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  #51  
Old 01-22-2020, 12:49 PM
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I've had chicken feet at dim sum. They are quite tasty if disconcerting.
Yes, chicken feet look ugly, but they are quite nice in soup (or on their own in dim sum). They give that broth more body and richness because of their collagen/gelatin content. It's been a long time since I've had chicken feet in my soup, but growing up it was not uncommon. I still occasionally see them for sale at my local supermarket, but they're very hit-or-miss about carrying it. It doesn't seem to be a seasonal item like pig's head is (tends to come around holidays), but more of a random supply throughout the year.

The kidney stories actually do remind me of the one time -- exactly one time -- my father stewed some kidneys at home. I've always been an omnivore with pretty much zero food aversions, but I could only manage a couple bites of those kidneys. (And, even as a kid, I enjoyed liver, tripe, chicken hearts, all that kind of stuff. I just couldn't stomach kidneys, or at least my dad's preparation of them. I guess I've had steak & kidney pie in the intervening years, and I did quite like that.)
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Old 01-22-2020, 01:03 PM
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I tried kidney once - it was like trying to chew a superball soaked in cat urine
  #53  
Old 01-22-2020, 01:32 PM
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I've had chicken feet at dim sum. They are quite tasty if disconcerting.
It wasn't the chicken feet per se (seen them at dim sum, as well as duck feet which my dad preferred) - it was the shock of them showing up when expecting something completely different. Especially since this was the first meal out after a week of my aunt's atrocious cooking. Almost none of the restaurant food we had on that trip was any good at all - this was 1985, everything was still very Communist. No incentive for food quality, service with a snarl personified. Fortunately we eventually reached my grandmother's, where the food was much better.
  #54  
Old 01-22-2020, 01:33 PM
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Threads like this one make me appreciate how offal and awful sound do much alike.
  #55  
Old 01-22-2020, 01:48 PM
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I wasn't there, but my grandmother told us how grandpa wanted her to cook kidneys, and she refused. One day she was out, and came home to find he and a neighbor had bought and cooked kidneys. Without preparing them properly, I guess, she said the house reeked of urine! The neighbor and grandpa were violently ill following their kidney feast.
That reminds me of my aunt's story about kidneys. After slaughtering one of her goats, she decided to make use of every possible part. She called up her grandfather, a butcher, and asked him what to do with the kidneys. "Soak them overnight in cold water," he said, "then take them outside and throw 'em into the woods for the coyotes."

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I've had chicken feet at dim sum. They are quite tasty if disconcerting.
Much like fish head curry, then?
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  #56  
Old 01-22-2020, 02:03 PM
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Pajaritos fritos, which translates as fried little birds. I’ve seen images online of some that are fried golden brown, and they actually look like good eating, but the ones I had looked more like those dead baby birds you sometimes see on the sidewalk, with their purplish hue, bald little heads, beaks, feet and even a feather or two. Served in a thin oily sauce, the idea was to eat them bones and all, crushing everything between your molars (yeah, the heads, beaks, feet and everything). Hunting and eating fried little birds has been illegal for some time now, so it was kind of a big deal for the people who had invited me. And that was a good thing, too, because it didn’t take them long to polish them off. Revolting!

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  #57  
Old 01-22-2020, 02:09 PM
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Stuffed intestines.
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  #58  
Old 01-22-2020, 02:36 PM
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Stuffed intestines.
So, sausage?
  #59  
Old 01-22-2020, 02:43 PM
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So, sausage?
Or just a very, very, large meal.
  #60  
Old 01-22-2020, 03:59 PM
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I once saw a cookbook at my local Indian/Pakistani market called "Good Food From Waste Products".
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Old 01-22-2020, 04:11 PM
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I think the worst thing I've ever been served was the boiled limpets my Grandpa cooked while we were camping once. I'm not sure how you're supposed to cook them, but these things had the texture of elderly used chewing gum, and tasted, more or less, of salt. I'm not sure if I managed to swallow any.


