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  #51  
Old 11-17-2017, 10:50 AM
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Originally Posted by DummyGladHands View Post
I would love meatloaf sandwiches if I could figure out how to make a meatloaf that holds together when sliced up for same.

I want my homemade chicken soup with kluski noodles or homemade veggie soup and the more cabbage the better.
If it's not holding together, then it's an ingredient problem. Usually, the culprit is too many binders, including milk. You only need two, usually just bread crumbs and egg. If you use bread and milk, it's very easy to add too much, which will make it mushy, as the bread can't absorb all the liquid and the rendered fat. If you add all three, the same thing will happen. If it's falling apart, then you aren't using enough bread, or the ratio of bread to second binder is off, or the meat is way too lean.
  #52  
Old 11-17-2017, 10:56 AM
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Neither of us likes lamb in the least, so we swap it for ground pork. Your sandwich is right on, except I use sweet relish instead of the pickles. I find it spreads out the pickly goodness into every bite.
Speaking of pickle relish, if you like some zing with the sweet, try Famous Dave's Spicy relish. It's wonderful on a red hot (spicy hot dog) too.
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  #53  
Old 11-17-2017, 11:55 AM
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When I lived in Olympia, Washington, there was a bakery (San Francisco Street Bakery) that I could walk to from my house, a five minute walk through cold drizzle. I'd order a bowl of their mushroom barley soup, drink a mug of coffee, and read my books for class.

That's one of my most comforting memories from those years.
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Old 11-17-2017, 11:58 AM
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This summer I discovered that most fruit can be canned in a water bath, and I was off to the races.

After canning 30 half-pints of blackberry jam and a dozen half-pints of orange marmalade, I canned 24 pints of applesauce (we have an apple tree) and a dozen pints of various varieties of plums.

Now that it's cold and rainy in the PNW, I'm having some of that home-canned fruit on my oatmeal every morning, and it's divine. Homey and comforting and delicious, and reminds me that we do get sunshine here. Sometimes.
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Old 11-17-2017, 12:43 PM
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This summer I discovered that most fruit can be canned in a water bath, and I was off to the races.

After canning 30 half-pints of blackberry jam and a dozen half-pints of orange marmalade, I canned 24 pints of applesauce (we have an apple tree) and a dozen pints of various varieties of plums.

Now that it's cold and rainy in the PNW, I'm having some of that home-canned fruit on my oatmeal every morning, and it's divine. Homey and comforting and delicious, and reminds me that we do get sunshine here. Sometimes.
We do quite a bit of canning. this morning we had canned peaches and a croissant smeared with blueberry/apricot/lemon jam. I keep telling my wife that she could win state fair awards for her jams.
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Old 11-17-2017, 12:49 PM
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Arroz Caldo, with about double the ginger called for in the recipe, and extra fried garlic. Bonus is that it is easy and I usually have all the ingredients on hand. Hardest part is chopping the garlic, as the garlic press doesn't work for this.
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Old 11-17-2017, 02:16 PM
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Love me some beef stew, especially after finding this recipe.
I just read this article and I am wholly convinced. Damn.
  #58  
Old 11-17-2017, 02:35 PM
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I just read this article and I am wholly convinced. Damn.
I've used this recipe before, and you should be convinced. Searing the meat as steaks? BRILLIANT! Blending the umami bombs with the stock? Easy (though a case could be made for browning the tomato paste). Two groups of vegetables? Why didn't I think of that before?!
  #59  
Old 11-17-2017, 05:33 PM
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I just read this article and I am wholly convinced. Damn.
It's nearly orgasmic. I used fish sauce instead of anchovies, because that's what I had in the house, and it worked just fine. I never would have thought of using gelatin, but it really fortifies things.
  #60  
Old 11-17-2017, 06:14 PM
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It's nearly orgasmic. I used fish sauce instead of anchovies, because that's what I had in the house, and it worked just fine. I never would have thought of using gelatin, but it really fortifies things.
One tweak I would add to the recipe: on America's Test Kitchen, frequently they will use a combination of beef AND chicken stock (e.g., a can of each , if using canned). It gives more depth of flavor overall. I use the "Better Than Bouillon" product and add a spoonful of beef and a spoonful of chicken to most soups. That combo in my split pea soup is divine.
  #61  
Old 11-17-2017, 06:32 PM
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One tweak I would add to the recipe: on America's Test Kitchen, frequently they will use a combination of beef AND chicken stock (e.g., a can of each , if using canned). It gives more depth of flavor overall. I use the "Better Than Bouillon" product and add a spoonful of beef and a spoonful of chicken to most soups. That combo in my split pea soup is divine.
Part of the reason that works is that "Better Than Bouillon" is a big umami bomb in and of itself with its MSG in the form of hydrolyzed soy protein. (And, I have no problem with that -- I use stock cubes or straight-up MSG in my cooking relatively frequently).
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Old 11-17-2017, 08:49 PM
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Shoulder of lamb. In a big tin with loads of rosemary, garlic, salt and pepper, cover with foil and into a super-hot oven to get it going, then turn it straight down to about 130C for about four hours.

