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Old 08-31-2019, 08:06 AM
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Small/subtle human trends & behaviors that have slowly subsided since the 70s/80s.


I'm 52. Every now and then I suddenly realize I don't see something anymore.

Just last week I saw a man jogging without a shirt on. Back in the 1970s it was very common to see a man walking around bare chested. Today it's a very rare occurrence.

Mustaches were very common among men in the 1970s. I think only state troopers have them now.

Perhaps it's my imagination, but I swear women's facial expressions have changed over the past 40 years. Women used to smile more. Now the "stone/cold/serious" face seems to be the norm.

The most obvious one, of course, is cigarette smoking. I'm glad that's gone away.
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Old 08-31-2019, 08:14 AM
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Confirmation bias
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Old 09-01-2019, 08:48 AM
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Confirmation bias
No, I still see plenty of confirmation bias.
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Old 08-31-2019, 08:46 AM
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Here's one: Flat tires. Tire technology has become so good, they're much more rare than they used to be. I had one friend years ago whose tire was so worn down you could see the steel belting*, and yet it didn't go flat. I've only ever had one flat, and that was because, unbeknownst to me, a screw penetrated the tire, and then I parked with the tire in just the right position to have the screw open a small hole for the air to leak out.

As a kid in the 70s, I remember my dad changing tires far more often than I ever have. "Oh, no, a flat!" used to be a standard plot point in movies and TV. Not so much any more.


*Yes, his family were just that clueless about cars. I'll tell you the battery light story some other time.
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Old 08-31-2019, 09:24 AM
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Here's one: Flat tires. Tire technology has become so good, they're much more rare than they used to be. I had one friend years ago whose tire was so worn down you could see the steel belting*, and yet it didn't go flat. I've only ever had one flat, and that was because, unbeknownst to me, a screw penetrated the tire, and then I parked with the tire in just the right position to have the screw open a small hole for the air to leak out.
Yeah, that's a good one. I remember when "my new car doesn't have a spare tire" meant that it didn't have a full size spare that you could put on and leave there for as long as you wanted but instead came with a donut. My current car (Civic) is my first car to not come with a spare at all. Just some fix-a-flat, a pump and the phone number for Honda's Roadside assistance.

Another one is having to jump cars. Even in the early 2000's I always had jumper cables in my trunk. Chances are, if you didn't, you knew someone that did. Getting your car jumped in a parking lot (even if you didn't own cables) usually meant asking one or two people.
Now, no one has them and no one really needs them. I don't know if batteries or alternators are better or things use less power or, I suspect, because the car is smart enough to shut everything off after a few minutes. Leaving your trunk open overnight doesn't mean a dead battery in the morning.

And, of course, even in some of my older cars that still have issues, I keep a jump pack around.
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Old 09-04-2019, 02:28 PM
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Yeah, that's a good one. I remember when "my new car doesn't have a spare tire" meant that it didn't have a full size spare that you could put on and leave there for as long as you wanted but instead came with a donut. My current car (Civic) is my first car to not come with a spare at all. Just some fix-a-flat, a pump and the phone number for Honda's Roadside assistance.
Yes, many cars companies are doing this and it's a terrible idea. Don't get a blowout while on a roadtrip at night or on a holiday. A minor issue like a tire change turns into waiting for a tow truck, hoping the dealer or tire shop actually has your tire in stock and is open tomorrow, and a hotel bill.
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Old 09-04-2019, 07:23 PM
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Yeah, that's a good one. I remember when "my new car doesn't have a spare tire" meant that it didn't have a full size spare that you could put on and leave there for as long as you wanted but instead came with a donut. My current car (Civic) is my first car to not come with a spare at all. Just some fix-a-flat, a pump and the phone number for Honda's Roadside assistance.
I got a flat in the freeway last night in my 2017 Civic and I freaked out because I remembered this post. But it turned out that there was a non full sized spare in the trunk. What year is your Civic?
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Old 08-31-2019, 09:26 AM
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Here's one: Flat tires. Tire technology has become so good, they're much more rare than they used to be. I had one friend years ago whose tire was so worn down you could see the steel belting*, and yet it didn't go flat. I've only ever had one flat, and that was because, unbeknownst to me, a screw penetrated the tire, and then I parked with the tire in just the right position to have the screw open a small hole for the air to leak out.

