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Old 01-18-2020, 09:48 PM
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I want to learn drumming


I've been thinking about trying to learn drumming. I don't want a full drum kit in my house, both because of the space it takes and because of the volume of the sound it produces (I have some hearing loss and try to protect myself from loud sounds). So I'm thinking about an electronic drum set. I see a lot of these things basically seem to be toys, marketed to children. Is this a viable way to learn to drum? What should I be looking for in buying an electronic drum set for serious use?

I guess another option would be something like bongos, although I know that's an entirely different kind of drumming, altogether. (Pause.) It seems to me (knowing basically nothing about drumming) that kit-type drumming is more versatile since you can produce more different sounds.

Any advice would be appreciated.
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Old 01-18-2020, 09:52 PM
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Drummers usually start out with a practice pad. They're not expensive, and allow you to start the basics.
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Old 01-18-2020, 09:56 PM
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Most electronic sets I see for sale are not toys for kids. Go to a local music store to see what drum sets they have and the cost. If you want to be quiet and save space electronic is the way to go. It's always best to get lessons at first in person from a local person. If you can't do that there are DVDs and books and websites . Even Youtube has lessons.
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Old 01-18-2020, 10:48 PM
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Most electronic sets I see for sale are not toys for kids.
Yeah, I have this kit at home. I've upgraded certain aspects of it (mesh snare trigger, kick drum trigger than takes a normal drum pedal, a different hi-hat trigger), but it's a perfectly fine to learn on. Now, I'm not really a drummer -- I'm a keyboardist who's screwed around with drums for several decades and has an acoustic kit and all, but I do think they are great. Are they different? Sure -- plenty of differences between an acoustic kit and an e-kit. But you can learn the basics of rhythm and drumming and limb independence and those sorts of stuff on either. Rhythm is rhythm. Coordination is coordination. And the electronic kits have lots of useful tools for learners on them, like built-in metronome, practice modes that show you how closely you hew to the beat (i.e. show you whether you're rushing or dragging a rhythm), built-in songs you can drum out to, etc.

They're definitely not just kids' toys.
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Old 01-19-2020, 06:30 AM
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Another vote for the electronic set being perfectly fine to learn on, and they're not toys. Like pulykamell, I'm not really a drummer, but I've got both an acoustic and an electronic set. Yeah, they do react differently from a real drum set - a real acoustic drum set allows more levels of volume, etc. There seems to be about 3 different levels of strike sensitivity in my Simmons kit, the acoustic set doesn't have that limitation. For most purposes, the electronic kit is fine. You could easily play a gig with one. Depending on the style, it might be more appropriate than the acoustic set.

Also, I've played the electronic kit tons more than I ever played the acoustic kit. The convenience of not having to wait until the house is empty to practice means I don't have to plan it out. If I have a few minutes and want to, I can. Plus, if you're trying to protect your hearing, you probably want to be nowhere near a snare drum. They don't take up that much less space than an acoustic set, though. However, you can fold them up and move them out of the way more easily.
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Old 01-19-2020, 11:04 AM
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Originally Posted by pulykamell View Post
Yeah, I have this kit at home.
Ah, I had been looking at all-in-one units like this or even roll-up units like this. Are these junk?

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Originally Posted by scabpicker View Post
There seems to be about 3 different levels of strike sensitivity in my Simmons kit, the acoustic set doesn't have that limitation.
I hadn't even considered strike sensitivity. Multiple levels seems important. Are there other features that differ between products that I should be looking for?
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Old 01-19-2020, 12:04 PM
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Drummers usually start out with a practice pad. They're not expensive, and allow you to start the basics.
Iím a little conflicted. I learned this way when I was 12 or so - playing on a pad and playing snare drum in school. I learned the Ďrudimentsí and went from there. There is a lot of limb independence required for drumming - each limb playing a different thing so step 1 is getting your hands coordinated, developing technique, stroke, speed, etc. A lot of top drummers started this way.

On the other hand, if you just want to play a simple beat and thrash around you can probably get a simple kit, electronic or acoustic, watch some YouTube videos and have at it. Thatís kind of expensive though if it turns out you donít really like it.
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Old 01-19-2020, 12:23 PM
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you can always sell the kit on craigslist if you don't like drumming.
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Old 01-19-2020, 12:45 PM
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. There seems to be about 3 different levels of strike sensitivity in my Simmons kit.
That seems really low to me. My cheapie Roland set seems to put out a range of 7-bit MIDI velocity values (I mean, looking through my MIDI stream of recorded drum sounds, I see velocities differing by one or two, with a low of around 20-ish for ghosted notes and a high of 127 of course for fully accented notes -- but I also see values like 125, 104, 105, 81, 90, 92, 93, etc.)

