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  #51  
Old 01-26-2020, 02:10 PM
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Originally Posted by markn+ View Post
So I'm a bit puzzled by this. First, it seems to contradict Sicks Ate's advice in #12 to NOT just "thrash around". Second, I'm a bit concerned that Lamoral and Guest-starring: Id! think that this is even possible for me. Should a completely inexperienced drummer be able to pick up a pair of sticks and start playing along to a song? That seems way beyond my abilities at this point.
The best way to start practicing any instrument is to play along with songs. Most of the best musicians started out that way. I would actually suggest playing along with songs rather than just a metronome or click track, because that way you have the original drummer's drum part in the background to guide you, and because playing in isolation of other instruments just isn't as much fun, and practicing should be fun.

Again, you should start out with a SLOW song with a SIMPLE drumbeat.
  #52  
Old 01-26-2020, 02:13 PM
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K after trying to think about how to say what I want succubus
  #53  
Old 01-26-2020, 02:16 PM
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...succinctly. Stupid phone apparently doesn't know that word.
  #54  
Old 01-26-2020, 02:19 PM
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The best way to start practicing any instrument is to play along with songs. Most of the best musicians started out that way. I would actually suggest playing along with songs rather than just a metronome or click track, because that way you have the original drummer's drum part in the background to guide you, and because playing in isolation of other instruments just isn't as much fun, and practicing should be fun.

Again, you should start out with a SLOW song with a SIMPLE drumbeat.
Yes, you ideally should do a bit of both, and you want to keep it fun, but you do have to also be able to practice in isolation. I mean, I didn't learn the Bonham shuffle by just playing along to "Fool In the Rain." That took weeks of playing it very slowly to a metronome and building up the correct muscle memory. (And it still don't "swing" as effortlessly as JB, of course.) Simply just playing along to a track, I feel, while fun and something I do all the time, that I don't really find myself developing new drum skills until I isolate parts I want to learn and build up to them through repetition and practice.

Last edited by pulykamell; 01-26-2020 at 02:19 PM.
  #55  
Old 01-26-2020, 02:25 PM
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I agree, but I think at this point the best way for him to develop a basic understanding of simply how to hit the snare, how to hit the hi-hat, how to hit the kick, and how to do them all in the same measure to create a consistent drum pattern, is to play along with a handful of simple songs. That's IMO the best way to build up the muscle memory. After that, more complex beats can be worked on without a song in the background.
  #56  
Old 01-26-2020, 02:53 PM
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The best way to start practicing any instrument is to play along with songs.
Must disagree on that point. The best way to start practicing any instrument is to learn the fundamentals of the instrument and build on that. Starting out by playing along might work if you're a 12-year old kid, maybe by the time you're 18 or 20 you've figured it out by trial and error. Or maybe you're missing out because you never learned fundamentals that you can build on and apply.

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Maybe you can chime in as well, but I found the most useful exercises beginning was practicing single stroke rolls, double stroke rolls, and paradiddles (and variants of these).
All very good, and translate to a kit nicely.

I'll go ahead and be the sole voice of this opinion apparently, but I was being perfectly serious about playing 8th notes. In fact, that's really step 2. Or 1.8. Or step 2.3, but not step 1.

Step 1: Grip and hand position. The stick should be held firmly between the pad of the thumb, and the crook/pad of the first knuckle of the index finger. Got that? Ok, now optimally there should be little or no gap between the thumb and finger behind the stick. Your other fingers should wrap securely around the butt of the stick, with the stick resting in the crease/pad between the first and second knuckle. There is some leeway here, but by getting close to this you're optimizing your stick control and power. Your pinkie stays on the stick. Always.

For your application, your sticks can be at less than a 90 degree angle but shouldn't be approaching parallel.

Your hands can vary from a flat grip with the palms down to a "French" grip with the thumbs up, and will adjust depending on what you're doing on the kit. For one-drum practice, make your palms flat and then let your wrists relax a bit so that they feel natural.

Step 1.5: Hitting the drum once. Raise the stick vertically with your wrist, and slightly loosen your fingers but not your fulcrum fingers (thumb and index). Now strike the drum once using your wrist while using your fingers to grip back to the stick, adding power.

Did you aim AT the drum head? Don't do that, you should be aiming through the drum head. Rule of thumb is that you should be directing the arc of the tip of the stick as far though the drum as your stroke starts above it. That does two things: give your a fuller sound, and makes the drum do work for you by sending the stick back up on the rebound.