As a kid in the 70s, I remember my dad changing tires far more often than I ever have. "Oh, no, a flat!" used to be a standard plot point in movies and TV. Not so much any more.


*Yes, his family were just that clueless about cars. I'll tell you the battery light story some other time.
Anyone know what exactly has changed with tires? Flats seemed more common even in the 90s. But I haven't seen actual data.

With cell phones, there's an expectation of people being contactable at nearly all times now. Hell if you got a flat or broke down back then, getting help was often difficult.
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Old 09-03-2019, 04:35 PM
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Here's one: Flat tires. Tire technology has become so good, they're much more rare than they used to be.......
How about battery technology - has anybody mentioned that? Time was everyone (if you had a car in the UK) would have a battery charger in the garage. AND sometimes people would actually put their car in the garage.

But here's the biggie for me - and the why-it-is. It just about fits the timeframe because it's a generational effect. Sports participation for kids is way down (in the UK at least - US also?). I see a real big drop off in the last 10 years, but I think the start of the phenomenon was the 80's and into the 90's. And the reason is this: this is the first generation of adolescents who, rather than getting involved in sports, sit in their bedrooms gaming - where their parents don't think this is unusual/unhealthy/unacceptable because it's exactly what they did as well.

Hmm - a little rant there. Sorry 'bout that.

j

Last edited by Treppenwitz; 09-03-2019 at 04:37 PM.
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Old 09-04-2019, 10:16 AM
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But here's the biggie for me - and the why-it-is. It just about fits the timeframe because it's a generational effect. Sports participation for kids is way down (in the UK at least - US also?). I see a real big drop off in the last 10 years, but I think the start of the phenomenon was the 80's and into the 90's. And the reason is this: this is the first generation of adolescents who, rather than getting involved in sports, sit in their bedrooms gaming - where their parents don't think this is unusual/unhealthy/unacceptable because it's exactly what they did as well.
I don't see that as the reason at all. What I do remember is that there was a moral panic of sorts in the early-mid 1980s with the abduction of Adam Walsh and other children, and this meant that parents got paranoid. Not so much the ones of children my age (born 1972) or older- they realized that this was more of a moral panic. But the parents whose first children were born from 1977 more or less onward came into parenthood with this moral panic in the forefront and were much less likely to let their children range freely.

Combine that with those of us who were a little older growing up with that moral panic info as a sort of fact of life, and 20+ years down the line, you have a couple of generations of parents whose conception of the world their children are growing up in is VERY different than that of their parents. I mean, when I was a kid in the suburbs, the expectation was that everyone was on the up-and-up and could be trusted. Not so anymore. I recall my parents just saying "Find us in about 20 minutes" and turning me loose at K-Mart or Target to go play the video game demos or look at the toys and sporting goods. Who would turn their 8 year old loose in a big box store these days? Nobody, that's who.

What I've noticed though, as a father of a couple of boys, is that parental involvement in stuff seems to be WAY down. I don't know if it's part of the general downturn in volunteerism, but it's frustrating to constantly end up doing stuff because nobody else is willing to step up, or when they do, to take it seriously and do a good job. Sports, Cub Scouts, PTA Dad's Club, you name it... people just sort of magically expect shit to get done without their involvement nowadays. Even lame stuff like getting the Cub Scout uniform stuff sewn or ironed on seems to be beyond the level of most people these days. Same for having their kids show up to sports practice on time or at all.
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Old 08-31-2019, 09:01 AM
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Good one. As a kid on a family road trip ("vacation"), I'd often see cars pulled over. A lot of people working a jack, trying to change a tire on the uneven shoulder of the road. And the ubiquitous overheating. Just like an old cartoon; the hood up, steam escaping from the engine as the dad wrapped his hand in a rag and tried to get the radiator cap off. We carried a milk jug full of water just in case.