That was all we had for dinner, as he had a somewhat casual attitude to childcare and just assumed we'd be able to forage something at the beach and it would be fun. I think I was about 6.
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Old 01-22-2020, 04:39 PM
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Driving through some mountain villages in Cambodia, we stopped at a village where the speciality was ... tarantulas. The locals raise them and eat them. It was market day, and we walked between stalls heaped high with cooked whole tarantulas.

I did NOT try them.
  #63  
Old 01-22-2020, 07:32 PM
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My wife used to eat tarantulas in Thailand. I asked her how she could eat something like that and she replied "I only eat the dute".

Dute is the Thai word for butt.

Dennis
  #64  
Old 01-22-2020, 07:42 PM
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Old, old chicken (I mean the lifespan, not the freshness -- it was almost certainly killed that day) in a Honduran village, then roasted.

Old chickens are tough as hell and should be stewed, long and low, to get tender enough to eat. This one was like trying to chew my shoe. Totally inedible.
The ethnic groceries in my town have stewing hens in the freezer. They look like rubber chickens, but I have always heard that they make the best soup.

Someone on another board told a story about "mud chicken." S/he had worked at a nursing home or senior center at one time, and an elderly woman told her one early spring that it was "mud chicken" time. What was that, you may ask? When she was growing up, her family tapped maple trees, and when they boiled down the syrup in an outdoor vat, her father and uncles would round up and kill all the no-longer-laying hens, and the kids would roll them around in mud puddles and toss them in the fire under the vat. After about an hour, the men would retrieve the chickens, let them cool for a while, and then crack off the mud, which took all the feathers with it, and everyone who helped with the maple sugar processing, and their kids, would have a delicious chicken feast.
  #65  
Old 01-22-2020, 07:48 PM
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Pajaritos fritos, which translates as fried little birds. I’ve seen images online of some that are fried golden brown, and they actually look like good eating, but the ones I had looked more like those dead baby birds you sometimes see on the sidewalk, with their purplish hue, bald little heads, beaks, feet and even a feather or two. Served in a thin oily sauce, the idea was to eat them bones and all, crushing everything between your molars (yeah, the heads, beaks, feet and everything). Hunting and eating fried little birds has been illegal for some time now, so it was kind of a big deal for the people who had invited me. And that was a good thing, too, because it didn’t take them long to polish them off. Revolting!
One of my favorite movies is "Babette's Feast", and there's a scene where this kind of thing happens.

SPOILER:
She's a French refugee living in a remote Danish village in 1885, and to celebrate the 100th birthday of the father of the two sisters she works for, she decides to prepare a French feast after winning a 10,000-franc lottery. One of the dishes is quail in pastry, or "Cailles en Sarcophage", and one of the guests is the relative of a villager who actually knows what this is and how to eat it. This was served with the skinned head, which he crunched into and sucked the brains out. She also prepares real turtle soup.


BTW, the movie is rated G.

Last edited by nearwildheaven; 01-22-2020 at 07:48 PM.
  #66  
Old 01-22-2020, 08:00 PM
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I think the worst thing I've ever been served was the boiled limpets my Grandpa cooked while we were camping once. I'm not sure how you're supposed to cook them, but these things had the texture of elderly used chewing gum, and tasted, more or less, of salt. I'm not sure if I managed to swallow any.
On the island I worked on in New Zealand, we once had a visit from a Maori elder, a representative of the original owners of the island. He strolled along the boulder beach and scrounged rock snails which he gathered in a bowl. He then offered them to us for a snack. You were supposed to winkle the snail out of the shell with a straight pin and eat it raw. I felt I had to try some for politeness sake. Now I've had scungilli and conch but these were pretty nasty. I think he was amused by watching the pakehas (white folks) try to choke them down.
  #67  
Old 01-22-2020, 08:16 PM
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Now I've had scungilli and conch but these were pretty nasty.
Do you like conch? We love it, prepared correctly. Just back from St Martin, where we always have at least one dinner at Yvette's (best conch on the island). The conch ceviche and the conch and dumplings, with Johnny cakes, rice&peas, and plantains on the side. A cheap dry white and a sparkling water and you're set.
  #68  
Old 01-23-2020, 08:07 AM
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I once saw a cookbook at my local Indian/Pakistani market called "Good Food From Waste Products".
Oh, now that sounds nice.
  #69  
Old 01-23-2020, 12:12 PM
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The mom of an ex learned that I happened to like creamed chipped beef on toast. I know it is effectively a very simple recipe, and toast is pretty much automatic [bread, toaster, electricity, time] and normally the recipe for creamed chipped beef is simplicity itself.