Or do you mean the drum module only triggers samples at three velocity points, and just scales the volume in between? In that case, you can always route the sounds into a DAW and get a better set of drum sounds with more sampling points. That's what I do with my TD-!K, as I'm not particularly fond of the factory sounds. I mean, they're not bad, but even a free plug-in like MT Power Drum Kit 2, they sound much better and more realistic to me. For the not-free ones, Toontrack's EZ Drummer or Superior Drummer are fantastic.
  #10  
Old 01-19-2020, 12:49 PM
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Ah, I had been looking at all-in-one units like this or even roll-up units like this. Are these junk?
Oh, interesting. Yeah, those I don't know much about. You can still certainly learn coordination with those, and musicians certainly do use pads like that (though maybe something a bit nicer) from time to time in either a live or studio context.
  #11  
Old 01-20-2020, 08:13 AM
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Originally Posted by pulykamell View Post
That seems really low to me. My cheapie Roland set seems to put out a range of 7-bit MIDI velocity values (I mean, looking through my MIDI stream of recorded drum sounds, I see velocities differing by one or two, with a low of around 20-ish for ghosted notes and a high of 127 of course for fully accented notes -- but I also see values like 125, 104, 105, 81, 90, 92, 93, etc.)

Or do you mean the drum module only triggers samples at three velocity points, and just scales the volume in between? In that case, you can always route the sounds into a DAW and get a better set of drum sounds with more sampling points. That's what I do with my TD-!K, as I'm not particularly fond of the factory sounds. I mean, they're not bad, but even a free plug-in like MT Power Drum Kit 2, they sound much better and more realistic to me. For the not-free ones, Toontrack's EZ Drummer or Superior Drummer are fantastic.
Yeah, it's the latter, I believe. I'm really pretty happy with the triggers themselves, but the samples in the brain leave a little to be desired. I can hear it transition from one strike sample to the next at certain volume levels (really only on certain kits, but they happen to be the ones I like), and it's a little distracting as a player. I'm pretty sure someone listening would have no idea it was happening. It does allow you to record the performance and output it as MIDI, though. So putting it through a DAW is certainly possible if I ever end up with a performance better than an example to show my drummer what I was thinking of.


I've never used one of those pads, but the concept is the same as an electronic drum kit, just without the frame to mount it on. If I were going to get one, I'd make sure it was from a place with an easy return policy.
  #12  
Old 01-20-2020, 12:06 PM
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Drummers usually start out with a practice pad. They're not expensive, and allow you to start the basics.
Yep.

Get a practice pad and good sticks and start learning grip, stroke, rebound control, etc. Learn the basic https://www.pas.org/resources/rudiments rudiments and learn to read notes. Learn some rudimental snare drum pieces until you're pretty proficient. You might be surprised how enjoyable that can be.

Then get a kit. You'll be much better prepared than if you just get one and start thrashing around.

Sicks Ate, a pretty fine rudimental percussionist (back in the day, at least.)

Last edited by Sicks Ate; 01-20-2020 at 12:08 PM.
  #13  
Old 01-20-2020, 01:31 PM
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Get a practice pad and good sticks and start learning grip, stroke, rebound control, etc.
Followup question: what constitutes "good sticks"? Do differences in sticks matter a lot? What should I look for in buying sticks?
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Old 01-20-2020, 01:36 PM
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Followup question: what constitutes "good sticks"? Do differences in sticks matter a lot? What should I look for in buying sticks?
Vic Firth and ProMark are always safe bets. Look at size 5A or 2B, at this point its probably a matter of preference but I like thicker heavier sticks so I'd go with 2B.
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Old 01-20-2020, 01:50 PM
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Yeah, it's going to be a matter of preference, but if I were to throw one out there for someone starting out, I would say get a pair of Vic Firth 5As with wooden tips. (With a drum pad, the type of tip shouldn't really make any difference, I don't think, but I picked wooded tips because those are probably the most common ones.)
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Old 01-21-2020, 07:17 PM
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Thanks everyone for the advice. I've considered the advice to start on a practice pad, but having a little more money than patience at the moment, I've ordered the Alesis Surge Mesh drum kit. It has all mesh heads, which seems to be a good thing. I do plan to work on the rudiments though. I was impressed by reading Mickey Hart's books about his rudimental background and how it influenced his later musical work. Thanks again, I'm excited about starting this.