Coarsely mashed mix of potato/carrot/swede (what you guys call rutabaga, I think?) and some sort of dark cabbage.

Gravy made from the copious juices in which the lamb will now be swimming, boiled down with chopped capers and a dollop of jelly made from the sloes leftover from making sloe gin.

Mint sauce.

Big ol' glass of Rioja. And another...
  #63  
Old 11-17-2017, 08:55 PM
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...or, as my name suggests, Yorkshire Pudding. For the uninitiated, it's basically a sort of huge pancake, oven roasted in dripping, served with gravy. Often made quite small and served as a side with roast beef, but here in Yorkshire they're the size of a dinner plate.
  #64  
Old 11-17-2017, 09:07 PM
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Today (and yesterday), it was Hungarian goulash (soup). I can never get tired of the stuff. I also have some chicken thighs in the fridge that I was just about ready to make into paprikash today, but had enough leftovers of the soup that I thought I should get through that first. But what I really wanted to do with the paprikash is make it into HortobŠgyi palacsinta, which are crepes rolled with the meat part of the paprikash within, and served with the paprikash sauce poured over it. Looking something like this. But that's a little bit of a PITA to make.
And that is actually what I ended up making today. And it was glorious. Meat stuffed crepes with paprika-sour cream sauce. What's not to like?
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Old 11-17-2017, 11:47 PM
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...or, as my name suggests, Yorkshire Pudding. For the uninitiated, it's basically a sort of huge pancake, oven roasted in dripping, served with gravy. Often made quite small and served as a side with roast beef, but here in Yorkshire they're the size of a dinner plate.
I love it, and its cousin done up with sausages--toad in the hole? I have to use bratwurst given where I live, but it's still glorious, especially with a bit of mustard on the side.

My favorite chilly dishes are potato leek soup (and I use ALL the leek, no French nonsense about only using the whites) and ham and bean soup. I also like to make pot roast with lots of onions and stewed tomatoes, and serve it mushed up and thickened over mashed potatoes. Also sausage and peppers with a side of "midwestern Alfredo": egg noodles tossed with a sauce of butter, cottage cheese (Michigan or Daisy brand or something without gums)and lots of black pepper.

And of course, pork chops and applesauce.
  #66  
Old 11-18-2017, 01:23 AM
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To me a "comfort food" has to be simple, and it has to have great basic taste with considerations of healthy eating put aside for the moment. Very appropriate topic with winter coming, and in the shorter term, heavy rain predicted for tomorrow.

One of my current fave comfort foods is shepherd's pie, which has the added virtue that this particular one can be bought read-made at a store up the street. Most commercial shepherd's pies are crap, but this store-made one creates the culinary ambiance of Sunday evening at grandma's house. Lots of beefy goodness with some peas and sweet corn and covered in a thick layer of piped mashed potatoes that gets browned in the oven. It works either with gravy or -- in the true rustic spirit of comfort food -- with ketchup.

