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Old 02-05-2020, 06:48 PM
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Kirk Douglas, R.I.P.


Kirk Douglas died at age 103.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kirk_Douglas
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Old 02-05-2020, 07:01 PM
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He was a real mensch.

RIP
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Old 02-05-2020, 07:03 PM
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I'M Spartacus!
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Old 02-05-2020, 07:14 PM
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Aww. I like him. I liked him as Van Gogh. What was that movie?
'Lust for Life', I think.
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Old 02-05-2020, 07:26 PM
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Looking over a list of his films, I realize I have only seen a small fraction of his work.

My favorites:

20,000 Leagues Under the Sea
Cast a Giant Shadow
There Was a Crooked Man . . .


And, as a guilty pleasure, The Villain, in which he plays the coyote to Arnold Schwartzenegger's roadrunner.
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Old 02-05-2020, 07:39 PM
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It will always be Paths of Glory for me.
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Old 02-05-2020, 07:43 PM
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RIP Chester Lampwick.
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Old 02-05-2020, 07:44 PM
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Lomax (Kirk Douglas): What made you think I wouldn't kill you?

Taw Jackson (John Wayne): Curiosity.

Lomax: Well, you're still alive. Now what's to keep you that way?

Taw Jackson: Money.

Lomax: How much?

Taw Jackson: Your share will be over a hundred thousand.

Lomax: That's what I've always said the world needs... more simple understanding to bring people together!


RIP, Spartacus. Ya done good.
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Old 02-05-2020, 08:08 PM
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I think the first movie I saw him in was "20,000 Leagues Under the Sea" opposite James Mason, who played Nemo. I was probably eight years old when that came out. A prolific actor who entertained us all in nearly every genre of film. Adios.

Last edited by Chefguy; 02-05-2020 at 08:10 PM.
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Old 02-05-2020, 08:34 PM
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103 years old. Man, that's a long life.

Such a handsome man and a terrific actor. RIP Mr. Douglas.
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Old 02-05-2020, 08:35 PM
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Damn.

I met him once, when we published his autobiography, pre-stroke. I had him autograph a copy and just thanked him for all of his amazing movie work, but the cute art director asked if she could touch the Chin Dimple (he obliged).

I agree that Paths of Glory is probably the best movie he was in, but I may break out the DVD of Ace in the Hole tonight. He’s not pretty in that, but he makes a great rat bastard, too.
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Old 02-05-2020, 08:39 PM
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Also recommend Lonely Are the Brave (1962), a bizarre western that was Kirk’s favorite of all his movies. Great bar fight where Kirk gets a beat down from a one-armed man.
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Old 02-05-2020, 09:00 PM
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Yes, he was great in Ace in the Hole.

At the other end of the scale, he was moving and effective in his "moral anchor" roles, too, such as in Seven Days in May.

As terentii said: a real mensch. And one of the last of the classic Great Stars.
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Old 02-05-2020, 09:06 PM
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Ace In The Hole was a great little film, and Kirk Douglas was demonic in it, in a great way. So fucking predictive. Look at our media.
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Old 02-05-2020, 09:23 PM
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Yes, he was great in Ace in the Hole.

At the other end of the scale, he was moving and effective in his "moral anchor" roles, too, such as in Seven Days in May.
He was always wonderful in tandem with Burt Lancaster. Sadly, Burt thought Kirk was several levels below him as an actor.
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Old 02-05-2020, 11:49 PM
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I only found out today that he was in Operation Petticoat, an uncredited role as "Welding Seaman"
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Old 02-05-2020, 11:54 PM
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It will always be Paths of Glory for me.
Absolutely.
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Old 02-06-2020, 12:08 AM
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I've seen him in so many movies, and loved him in every role. It's hard to pick a favorite.

R.I.P., Mr. Douglas. One of the last of the Golden Age (Olivia de Havilland still lives, 5 months older than Douglas).
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Old 02-06-2020, 01:44 AM
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To the above, I have to add Town without Pity and The Vikings.
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Old 02-06-2020, 09:16 AM
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He survived so much, including the worst thing that can happen to anyone, the death of his son Eric in 1994.

A real tropper
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Old 02-06-2020, 11:50 AM
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Damn.