Ok hit the drum again, but this time I'll make the allowance that you can remove your back fingers mostly off the stick just this once. Raise the stick and strike the drum but move your rear fingers out of the way so that the stick rebounds all the way back up by itself. Do it a couple of times to get a feeling for how the stick wants to return to it original 'up' position.

Step 2: Using the rebound to play....you guessed it, 8th notes. Now we're going to play 8 notes on 1 hand, using the rebound from the head, the wrist, and back fingers. After the first stroke, let the stick rebound up by flexing your wrist up with the stick. Your back fingers are going to be just loose enough immediately after the strike (and still in contact with the stick the entire time) to allow the stick to return on its own to the 'up' position. Note here that at this point, YOU are not raising the stick back to the 'up' position; you are merely keeping control of it in preparation for the next stroke.

This sounds easy so far, but it's extremely non-intuitive so be patient.

Now, play 8 notes on one hand using the rebound. It should feel kind of like bouncing a basketball. And ya don't have to grab the basketball at the floor and pick it up again for the second bounce, right?

Then do 8 on one hand, 8 on the other, for hours and hours. Totally kidding. Kind of. Make sure that each note is equally spaced (this is where click track comes in), is played with the same dynamic and that your hands are consistently doing the same thing.

Step 2.558: Alternating 16th notes, or 'single stroke' roll: Ok now we have fun. 8, 8th notes on each hand, followed by 16, 16th notes alternating hands. Then straight back in to the 8/8/16 pattern.

Anyway, that was a pretty quick-and-dirty overview. Then after you are fairly consistent and comfortable with this exercise, we can use the technique for double-stroke rolls, diddles, and other rudiments you can throw on a kit.

Then we have to talk about accents and taps and all kinds of other things.


Now I'm not saying it's bad to go ahead and jam to "When the Levee Breaks", by all means go have fun with that! But it is not be personal and formerly semiprofessional opinion that that is where the bulk of your time should be used at this point.
  #57  
Old 01-26-2020, 03:07 PM
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This is a good video to show exactly what 8-on-a-hand should look like. You don't have to watch the whole video, but I thought it was funny that it sounds like I ripped off the guy giving the explanation. That's just pretty universally how drum teacher explain the concept.
  #58  
Old 01-26-2020, 04:14 PM
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Thanks very much Sicks Ate, this is awesomely helpful. I've noticed that a lot of the Youtube videos that claim to be "your first drum lesson" start out with beat patterns. As you note, there are some important things I need to know before that point, like how to hold the stick, how to strike, etc.
  #59  
Old 01-26-2020, 04:40 PM
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Oh, a grip question. I've been using matched grip, which seems to be what you are suggesting above. Is there any reason to consider traditional grip? (You can assume I will never be marching while playing.)
  #60  
Old 01-26-2020, 05:56 PM
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Thanks very much Sicks Ate, this is awesomely helpful. I've noticed that a lot of the Youtube videos that claim to be "your first drum lesson" start out with beat patterns. As you note, there are some important things I need to know before that point, like how to hold the stick, how to strike, etc.
You're absolutely welcome! It's been a (long) while since I needed to flex those muscles, so that was fun. All my boys were stoked to discover my box of drumming misc. just recently, so I'm also looking forward to teaching at least one of them.

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Oh, a grip question. I've been using matched grip, which seems to be what you are suggesting above. Is there any reason to consider traditional grip? (You can assume I will never be marching while playing.)
Technically, there is absolutely zero advantage to traditional grip.

Stylistically...well, it's called 'traditional' grip. It looks cooler, more classic. And if that becomes something that you want to make part of your style, then do. But learn match first.

As far as marching, traditional grip doesn't make any sense there either. It's just the way it's always been done, and yes it does look cooler. There have been small movements to just say hell with traditional and switch to match for the snare drums, but they always dwindle out.
  #61  
Old 01-26-2020, 09:05 PM
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What do you think of "open-handed" drumming Sicks Ate? The matched vs trad grip question made me think of it. This is probably beyond the scope of a beginner's drum lessons, but then again, maybe it isn't. By open drumming I mean hi-hat on the left hand and snare on the right instead of crossing over as is more traditional. This seems to make a hell of a lot more sense to me, and while the crossed-hand style is what I personally mostly do (except when I'm tying to give my left hand a workout), it is something I feel would have been advantageous to learn early on.
  #62  
Old 01-26-2020, 11:12 PM
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What do you think of "open-handed" drumming Sicks Ate? The matched vs trad grip question made me think of it. This is probably beyond the scope of a beginner's drum lessons, but then again, maybe it isn't. By open drumming I mean hi-hat on the left hand and snare on the right instead of crossing over as is more traditional. This seems to make a hell of a lot more sense to me, and while the crossed-hand style is what I personally mostly do (except when I'm tying to give my left hand a workout), it is something I feel would have been advantageous to learn early on.
Opinion forthwith, but full disclosure I chose my kit vs. rudimental/marching path pretty early, and obviously chose rudimental/marching. That said, I put my time in behind a set of drums and took lessons through my late teens. It just wasn't what resonated with me at the time.