Last edited by markn+; 01-21-2020 at 07:19 PM.
  #17  
Old 01-21-2020, 07:23 PM
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Thanks everyone for the advice. I've considered the advice to start on a practice pad, but having a little more money than patience at the moment, I've ordered the Alesis Surge Mesh drum kit. It has all mesh heads, which seems to be a good thing. I do plan to work on the rudiments though. I was impressed by reading Mickey Hart's books about his rudimental background and how it influenced his later musical work. Thanks again, I'm excited about starting this.
Oh, wow, yeah. That looks like a nice starting kit.
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Old 01-21-2020, 07:42 PM
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Thanks everyone for the advice. I've considered the advice to start on a practice pad, but having a little more money than patience at the moment, I've ordered the Alesis Surge Mesh drum kit. It has all mesh heads, which seems to be a good thing. I do plan to work on the rudiments though. I was impressed by reading Mickey Hart's books about his rudimental background and how it influenced his later musical work. Thanks again, I'm excited about starting this.
Cool, and very nice! Check back on with some feedback on it after a while; I've been thinking hard for a while about getting a kit for me and the kids to jam around on.

And if you want some rudimental exercises to work on, let me know. I have a stack a few inches high and can scan you some stuff.
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Old 01-21-2020, 08:00 PM
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I have been playing drums for about 3 months now, after NEVER having played drums other than messing around on the drum kit of the drummer in the band that I played in in 2007 every once in a while for a few minutes at a time. I hadn't even played drum sets at Guitar Center just for the hell of it. For all intents and purposes I was starting from zero.

However I have played bass since I was 13 (I'm now 33) and played pretty seriously and consistently for the past 5 years. I guess since I've spent countless hours standing next to drummers, I picked up the drums really fast - enough so that I've been able to sit in on the kit during jam sessions and hold my own (haven't yet performed on drums though.)

I already had the sense of rhythmic timing from the decades of playing bass. I already had the intuitive sense of what a proper rock drum part is supposed to sound like, from decades of listening, very intently, to music. But what was hard for me at the beginning was the physicality of it. Using all four of my limbs independently to play different parts was utterly foreign to me.

What I found worked really well, in teaching myself to feel comfortable with the physicality of it, was to SLOW down whatever beat I was playing until I was able to consistently play everything properly. Once I slowed it down enough, I found that I could consistently get the hi-hat rhythm on my left hand, the sustain of the hi-hat with my left foot, the kick rhythm with my right foot, and the snare or tom hits with my right hand, all where they needed to be. And then I'd just keep repeating it until I could do it without thinking about it. Only then would I attempt to play it at speed, along with whatever song I was playing with.

So my advice would be: SLOW, SLOW, SLOOOOOOW down on the drums if you feel confused by the beat. Slow it down and REPEAT playing whatever it is that you're trying to learn, until you can do it consistently; then gradually try it faster and faster.

Oh yeah - the other piece of advice I would offer, is to think of the hi-hat as the core of the drum set. The hi-hat (or in some cases the ride) is usually playing the most consistent part of the beat. So spend plenty of time just focusing on those, when you practice.

Last edited by Lamoral; 01-21-2020 at 08:04 PM.
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Old 01-21-2020, 09:03 PM
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So my advice would be: SLOW, SLOW, SLOOOOOOW down on the drums if you feel confused by the beat. Slow it down and REPEAT playing whatever it is that you're trying to learn, until you can do it consistently; then gradually try it faster and faster.
This is sage advice. Don't learn it fast and sloppy. Learn it slow and correctly and speed up the tempo like 4 bpm or so at a time to get up to speed. Learn the correct muscle memory.
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Old 01-22-2020, 12:01 AM
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Oh, wow, yeah. That looks like a nice starting kit.
Oh yeah, that's a nicer and more expensive kit than my electronic set (hey, it was on sale). The best part is that you can use whatever kick pedal you like with it. Even the base Pearl kick pedal from my acoustic set was a lot more easy to control than the one that came with my base Simmons set.

And yeah, slow any beat you are trying down as much as you can tolerate when practicing. When you have it nailed slow, you'll be better when doing it fast. That works on any instrument I've tried.
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Old 01-22-2020, 07:54 AM
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Oh, and listen to The Who. A lot.
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Old 01-22-2020, 09:17 AM
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That kit looks sweet... I'm tempted!

