people per unit of area - very much affects how epidemic diseases behave. Yes, Iceland's Reykjavik is the densest city on the island but in absolute terms it's far from what most people think of as "very dense". The denser the population the more transmission and higher infection rates. This involves absolute numbers and not relative density.

I'm not sure why you don't understand that.

It is also true that it's not the only factor at work - low density populations can be heavily impacted, and high density populations that can stop transmission can be less affected (islands that can impose effective quarantine quickly, or not, being examples of both).
  #3214  
Old 05-20-2020, 06:30 PM
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Originally Posted by Broomstick View Post
Density - people per unit of area - very much affects how epidemic diseases behave. Yes, Iceland's Reykjavik is the densest city on the island but in absolute terms it's far from what most people think of as "very dense". The denser the population the more transmission and higher infection rates. This involves absolute numbers and not relative density.

I'm not sure why you don't understand that.

It is also true that it's not the only factor at work - low density populations can be heavily impacted, and high density populations that can stop transmission can be less affected (islands that can impose effective quarantine quickly, or not, being examples of both).
I am trying to say that density very much affects how epidemic diseases behave. I am glad you got that bit. Absolute number of the population less so. I am also glad you seem to have understood that population density enables disease transmission and can increase infection rates.

I am less impressed with the "I'm not sure why you don't understand that." as I have been trying to explain this to you for several posts.

I am also trying to say that Iceland is not at all "extremely low population density" in any way that affects how epidemic diseases behaves or impact the population. They are absolutely the opposite. There is a reason why Iceland is listed among the most urbanized nations on earth. There is also a reason why they rank among nations that are basically cities only on such lists. It is the same reason why you use cities as examples when trying to illustrate the density of most of the population.

That reason is that the population of the nation Iceland mostly live in a density that is equivalent to cities not nations. And this is not an advantage when it comes to epidemic disease.
  #3215  
Old 05-20-2020, 06:58 PM
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Why is no one talking about Iran? They seem to be experiencing the second wave.
Yeah. That doesn't look good. Lots of data here and many ways to map/graph it. From Country, down to US County. http://ncov.bii.virginia.edu/dashboard/

You'll need to play with a bit to see just how much info is there.
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  #3216  
Old 05-20-2020, 08:06 PM
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Don't know if this has been posted before (and it's not exactly new news,) but far from costing lives, the coronavirus may have in fact actually result in a net gain of over 70,000 lives saved in China.
  #3217  
Old 05-20-2020, 08:21 PM
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There's an interesting project discussed here where a researcher did some work to estimate the "lived density" of various countries in Europe - ie, how dense an environment do the actual people who live in that country, live in.

He puts the lived density of Iceland at around about France, and a fair bit less than Italy.

It's an interesting list, because 'lived density' does seem to match up slightly better to bad corona outbreaks than traditional country-level density - mostly because of Spain and Andorra, who are quite high up on that list, but low on country-level density
  #3218  
Old 05-20-2020, 08:29 PM
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The coronavirus may have in fact actually result in a net gain of over 70,000 lives saved in China?
Hmm, why am I thinking this is a far more accurate interpretation of that headline,
Study: Lockdown Likely Saved 77,000 Lives In China Just By Reducing Pollution
than this
Study: Coronavirus Likely Saved 77,000 Lives In China Just By Reducing Pollution
is?

CMC fnord!
  #3219  
Old 05-20-2020, 08:31 PM
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I am trying to say that density very much affects how epidemic diseases behave.
Yes, we know that.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Grim Render View Post
I am also trying to say that Iceland is not at all "extremely low population density" in any way that affects how epidemic diseases behaves or impact the population. They are absolutely the opposite. There is a reason why Iceland is listed among the most urbanized nations on earth.
They may be highly urbanized in one sense but their largest city barely rates as a large town in many other places and the density of that one city is nowhere near the density of many genuinely large cities.

So yes, disease is going to spread better in Reykjavik than anywhere else in Iceland, but because it's absolute density is orders of magnitude smaller not as badly as someplace like New York City or London or Mexico City or Mumbai or a bunch of other places that in every way are MORE populous and MORE dense than Reyjavik.

