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  #201  
Old 02-03-2020, 05:31 PM
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I laughed every time they showed nude women lounging around in The Tudors. They all had absolutely perfect bodies and glowing skin. Not a hairy leg or armpit on any of them.
Not long ago, I saw a clip from a movie set in the 1960s. It showed a bunch of hippies frolicking unclad. The women all had Brazilian waxes.
  #202  
Old 02-03-2020, 06:10 PM
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The excellent HBO miniseries John Adams has period accurate teeth, especially for the old people. It's quite noticeable and I love it.

Honestly, even shows set today ought to have at least some people with terrible teeth. They're out there, in all walks of life, though the wealthy can usually get cosmetic surgery or implants.


This one annoys me every time. Even the otherwise accurate Deadwood has a lot of historically inappropriate hats. Pretty much anyone in any western who isn't wearing a Derby or Boss of the Plains (or the odd topper) is wrong.
Derbies were for townsfolk. The Boss of the Plains hat, or any of every wide brimmed "wideawake" felts hats were what cowboys wore.

A writer saw a lot of pictures of cowboys posed in dress up with derbies and assumed that that was what they wore, because yes, the sterotypical cowboy hat wasnt common until later. When Teddy Roosevelt wrote about his days as a rancher and hunter on the frontier, he said any cowboy wearing a bowler or similar hat would get it shot off.

This isnt the original article but it passes on the same wrong info.
https://www.ripleys.com/weird-news/cowboy-hats/

Here's a link to a article that shows real cowpokes out on the range, taking a "coffee break"- it shows none with "real" cowboy hats, but no bowlers either, they all have widebrimmed felt hats of one sort or another.

https://truewestmagazine.com/cowboy-coffee/

and here's another:
https://centerofthewest.org/2014/06/...-are-a-cowboy/

That article also sez: Hats typically varied from region to region, as the weather indicated what type of hat was needed. For instance cowboys of the northwest preferred smaller brims as they had high winds, and the southerners had larger brims, similar to sombreros, to protect cowboys from the rays of the sun. But no matter where the cowboy worked all hats were made out of felt with deep crowns. The deep crown of the cowboy hat was essential as it enabled it to stay on one’s head securely while riding a galloping horse [7].

By the 1890s, cowboys everywhere were wearing Stetson hats, designed by John B. Stetson [8]. His most popular designs were the peaked hats, nicknamed “Montana Peak,” and his ten-gallon Stetsons.


So yeah, the hat we call a cowboy hat came later in the period, but a widebrimmed felt hat was worn on the trail, not no derbies.

Last edited by DrDeth; 02-03-2020 at 06:10 PM.
  #203  
Old 02-03-2020, 07:30 PM
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Another thing that makes my gourd all frosty.

Two people, a pilot and a passenger, are riding in something like a DeHaviland Beaver, and conversing in normal tones of voice. I guarantee you, that big round engine is so loud that even shouting is barely hearable. in actuality, almost always each person is wearing headphones and a microphone so that they can talk to each other.
  #204  
Old 02-03-2020, 08:04 PM
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So yeah, the hat we call a cowboy hat came later in the period, but a widebrimmed felt hat was worn on the trail, not no derbies.
The 2010 remake of True Grit was one of the few westerns that tried to use authentic clothing styles from the era. A commentary from the movie mentioned the hat issue. You can see the results in this crowd scene.
  #205  
Old 02-03-2020, 10:56 PM
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Oh yes, this for sure! Doesn't every self-defense class teach this? I think the only time I saw it used was in Jumpin' Jack Flash when Whoopie took down one of the baddies - around the 1:30 mark.

I have to wonder, too - how many people, when being chased, will keep turning to look behind at their pursuer? Me, I'd be bookin' it at full speed till I couldn't - then maybe I'd look back.
Once in elementary my friend was chasing me for some reason and I stopped and gave him a huge kick 'you know where!' Everyone, especially the guys were *OOOOOOOooooo...WHY'D YOU DO THAT!" It was pure instinct at the time (and yeah, I'm a guy!) that probably hasn't left me!

TL;DR...Don't chase lingyi!
  #206  
Old 02-03-2020, 11:59 PM
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Whenever the script calls for an actor to fake playing an instrument, it is always done badly and the actor's movements obviously have no relationship to the sound purportedly being produced. It's like they don't even try. In Sherlock Benedict Cumberbatch doesn't even move the bow in any realistic way, and in A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood Tom Hanks's left hand is way too high on the piano for what notes are supposedly being played. Is it that hard for someone to study a bit for 5 minutes and tell them how to fake it? Or figure out camera angles so you don't actually see what their fingers are doing?