Roast prime rib with Yorkshire pudding and mashed potatoes whipped with cream (not milk) is another one although it fails the "simple" requirement. I mention it because we had it last night and it was totally yummy (that's a technical term used by Michelin-starred chefs ) and now I'm going to try my hand at homemade shepherd's pie with the leftovers. I was long under the impression -- probably wrongly -- that shepherd's pie was a traditional way of using up roast beef leftovers. I think this is wrong because traditional shepherd's pie is a lamb dish anyway, and the beef version I believe is largely an Americanization.

Baked sausage rolls is another rainy-day comfort -- the traditional piggies in a blanket. They need apple sauce for dipping but not any apple sauce: they need Stonewall Kitchen Roasted Apple Grille Sauce.

Another store-bought one that works for me is a particular local version of chipotle chili, with garlic bread for sopping up the last of it. This can be either fresh rolls or baguette slices toasted and buttered with garlic butter, or a recent new twist: having a little mini casserole of baked shrimp in garlic butter first, then having the chili with bread dipped in the leftover and still-warm garlic butter.
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Old 11-18-2017, 09:11 AM
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I'll likely be making fried lumpia soon, which can be a PITA for those who are not experienced in peeling and rolling the tissue-thin wrappers. But I've probably made 10,000 of these lovely Filipino versions of an egg roll, so it goes pretty quickly. I like to make them with pork and bay shrimp. If any of you decide to attempt these, regular egg roll wrappers are a very poor substitute.
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Old 11-18-2017, 09:36 AM
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My comfort food go to is perogies. The frozen ones will never be as good as the homemade ones my Ukrainian Baba used to make, but she's gone now, so they have to do. Boil them, pan fry some bacon, then lightly brown the boiled darlings in some of the bacon fat. I used to serve them at this point, but for an extra yummy, gooey, comforting dish, put them in a casserole dish with the bacon bits, cover with grated cheddar cheese and bake for 10-15 minutes until the cheese is all melty. You can also add sauteed onions, though I prefer them without. Serve with sour cream and chopped green onions. So good.
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Old 11-18-2017, 01:08 PM
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My comfort food go to is perogies. The frozen ones will never be as good as the homemade ones my Ukrainian Baba used to make, but she's gone now, so they have to do. Boil them, pan fry some bacon, then lightly brown the boiled darlings in some of the bacon fat. I used to serve them at this point, but for an extra yummy, gooey, comforting dish, put them in a casserole dish with the bacon bits, cover with grated cheddar cheese and bake for 10-15 minutes until the cheese is all melty. You can also add sauteed onions, though I prefer them without. Serve with sour cream and chopped green onions. So good.
Iíve done pierogies like that, too, so good! I agree the frozen ones will never match homemade. Iíd love to know a place where I could buy them fresh.
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Old 11-18-2017, 05:17 PM
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Iíve done pierogies like that, too, so good! I agree the frozen ones will never match homemade. Iíd love to know a place where I could buy them fresh.
The frozen ones are better than never having ANY!

I don't boil them. I fill a quart measuring cup with very hot tap water and drop in the desired number of frozen pierogies. Let them hang out in there 7-10-ish minutes while you heat up the butter, maybe fry some onions. Then drop them in the butter. They will spatter because of the water, so cover for a couple of minutes. Then fry until GBD (Golden Brown & Delicious --Alton Brown).
  #71  
Old 11-18-2017, 06:52 PM
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Iíve done pierogies like that, too, so good! I agree the frozen ones will never match homemade. Iíd love to know a place where I could buy them fresh.
Some of the frozen brands gets quite close. So close, that my mom doesn't even bother making them homemade. Here in Chicago we have Alexandra's as the family favorite. Kasia's is pretty decent, too. We are not fans of Mrs. T's, though.
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Old 11-18-2017, 06:55 PM
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The frozen ones are better than never having ANY!