She burnt the toast and scraped off the charcoal.

I don't insist upon a veloute sauce as the base, just a good basic white sauce without the added salt is good, and traditional [but try it with a proper bechamel or veloute, wow] Hers was lumpy with unblended flour lumps, enough pepper to scorch out your nose hairs, she added not just a couple drops of tabasco sauce [which is a valid addition] but easily a tablespoon of the stuff. IT was on its own merits inedible. Then, she did not rinse out the excess salt from the chipped beef and to get fancy she dumped in a can of [drained] peas. I am not certain canned peas is actually a food.

Yikes. I have no idea where or if she used a recipe ... even the US military authorised recipe book produces an edible SOS ...

<if you want something amazing, veloute sauce, thin sliced bstirma on sourdough texas toast. Wow. ]
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Old 01-23-2020, 12:21 PM
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Do you like conch?We love it, prepared correctly. J
I love it, but the operative words are "prepared correctly." I've had great fried conch in the Bahamas. On the other hand, I've had a conch stew in Panama that left much to be desired.
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Old 01-23-2020, 05:55 PM
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Amberlyn Reid's salmon.
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Old 01-23-2020, 06:02 PM
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I read today that the probable origin of the latest corona virus in China is the outdoor exotic animal food market in Wuhan. Snakes and/or bats are the suspected vector.

That reminded me of a recent video from a youtube cooking channel that I watch. The channel is Travel Thirsty, which shows videos of cooks in Asia preparing exotic dishes. I watched (and wished I hadn't) this video of the cutting up and cooking of fruit bats in Thailand.

Gah. I have a pretty strong stomach for watching exotic cookery, but this one is beyond the pale.
  #73  
Old 01-23-2020, 06:28 PM
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I read today that the probable origin of the latest corona virus in China is the outdoor exotic animal food market in Wuhan. Snakes and/or bats are the suspected vector.

That reminded me of a recent video from a youtube cooking channel that I watch. The channel is Travel Thirsty, which shows videos of cooks in Asia preparing exotic dishes. I watched (and wished I hadn't) this video of the cutting up and cooking of fruit bats in Thailand.

Gah. I have a pretty strong stomach for watching exotic cookery, but this one is beyond the pale.
Eh, minus the disease problem, I'd try it. It doesn't look particularly appetizing, but it doesn't look any worse than a lot of foods we eat.Though, I do have to admit, that whole "screaming" pose they're in is a bit demonic looking.
  #74  
Old 01-23-2020, 06:30 PM
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Stuffed intestines.
Stuffed kishka. What do you think sausages are?

My worst was lutefisk. Preserve fish in lye for a year, then run it under water for a couple days to get rid of the lye (as well as all possible tasted) and then broil it with loads of butter (to give some flavor.

I just wanted to say that if you cook a stew, or a soup for a couple hours in a covered pot it will be sterile. If you take the lid off and take some out, it won't be sterile but it won't have many bacteria in it. If you then boil it up before serving again, it will be sterile again. Rinse and repeat. What do you think people did in the days before refrigeration?
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Old 01-23-2020, 06:59 PM
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If you then boil it up before serving again, it will be sterile again.
While the bacteria may be dead, there are toxins some bacteria produce that are heat-stable and still can get you sick, like staph, for instance.

ETA: Oh, sorry, I should have a cite.

Quote:
The toxin produced by staph bacteria is very heat-stable—it is not easily destroyed by heat at normal cooking temperatures. The bacteria themselves may be killed, but the toxin remains. Re-heating foods, even at high temperatures, that have been contaminated with toxins will NOT make them safe to eat!

Last edited by pulykamell; 01-23-2020 at 07:01 PM.
  #76  
Old 01-23-2020, 10:41 PM
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I read today that the probable origin of the latest corona virus in China is the outdoor exotic animal food market in Wuhan. Snakes and/or bats are the suspected vector.