Open handed drumming sounds pretty good when you assume the right hand is usually on the hi-hat. As soon as you throw it on a ride or cowbell or something else that is usually set up NOT on the left side of the snare, all assumptions about that go out the window. Considering that most fills etc. will lead with the right, the left will follow right behind coming off of the snare.

Honestly, I think any really able drummer could pull off either. There are left-handed drummers, after all. Throw your ride up on the left side over the hat and just cruise from there? Totally do-able.

Once again, it might just go back to tradition and how most drummers are taught.

Last edited by Sicks Ate; 01-26-2020 at 11:13 PM.
  #63  
Old 01-26-2020, 11:19 PM
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Good luck dude. I lack the ability to push good sounds out of musical instruments. But I appreciate the people who can. From time to time I get hung up on you tube drumming videos that I can't stop watching like this one,

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WnLHTs8CyUI

it's like magic to me.
I just got around to watching this. Wasn't familiar with the song, but I LOVE the sound of his drums. So fat. Might be mic'd up and processed, but props anyway.

Edit: And just when I thought I had forgotten everything I know about rudimental drumming, I watch that video and realize that I'd be damn near completely lost behind a kit.....

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  #64  
Old 01-26-2020, 11:23 PM
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Thought of something

Ah, Okay. Brushes are your Friend. Not sure if they work on electronic drums.
  #65  
Old 01-27-2020, 12:45 AM
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Ok not to hijack, but I went down a YouTube rabbit hole as I am wont to do. I eventually wandered across this, which is an astounding example of what rudimental/marching drumming can be.
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Old 01-27-2020, 07:27 AM
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Ok not to hijack, but I went down a YouTube rabbit hole as I am wont to do. I eventually wandered across this, which is an astounding example of what rudimental/marching drumming can be.
Very cool! Thanks.
  #67  
Old 01-27-2020, 10:06 AM
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Honestly, I think any really able drummer could pull off either. There are left-handed drummers, after all. Throw your ride up on the left side over the hat and just cruise from there? Totally do-able.
Yeah, and there are also drummers who set up the hi-hat on the right of the kit, near the ride, and just use a remote pedal on the left, which wasn't possible with drum kits way back when. So, whatever works. It's just when I first approached drums in my teens, it kind of made sense to me to hit the hi-hat on the left with the left hand, and the ride on the right with the right hand. The whole crossed position seemed kind of odd to me, though I understand it if you're right hand dominant, you'll usually be playing faster and more complex patterns with that hand. At the time, I didn't really see "open drumming" as an option, but now I see more and more players drum that way, and it is kind of fun and liberating drumming that way, and it does seem to teach a bit more ambidexterity.

It's interesting for me to see how many different ways drummers drum. Like it sounds you use a forefinger fulcrum -- I was taught a middle finger fulcrum. I like the sticks feeling like they're balancing on their fulcrum point in my hand, and that's the traditional way to be taught, but then I see guys like Carter Beauford do the most ridiculous stickwork with his hands, but he holds them way back compared to normal. You're also taught not to hold your pinkies out, but if you watch Jimmy Chamberlin play, his snare hand often has the pinkie stick out. It seems like it's good to learn traditionally, but not be too concerned if one develops more idiosyncratic technique that is more comfortable, as long as it sounds right.
  #68  
Old 01-27-2020, 10:07 AM
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Ok not to hijack, but I went down a YouTube rabbit hole as I am wont to do. I eventually wandered across this, which is an astounding example of what rudimental/marching drumming can be.
God damn that is so clean, especially for a group that size.
  #69  
Old 01-27-2020, 10:20 AM
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Must disagree on that point. The best way to start practicing any instrument is to learn the fundamentals of the instrument and build on that. Starting out by playing along might work if you're a 12-year old kid, maybe by the time you're 18 or 20 you've figured it out by trial and error. Or maybe you're missing out because you never learned fundamentals that you can build on and apply.
Agree completely with this. "Just playing along" works for some instruments, but drumming is entirely about consistency and precision. Creativity comes after you've already mastered the fundamentals.