I don't boil them. I fill a quart measuring cup with very hot tap water and drop in the desired number of frozen pierogies. Let them hang out in there 7-10-ish minutes while you heat up the butter, maybe fry some onions. Then drop them in the butter. They will spatter because of the water, so cover for a couple of minutes. Then fry until GBD (Golden Brown & Delicious --Alton Brown).
Iíve fried them and boiled them but Iíve never tried the hot water method,Iím going to next time.
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Old 11-18-2017, 06:57 PM
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Some of the frozen brands gets quite close. So close, that my mom doesn't even bother making them homemade. Here in Chicago we have Alexandra's as the family favorite. Kasia's is pretty decent, too. We are not fans of Mrs. T's, though.
I will have to see if we have Alexandraís around here, Iím almost positive we donít have Kasiaís unfortunately.
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Old 11-18-2017, 07:15 PM
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Some of the frozen brands gets quite close. So close, that my mom doesn't even bother making them homemade. Here in Chicago we have Alexandra's as the family favorite. Kasia's is pretty decent, too. We are not fans of Mrs. T's, though.
Mrs. Tís suck. They are a nationally distributed brand, no?

Brooklyn has White Eagle, sold refrigerated in many groceries, made locally, rolled on the naturally perfumed thighs of beautiful young blonde Polish virgins.
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Old 11-18-2017, 07:25 PM
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Rainy weather calls for grilled cheese and 'mater soup. If it is a cold icy rain, add hot chocolate.
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Old 11-18-2017, 07:32 PM
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Rainy weather calls for grilled cheese and 'mater soup. If it is a cold icy rain, add hot chocolate.
Tomato and chocolate soup doesn't sound all that comforting to me personally.
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Old 11-18-2017, 07:34 PM
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Iíve fried them and boiled them but Iíve never tried the hot water method,Iím going to next time.
That's just to thaw them a little. Faster than boiling them (and unnecessary).
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Old 11-18-2017, 10:08 PM
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My comfort food go to is perogies. The frozen ones will never be as good as the homemade ones my Ukrainian Baba used to make, but she's gone now, so they have to do. Boil them, pan fry some bacon, then lightly brown the boiled darlings in some of the bacon fat. I used to serve them at this point, but for an extra yummy, gooey, comforting dish, put them in a casserole dish with the bacon bits, cover with grated cheddar cheese and bake for 10-15 minutes until the cheese is all melty. You can also add sauteed onions, though I prefer them without. Serve with sour cream and chopped green onions. So good.
Totally agree with you about the goodness of authentic homemade perogies, but I also love onions so can't agree with you on that. I start to brown them in butter and then add chopped white onion, and serve with sour cream when the perogies are browned and the onions golden. I often add chopped green onions, too -- I thought I was the only one who did that, but I tend to add those to lots of things!
  #79  
Old 11-18-2017, 10:23 PM
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I will have to see if we have Alexandraís around here, Iím almost positive we donít have Kasiaís unfortunately.
I think Alexandra is limited to the Chicago area. Kasiaís, at least looking at their store locator online, seems to have at least some national distribution.
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Old 11-19-2017, 02:15 AM
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It's about time to make a huge batch of my SO's cheese lentil potato soup. Lentil soup with frozen hash browns, cooked until they dissolve. Add enough cheese to raise your cholesterol level, along with some onion. It's yummy fresh made, and gets better with freezing, although you might have to thin it out with some milk when you reheat it.

I like to make a huge batch and free it in 2 serving sizes. Nights I don't feel like cooking, I can pull one out and serve with a salad or with some kind of bread.
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Old 11-19-2017, 01:43 PM
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That's just to thaw them a little. Faster than boiling them (and unnecessary).
Good to know, thanks!
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Old 11-19-2017, 04:09 PM
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Cream of Wheat
hot tea
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Old 11-19-2017, 06:32 PM
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Damp, cold and overcast today so I made a big pot of my Mother's corn chowder. She always added lima beans and sliced kielbasa. Still very tasty and soothing.
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Old 11-19-2017, 06:42 PM
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A favorite I've mentioned before: fried kielbasa, potatoes and onions, with liberal amounts of pepper. Simple and addictive.
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Old 11-19-2017, 09:23 PM
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A favorite I've mentioned before: fried kielbasa, potatoes and onions, with liberal amounts of pepper. Simple and addictive.
Wouldn't hurt to throw some cabbage in there, too.
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Old 11-19-2017, 09:38 PM
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Damp, cold and overcast today so I made a big pot of my Mother's corn chowder. She always added lima beans and sliced kielbasa. Still very tasty and soothing.
Ooo. That speaks to me. Can you share the recipe? Or, rather, just the general approach would be fine (I can figure out quantities.)
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Old 11-20-2017, 04:56 PM
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I love it, and its cousin done up with sausages--toad in the hole? I have to use bratwurst given where I live, but it's still glorious, especially with a bit of mustard on the side.