And if a car turned 100,000 miles? Everyone in the neighborhood knew it. "Hey, see that old Plymouth? That's Mr. Avanti's. It's got over a hundy thou!" And at 99,999 the family would pile in the car, other kids would jump in, all to watch the odometer turn over to all zeroes (Chevy never expected our station wagon to make it that far, only 5 digits on the odometer).
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Old 08-31-2019, 09:08 AM
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Drunk acceptance
Community organizations and clubs
Community showering
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Old 08-31-2019, 04:04 PM
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Drunk acceptance
Foster Brooks, eh?
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Community organizations and clubs
Stronger than ever. Rotary, Elks, Shriners, historical societies, neighborhood associations, etc...
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Community showering
Really? Where in LA or the USA was that a thing?
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Old 08-31-2019, 04:48 PM
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Stronger than ever. Rotary, Elks, Shriners, historical societies, neighborhood associations, etc...
"Stronger than ever" is likely not, in fact, the case, for most fraternal and social organizations. Most of them peaked in the 1950s and 1960s, and have seen a steady decline in membership for decades, and few younger people have interest in joining organizations that seem to be more oriented towards their parents and grandparents.

Examples of membership decline numbers, from the articles cited below:
- Freemasonry membership is down by 3.8 million from the late 1950s
- The Elks are down from over 1.6 million in 1980, to 800,000 in 2012
- Membership in the Shriners is down 27% since 1979
- Membership in the Jaycees is down 44% since 1979
- Rotary Club membership is down 17% since 1995, and only 10% of Rotarians are under age 40

https://www.jconline.com/story/news/...ship/16874977/
https://thesociologicalmail.com/2018...out-over-time/
https://wotsmqt.com/service-clubs-dying/
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Old 08-31-2019, 05:00 PM
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Examples of membership decline numbers, from the articles cited below:
- Freemasonry membership is down by 3.8 million from the late 1950s
- The Elks are down from over 1.6 million in 1980, to 800,000 in 2012
- Membership in the Shriners is down 27% since 1979
- Membership in the Jaycees is down 44% since 1979
- Rotary Club membership is down 17% since 1995, and only 10% of Rotarians are under age 40
Another thing to bear in mind here is that the U.S. population has been steadily growing. If any of these organizations had simply been keeping pace with U.S. population growth, their membership would have been growing substantially. The U.S. population has grown by:
-> 82% since 1960
-> 45% since 1980
-> 23% since 1995

Given that, it's clear that membership in most of these sorts of organizations is withering.

Last edited by kenobi 65; 08-31-2019 at 05:01 PM.
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Old 08-31-2019, 11:07 PM
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Foster Brooks, eh?Stronger than ever. Rotary, Elks, Shriners, historical societies, neighborhood associations, etc...Really? Where in LA or the USA was that a thing?
Alcohol was much more prevalent in the workplace and popular media until around the advent of MADD and drunk driving awareness.

Community associations are not nearly what they used to be. I didnt say they were dead or even dying, but a far lesser percentage of the population belong to them.

Showering in oublic schools used to be a thing. Swimming naked in public pools used to be a thing.
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Old 09-01-2019, 10:42 AM
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Alcohol was much more prevalent in the workplace and popular media until around the advent of MADD and drunk driving awareness.
I recall that "day drinking" was much more common in the 70s. People would drink beer while cutting the grass, working on a car, etc.
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Old 09-01-2019, 11:18 AM
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I recall that "day drinking" was much more common in the 70s. People would drink beer while cutting the grass, working on a car, etc.
Around here that would not be uncommon. Day Drinking during the work week, however, has surely tapered off. When I started practicing law, several judges had lunch every day at the lounge across the street from the courthouse. This was in the 80s. I was told that in the 60s and 70s it was even more widespread.

ETA. As for communial showers, we were expected to shower as a group from 5th grade on.