The only show I ever thought did a good job of faking this was House, then I learned recently that Hugh Laurie's side gig is professional musician and the show was actually significantly underselling what he can really do with a piano. So the hunt continues.
  #207  
Old 02-04-2020, 12:14 AM
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There are always three. Our hero never had a slow message day where there was only the one important message.
Nor are there ever dozen messages from scammers/robocalls.
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  #208  
Old 02-04-2020, 12:19 AM
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Whenever the script calls for an actor to fake playing an instrument, it is always done badly and the actor's movements obviously have no relationship to the sound purportedly being produced. It's like they don't even try. In Sherlock Benedict Cumberbatch doesn't even move the bow in any realistic way, and in A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood Tom Hanks's left hand is way too high on the piano for what notes are supposedly being played. Is it that hard for someone to study a bit for 5 minutes and tell them how to fake it? Or figure out camera angles so you don't actually see what their fingers are doing?

The only show I ever thought did a good job of faking this was House, then I learned recently that Hugh Laurie's side gig is professional musician and the show was actually significantly underselling what he can really do with a piano. So the hunt continues.
Ralph Macchio worked for months with Arlen Roth to make it look like he knew how to play guitar in Crossroads.
  #209  
Old 02-04-2020, 01:44 AM
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Ralph Macchio worked for months with Arlen Roth to make it look like he knew how to play guitar in Crossroads.
I wish Steve McQueen had taken a few fife lessons before they filmed The Great Escape. He would have at least learned how to hold the instrument properly.
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  #210  
Old 02-04-2020, 10:28 AM
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Hair styles that don't fit the period. "Happy Days", and "MASH". Shows set in the 50's where everybody has a 70's hairstyle, the era when those shows were made. (except the Fonz).

Even some westerns from the 30's and 40's, you can almost tell the period when they were made based on the women's hairstyles.
YES! This drives me crazy too. I've seen the dance hall girls in westerns from the 60s-70s wearing bright blue eyeshadow. Even as a kid watching MASH and Happy Days I noticed the styles were all wrong. I don't get it. It's like the actors refused to really look the part.
  #211  
Old 02-04-2020, 11:27 AM
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Both M*A*S*H - the movie and especially M*A*S*H - the series were full of allegories about the Vietnam war, hypocrisy of the government and the futility of the Vietnam War which was ongoing during the time of the movie and first years of the series. They never strived for accuracy, except for the surgery scenes, which in the series didn't have laugh track.

"As he concludes, undermining the falsely reassuring and overly optimistic message of the original film, "Guns, and bombs, and anti-personnel mines have more power to take life than we have to preserve it. Not a very happy ending for a movie. But then, no war is a movie," ("Yankee Doodle Doctor").

Hawkeye's speech, and other comments he makes throughout the series, reinforce the face that despite its setting in Korea, M*A*S*H is widely accepted as a critique of the Vietnam War, which is most evidenced in these early years (Shires)"

Source: https://mash.fandom.com/wiki/How_to_...o_do_the_same)

"While the show is traditionally viewed as a comedy, many episodes had a more serious tone. Early seasons aired on network prime time while the Vietnam War was still going on; the show was forced to walk the fine line of commenting on that war while at the same time not seeming to protest it. For this reason, the show's discourse, under the cover of comedy, often questioned, mocked, and grappled with America's role in the Cold War."

"The end of the Vietnam War in 1975 was a significant factor as to why storylines become less political in nature and more character driven. Several episodes also experimented with the sitcom format:

"Point of View" – shown from the perspective of a soldier with a throat wound
"Dreams" – an idea of Alda's, where during a deluge of casualties, members of the 4077 take naps on a rotation basis, allowing the viewer to see the simultaneously lyrical and disturbing dreams
"A War For All Seasons" – features a story line that takes place over the course of 1951
"Life Time" – a precursor to the American television series 24, it utilizes the real time method of narration[2]"

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/M*A*S*H_(TV_series)

The biggest physical change, especially in her hairstyles was Margaret who went from a parody of the '50's woman, striving to please the men in her life, Frank, Donald, her Dad, to an independently strong woman, reflected in the later years by her contemporary 70's, '80's hair styles.