I have a friend that I grew up with that wanted to learn the drums so we could start a band, back in our 20s. We had a mutual friend who was an outstanding drummer who tried to teach the him, but he refused to learn the fundamentals because it was boring; he just wanted to bash. He was given simple, proven learning techniques, but he just wanted to be Jimmy Chamberlin from the jump. Needless to say, he was fucking terrible. He could start out a song okay, but the moment he tried to do anything besides a basic beat, which he would do almost immediately, it all fell apart.

Drummers who can't keep a simple, basic rhythm are absolutely useless. Don't be that guy.
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Old 01-27-2020, 11:20 AM
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That's not what I'm advocating at all, if you read the specifics of what I posted.
  #71  
Old 01-27-2020, 08:25 PM
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Thought of something

Ah, Okay. Brushes are your Friend. Not sure if they work on electronic drums.
I don't believe they work on electronic drums. The top is just a mesh held taut. There are electronics underneath it that I assume detect its movement. Brushing it won't produce much movement so I don't think it will do anything. Scratching the top with my fingernail doesn't produce any output sound.

Last edited by markn+; 01-27-2020 at 08:25 PM.
  #72  
Old 01-27-2020, 08:32 PM
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I don't want to turn this thread into a personal drum lesson, but I have a couple of technical questions if you guys don't mind.

I've been playing one of the weak hand exercises that Guest-starring: Id! linked to. It is alternating 16ths on the snare starting with the left hand, but with 2 on the 1st tom, 3 on the 2nd tom and 4 on the 3rd tom. A problem I'm having is when I try to hit 3rd tom with my left hand, I sometimes collide with my right stick. It seems natural after each strike to hold the stick up in preparation for the next, but in this case I guess I should be holding the right stick low to allow room for the left? Or should I be holding my left hand pretty high and striking way down to reach the tom? My 3rd tom is actually about an inch above my snare, but I see in a lot of photos of acousitic kits that 3rd tom is often lower than the snare, which would make this worse. Is it common to hit 3rd tom with the left hand in real playing rather than as an exercise?

Second question: when I hit the kick, does it matter if I leave my foot pressing down until the next strike? I'm unsure if holding the mallet against the drum affects its sound in an acoustic drum. As far as I can tell, it makes no difference with the electronic kick drum I'm using. Any other words of wisdom about proper kick technique would be appreciated.

BTW, Sicks Ate asked for a review of my Alesis kit and I fully intend to do that after I've had some more experience with it. Mostly I'm very happy with it so far although there are some things in the electronic user interface that I wish they'd done differently.
  #73  
Old 01-27-2020, 08:58 PM
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Second question: when I hit the kick, does it matter if I leave my foot pressing down until the next strike? I'm unsure if holding the mallet against the drum affects its sound in an acoustic drum. As far as I can tell, it makes no difference with the electronic kick drum I'm using. Any other words of wisdom about proper kick technique would be appreciated.
What you're doing is called "burying the beater." It's kind of considered sloppy by old-school drum teachers: you're supposed to let the beater rebound for the best tone. That said, a lot of drummers do bury it.
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Old 01-27-2020, 11:18 PM
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What you're doing is called "burying the beater." It's kind of considered sloppy by old-school drum teachers: you're supposed to let the beater rebound for the best tone. That said, a lot of drummers do bury it.
I've spent my whole life trying to "bury the beater", and now you're telling me I've been doing it wrong???
  #75  
Old 01-28-2020, 08:06 AM
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I've spent my whole life trying to "bury the beater", and now you're telling me I've been doing it wrong???
Assuming I'm not being whooshed by innuendo, it's not so much "wrong" as often seen as not ideal technique. Think of it a bit as if when you hit your drumheads with your sticks, you'd "bury" them into the head instead of letting them naturally rebound, and think about what that does to the tone. There's a Youtube discussion of it here with audio examples demonstrating the two. Burying the beater I would think is easier vs letting the beater rebound (especially if you're playing heel-up), so you should be happy you can let the drum properly resonate.
  #76  
Old 01-30-2020, 07:30 PM
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A problem I'm having is when I try to hit 3rd tom with my left hand, I sometimes collide with my right stick. It seems natural after each strike to hold the stick up in preparation for the next, but in this case I guess I should be holding the right stick low to allow room for the left? Or should I be holding my left hand pretty high and striking way down to reach the tom? My 3rd tom is actually about an inch above my snare, but I see in a lot of photos of acousitic kits that 3rd tom is often lower than the snare, which would make this worse. Is it common to hit 3rd tom with the left hand in real playing rather than as an exercise?
Most of these questions depend on what kind of a beat or fill you're playing. There can be so many variations, in this regard, that I can't see any fixed method for how high or low your stick attack should be. Your third tom - which, on an acoustic kit, would be your floor tom - is more or less on the same level with the snare in most set-ups. To add to your bounteous cornucopia of exercises, maybe try (super slowly!) 16ths between just the 2nd and 3rd toms (and between the snare and 3rd tom) until you find your own personal patterns in stick collision avoidance.