Last edited by Procrustus; 09-01-2019 at 11:21 AM.
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Old 09-01-2019, 01:02 PM
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I recall that "day drinking" was much more common in the 70s. People would drink beer while cutting the grass, working on a car, etc.
Heh, guess I'm old fashioned.
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Old 08-31-2019, 09:19 AM
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Perhaps it's my imagination, but I swear women's facial expressions have changed over the past 40 years. Women used to smile more. Now the "stone/cold/serious" face seems to be the norm.
I don't remember most of that period--I'm only 40. However, I have found out through personal experience that if you make eye contact and smile at people first, a rather large percentage of the time they'll return the smile.

One thing that I do remember is leg warmers. I liked (and still like) some things about 80s fashion, but I never understood how leg warmers were ever considered sensible or desirable in any way. They just looked goofy.
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Old 09-24-2019, 02:28 PM
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... thing that I do remember is leg warmers. I liked (and still like) some things about 80s fashion, but I never understood how leg warmers were ever considered sensible or desirable in any way. They just looked goofy.
I used to wear them unfolded, if that's the right term. They tended to be worn with the bottom bit doubled up and the top bit doubled up, but I took to wearing them full length, keeping them in place with a large elastic band. My version probably looked even goofier than most, but going to and fro on a low-powered moped in the winter, they did actually serve a reasonable leg-warming purpose, just not their original one*.

* to help dancers avoid muscle cramps or something.
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Old 08-31-2019, 09:20 AM
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Missing a TV show because you went out that night.
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Old 08-31-2019, 09:26 AM
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Coming home and checking the answering machine for messages. That popped into my head as I returned from a bike ride the other day - it used to be the thing you did when you got home. Who called? Are friends getting together tonight? Did I get that job offer?
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Old 08-31-2019, 09:47 AM
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Coming home and checking the answering machine for messages.
You can even take that one step further back within the timeline given by the OP: flat out missing calls because no one was home, someone was home but outside, or someone was home but on the phone (pre-call waiting). It was just part of life that sometimes you couldn't be reached by phone. Somehow, we all survived.

Side note, though, since you mentioned job offers: I once had the offer waiting for me on my answering machine when I got back home from the interview. I was pretty damn cool.

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Old 08-31-2019, 10:00 AM
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My favorite is that in the 1970s you called places, but now you can actually call people.

1972:

<ring-ring!>
Is Mom there?
No, I think she's at Aunt Betty's.

<ring-ring!>
Aunt Betty? Is Mom there?
Sorry, honey, but she went to work.

<ring-ring!>
Hello?
Mom?
Yes, honey...

Now:

<ring-ring!>
Is Mom there?
You're calling my cell phone, dipshit. Who do you think is answering this call?
  #26  
Old 09-03-2019, 10:47 AM
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My favorite is that in the 1970s you called places, but now you can actually call people.

1972:

<ring-ring!>
Is Mom there?
No, I think she's at Aunt Betty's.

<ring-ring!>
Aunt Betty? Is Mom there?
Sorry, honey, but she went to work.

<ring-ring!>
Hello?
Mom?
Yes, honey...

Now:

<ring-ring!>
Is Mom there?
You're calling my cell phone, dipshit. Who do you think is answering this call?
Excellently put. Seems obvious when you think about it, but I’m glad you pointed it out.
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Old 09-03-2019, 11:47 AM
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Excellently put. Seems obvious when you think about it, but I’m glad you pointed it out.
It's funny because the scriptwriters for American Hustle forgot this. My memory is a bit hazy, but Bradley Cooper calls somebody, argues with them, then asks "where are you?"... and I'm thinking, "But, Bradley, you called him. You should know exactly where he is!" And he should have known this (well, maybe not the specific office#, but he knows what building/business he calls) - it's how calls were made in 1979.

"Let me call around, see if I can find... " is a sentence uttered maybe 20 times a day now, but it was uttered millions of times daily back in the 70s, because that's how you found a particular person to call - by calling places, and seeing if they were there.

So get with it, Bradley Cooper!

Last edited by JohnT; 09-03-2019 at 11:49 AM.
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Old 08-31-2019, 10:15 AM
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Perhaps it's my imagination, but I swear women's facial expressions have changed over the past 40 years. Women used to smile more. Now the "stone/cold/serious" face seems to be the norm.
I think it's the teenaged girls that have changed the most. They used to want to date me all the time in the 1980s, rarely happens now.