Last edited by lingyi; 02-04-2020 at 11:30 AM.
  #212  
Old 02-04-2020, 11:44 AM
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Not long ago, I saw a clip from a movie set in the 1960s. It showed a bunch of hippies frolicking unclad. The women all had Brazilian waxes.
When he was directing Taking Woodstock, Ang Lee recreated a good many of the iconic photos from the original festival, like the guy waking with an American flag draped over his shoulders. Accordingly, for the skinny dipping hippy scene, the extras were hired months before the shoot so they could stop trimming or shaving and let it grow back in.

He also commented it was hard finding skinny people. "People were skinnier back then. We have skinny people today but it's a different kind of skinny."
  #213  
Old 02-04-2020, 12:01 PM
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Also, in poker, rich guy takes the deeds to the ranch out of his pocket and bets it. Wouldn't be allowed. See: table stakes. In the later Casino Royale, Le Chifre bets his car like this. The dealer protests about table stakes, but allows it. No way. They can't get 4% rake on a car.
That was a different character.
  #214  
Old 02-04-2020, 01:38 PM
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Also, in poker, rich guy takes the deeds to the ranch out of his pocket and bets it. Wouldn't be allowed. See: table stakes. In the later Casino Royale, Le Chifre bets his car like this. The dealer protests about table stakes, but allows it. No way. They can't get 4% rake on a car.
To get really picking my nits:

Casino Royale makes a much bigger gaffe in the poker scene. In the final hand, where everyone bets, and Bond and Le Chifre go all in, you don't reveal hands based on went all in first! You go with who had the most, or the side pot between the two who had the most, and then keep going down to the main pot.

In other words, it should have been Le Chifre and Bond revealing first for their side pot and then the winner being challenged for the other (side) pots until it's all won.

But that's not dramatic! It does throw me out of the scene, though.

I don't agree that it's table stakes but instead that you can only bet what you have in front of you. The others players have the right to know how much you can bet. (You don't have to count it for your opponent if they ask, just show your stack and let them count it.) It makes a big difference to bets if you can suddenly drop more onto the table or if you have more you are willing to bet. Even in cash games, you can't bet more than you started the hand with but can rebuy to keep the seat.
  #215  
Old 02-04-2020, 02:20 PM
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YES! This drives me crazy too. I've seen the dance hall girls in westerns from the 60s-70s wearing bright blue eyeshadow. Even as a kid watching MASH and Happy Days I noticed the styles were all wrong. I don't get it. It's like the actors refused to really look the part.
Military members with haircuts that would get them at the minimum gigged, if not immediately ordered to the barber.
  #216  
Old 02-12-2020, 03:05 PM
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I only starting noticing this after reading someone else mention it last year, but now I see it everywhere: in period movies all the cars are pristine. Cars parked in the background, driving past the characters, etc look like they came right out of a showroom, because they have. You’ll only ever see a car with damage if it’s a plot point, every single other car on the road looks shiny and brand new.
I noticed another related one while watching Young Sheldon last night. The current season is set circa 1990 I think. The cars shown, for the most part, fit the period, but they're pretty much all American sedans and wagons and pickups, which I'm pretty sure doesn't really represent an accurate mix of cars that actually would have been seen on the roads in those days. Where are the minivans? As I remember, minivans had become extremely by the late 1980s, pretty much killing off station wagons. Yet you never see minivans in shows set that era. They always show families driving around in station wagons, like Sheldon's mom.

And where are the imports? You might argue that Young Sheldon is set in Texas, where there was probably a stronger "buy American" mentality, but today a car blog I read featured a photo of a street in Dallas in the early 1980s. Yes, there are several American sedans, but also two Toyotas. And this is something I've noticed in other period shows as well. For that matter, you don't see many domestic compacts in period shows either. Never any Cavaliers or Escorts or Chevettes in shows set in the 80s, nor Pintos or Vegas in shows set in the 70s. I know, actually finding those cars is probably a pretty tall order for the producers -- I suspect finding a stock Vega is next to impossible.

Stranger Things did feature a Pinto as a character's car, which I thought was a nice touch. And an old beat up Ford LTD, avoiding the "every car looks brand new" problem.
  #217  
Old 02-12-2020, 04:03 PM
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I noticed another related one while watching Young Sheldon last night. The current season is set circa 1990 I think. The cars shown, for the most part, fit the period, but they're pretty much all American sedans and wagons and pickups, which I'm pretty sure doesn't really represent an accurate mix of cars that actually would have been seen on the roads in those days. Where are the minivans? As I remember, minivans had become extremely by the late 1980s, pretty much killing off station wagons. Yet you never see minivans in shows set that era. They always show families driving around in station wagons, like Sheldon's mom.