I live in a genuine small town in fracking Indiana and our population density is nearly four times that of Reykjavik! Sure, in absolute terms we have fewer people but we pack 'em in four times tighter. Chicago packs in twenty five times as many people by unit of area than Reykjavik does. Then densest city in the world, Dhaka, Bangladesh, has one hundred times as many people per unit of area than Reykjavik.

That is what you don't seem to grasp - what is, in Iceland, "densely populated" is not that by the standards of other people.
  #3220  
Old 05-20-2020, 10:21 PM
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... I am not sure if you realize that you are comparing the population density of a country to that of a city and saying the country has an "extremely low population density" because its population density is not tha high for a city.

If two-thirds of the US lived in an conurbation with the density of Huntsville, would you refer to it as "low density"?

The population density of Lombardy is 420 ppl/sq km. Grand Est seems to be the worst hit part of France. Its 97 ppl/sq km. At a glance, it seems Castille La Mancha was the hardest hit in Spain, their population density is 26 ppl/sq km.
Sorry for your confusion but ... no. Iceland as a country has very low population density. But most live in the Capital Region and some in Reykjavik itself!!! And that metropolitan region is less dense than most tiny town. NO ONE in Iceland lives in an actual dense urban environment. If "city" is defined by population density then no one there lives in a city. Most live in one region with the density of a sparsely populated country town. Reykjavik's population density, that's THE CITY is about 40% less than the typical American suburb, and the Capital Region about 70% less dense. What is a "city region" in Iceland is an exurb in the United States. This is low population density experience that very much affects how epidemic diseases behaves or impact the population.

Yes, if two-thirds of the US lived in an conurbation with the density of Huntsville, I would refer to it as extremely "low density". Instead about a quarter live in cities of urban density like Chicago, about half in suburbs (with much more density than Reykjavik) and even the 20% who live in rural America are often clustered together closer than those in the Capital Region are.
  #3221  
Old 05-20-2020, 11:07 PM
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5,089,615 total cases
329,724 dead
2,023,472 recovered

In the US:

1,592,723 total cases
94,936 dead
370,076 recovered

Yesterday's numbers for comparison:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Snowboarder Bo View Post
4,988,994 total cases
324,958 dead
1,959,149 recovered

In the US:

1,570,583 total cases
93,533 dead
361,180 recovered
  #3222  
Old 05-21-2020, 08:53 AM
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Taiwan had its first new case in two weeks, but it was somebody who had become infected overseas and had returned. The person was showing symptoms prior to coming home so they were immediately quarantined in the quarantine center upon their return. It’s still been a month and a half or so since the last domestic transmission.
  #3223  
Old 05-21-2020, 01:17 PM
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Coronavirus-triggered layoffs in US hit nearly 39 million
Quote:
The number of Americans applying for unemployment benefits in the two months since the coronavirus took hold in the U.S. has swelled to nearly 39 million, the government reported Thursday, even as states from coast to coast gradually reopen their economies and let people go back to work.

More than 2.4 million people filed for jobless aid last week in the latest wave of layoffs from the outbreak that has triggered nationwide business shutdowns and brought the economy to its knees, the Labor Department said.

That brings the running total to a staggering 38.6 million, a job-market collapse unprecedented in its speed.

The number of weekly applications has slowed for seven straight weeks. Yet the figures remain breathtakingly high — 10 times higher than normal before the crisis struck.

And the continuing rise shows that even though all states have begun reopening over the past three weeks, the job market has yet to snap back, and the outbreak is still doing damage to businesses and destroying livelihoods.
  #3224  
Old 05-21-2020, 04:26 PM
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Today in Austria:
  • Tomorrow Hungary will be opening its border with Austria, albeit only for those travellers who are in possession of negative coronavirus test results no older than four days.

  • Vienna's famous amusement park at Prater will re-open on 29 May.

  • Current statistics: 16,335 confirmed infections, 633 deaths, 14,951 recovered.
  #3225  
Old 05-21-2020, 04:36 PM
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Australia's tally of new cases yesterday was 2.
  #3226  
Old 05-21-2020, 11:55 PM
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5,197,739 total cases
334,672 dead
2,082,639 recovered

In the US:

1,620,902 total cases
96,354 dead
382,169 recovered

Yesterday's numbers for comparison:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Snowboarder Bo View Post
5,089,615 total cases
329,724 dead
2,023,472 recovered

In the US:

1,592,723 total cases
94,936 dead
370,076 recovered
The US will hit 100,000 deaths due to Covid-19 no later than Sunday 24 May 2020.
  #3227  
Old 05-22-2020, 12:42 AM
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Originally Posted by Snowboarder Bo View Post
The US will hit 100,000 deaths due to Covid-19 no later than Sunday 24 May 2020.