Yeah, practice slowly with metronome. Learn to count quarter/eighths as 1 and 2 and 3 and 4 and. Add sixteenths if needed as 1 ee and uh 2 ee and uh...

Start with good ergonomics from the beginning. The are many good online videos to help you. A drummer should be able to play for hours without getting too tired and without getting cramps, sore back, etc.
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Old 01-22-2020, 10:09 AM
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And familiarize yourself with triplet patterns - they're one of the most effective weapons in a drummer's arsenal for adding some variety to otherwise-straight beats. Listen to Ringo Starr's drum fills for good examples.
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Old 01-22-2020, 12:29 PM
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That kit looks sweet... I'm tempted!

Yeah, practice slowly with metronome. Learn to count quarter/eighths as 1 and 2 and 3 and 4 and. Add sixteenths if needed as 1 ee and uh 2 ee and uh...

Start with good ergonomics from the beginning. The are many good online videos to help you. A drummer should be able to play for hours without getting too tired and without getting cramps, sore back, etc.
Yeah, playing relaxed, with a loose body, is pretty key. You shouldn't be tightening up your muscles to keep up with a beat. If you are, you're going too fast and need to build up to that speed. There's a video -- wait, lemme see if I can find it -- here it is. It's Stewart Copeland giving a class to an amateur drummer. If you watch at around 1:20 onward, you can see just how tight and tense he looks drumming (okay, I might be a bit tense, too, drumming for Stewart Copeland, but you know what I mean.) Note Stewart's advice at around 1:50 "Relaxing is what it's all about."
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Old 01-22-2020, 12:32 PM
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Easy: just watch some videos of Neil Peart's drum solos, and do what he does.
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Old 01-22-2020, 01:08 PM
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Oh yeah, and one final thing. Sometimes when listening to the drum part in a song that you want to learn, you'll hear what sounds like an impossibly fast and precise sixteenth-note rhythm on the hi-hat, and you'll think, "how in the hell can I possibly play that, on top of all the other things in this beat?" And the answer is, you can't, because it's a shaker.
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Old 01-22-2020, 01:12 PM
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Oh yeah, and one final thing. Sometimes when listening to the drum part in a song that you want to learn, you'll hear what sounds like an impossibly fast and precise sixteenth-note rhythm on the hi-hat, and you'll think, "how in the hell can I possibly play that, on top of all the other things in this beat?" And the answer is, you can't, because it's a shaker.
Or it's Stewart Copeland or Carter Beauford playing.
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Old 01-22-2020, 01:31 PM
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I just want to be ready when I'm in the audience and the drummer passes out on stage, and the band calls for a drummer from the audience, like Scot Halpin. That happens a lot, right?
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Old 01-22-2020, 03:57 PM
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Easy: just watch some videos of Neil Peart's drum solos, and do what he does.
I used that same technique to learn how to play guitar: I just watched and listened to Frank Zappa relentlessly, then I just put my fingers where he did and voila! I sound just like Frank Zappa!
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Old 01-22-2020, 03:59 PM
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I just want to be ready when I'm in the audience and the drummer passes out on stage, and the band calls for a drummer from the audience, like Scot Halpin. That happens a lot, right?
Oh man, you have no idea... as a stagehand, if I had a nickel for every replacement drummer I've seen needed at the last moment...
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Old 01-22-2020, 07:29 PM
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I just want to be ready when I'm in the audience and the drummer passes out on stage, and the band calls for a drummer from the audience, like Scot Halpin. That happens a lot, right?
Follow a Spinal Tap tour.
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Old 01-22-2020, 09:37 PM
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I knew a drummer who thought “five to the bar” meant the combo was taking a break.
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Old 01-25-2020, 12:28 PM
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Been 'playing' for years, badly. Nothing to add. I'm not so much a drummer, just a guy that owns drums.

Have fun.
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Old 01-25-2020, 05:32 PM
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Plus, if you're trying to protect your hearing, you probably want to be nowhere near a snare drum.
The cymbals, though (especially a nice 20" Paiste "Rude" China Crash) are significantly worse for causing tinnitus.
(A moot comment, though, if we're dealing with electronics.)

Unfortunate, markn+, you didn't get an acoustic one soley for the joy of standing up on the kick drum in moments of narcissitic glory and world domination.

Bought your flashpots yet, I trust?
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Old 01-25-2020, 07:34 PM
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I've had the set for two days now.