That reminded me of a recent video from a youtube cooking channel that I watch. The channel is Travel Thirsty, which shows videos of cooks in Asia preparing exotic dishes. I watched (and wished I hadn't) this video of the cutting up and cooking of fruit bats in Thailand.

Gah. I have a pretty strong stomach for watching exotic cookery, but this one is beyond the pale.
Bats in rigor mortis. It's what's for dinner.

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Old 01-24-2020, 01:20 PM
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I tried kidney once - it was like trying to chew a superball soaked in cat urine
We picked up some kidney at a local ranch market, and my wife made kidney soup, which was quite good. Have had steak and kidney pie when my neighbor was a british guy, not so good. The oddest thing I've eaten (and I would eat again if I could find it) was what a French restaurant billed as 'sweetmeats', which I understand now to be cow thyroid. It was excellent.
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Old 01-24-2020, 01:22 PM
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A very good, very old friend fancies himself a good cook. My wife and I visited him the night before a party he was throwing the next day and he showed off some stew he was preparing. Great huge pot of it. Smelled good. We arrived the next day to find the very same pot in exactly the same spot on the stove. He said it sat there all night (too big to put in the fridge) and he was just warming it up. We passed on having any and we watched in horror as all the guests were filling their bowls. Images of imminent event of violent projectile vomit and worse came to us as we stuck to the fresh vegetables and cheese plate.
You cannot put warm things in the fridge, and a big pot takes forever to cool down. In summer you have a big problem. At other times of year, you can either leave it on the stove if the room is not too hot, or park it outside, after covering it to deter hungry animals.

It depends what is in it. Anything with fish or eggs (no, they are not usual ingredients of a stew): fridge it or bin it. Meat: usually OK overnight, pork is a bit more dodgy. and it is best to heat it to boiling point in the late evening. Anything purely vegetarian lasts longer. So does curry or chllli. However, don't tempt fate, boil it briefly as soon as possible the next day.
  #79  
Old 01-24-2020, 01:26 PM
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My in-laws (who live with us) do this. They'll keep pots of soup on the stove for a couple of days at a time like that, just reheating it whenever they want to serve it. I hate it and beg them to put it in the refrigerator, but they say they've done it that way their entire lives and it's never gotten anyone sick so they're not going to change now.
It will keep. Apparently in Africa they have stew pots that have been going for years. So I am told.
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Old 01-24-2020, 01:34 PM
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The senior Mrs. Ded, now of blessed memory, was a memorable cook. My sisiter gags when she recalls the butter beans we were served. Butter beans are dried broad beans, and seriously dull unless juiced up a bit. They weren't. What I hated with a passion was rissoles. I don't know what the official recipe is or was, but to me it seemed to be:

clear out the kitchen and the fridge of whatever had been left over. the past week Mold it into patties. Fry it is some sort of axle grease, albeit of animal origin. Serve.

The one meal that sticks in my memory, and my throat, was at an Indian restaurant in Tokyo. Normally you start a curry by frying the onions and then frying the spices. I got a curry with both onions and spices almost raw. Fer chrissake, at least one of the cooks was Indian.

I ate it, and then wished I hadn't. For several hours.
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Old 01-24-2020, 01:57 PM
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Raw sea urchin set the truly awful bar for me, when I was in Tonga. I can still say, 30 years after that experience, no matter what I try, "It was better than raw sea urchin!"
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  #82  
Old 01-24-2020, 02:08 PM
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Raw sea urchin set the truly awful bar for me, when I was in Tonga. I can still say, 30 years after that experience, no matter what I try, "It was better than raw sea urchin!"
Yes, sea urchin is one thing I've eaten and would prefer to not eat again, and I'll eat anything. Heck, I tried chicken sashimi. I was a bit grossed out by the mental picture, but it wasn't bad and I'd eat it again.
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Old 01-24-2020, 02:34 PM
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The oddest thing I've eaten (and I would eat again if I could find it) was what a French restaurant billed as 'sweetmeats', which I understand now to be cow thyroid. It was excellent.
You are confusing sweetbreads (thyroid or pancreas) with sweetmeats (confections).