Paths of Glory
Spartacus
20,000 Leagues
Detective Story
Lust for Life
The Vikings
The List of Adrian Mesinger
Seven Days in May




The Tales from the Crypt episode "Yellow" from 1991 that echoed "Paths of Glory", and gave him the opportunity to act with his less-known son Eric (who died in 2004 of a drug overdose)



Even the bad films -- The Fury, The Villain (that live-action cartoon, with a still little-known Arnold Schwarzeneggar as The Hero), Saturn 3 -- were worth watching.

Tpugh Guys, which teamed him up with Burt Lancaster again (and an unknown Dana Carvey) was a hoot. And Douglas looked great working out in the gym at 70.

He made three pictures after his stroke. And continued writing Op-Ed pieces after he was 100.

That's how I want to go -- kicking and screaming.
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Old 02-06-2020, 12:16 PM
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RIP Kirk Douglas


https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/ne...artacus-670526

I'm Spartacus.

EDIT: D'oh. Duplicate thread. I did Cntrl+F, I swear.

Last edited by Trancephalic; 02-06-2020 at 12:17 PM.
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Old 02-06-2020, 12:17 PM
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Today, nobody is Spartacus.
Anymore.
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Old 02-06-2020, 03:00 PM
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Is he the most famous movie star to reach 100? Olivia de Havilland is the same age and still alive but I would judge him to be a bit more famous. Is there anyone else?

I have only seen him in Spartacus and Paths of Glory. Of his other films Ace in the Hole sounds the most interesting and I like Billy Wilder too.
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Old 02-06-2020, 03:31 PM
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I liked Kirk's Westerns. Gunfight at the Ok Corral and War Wagon (with John Wayne) are really good.

Kirk led a very long and interesting life. His creative work as an author is also very good.

RIP

Last edited by aceplace57; 02-06-2020 at 03:34 PM.
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Old 02-06-2020, 03:42 PM
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Is he the most famous movie star to reach 100? Olivia de Havilland is the same age and still alive but I would judge him to be a bit more famous. Is there anyone else?

I have only seen him in Spartacus and Paths of Glory. Of his other films Ace in the Hole sounds the most interesting and I like Billy Wilder too.
George Burns lived a few months past his 100th birthday. I think he's mostly known for his TV roles, but he did some movies too. To my generation he's mostly famous for being old.

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Old 02-06-2020, 03:49 PM
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I remember reading somewhere in an interview where he and john Wayne were talking about being best friends pretty much and Wayne says something to the effect "i dont know how or why it happened because we dont agree on one damn thing together "
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Old 02-06-2020, 04:54 PM
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Not a big fan of his acting (esp. Twenty Thousand Leagues... which he taints), but he was good in Out of the Past (1947), pretty good in Young Man with a Horn (1950), excellent in Ace in the Hole (1951), very good in The Bad and the Beautiful (1952) and fine in Paths of Glory (1957).
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Old 02-06-2020, 06:30 PM
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I've watched Ace in the Hole, The Bad and the Beautiful, and Five Days in May in the past year or so. (And I've seen Paths of Glory, Spartacus and many of this other films less recently.) Kirk was great at portraying men beset by moral conflict, and sometimes doing the right thing, sometimes not.

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Is he the most famous movie star to reach 100? Olivia de Havilland is the same age and still alive but I would judge him to be a bit more famous. Is there anyone else?
Norman Lloyd, perhaps best known as Dr. Auschlander in St. Elsewhere, turned 105 in November.

Olivia de Havilland will turn 104 on July 1.

Marsha Hunt, who appeared in the 1940 Pride and Prejudice, turned 102 in October (on my birthday!).

Other, now deceased, actors who lived past 100 include Bob Hope, character actor Charles Lane, and Estelle Winwood.

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George Burns lived a few months past his 100th birthday. I think he's mostly known for his TV roles, but he did some movies too.
I think Douglas and de Havilland had the most distinguished careers among this group of centenarians. However, Burns remained in the public eye later in his life than any of these others, and for that reason might be more "famous" (however that is measured).