I don't think I fully appreciated before now how inept my left hand is.
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Old 01-25-2020, 10:54 PM
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What exactly are you trying right now? Playing to songs? Any instuctional videos / manuals / in person?
As mentioned earlier - crucial to have the kit as ergonomically set up to your comfort / striking zone as possible.
Fighting with your kids over it? Can you (still) kick their ass technically? Will you need to soundproof the room or is it down in the basement (so that your wife won't hear)?

Yeah, not a bad-looking kit.
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Old 01-25-2020, 11:20 PM
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I've been following some YouTube videos. I did watch a couple about setting up a drum kit, and have spent some time fiddling with mine to where I think it's pretty good for me. I've done a few of the beginner lessons from this guy: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?lis...1IO31tE16CjUr2
He also has a structured series of lessons that you can get from his website. I started the first lesson. He wants me to do alternating eighth notes, then alternating 16ths, then alternating sextuplets. I'm really noticing that at higher speeds my right hand is doing fine and my left hand gets very sloppy.
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Old 01-25-2020, 11:43 PM
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I suggest you play along with an easy, slow song from whatever genre of music you like, and just do nothing but play with that song until you can play along with it perfectly. Then, after you're able to duplicate the original drum part, add something to it. And just keep experimenting with adding your own little fills to it. Keep at that one song until you are as comfortable with inhabiting the rhythmic space of that song as you are with breathing. With a slow, easy song, this should not be hard. I think this is the best practice you can get and I'd do this before you even try to watch any instructional videos.

When I started playing drums, my song was Cripple Creek Ferry by Neil Young. I swear I didn't play a single other song on those drums for about a week.
  #40  
Old 01-26-2020, 12:10 AM
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I'm really noticing that at higher speeds my right hand is doing fine and my left hand gets very sloppy.
I'm aware you know this (and stated multiple times earlier), but does needs to be reiterated - slow is beautiful. Especially when you say your left hand has been lacking: in a perfect world, it's good to advance so that your left hand can do what your right can. It's possible that this might not be achievable to a 100% extent, but at least (especially when practicing rudiments on snare, say) try to focus maybe a little more on your left hand, for a bit, with, dare I say, boring weaker-hand exercises.
One example, this dude shows some good exercises (as well as having a metronome click, and showing tab!). While his explaining might be a bit much, when he gets to the actual demo it's really easy for any beginner to follow, and one of the advantages here is that his weaker hand is the left one, which he's accordingly tailored the exercises to.

And, as Lamoral said, something off After the Gold Rush won't hurt, either.
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Old 01-26-2020, 08:18 AM
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He also has a structured series of lessons that you can get from his website. I started the first lesson. He wants me to do alternating eighth notes, then alternating 16ths, then alternating sextuplets. I'm really noticing that at higher speeds my right hand is doing fine and my left hand gets very sloppy.
As said, slow it down until you can get it to a speed that you can play along with, and speed it up maybe 4 bpm at a time. Do not continue playing it sloppy, as it will engrain bad habits and bad muscle memory. It may takes weeks or perhaps even months to get up to full tempo, but give it time. Also, learn to play the notes in a relaxed manner and evenly (or perhaps with groups of notes accented--depends on what the lesson is.) And switch off with doing the excercises leading with your right hand and leading with your left hand so you're equally comfortable to play groupings as RLRLRLRL and LRLRLRLR. Don't get ahead of yourself. You don't need to be doing blazing fast sextuplets yet.

Last edited by pulykamell; 01-26-2020 at 08:19 AM.
  #42  
Old 01-26-2020, 08:29 AM
Isamu is offline
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Good luck dude. I lack the ability to push good sounds out of musical instruments. But I appreciate the people who can. From time to time I get hung up on you tube drumming videos that I can't stop watching like this one,

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WnLHTs8CyUI

it's like magic to me.
  #43  
Old 01-26-2020, 08:32 AM
pulykamell is online now
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And I probably would also start incorporating more of my limbs into early lessons as well, but it's hard for me to remember how I started. Maybe something like first doing hi-hat eighth notes at 60 bpm; then once I'm comfortable with that, adding kick on one and three; and once I'm comfortable with that, adding the left hand snare. Just an idea, but that will get you the backbone of a basic rock beat.

Last edited by pulykamell; 01-26-2020 at 08:32 AM.
  #44  
Old 01-26-2020, 11:23 AM
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Thanks for all the advice everyone, I really appreciate it. I want to ask about Lamoral's advice though:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lamoral View Post
I suggest you play along with an easy, slow song from whatever genre of music you like, and just do nothing but play with that song until you can play along with it perfectly.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Guest-starring: Id! View Post
And, as Lamoral said, something off After the Gold Rush won't hurt, either.
So I'm a bit puzzled by this. First, it seems to contradict Sicks Ate's advice in #12 to NOT just "thrash around". Second, I'm a bit concerned that Lamoral and Guest-starring: Id! think that this is even possible for me. Should a completely inexperienced drummer be able to pick up a pair of sticks and start playing along to a song? That seems way beyond my abilities at this point.