Last edited by Colibri; 01-24-2020 at 02:35 PM.
  #84  
Old 01-24-2020, 02:49 PM
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Funny. Raw sea urchin is my absolute favorite delicacy for sushi. It's expensive but I make a point to have it a few times a year. Intensely pleasurable texture and flavor.
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Old 01-24-2020, 04:33 PM
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Nothing to compare with eating bats or anything, but my dear departed mother in law was a delightful person but not to be trusted anywhere near a kitchen.

Unfortunate culinary experiences at her table are too numerous to mention, and too likely to trigger PSTD, but early in my relationship with the Lovely and Talented Mrs. Shodan I was served a dish that my MIL dreamed up herself. Canned fruit cocktail, lemon pie filling, mixed thoroughly and served on a bed of iceberg lettuce vinaigrette. I was anxious not to offend, so I ate it without comment.

In the car on the way home I asked my then-girlfriend-now-wife what it was called. It had no name, so we christened it Fruit Vomit and so it was referred to between us. I loved my MIL, but Escoffier had nothing to fear from her.

My daughter, when she was four or five, made Rice Krispie bars for us, except she used Fruity Pebbles instead of Rice Krispies and added cinnamon hearts. I managed to eat one and after I managed to pry my jaws apart, which were nearly fused together, to thank her warmly for the effort, before I was sent into diabetic coma from the massive sugar overdose. After she left, I asked my wife what to do - "I can't eat those things!" My wife said, "Take them to work. Those people will eat anything." Sure enough - twenty minutes after I put them on the printer table, they were gone. Although I don't recall anyone asking me to bring anything to any pot lucks for some time afterwards.

Regards,
Shodan
  #86  
Old 01-24-2020, 04:42 PM
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My mom was a depression baby from the midwest, and wasn't much of a cook.

She'd combine all the leftovers from the fridge in one pot and call it "garbage soup". All the small refrigerator containers of spaghetti, creamed corn, tamale pie remnants, and red beans and rice would be stirred together in a pot with water and served up. I'm still nauseated just thinking about it.

ETA: as far as restaurant meals, we were once in a Chinese restaurant, and a waiter walked by bearing a plate of fermented tofu. It smelled exactly like cat shit. Diners in the restaurant were covering their noses and gagging.
My mom is a born-and-bred Hoosier and thus a poor cook when I was a kid. She and Dad raved about a dish at a Mexican restaurant near Seattle that served "Prison Food" which seemed to be all of yesterday's leftovers thrown into a pot and cooked.

My folks bought a side of beef every year, and one year she cooked beef tongue. I don't know what she was supposed to do, but the gray lump with the texture of my own tongue was revolting.
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Old 01-24-2020, 04:55 PM
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My folks bought a side of beef every year, and one year she cooked beef tongue. I don't know what she was supposed to do, but the gray lump with the texture of my own tongue was revolting.
My mother loved beef tongue. I didn't think it tasted that bad, but the texture was creepy.

One of the best bits from All In the Family:

Edith: Archie complained about the tongue sandwich I made him yesterday. He said he didn't want to eat anything that had been in a cow's mouth.

Gloria: So what did you make him instead?

Edith: Hard-boiled eggs!
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Old 01-24-2020, 05:43 PM
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Garbage Omelets Are a Thing Too


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This is an actual 'thing'. Comedienne Phyllis Diller popularized it years ago, she called it 'Garbage Soup'. You start out making soup with meat or a bone, add onion, bay leaf, salt and pepper, and vegetables, and you basically clean our your refrigerator of any leftovers. Including leftover spaghetti, and salad (with salad dressing) - all boiled together.

I wasn't there, but my grandmother told us how grandpa wanted her to cook kidneys, and she refused. One day she was out, and came home to find he and a neighbor had bought and cooked kidneys. Without preparing them properly, I guess, she said the house reeked of urine! The neighbor and grandpa were violently ill following their kidney feast.
Ah, those Great Depression culinary habits! My friend's mom, a child of parsimonious Catholic parents and a Depression baby, had that horror of "wasting food". My friend and his siblings warned me in advance when I accompanied them on a shore vacation.