Burns' heyday was in the 1950s, but after Gracie died in 1964, he made only a handful of TV appearances over the next decade. His career was revived by The Sunshine Boys in 1975, just before his 80th birthday, and he went on to do eight more feature films in the next 19 years, the last, Radioland Murders (1994), when he was 98! In at least half of those eight, he had the lead role.

In contrast, none of the others have had lead roles for decades. Lloyd had a couple of small parts in features in 2014 and 2015. Douglas' last appearance was a TV movie in 2008, as was Hunt's (different movie), and de Havilland's was a TV movie in 1988.
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Old 02-06-2020, 06:58 PM
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Quote still not working for me.

On Ike's comment on Burt Lancaster believing he was the better actor: I guess it's a matter of taste, but I have to disagree with Burt. He was always a mannered performer.

But, yes: they were very good together.
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Old 02-07-2020, 10:53 AM
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...On Ike's comment on Burt Lancaster believing he was the better actor: I guess it's a matter of taste, but I have to disagree with Burt. He was always a mannered performer.
I disagree with Burt too, but if you don’t think Lancaster was a terrific film actor, check out Frankenheimer’s The Train (1964), with Paul Scofield and Jeanne Moreau. Pure bliss, especially if you’re an art lover and a Nazi hater.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Train_(1964_film)
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Last edited by Ukulele Ike; 02-07-2020 at 10:54 AM. Reason: Fixed tag
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Old 02-09-2020, 09:22 PM
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Chiming in here to restore Ukulele Ike’s faith in America by helping Kirk Douglas beat Robert Conrad in the thread count. As noted above, Douglas felt Lonely Are the Brave his favourite film. The screenplay was by Dalton Trumbo, from the novel The Brave Cowboy by Edward Abbey, environmentalist, sorta anarchist (his MA thesis was on anarchism) and author of the Monkeywrench Gang, a bible of the early (70s) ecology movement.
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Old 02-09-2020, 09:24 PM
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Also, the one armed man in the movie was Bill Raisch, the one armed man in The Fugitive tv show
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Old 02-09-2020, 09:43 PM
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God Bless you Kirk, you were one of a kind, Hollywood royalty. I was pleasantly surprised when I read Jamie Lee Curtis say you saved her from drowning as a child. You had the classical good looks of your era, and you left your indelible mark on cinema, there will never be another quite like you.
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Old 02-09-2020, 11:22 PM
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Chiming in here to restore Ukulele Ike’s faith in America by helping Kirk Douglas beat Robert Conrad in the thread count. As noted above, Douglas felt Lonely Are the Brave his favourite film. The screenplay was by Dalton Trumbo, from the novel The Brave Cowboy by Edward Abbey, environmentalist, sorta anarchist (his MA thesis was on anarchism) and author of the Monkeywrench Gang, a bible of the early (70s) ecology movement.
Also based upon the comment by Ukulele Ike in the Robert Conrad thread, here are my recollections of Mr. Douglas (who was not a part of everyday life through re-runs like Bob Conrad was).

My very favorite memory was after the stroke when he was a presenter at an awards show with his son Michael. His speech was very slurred, and Michael warned him: “Dad, they want you to say-‘the award goes to….’” Kirk acknowledges the instruction, opens the envelop and said: “THE WINNNNNER IS. . . .” He was too good a man to believe that just to be nominated is a win bullshit (an honor I agree—a win, no!). He knew this was a contest and the one selected was the winner! Defiant even in compromised health, Mr. Douglas, you earned my respect that day.

I very much liked the later day movie he made with Burt Lancaster where they were both old hoodlums released from prison whom were still more than a match for guys half their age, TOUGH GUYS. I also very much liked the one he did with Michael J. Fox when all his relatives were sucking up to him because he was supposedly very sick and loaded. When AGAINST ALL ODDS was big at the box office Roger Ebert pointed out the movie was a remake of OUT OF THE PAST. Watching the original was where I learned to appreciate Noir films. He was genuinely scary in that role and I was always glad I did not live in that era because I would not have done well banging heads with guys like Mitchum and Douglas. (By contrast- I could never fear ‘The Dude’ or El Duderino if you’re not into the whole brevity thing, and while James Woods is intense he also seems kind of scrawny and I would much rather throw down with him then either of the old guys. I guess Mitchum was an honest to god bad ass in real life, and I have no doubt Mr. Douglas was just as tough.)