And where are the imports? You might argue that Young Sheldon is set in Texas, where there was probably a stronger "buy American" mentality, but today a car blog I read featured a photo of a street in Dallas in the early 1980s. Yes, there are several American sedans, but also two Toyotas. And this is something I've noticed in other period shows as well. For that matter, you don't see many domestic compacts in period shows either. Never any Cavaliers or Escorts or Chevettes in shows set in the 80s, nor Pintos or Vegas in shows set in the 70s. I know, actually finding those cars is probably a pretty tall order for the producers -- I suspect finding a stock Vega is next to impossible.
The problem here is that productions typically rely on renting vehicles from companies which specialize in such. Here's one.
  #218  
Old 02-12-2020, 07:43 PM
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The problem here is that productions typically rely on renting vehicles from companies which specialize in such. Here's one.
Fair enough, although I do note that their inventory does contain several 1980s Toyotas and Hondas, so it seems like they could show some of those in the background every so often. But it looks like their only 80s minivan has some pretty severe damage to it, like some previous production cut a hole in the hood for some reason. And not a single 80s domestic compact, and one really beat up Pinto in their 70s collection. But they do have multiple Gremlins and Pacers, some of the quirkiest cars of the 70s!
  #219  
Old 02-14-2020, 03:02 PM
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"A War For All Seasons" – features a story line that takes place over the course of 1951
And sent Col. Potter back in time.
  #220  
Old 02-15-2020, 08:13 AM
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I laughed every time they showed nude women lounging around in The Tudors. They all had absolutely perfect bodies and glowing skin. Not a hairy leg or armpit on any of them.
Body lice was a major problem. Not just cause of the itch but because of the diseases they carried.

People, and generally this meant the more upper crust folk (as well as the people that, um, dealt with them personally), shaved everything they could. Hence wigs and merkins.
  #221  
Old 02-15-2020, 08:42 AM
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Seconded. More rare, but equally stupid: a space ship that takes a severe hit in battle then starts going down. In space.
But we have a similar situation in Sharknado so we know this is what actually happens. Shoot (or spear or chainsaw) a shark being tossed around by tornado-level winds and it will immediately fall out of the sky. I've seen it.
  #222  
Old 02-15-2020, 09:48 AM
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But we have a similar situation in Sharknado so we know this is what actually happens. Shoot (or spear or chainsaw) a shark being tossed around by tornado-level winds and it will immediately fall out of the sky. I've seen it.
Well, they couldn't put it in a movie if it wasn't true!
  #223  
Old 02-15-2020, 10:01 AM
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Just saw this one again for the umpteenth time on Chicago PD.
Cops get a tip on a suspects whereabouts so two plainclothes detectives go to find and question them. Maybe at a church, or a factory, a retail store, etc.
When they find the guy, rather than one cop slowly approaching them while the other cop circles around the other side of the suspect to have them trapped, they stand next to each other and call out the suspects name from across the room “Hey, Jim Brown! We want to talk to you!” and 10 times out of 10 the guy/gal takes off on foot escaping out a back door.
  #224  
Old 02-15-2020, 11:21 AM
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Whenever the script calls for an actor to fake playing an instrument, it is always done badly and the actor's movements obviously have no relationship to the sound purportedly being produced.
I encourage you to seek out the film 'Round Midnight to see an excellent way to avert this problem: hire actual musicians and let them actually play the songs on film.
  #225  
Old 02-15-2020, 01:05 PM
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That's just crazy talk.
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  #226  
Old 02-15-2020, 02:37 PM
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Whenever the script calls for an actor to fake playing an instrument, it is always done badly and the actor's movements obviously have no relationship to the sound purportedly being produced. It's like they don't even try.
An early SNL skit had John Belushi as Beethoven, quietly composing a sonata or whatever when he suddenly goes into Ray Charles mode. I think he might have been doing "What'd I Say". He's facing us while seated at the piano so we can't say his arms below the elbows. Big laugh from the audience as he performs a huge glissando ("sliding" fingers up or down the keyboard). We hear a right-to-left (high-to-low) glissando but Belushi mimes the opposite action (low -to-high). The disconnect between sight and sound was hilarious. It had to have been intentional.