Instead of making soup, Mom would simply add any and all leftovers in quantities insufficient for a second meal to eggs, and serve it up as a "breakfast omelet". Her kids swore that she also secretly included plate scrapings, although she denied this.

Some leftovers were "omeletable", but of course the varied, random leftovers and the mixing of various incompatible flavors usually resulted in a vile concoction.

Once I attended a graduation party at their house; the buffet-style food included big plates of mini-sandwiches: standard supermarket white bread and fillings like ham and tuna. Despite protests and objections from her kids, after the party Mom insisted on wrapping the uneaten sandwiches in plastic wrap and putting them in the freezer.

There are foods that just don't freeze well. In this case, the moisture in both the slightly soggy bread and the sandwich filling formed ice crystals when frozen; when thawed out, the bread was gooey and the meat/tuna had an off taste and gritty texture.

Sometimes even Mom reluctantly agreed that her recycled offerings were inedible. When the defrosted sandwiches were nominally tasted and rejected en masse during a subsequent lunch, she didn't insist that they were perfectly fine as she was wont to do.

But her daughters pointedly gathered up the remains and disposed of them. There was a clear and present danger that despite conceding defeat, Mom might attempt to rescue the food in the form of a Sandwich Omelette.
  #89  
Old 01-24-2020, 06:18 PM
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You cannot put warm things in the fridge, and a big pot takes forever to cool down. In summer you have a big problem. At other times of year, you can either leave it on the stove if the room is not too hot, or park it outside, after covering it to deter hungry animals.

It depends what is in it. Anything with fish or eggs (no, they are not usual ingredients of a stew): fridge it or bin it. Meat: usually OK overnight, pork is a bit more dodgy. and it is best to heat it to boiling point in the late evening. Anything purely vegetarian lasts longer. So does curry or chllli. However, don't tempt fate, boil it briefly as soon as possible the next day.
I just break it down to smaller portions, set it down on the counter, and put it in the fridge after about an hour to two. It's usually plenty cool by then to refrigerate. I'm pretty lax with food, but I will not leave anything brothy/soupy overnight on the counter -- that's just like a bacterial playground, so no thanks.

Last edited by pulykamell; 01-24-2020 at 06:19 PM.
  #90  
Old 01-24-2020, 06:21 PM
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Do you like conch? We love it, prepared correctly. Just back from St Martin, where we always have at least one dinner at Yvette's (best conch on the island). The conch ceviche and the conch and dumplings, with Johnny cakes, rice&peas, and plantains on the side. A cheap dry white and a sparkling water and you're set.
I ate a ton of conch fritters when we visited Andros Island in The Bahamas. They were excellent.
  #91  
Old 01-24-2020, 07:32 PM
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Originally Posted by Shodan View Post
Canned fruit cocktail, lemon pie filling, mixed thoroughly and served on a bed of iceberg lettuce vinaigrette. I was anxious not to offend, so I ate it without comment.

In the car on the way home I asked my then-girlfriend-now-wife what it was called. It had no name, so we christened it Fruit Vomit and so it was referred to between us.
I think if you used fresh diced fruit, fruit vomit would actually be tolerable [though instead of pie filling, blend well lemon curd, mascarpone and a small amount of honey if you want it sweeter might be interesting]

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Originally Posted by Little BrÝther View Post
Ah, those Great Depression culinary habits! My friend's mom, a child of parsimonious Catholic parents and a Depression baby, had that horror of "wasting food". .
GOt lucky, mom mom grew up on a small farm during the depression, and while she also had the horror of wasting food, she was taught not to make more than enough to feed the people at supper, she rarely made anything that was considered leftovers though desserts [cakes, cookies, pies] were the exception and breadmaking was a 3 times a week evolution [4 loaves per batch, it was a 5 pound sack of flour, a cup of sourdough starter and salt with however much water was needed.] Me? I like making batches so I can freeze or can portions for another meal. With the recent cancer kerfluffle the stored food saved me lots of effort - I could just grab and nuke =) I also like canning my own produce to my own recipes.