My favorite chilly dishes are potato leek soup (and I use ALL the leek, no French nonsense about only using the whites) and ham and bean soup. I also like to make pot roast with lots of onions and stewed tomatoes, and serve it mushed up and thickened over mashed potatoes. Also sausage and peppers with a side of "midwestern Alfredo": egg noodles tossed with a sauce of butter, cottage cheese (Michigan or Daisy brand or something without gums)and lots of black pepper.

And of course, pork chops and applesauce.
Oh, you're talking my kind of language there! Toad in the hole is a big favourite. And I made leek and potato soup (with dumplings) last week. And the only bit of the leek that was left out was the dirt I washed off it. And ham and beans...yup, that was yesterday!

And yes. I'm a fool for a pork chop...
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Old 11-21-2017, 07:12 PM
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Ooo. That speaks to me. Can you share the recipe? Or, rather, just the general approach would be fine (I can figure out quantities.)

I never measure anyway, just throw in what looks like enough.
Dice up some smoky bacon and fry until crisp. Add chopped onion and fry until softened. Chuck in cubed potato and enough water to barely cover, maybe a little salt-depends on the bacon. Bring to a boil and simmer until potatoes are just tender. Add in corn - I use a mix of fresh frozen and canned creamed corn-baby lima beans, sliced kielbasa sausage and add milk. I usually use whole. Salt and pepper to taste and let the whole mess simmer, not boil, until everything melds into a yummy pot of deliciousness.

Just polished off a bowl along with some garlic bread.
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Old 11-21-2017, 08:31 PM
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Oh, you're talking my kind of language there! Toad in the hole is a big favourite. And I made leek and potato soup (with dumplings) last week. And the only bit of the leek that was left out was the dirt I washed off it. And ham and beans...yup, that was yesterday!

And yes. I'm a fool for a pork chop...
We just polished off a couple of pork cutlets. Bashed a thick pork chop with a meat hammer until thin, dipped in egg wash, coated with panko and then sauteed in fat until crispy and just done. Served up with a lettuce wedge topped with bleu cheese dressing and fresh bacon.

Last edited by Chefguy; 11-21-2017 at 08:31 PM.
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Old 11-21-2017, 08:59 PM
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Pork and cabbage is mighty fine on a cold day, but pork and sauerkraut is better. Try Hungarian Szekeley gulyas (Sauerkraut goulash).

http://www.craftycookingmama.com/por...arian-goulash/

This is a good enough recipe to be going on with, but for GOD’S SAKE, don’t use a green bell pepper...look for a “cubanelle” or an “Italian frying pepper,” which is long and pale green and much closer to what a Budapest cook would use. Also, 2 cups of sour cream is excessive. When you get to that stage, just keep stirring in more until it gets attractively creamy. The recipe makes 6-8 servings (God, I’ve never made that much at once), and I wouldn’t go over a scant cup for that quantity.

If you can make homemade spaetzel or nockerlin-style dumplings, do. Otherwise egg noodles are fine.
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Old 11-24-2017, 02:33 PM
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It's not unusual for us to have snow on the ground from mid-December through the end of March...so the wife and I spend lots of time cooking (and eating) on the weekends...

Next week will be homemade turkey soup...the following months will include chicken tetrazzini, big Dutch oven of homemade mac-and-cheese, multiple iterations of chili, Shepherd's pie, corn beef and cabbage, spicy beef stew in the crock pot...winter is long around here...
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Old 11-26-2017, 10:07 PM
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It's nearly orgasmic. I used fish sauce instead of anchovies, because that's what I had in the house, and it worked just fine. I never would have thought of using gelatin, but it really fortifies things.
I made this beef stew today. OMG you guys.

https://instagram.com/p/Bb-pNDLH9uc/
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Old 11-26-2017, 11:51 PM
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I made this beef stew today. OMG you guys.

https://instagram.com/p/Bb-pNDLH9uc/
Right? (I really hate that phrase, but it seems to fit). Enjoy!
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Old 11-27-2017, 04:24 PM
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One time when Mrs. L.A. wasn't feeling well, I made loco moco. She found that a comforting food.
Yeesh! I read that name as Spanish and envisioned some sort of gelatinous sauce.