Last edited by TreacherousCretin; 02-15-2020 at 02:37 PM.
  #227  
Old 02-15-2020, 03:07 PM
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I encourage you to seek out the film 'Round Midnight to see an excellent way to avert this problem: hire actual musicians and let them actually play the songs on film.
Agreed. Another workaround which didn't impress me can be seen in Five Easy Pieces, Jack Ncholson's first film after Easy Rider, IIRC.
Jack's character is a former child prodigy classical pianist who'd dropped out of his life for many years, and is now revisiting his estranged family. At one point he plays a piano piece for his sister (or with her, can't remember - the entire family is ). The hype was that Nicholson actually "learned to play classical piano" for the scene. I was underwhelmed when Jack's performance was Chopin's Prelude in E minor, a slow and extremely easy piece to play. No matter how many years he'd been away from the instrument, a former prodigy choosing a piece for advanced beginners* in that situation strained credibility.

* In my snooty opinion. Also, even an easy piece can be played superbly, mechanically, or adequately. I don't remember where Jack's performance would fall.
  #228  
Old 02-15-2020, 05:43 PM
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I apologize if this is posted upthread, but:

Someone gently closing the staring eyes of the recently deceased corpse.

Can't do it. Tried twice (ie, two corpses). There's a GQ OP I posted on that somewhere.
  #229  
Old 02-16-2020, 01:07 PM
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An early SNL skit had John Belushi as Beethoven, quietly composing a sonata or whatever when he suddenly goes into Ray Charles mode...The disconnect between sight and sound was hilarious. It had to have been intentional.
Speaking of intentional, remember "Dancing in the Dark" with Gilda Radner and Steve Martin? Gilda's skirt and blouse are two different shades of white. That could have been a matter of the show's costume department having to make do with what they had. Or it could have been intentional, and I choose to take it that way, because it's that extra little dollop of absurdity.
  #230  
Old 02-16-2020, 02:36 PM
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Detectives are looking at a digital image but want to see something that's not in the frame. They find a reflective surface in the image and zoom in on that to get a different view. Sometimes they need to further zoom in on a 2nd mirror before they can see their target. Digital images cannot be enhanced like that.

In some shows, this is done like slapstick, but I've also seen it taken seriously on CSI.

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Another one...."But I don't have that much..."

AND??? Bet what you have.
Some movies set in the 1800's have as a theme that a player must borrow money, or throw in the deed to his land, to call a bet exceeding his table stake. I've always assumed this was fiction, but are we sure?
  #231  
Old 02-16-2020, 02:41 PM
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...The hype was that Nicholson actually "learned to play classical piano" for the scene. I was underwhelmed when Jack's performance was Chopin's Prelude in E minor, a slow and extremely easy piece to play. No matter how many years he'd been away from the instrument, a former prodigy choosing a piece for advanced beginners* in that situation strained credibility.

* In my snooty opinion. Also, even an easy piece can be played superbly, mechanically, or adequately. I don't remember where Jack's performance would fall.
I had to look up that piece since I am clueless about classical music....and I agree that it is one that a beginner ought to be able to play--even me with my totally non-existent skillz at the piano could probably learn to play it.

But it's all in your asterisk. It sure sounds like a piece that has a HUGE amount of room for expression--it really sounds like you have to have had your dog die that morning in order to evoke the correct mood to play it as intended.

Now I have to dig up Jack's performance and see if it is full of emotion.
  #232  
Old 02-16-2020, 04:08 PM
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I had to look up that piece since I am clueless about classical music....and I agree that it is one that a beginner ought to be able to play--even me with my totally non-existent skillz at the piano could probably learn to play it.

But it's all in your asterisk. It sure sounds like a piece that has a HUGE amount of room for expression--it really sounds like you have to have had your dog die that morning in order to evoke the correct mood to play it as intended.

Now I have to dig up Jack's performance and see if it is full of emotion.
Here you go.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CbUvLbgnxIQ
  #233  
Old 02-16-2020, 05:36 PM
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nor Pintos or Vegas in shows set in the 70s.
So I've finally gotten around to watching Mindhunter, and although I've only watched two episodes so far I have to give them credit -- I spotted two Pintos in episode 2. Not going to hold my breath for a Vega, though.
  #234  
Old 02-16-2020, 06:11 PM
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Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Moscow, Idaho
Posts: 5,765
Quote:
Originally Posted by WildaBeast View Post
So I've finally gotten around to watching Mindhunter, and although I've only watched two episodes so far I have to give them credit -- I spotted two Pintos in episode 2. Not going to hold my breath for a Vega, though.
They've probably all rusted away to dust by now.

Speaking as the proud owner of a new '72 Vega that despite proper care and mild San Diego climate was literally worthless four years later (except for the tires). The LONG list of problems included rusted-out holes you could put your hand through. Click and Clack said you could HEAR a Vega rusting, and I almost believe them.
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