Quote:
Originally Posted by pulykamell View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brayne Ded View Post
You cannot put warm things in the fridge, and a big pot takes forever to cool down. In summer you have a big problem. At other times of year, you can either leave it on the stove if the room is not too hot, or park it outside, after covering it to deter hungry animals.
end quote

Re soup: I just break it down to smaller portions, set it down on the counter, and put it in the fridge after about an hour to two. It's usually plenty cool by then to refrigerate. I'm pretty lax with food, but I will not leave anything brothy/soupy overnight on the counter -- that's just like a bacterial playground, so no thanks.
IN a word, cooling paddle =) One can buy one, or one can simply freeze water in heavy plastic bottles and use those instead =)
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  #92  
Old 01-24-2020, 08:23 PM
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Originally Posted by aruvqan View Post
I think if you used fresh diced fruit, fruit vomit would actually be tolerable [though instead of pie filling, blend well lemon curd, mascarpone and a small amount of honey if you want it sweeter might be interesting]

GOt lucky, mom mom grew up on a small farm during the depression, and while she also had the horror of wasting food, she was taught not to make more than enough to feed the people at supper, she rarely made anything that was considered leftovers though desserts [cakes, cookies, pies] were the exception and breadmaking was a 3 times a week evolution [4 loaves per batch, it was a 5 pound sack of flour, a cup of sourdough starter and salt with however much water was needed.] Me? I like making batches so I can freeze or can portions for another meal. With the recent cancer kerfluffle the stored food saved me lots of effort - I could just grab and nuke =) I also like canning my own produce to my own recipes.


IN a word, cooling paddle =) One can buy one, or one can simply freeze water in heavy plastic bottles and use those instead =)
Yeah, but then you need freezer space for it. I find breaking it down into smaller portions it'll cool down enough that I could put it in the fridge. That said, that paddle will get you a hell of a lot faster into the "safe zone." You could also use an immersion chiller like they use for beer-making (which I do happen to have around), but I don't usually have five gallons of stew or soup I need to chill; just typically a gallon to 5 quarts at the most.

Last edited by pulykamell; 01-24-2020 at 08:27 PM.
  #93  
Old 01-24-2020, 11:38 PM
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We picked up some kidney at a local ranch market, and my wife made kidney soup, which was quite good. Have had steak and kidney pie when my neighbor was a british guy, not so good. The oddest thing I've eaten (and I would eat again if I could find it) was what a French restaurant billed as 'sweetmeats', which I understand now to be cow thyroid. It was excellent.
Are you sure it was thyroid and not thymus? Eating animal thyroids can cause symptoms resembling hyperthyroidism; there was a butcher shop in the Midwest some years back that wasn't diligent about removing the thyroids from the animals they slaughtered and processed and this made some local residents very sick, and it took a long time to figure out why.

https://apnews.com/1a42e4368636a673764c368ea9ab2225

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QTKIxWVoz5Q

"Sweetbread" is another term for the thymus and/or pancreas of a cow, or perhaps other animals as well.

Beef- and pork-sourced thyroid has long been used as hormone replacement, although most doctors nowadays use synthetic levothyroxine.
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Old 01-24-2020, 11:40 PM
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Originally Posted by Brayne Ded View Post
It will keep. Apparently in Africa they have stew pots that have been going for years. So I am told.
NPR's "The Splendid Table" once told a story about a burger joint that had used the same grease for almost 100 years; they didn't change it, but instead simply topped it off when it got a little low.
  #95  
Old 01-25-2020, 10:00 AM
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Originally Posted by Colibri View Post
I've had chicken feet at dim sum. They are quite tasty if disconcerting.
I like dimsum chicken feet. I've also purchased chicken feet to make broth. Yum.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Colibri View Post
You are confusing sweetbreads (thyroid or pancreas) with sweetmeats (confections).
Ugh. I had sweetbreads once. Like little blobs of brain surrounded by a sea of mucus. I won't be ordering that again.
  #96  
Old 01-25-2020, 10:08 AM
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...
I just wanted to say that if you cook a stew, or a soup for a couple hours in a covered pot it will be sterile. If you take the lid off and take some out, it won't be sterile but it won't have many bacteria in it. If you then boil it up before serving again, it will be sterile again. Rinse and repeat. What do you think people did in the days before refrigeration?
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Originally Posted by pulykamell View Post
While the bacteria may be dead, there are toxins some bacteria produce that are heat-stable and still can get you sick, like staph, for instance.