Does your foot rest completely flat on the pedal, or do you have just the ball of your foot resting on it? Usually the faster you play, the more sensible it is to have just the ball of your foot resting on the pedal to facilitate rapid response to kick-back (after you've struck the head with the mallet), and for more control. For basic, slow to mid-tempo beats, I myself just let the entire sole rest on the pedal. How do you find adjusting the tension on the kick and high hat pedals?

Alesis brand, I see. Their DM5 Module was frickin eh when I used to play.

Connected up its funky sequencer yet to record your playing?
  #77  
Old 01-30-2020, 10:54 PM
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Hey markn+, I was watching reviews of electronic drums thanks to this thread, and ran across this video. I like a lot of the things this guy says that demonstrate good fundamentals. I really like the camera angle where you you can see how his fingers work on the rebound.

I have quibbles with some things; his single-stroke rolls were very right-hand heavy, and his double-stroke rolls were weak on the second stroke. My initial diagnosis is partially because of the thumb-forefinger gap.

On another listen, his double-stroke rolls were right-hand heavy as well.

Actually, towards the end he's pretty sloppy. I guess the lesson is you can take good and bad things away from everybody you watch?

Last edited by Sicks Ate; 01-30-2020 at 10:55 PM.
  #78  
Old 01-30-2020, 11:14 PM
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And just for the hell of it, more gratuitous marching drumming porn.

Edit: Oh, and this.

Last edited by Sicks Ate; 01-30-2020 at 11:18 PM.
  #79  
Old 01-30-2020, 11:34 PM
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Hey markn+, I was watching reviews of electronic drums thanks to this thread, and ran across this video.
Thanks! I had actually run across that video a couple of days ago. I didn't notice the flaws in his playing though; thanks for pointing that out.

The latest update is I have engaged a drum teacher. I've decided there are too many little things that I don't feel I can adequately pick up just by watching videos, and I don't want to develop bad habits that I have to work on changing later. I had my first lesson with him today, and I feel it was very productive.
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Old 02-01-2020, 01:41 PM
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I've had my Alesis Surge for about a week now, so here is my initial review. Keep in mind that I'm not a drummer and in fact this is the first drum kit I've ever even touched, so take this all with a big grain of salt.

The drum heads are a taut mesh with the fibers spaced about half the spacing of standard window screening. I keep thinking it's going to rip if I hit it too hard but I'm sure that's not the case. The snare is 10" diameter and the three toms are 8" diameter. All three toms are physically identical; the software makes them produce different sounds. The drums detect rim shots and make a different sound for them. The hi-hat, crash and ride cymbals are likewise physically identical, each being a 10" plastic disk about 1/4" thick with a rubbery coating on the front half where you strike it. There is a marked area about 2" wide at the front of each cymbal where you can grab it to stop it ringing. I guess there's a hidden button there; grabbing it anywhere else has no effect on the ringing. The hi-hat pedal just electronically changes the sound of the hi-hat; there is no physical connection between the pedal and the hi-hat. The kick pedal strikes a vertical 8" drum head with a beater.

All the components are mounted on a frame made of 1.5" diameter chrome-plated tubing. The frame and all the physical components seem sturdy and well made.

The electronic module accepts a big plug which has a wire snaking out to each drum and cymbal. There are jacks for connecting a fourth tom and a second crash but these components are not included with the base set. There is a standard 3.5 mm output jack to connect headphones or the like, and two TRS jacks to connect a monitor (left and right, although I'm not sure why drums need stereo output). There is a 3.5 mm input jack, whose purpose puzzled me for a while until I realized it's handy for playing with headphones on. You can plug in a music source and hear it along with the drums through the headphones. There are also MIDI in and out jacks, and a USB port which the manual says can send MIDI to a computer but I haven't tried to use any of those.