Just in time for Memorial Day.
  #3228  
Old 05-22-2020, 04:58 AM
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Looking at the current trend for US from 1st May up to 22nd May so far has resulted in 31k deaths, that figure will very likely be around 40k by month's end.

It's only when you consider the new infections that you see things are looking to b difficult for some time to come.

Most of those deaths will be from infections from 3 weeks or more in the past, yet the rate of infections had only declined slightly.

We have folk thinking that the curve has flattened, but all that means is that the rate has stabilised and infections are now continuing at a steadier rate.

That surely has to mean that deaths will follow a similar trend - perhaps it will fall a little as care and medical interventions improve but it seems to say to me that US can expect deaths in the range of 500 to 1000 per day for more than three weeks.

All this is with one caveat, and its a big one, the effects of states reducing the stringency of their control measures. I do not hold out much hope due to the oncoming Presidential election - if anything I think there will be much more pressure to unlock further and to either massage figures as has been alleged in some states or to simply spin the deaths away somehow.

At the moment I'd now be expecting deaths to get near to 140k with current rate of growth given the current level of infections in the Covid pipeline, but if the rate of infection continues with the very slow decline that number could be higher - and that's not considering a further wave of infections.

Last edited by casdave; 05-22-2020 at 04:59 AM.
  #3229  
Old 05-22-2020, 06:44 AM
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International Flight Restrictions Expected to Continue Until October:

Quote:
Heavy restrictions on international air travel into China will continue until at least October, the Civil Aviation Administration of China (CAAC) announced Tuesday. The news comes as a blow to many foreigners who are eagerly awaiting the end of China’s visa ban, as it indicates that a return to China could be difficult even if the ban is lifted.

The flight restrictions in question are known as the "Five Ones" – in place since Mar 29 – meaning that each (one) country can only send one flight from one airline via one route once per week.
More at the link.

"The Five Ones" = 1 airline can fly to 1 country, 1 time, 1 route, each 1 week.

This appears to be happening because other countries cannot get their act together and stop spreading the virus. My summer vacation is supposed to start July 19 and I really would like to be able to fly out of China and, of course, return at the end of the school break. And I would like even more for the wife to be able to come back. Get it together, people, and stop doing stupid stuff!

Yeah, like that plea will work.
  #3230  
Old 05-22-2020, 06:58 AM
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On a different, but still COVID-19-related issue, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is reopening a number of its chapels and temples per the phased plan announced back on 19 May 2020 (PDF).

If you check the first link, you'll see a number of procedures for the meetings. I'm finding it interesting in a kind of morbid (I guess) way. Our branch presidency here in Beijing was contacted by the police station for the area where we meet to begin the process for us to return to the chapel. As it turns out, there are two foreigner branches sharing the chapel in the morning and one Chinese branch using the chapel in the afternoon. I'm wondering what changes to the meeting schedule will occur to comply with both the government regulations and the Church's directions. I'll report here as it pans out.

Oh, I forgot to mention that right now is The Two Sessions. Oh, joy! Usually that's in March, but good ol' COVID-19 caused a couple of delays and it's happening now.
  #3231  
Old 05-22-2020, 09:05 AM
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We have folk thinking that the curve has flattened, but all that means is that the rate has stabilised and infections are now continuing at a steadier rate.

That surely has to mean that deaths will follow a similar trend - perhaps it will fall a little as care and medical interventions improve but it seems to say to me that US can expect deaths in the range of 500 to 1000 per day for more than three weeks.
Realistically, I think this is best possible outcome we can expect in America. It's clear that many Americans aren't willing to make great sacrifices for the pandemic. They're not even willing to make moderate sacrifices, such as wearing masks and not going to crowded bars. If we can get to a state where the infections are at a constant level and the medical systems aren't overwhelmed, that's likely the best possible scenario that could be achieved. Trying to lower the rate significantly by enforcing more restrictions will likely have major push back and lead to more civil unrest.
  #3232  
Old 05-22-2020, 03:09 PM
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Do the different names for this virus have any particular differences of meaning? Do COVID-19, Novel Coronavirus, and SARS-COV-2 mean different things?
  #3233  
Old 05-22-2020, 03:18 PM
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Do the different names for this virus have any particular differences of meaning? Do COVID-19, Novel Coronavirus, and SARS-COV-2 mean different things?
COVID-19 - short for "coronavirus disease 2019", the actual disease caused by...