Last edited by Riemann; 08-31-2019 at 10:16 AM.
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Old 08-31-2019, 10:18 AM
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I think it's the teenaged girls that have changed the most. They used to want to date me all the time in the 1980s, rarely happens now.
You keep getting older, they stay the same age.
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Old 08-31-2019, 03:50 PM
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You keep getting older, they stay the same age.
Alright, alright, alright.
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Old 08-31-2019, 02:09 PM
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I was thinking about something related to this last night when reading an article about the (no, really this time!) release of the Galaxy Fold and how mind-staggeringly expensive it was going to be at $2000. The Gordon Gekko phone? That was the Motorola DynaTAC 8000x, which cost $4000 in 1983, the equivalent of more than $10,000 today.
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Old 08-31-2019, 02:21 PM
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I mentioned this in another recent thread. The Rocky Horror Picture Show was released in 1975. There's an exchange in the movie where Frank asks Brad if he has a tattoo. Brad indignantly says no. Frank then turns to Janet and asks her is she has one.

That was the punchline. Back in the seventies, the idea of a woman having a tattoo was so unlikely it was a joke just to ask her if she had one.
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Old 08-31-2019, 02:33 PM
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I mentioned this in another recent thread. The Rocky Horror Picture Show was released in 1975. There's an exchange in the movie where Frank asks Brad if he has a tattoo. Brad indignantly says no. Frank then turns to Janet and asks her is she has one.

That was the punchline. Back in the seventies, the idea of a woman having a tattoo was so unlikely it was a joke just to ask her if she had one.
There's a good one in Silkwood. It's a serious movie but it had one big laugh line. The plant workers are invited to fly to Washington DC to testify. There were a bunch of hicks who had never been on an airplane before. After they are served their in flight meal, one of the men reaches for his wallet to pay the flight attendant. Hahaha, he thought that you had to pay for an airline meal.
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Old 08-31-2019, 02:27 PM
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Old 09-01-2019, 08:43 PM
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More TV: original network dramatic/comedy programming on Saturday night.
Also the major TV networks (ABC/CBS/NBC) having Saturday morning cartoons for 3 to 4 hour blocks.
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Old 08-31-2019, 02:33 PM
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Kids not playing outside is the most notable to me. Even playgrounds look empty. Those big towers of rope and molded plastic are meant for climbing and sliding, not just standing around like public artworks.
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Old 08-31-2019, 03:47 PM
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Kids not playing outside is the most notable to me. Even playgrounds look empty. Those big towers of rope and molded plastic are meant for climbing and sliding, not just standing around like public artworks.
This is quite noticeable here. There's a wooded area with a creek next to us. The kids used to play there a lot. They beat down trails and such. Now, the only trail is one the deer use. There was a time the kids used to cut thru the yards and then thru the woods to get to the other side of the neighborhood. But they don't even do that any more.

I can't even yell at the kids to get of my lawn anymore.
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Old 09-01-2019, 09:03 PM
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This is quite noticeable here. There's a wooded area with a creek next to us. The kids used to play there a lot. They beat down trails and such. Now, the only trail is one the deer use. There was a time the kids used to cut thru the yards and then thru the woods to get to the other side of the neighborhood. But they don't even do that any more.

I can't even yell at the kids to get of my lawn anymore.
When I was ten years old there was whole group of kids (9 to 12 years old) just wandering all over our small town(both on foot and on our bikes). In summer we'd bike the two miles from the downtown to the town beach on our local lake.

Or sometimes we would all load ourselves into the bed of a pickup truck and one of our relatives would drive us there. (That would be 6 to 7 kids in the back and the police wouldn't bat an eye.)
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Old 09-03-2019, 02:34 PM
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This is quite noticeable here. There's a wooded area with a creek next to us. The kids used to play there a lot. They beat down trails and such. Now, the only trail is one the deer use. There was a time the kids used to cut thru the yards and then thru the woods to get to the other side of the neighborhood. But they don't even do that any more.