I did learn the "money beat". (Not sure if that's standard terminology; it's 1/8 notes on the closed hi-hat with kick on 1 and 3, and snare on 2 and 4.) And I've tried playing that along to When the Levee Breaks which is kind of fun, but doesn't feel like I'm developing new skills like it does when I learn beats. If I were to deviate from the money beat, I feel like I'd quickly get lost and have to stop and catch up to the beat again. And I'd just be using ad hoc beats and fills that I invent myself and (I guess) won't actually use once I learn the real methodology.

I mean, no one would tell someone to start learning piano or guitar by just fooling around with the instrument and try to play along with a song. So I feel like I may be misunderstanding this advice.
  #45  
Old 01-26-2020, 11:33 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by markn+ View Post
I did learn the "money beat". (Not sure if that's standard terminology; it's 1/8 notes on the closed hi-hat with kick on 1 and 3, and snare on 2 and 4.)
Very nice. That's a good start. I would then maybe move on to adding one more note to the kick drum. Keeping the pattern you already have above, one beat is is to add the kick drum right before the 3 (on the "2 and" beat. It should sound a little bit like a "heartbeat" now.) and the other beat is to add a kick on the eighth note after the 3 (a simple, "driving" rock beat.) Those two are what I would characterize as the quintessential rock beats, even more so than the "money beat."

And then there's also the "four to the floor" beat where the kick is on all fours. Pay attention so you're hitting the notes cleanly together when they coincide and that you're not "flamming" them (playing them slightly apart.) You want it sounding pretty tight and clean when you're learning (you can learn to drag or push certain aspects of the beat later, if you want to.)

Last edited by pulykamell; 01-26-2020 at 11:34 AM.
  #46  
Old 01-26-2020, 11:45 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by markn+ View Post
Should a completely inexperienced drummer be able to pick up a pair of sticks and start playing along to a song? That seems way beyond my abilities at this point.
Fair enough - might as well not pursue that end quite yet if it doesn't feel right for you.
(Eventually, though, you will start to hear easy beats in songs that you will be able to replicate.)

In the meantime Pulykamell's advice has been excellent for getting started. (heh and that video I linked!)
  #47  
Old 01-26-2020, 11:53 AM
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you can always sell the kit on craigslist if you don't like drumming.
You mean if you can't drum up enough enthusiasm to continue?
  #48  
Old 01-26-2020, 01:02 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by markn+ View Post
So I'm a bit puzzled by this. First, it seems to contradict Sicks Ate's advice in #12 to NOT just "thrash around". Second, I'm a bit concerned that Lamoral and Guest-starring: Id! think that this is even possible for me. Should a completely inexperienced drummer be able to pick up a pair of sticks and start playing along to a song? That seems way beyond my abilities at this point.


Yeah I'm telling you dude.... If you've never hit a drum before, you need to be spending a significant amount of your practice time at this point playing eighth notes and sixteenth notes on one drum*. You'll learn much more about how drums and drumsticks act starting that way and it will serve you well when you start moving around the drums.

* With a metronome / click track.

Last edited by Sicks Ate; 01-26-2020 at 01:04 PM.
  #49  
Old 01-26-2020, 01:09 PM
pulykamell is online now
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Originally Posted by Sicks Ate View Post
Yeah I'm telling you dude.... If you've never hit a drum before, you need to be spending a significant amount of your practice time at this point playing eighth notes and sixteenth notes on one drum*. You'll learn much more about how drums and drumsticks act starting that way and it will serve you well when you start moving around the drums.

* With a metronome / click track.
Maybe you can chime in as well, but I found the most useful exercises beginning was practicing single stroke rolls, double stroke rolls, and paradiddles (and variants of these).
  #50  
Old 01-26-2020, 02:08 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pulykamell View Post
Maybe you can chime in as well, but I found the most useful exercises beginning was practicing single stroke rolls, double stroke rolls, and paradiddles (and variants of these).

I'm going to have to be careful not to get in to instructor mode and write an essay.....

K after trying to think about how to say what I want succubus, I'm going to have to get on a keyboard because this is going to take too long on a phone!

Back with you guys later.
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