The module has a number of learning features. It has a metronome which you can set to one of 40 different time signatures. While the metronome is running, when you strike a drum the module will flash an indicator of whether the strike was "good", "fast" or "slow". It has a set of beats (snare only) and rhythms (full kit) which you can play along with. When you're playing a beat or rhythm, it will give you score at the end from 0-100 indicating how well you did. It also has a set of 80 songs that you can play along with. When playing a song, you can independently control the volume of the drums and the accompaniment. So you could for example mute the drum track so you can only hear your own drum playing. You can adjust the speed of the metronome, beats, rhythms and songs, from 30 BPM to 180 BPM.

You can choose between 40 different "kits", which changes the sound of each of the drums & cymbals, making them sound for example like steel drums etc. You can also directly tweak the sounds, by adjusting the voice, pitch, reverb, and a few other things. I haven't played around much with the different kits or tweaks.

The module has a set of 12 buttons, each of which is associated with one drum or cymbal. Pressing a button produces the sound of the associated instrument. Each button also has a light on it which flashes when you hit the associated instrument. I have not yet discerned any useful purpose for these buttons, except that when playing a rhythm, the lights show you which instruments should be hit.

My biggest complaint is the user interface in the module. There is a large 6 chracter display, 3 letters followed by 3 digits. This is pretty much the entire UI. Pressing buttons brings up cryptic abbreviations on the display like "BEA004" (beat #4), "PTN022" (pattern #22), "SEN012" (pad sensitivity = 12), etc. It's a pretty crude interface. There's also a somewhat confusing mode system -- you are in either "normal" mode or "learning" mode, but some features that I would consider "learning", like playing along with a song, are accessed in "normal" mode while others like playing along to a rhythm are in "learning" mode. However when you're just playing the drums rather than messing around with learning features, you rarely need to interact with the module's UI.
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Old 02-01-2020, 02:37 PM
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The hi-hat pedal just electronically changes the sound of the hi-hat; there is no physical connection between the pedal and the hi-hat.
Really? So, as you're playing it, it won't let you slightly open and close it to create the usual sound variances that an opening and closing acoustic (metal) hi-hat would?
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Old 02-01-2020, 02:52 PM
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You can strike the hi-hat and then hit the pedal ("close" it) while it's ringing, which does damp the sound like an acoustic one does, but it's all software magic; the pedal isn't doing anything physical to the hi-hat disk itself. I don't think that you can strike it while it's closed and then open it to change the sound, or at least I haven't been able to achieve any timing of strike & pedal that does that. I also don't think you can "slightly" open/close it -- I think there's just a binary switch in the pedal that is either open or closed.
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Old 02-01-2020, 03:00 PM
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Really? So, as you're playing it, it won't let you slightly open and close it to create the usual sound variances that an opening and closing acoustic (metal) hi-hat would?
It'll probably depend on the kit. The hi-hat trigger I have (which is just a pedal--the hat itself is just a normal cymbal pad that doesn't open or close) does allow at least three different levels: open, closed, partially closed (and, of course, a "foot" hat.) I'm not sure how many levels of partially open/closed it distinguishes. If you just have a binary response, that's something you can almost certainly upgrade.
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Old 02-01-2020, 03:14 PM
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Ah, interesting, thanks for both repsonses.
Curious if there's other electronic cymbal types, like for chinas, splashes, etc. (google-fu is failing me.)
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Old 02-11-2020, 07:59 PM
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Any more opinions from markn+ or anyone else on the Alesis kits? I'm going to order the Nitro Mesh soon for the kids and me to bang on. Going to get a bunch of O/T w/ holiday pay tomorrow, and Five Four (and 3/4) suggested I go ahead and get it.
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Old 02-14-2020, 06:25 PM
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Hey markn+, how's the drummin' comin'?
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Old 02-14-2020, 10:01 PM
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.....don’t they have machines for that now?

— Uke, horns and keyboard
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  #88  
Old 02-14-2020, 10:04 PM
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Ya heard about the drummer who thought “five to the bar” meant the combo was taking a break?
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Old 02-14-2020, 10:05 PM
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.....sorry, coming in late. Have all the drummer jokes already been made?
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Old 02-15-2020, 02:46 AM
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i only have one:

whats the difference between a drummer and a drum machine?

you only have to punch the instructions into a drum machine once.

anyhoo, excellent thread - i've been fascinated to read about mark's journey into drumming and all the expertise on offer here
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