SARS-CoV-2 - short for "severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2" aka the causative virus

novel coronavirus - just another shorthand denoting that SARS-CoV-2 is a recently discovered virus in the coronavirus family of viruses

Last edited by Tamerlane; 05-22-2020 at 03:21 PM.
  #3234  
Old 05-22-2020, 03:52 PM
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A COVID-19 murder?

https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/...-being-spat-at

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A [London] cab driver died with Covid-19 after being spat at by a fare dodger who claimed to have the disease...
  #3235  
Old 05-22-2020, 03:54 PM
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Today in Austria:
  • A survey on attitudes towards vaccination revealed that 62% of Austrians would like to be vaccinated against coronavirus if/when such a vaccine becomes available. (This number is actually much higher than that reported in previous surveys on the desire to be vaccinated against influenza.) The same survey showed that 25% would not want to take a coronavirus vaccine.

  • It's been one week since restaurants were permitted to reopen, and already many of them are closing again due to a lack of customers. Particularly hard-hit are restaurants in downtown Vienna, which depend much more on tourists than locals.

  • A group of 30 people blocked an Austria–Slovakia border crossing to protest Slovakia's quarantine rules for incoming travellers. The protesters succeeded in backing up traffic for a kilometre, preventing thousands of travellers from crossing the border.

  • Current statistics: 16,388 confirmed infections, 635 deaths, 15,005 recovered. Vienna has gone 12 days without any coronavirus deaths.
  #3236  
Old 05-22-2020, 03:55 PM
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novel coronavirus - just another shorthand denoting that SARS-CoV-2 is a recently discovered virus in the coronavirus family of viruses
To expand on this, "novel" is a term of art in scientific research writing that means something a little more specific than just temporally "new", it means something more like "not previously described in the literature".
  #3237  
Old 05-22-2020, 03:55 PM
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A whole lot of people are comparing Reykjavik to BFE, which is laughable. Sure, it's not Manhattan, but it's a whole lot more dense than some shithole town in the middle of nowhere. Hell, a lot of cities don't have 20 story apartment buildings, but Reykjavik does. The more spread out residential areas are filled with touching 2-4 story buildings, which is still a far cry from Green Acres, Arkansas or Shittsville, Alabama.
  #3238  
Old 05-22-2020, 04:21 PM
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[*] It's been one week since restaurants were permitted to reopen, and already many of them are closing again due to a lack of customers.
This is going to be the big problem: the world has changed. The world has changed and the vast majority of people see that it simply is not safe to leave their houses and sit down amongst dozens of other people for the purpose of putting things in their mouths.

And lots of other activities, too, and so businesses are going to fail.

Last edited by Snowboarder Bo; 05-22-2020 at 04:22 PM. Reason: T not t
  #3239  
Old 05-22-2020, 05:29 PM
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This is going to be the big problem: the world has changed. The world has changed and the vast majority of people see that it simply is not safe to leave their houses and sit down amongst dozens of other people for the purpose of putting things in their mouths.



And lots of other activities, too, and so businesses are going to fail.
I don't really think this is the case, at least not everywhere. Here in the Netherlands people seem to be waiting impatiently for restaurants to open up again. Since this will be at a much lower capacity at first, I don't expect them to struggle that much.

This is of course different for areas that rely on tourists from abroad. These just aren't going to be around (although I'm seeing quite some German cars around, the last few days.

Verstuurd vanaf mijn moto g(6) met Tapatalk
  #3240  
Old 05-22-2020, 09:23 PM
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Today in Austria:
[list][*] A survey on attitudes towards vaccination revealed that 62% of Austrians would like to be vaccinated against coronavirus if/when such a vaccine becomes available. (This number is actually much higher than that reported in previous surveys on the desire to be vaccinated against influenza.) The same survey showed that 25% would not want to take a coronavirus vaccine.