Lastly, I seem to recall that when he was in the news because of the stroke- that he was a bit of hero to some Hollywood writers who Joe McCarthy was after. He commissioned them to write screenplays under assumed names just to scratch out a living. I didn’t look it up, but the way I remember it he didn’t plan to make the movies, just gave them a chance to survive until the red scare went away. I hope it is true because I have admire a man so far ahead of the times who did the morally right thing just because.
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Old 02-11-2020, 07:52 PM
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Lastly, I seem to recall that when he was in the news because of the stroke- that he was a bit of hero to some Hollywood writers who Joe McCarthy was after. He commissioned them to write screenplays under assumed names just to scratch out a living. I didn’t look it up, but the way I remember it he didn’t plan to make the movies, just gave them a chance to survive until the red scare went away. I hope it is true because I have admire a man so far ahead of the times who did the morally right thing just because.
Not quite. The black market for screenplays was vibrant and while the rates were pennies-on-the-dollar, it still allowed many blacklisted screenwriters to surreptitiously make a living on the downlow. Kirk (who was starting to produce his own films by the late 50s) was a star who was well aware of this mini-industry but he wasn't unique about making movies from this secret assembly line.

But what did make Kirk unique was that he announced publicly that Dalton Trumbo (one of the most prolific blacklisted writers in Hollywood) would be writing the screenplay for SPARTACUS, an enormous, high-profile epic. Between that and Otto Preminger's EXODUS (which Trumbo also wrote, both 1960), this public show of confidence for these writers and the public criticism of the still thriving blacklist (depriving many craftsmen, not just writers, of their livelihoods) was momentous and highly controversial. So Douglas put his reputation on the line by showing the political courage to call out the red-baiters who still had a strangle-hold on the studios.

If you get a chance, watch the movie TRUMBO, which dramatizes the entire blacklist era, with Dean O'Gorman doing a rather uncanny impersonation of Douglas. His scenes in the film are some of the best.

Last edited by MovieMogul; 02-11-2020 at 07:54 PM.
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Old 02-11-2020, 10:45 PM
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Not quite. The black market for screenplays was vibrant and while the rates were pennies-on-the-dollar, it still allowed many blacklisted screenwriters to surreptitiously make a living on the downlow. Kirk (who was starting to produce his own films by the late 50s) was a star who was well aware of this mini-industry but he wasn't unique about making movies from this secret assembly line.

But what did make Kirk unique was that he announced publicly that Dalton Trumbo (one of the most prolific blacklisted writers in Hollywood) would be writing the screenplay for SPARTACUS, an enormous, high-profile epic. Between that and Otto Preminger's EXODUS (which Trumbo also wrote, both 1960), this public show of confidence for these writers and the public criticism of the still thriving blacklist (depriving many craftsmen, not just writers, of their livelihoods) was momentous and highly controversial. So Douglas put his reputation on the line by showing the political courage to call out the red-baiters who still had a strangle-hold on the studios.

If you get a chance, watch the movie TRUMBO, which dramatizes the entire blacklist era, with Dean O'Gorman doing a rather uncanny impersonation of Douglas. His scenes in the film are some of the best.
Thank you for the correction. I knew he did something to combat the paranoia and injustice associated with Senator McCarthy but did not recall much about it. Oddly, I understated his behaviors rather than exaggerate them, rare for me.

(And please forgive the inaccuracy. I always try to write my recollections before I read the linked obituary or article so I can sort of fact check my memory. Two things I was VERY wrong about in this case I learned before posting because I couldn't recall the names of the pictures so I looked them up. First, I was so sure he played the Yul Brenner role in TARAS BULBA, but my recollections of Tony Curtis and Mr. Douglas in the same movie must be from SPARTACUS. My second error was a vivid memory of him painting the Sistine Chapel in THE AGONY AND THE ECSTASY, which I am sure Charlton Heston would resent. I could claim that I knew he played some famous artist and got the wrong one-- but it would be a bad justification. So I guess in my mind Kirk Douglas is such a good actor I can remember two roles he never even played. Now THAT is acting!)
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