ETA: Oh, sorry, I should have a cite.
sure, if the staph ever builds up that can be a problem. But if the stew was made with fresh meat and cooked thoroughly, there shouldn't be much staph in it to grow overnight. Especially if they left the lid on when they turned off the stove.

I know that spoilage bacteria are different from toxic bacteria, but they both like the same conditions. Spoilage bacteria are a decent indicator of how much has grown in your stew overnight. If it still smells good in the morning, and you reheat it, odds are it's fine.

I've left broth out overnight when it was too hot to put in the fridge. My experience is that in the winter, when my kitchen is cool overnight, it's fine. In the summer it frequently spoils. I don't do that anymore because now I have an instant pot, and I just leave it on "keep warm" overnight and process it in the morning. But I used to do it regularly. I sometimes had to toss a pot of broth because it smelled off, but no one ever got sick from my broth. And I doubt my relatives are magically immune to staph toxin.

Last edited by puzzlegal; 01-25-2020 at 10:09 AM.
  #97  
Old 01-25-2020, 10:30 AM
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I made it myself!!!!

Last April, when wild onion season came in (or as we call them 'round here, "munions"), I decided I'd look on YouTube for a recipe that uses them. Sure enough, I found a guy whose schtick is creating old-timey (think 1700s and 1800s) recipes using period-specific equipment and techniques, and foraged ingredients. He had a recipe for a sort of meatless shepherd's pie that used them.

It was utterly disgusting on every level -- taste, texture, visual presentation. No sooner had the fork entered my mouth then I was violently spitting it out and gargling with water, trying valiantly not to puke.
  #98  
Old 01-25-2020, 10:39 AM
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Originally Posted by puzzlegal View Post
I've left broth out overnight when it was too hot to put in the fridge. My experience is that in the winter, when my kitchen is cool overnight, it's fine. In the summer it frequently spoils.
Well, there we go, so it does go off. I suspect one bout of food poisoning I had was on leaving my stock pot overnight (with chicken) on the stove and eating the soup the next day (though much later, like for dinner). I thought I had cooked it through when I reheated, but either I didn't, or the toxins did me in. At any rate, not an experiment I care to repeat, and I don't care to figure out where the point is between how long I can leave it out and how warm the room temperature can be and when I'm likely to get sick when there's an easy way to avoid it. (And I very rarely get food poisoning; I can only think of two or three other times; one was particularly bad, though, with eating what I think were some bad eggs in Transylvania and being sick for three days after that. I was surprised at how quickly that one put me out. Fever, chills, muscle pains, vomiting, diarrhea. Ugh.) To be fair, though, I still have no problem eating raw eggs and raw meat, but broth left out overnight just squicks me out.

Last edited by pulykamell; 01-25-2020 at 10:42 AM.
  #99  
Old 01-25-2020, 10:52 AM
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In, "A Christmas Story," the big pot of red cabbage cooking on the stove looks like some three-taloned-fingered creature should reach up out of the dreck and pull the mother down into its foetid depths. Happy Holidays!
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  #100  
Old 01-25-2020, 10:59 AM
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Originally Posted by pulykamell View Post
...leaving my stock pot overnight (with chicken) ...
I doubt chicken broth (or stew) is any more dangerous than any other meat broth. I think the issue with chicken is that the bacteria it is likely to carry when raw are harder to kill than the ones likely to be on beef. But once you've killed them (by making broth) the risk is from whatever happens to be around your kitchen, not from the animal the broth was made from.

Broth is a good medium for stuff to grow in, of course.

To be fair, I have an unusually good sense of smell. I am the family food-tester, because I can smell "off" a long time before anyone else. So that might have something to do with my success rate. I do think spoilage bacteria are a good indicator of how much has grown on something.
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