Looked it up.

Definitely a cautionary about naming things carefully
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Old 11-27-2017, 04:43 PM
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If it's not holding together, then it's an ingredient problem. Usually, the culprit is too many binders, including milk. You only need two, usually just bread crumbs and egg. If you use bread and milk, it's very easy to add too much, which will make it mushy, as the bread can't absorb all the liquid and the rendered fat. If you add all three, the same thing will happen. If it's falling apart, then you aren't using enough bread, or the ratio of bread to second binder is off, or the meat is way too lean.
Agree. But I never use milk in the first place. Meat, pre-sautťed vegetables, seasonings and about one egg per pound of meat. Mix well, then work in bread crumbs until it's sticky instead of slimy and holds a shape. Bake free-form in a larger pan to catch the drippings. Tender when hot and sliceable when cold.
  #96  
Old 11-27-2017, 04:58 PM
MacLir is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yorkshire Pudding View Post
Shoulder of lamb. In a big tin with loads of rosemary, garlic, salt and pepper, cover with foil and into a super-hot oven to get it going, then turn it straight down to about 130C for about four hours.
Oh yes. Except I sliver the garlic and bard it into the surface of the meat. Usually a leg rather than a shoulder - question of availability.
  #97  
Old 11-27-2017, 05:31 PM
MacLir is offline
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Somewhat tangential to the thread, but interesting, is an anecdote told me by a friend.

His sister did a study for WHO or one of the other aid organizations trying to determine a food that would be "universal" - that any culture would know what to do with.

Apparently, the conclusion they came to was Ö

SPOILER:
Burritos, sort of. Every culture that has agriculture has some sort of flatbread, and at that point the thought to wrap more food in it becomes inevitable.
  #98  
Old 11-27-2017, 05:50 PM
Johnny L.A. is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MacLir View Post
Yeesh! I read that name as Spanish and envisioned some sort of gelatinous sauce.

Looked it up.

Definitely a cautionary about naming things carefully
Per wikipedia:
Quote:
The dish was reportedly created at the Lincoln Grill restaurants in Hilo, Hawaii, in 1949 by its proprietors, Richard Inouye and his wife Nancy, at the request of teenagers from the Lincoln Wreckers Sports club seeking something that differed from a sandwich, was inexpensive yet quickly prepared and served. They asked Nancy to put some rice in a bowl, a hamburger patty over the rice and then topped with brown gravy. The egg came later. The teenagers named the dish Loco Moco after one of their members, George Okimoto, whose nickname was "Crazy". George Takahashi, who was studying Spanish at Hilo High School, suggested using Loco, which is Spanish for crazy. They tacked on "moco" which "rhymed with loco and sounded good".[1][2][3] However, to Spanish-speakers, this may sound odd, considering that moco means "booger" in Spanish.
  #99  
Old 11-27-2017, 11:04 PM
Eva Luna is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nava View Post
I've got the makings of chocolate a la taza from Amatller That's the kind of chocolate usually associated with churros. Planning on making me a cup this Sunday. When we were little it was an occasional winter-Sunday treat; I'd spend over half an hour just scrapping chocolate shavings off the bar, Amatller kindly sells it in shavings form. It was also part of Sunday breakfast in my dorm: during a year in which the rest of the meals had gone completely downhill, we still agreed that Sunday breakfast made up for "if it's peas, it's Tuesday".

Cocoa has to make do when one can't find a properly stiff chocolate, but it's not really the same.
You're killing me, woman! And I checked their website and it doesn't look like they ship outside Europe. Any favorite brands that can be found in North America?

Last edited by Eva Luna; 11-27-2017 at 11:04 PM.
  #100  
Old 11-28-2017, 04:25 PM
MacLir is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnny L.A. View Post
I associated moco with snot instead of booger, but that's what I looked up.
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