Was there a follow-up question asking those who are against such vaccination why they are against it?
  #3241  
Old 05-22-2020, 09:55 PM
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Patrick Ewing is in the hospital after testing positive.
https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news...virus-n1213496
  #3242  
Old 05-22-2020, 11:35 PM
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5,306,158 total cases
340,040 dead
2,160,039 recovered

In the US:

1,645,094 total cases
97,647 dead
403,201 recovered

Yesterday's numbers for comparison:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Snowboarder Bo View Post
5,197,739 total cases
334,672 dead
2,082,639 recovered

In the US:

1,620,902 total cases
96,354 dead
382,169 recovered
  #3243  
Old 05-23-2020, 11:13 AM
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In the developing world, the coronavirus is killing far more young people

Quote:
As the coronavirus escalates its assault on the developing world, the victim profile is beginning to change. The young are dying of covid-19 at rates unseen in wealthier countries — a development that further illustrates the unpredictable nature of the disease as it pushes into new cultural and geographic landscapes.

[ . . . ]
Bolsonaro, a global leader in minimizing the disease, repeats a mantra: Only the elderly are at risk. So the best policy is to isolate only them. He has called it “vertical isolation.”
[ . . . ]
Pedro Archer, a physician at a public hospital in Rio, said his young patients have been stunned by their illness. Some had parroted Bolsonaro, who has repeatedly belittled the illness as a “gripezinha” — a little cold. Until they got sick.

“I have people say to me, ‘I really had thought this was only a gripezinha, and now I see this is serious,’ ” Archer said. “I’ve seen people dying who have said the same thing.”
Article attributes this, at least in part, to poor health care available to many younger people in the countries in question. But I wonder whether those in the USA who are claiming we only need to shut up old people and those obviously ill, and everyone else can carry on as 2019-normal, aren't setting us up for similar problems.
  #3244  
Old 05-23-2020, 01:01 PM
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In the developing world, the coronavirus is killing far more young people

Article attributes this, at least in part, to poor health care available to many younger people in the countries in question. But I wonder whether those in the USA who are claiming we only need to shut up old people and those obviously ill, and everyone else can carry on as 2019-normal, aren't setting us up for similar problems.
I'd read somewhere that many developing countries skew much younger than developed ones, especially in comparison to places like Italy or Japan. This could skew infection incidence younger as well, since there's fewer old folk to be victims in those places.
  #3245  
Old 05-23-2020, 01:56 PM
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...
Article attributes this, at least in part, to poor health care available to many younger people in the countries in question...
Poor underlying health, maybe. But poor healthcare? Most of the younger people in the first world who aren't dying of it aren't getting much healthcare, either. They are staying home, resting, and drinking chicken soup, as they would for a cold or an ordinary flu. I'm pretty sure that "bed rest" is available medical care even to most of the world's poor.

Quote:
Originally Posted by squeegee View Post
I'd read somewhere that many developing countries skew much younger than developed ones, especially in comparison to places like Italy or Japan. This could skew infection incidence younger as well, since there's fewer old folk to be victims in those places.
And of course, we have younger people dying, too.
  #3246  
Old 05-23-2020, 03:16 PM
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https://www.businessinsider.com/near...FzGCX2skrdH9W4

Roughly half the Twitter accounts pushing to 'reopen America' are bots, researchers found
  #3247  
Old 05-23-2020, 03:31 PM
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https://www.businessinsider.com/near...FzGCX2skrdH9W4

Roughly half the Twitter accounts pushing to 'reopen America' are bots, researchers found
Well, of course. Bots are immune to coronavirus.
  #3248  
Old 05-23-2020, 03:43 PM
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Hertz is being killed off by Covid-19, just the latest corporate person felled by this deadly disease.
  #3249  
Old 05-23-2020, 03:46 PM
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From https://www.worldometers.info/coronavirus/ - Brazil is now #2 in cases, and is still in the exponential growth phase. Russia is number 3 and only recently hit peak numbers of cases while deaths have yet to subside.

Last edited by glowacks; 05-23-2020 at 03:46 PM.
  #3250  
Old 05-23-2020, 03:54 PM
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Hertz is being killed off by Covid-19, just the latest corporate person felled by this deadly disease.
Hertz was already on death's door.
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