I can't even yell at the kids to get of my lawn anymore.
I never see neighborhood kids outside playing random games, random contests like 3-on-3 or 4-on-4 football games stretching across two neighbor's lawns, regardless of whether we'd asked permission to use their property or not. No kids biking around the neighborhood. It's all organized now: kids join squads or clubs.
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Old 09-06-2019, 08:29 PM
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I never see neighborhood kids outside playing random games, random contests like 3-on-3 or 4-on-4 football games stretching across two neighbor's lawns, regardless of whether we'd asked permission to use their property or not. No kids biking around the neighborhood. It's all organized now: kids join squads or clubs.
In my experience, or at least in my community, this is strongly class-based. In the middle- and upper-middle-class areas in and around my city, this is absolutely the case--and this has changed even in the lifetimes of my own kids, who are now in their early thirties. If kids are out doing things like that, and that's seldom, there's usually a parent hovering nearby. It's even rare to see a couple of kids walking along the sidewalk without a parent present, at least up through age 11 or so.

But in the poorer sections of town, it's quite common to see kids riding their bikes around, shooting hoops in someone's driveway, jumping rope on the sidewalk, playing various ball games in the street, making their way down the sidewalk. Usually without any indication of adult supervision. It's an interesting dichotomy.
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Old 08-31-2019, 02:35 PM
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Hitchhiking used to be very common and now it is almost nonexistent. I was driving west on I-10 between Beaumont and Houston a few weeks ago and saw a guy standing at the end of an entrance ramp holding a cardboard sign that read "El Paso". He had a full beard, baggy clothes, and a duffel bag. I thought I was in a Twighlight Zone episode and had driven back to 1975.
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Old 08-31-2019, 03:56 PM
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Jukeboxes. They used to be everywhere, but I see them less and less. Pinball machines and arcade games too.
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Old 09-19-2019, 03:32 PM
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Originally Posted by Fear Itself View Post
Jukeboxes. They used to be everywhere, but I see them less and less. Pinball machines and arcade games too.
There are still jukeboxes, but they're internet connected and don't have records in them
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Old 08-31-2019, 04:51 PM
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Perhaps it's my imagination, but I swear women's facial expressions have changed over the past 40 years. Women used to smile more. Now the "stone/cold/serious" face seems to be the norm.
I hadn't noticed really( I'm not terribly observant about people in general these days ). But now that you mention it there is a possibility that there might be a genuine small cultural shift here. If so it is a good one IMHO.

I do recall that there seemed to be a meme where young girls were taught to "smile more" by their parents as an expression of good manners. I remember over-hearing little girls being told that by their mothers. Often as not it ended in a rebellious scowl, but sometimes a grudging and fake smile. Contrarily I've never heard that addressed to a little boy. So it may have been something programmed into the young girls that has faded away like other archaic mannerisms. "Show a happy face to the world and always wear clean underwear!"

The clean underwear is probably still a reasonable ask . But nobody owes the world a phony smile.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Musicat View Post
Where in LA or the USA was that a thing?
Don't know what is meant by community in this instance. But as we've discussed on this board before forcing kids to shower as a group in High School was still definitely a thing back in the early 1980's when I was enrolled.

Last edited by Tamerlane; 08-31-2019 at 04:55 PM.
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Old 08-31-2019, 05:02 PM
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Don't know what is meant by community in this instance. But as we've discussed on this board before forcing kids to shower as a group in High School was still definitely a thing back in the early 1980's when I was enrolled.
So how do they shower now? In individual cubicles? Virtual H2O?
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Old 08-31-2019, 06:12 PM
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So how do they shower now? In individual cubicles? Virtual H2O?
"Not at all" apparently is increasing common, with occasional exceptions for swim days in schools that have a pool( and even then sounds like kids rinse off with their suits on, which was verboten by some teachers at my school ). Which I don't find surprising because even in my day many kids tried to dodge it because they found it embarrassing. To the point where sometimes gym teachers would stand by the locker-room doors and check if you had wet hair as you left.
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Old 09-01-2019, 12:41 PM
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Originally Posted by Tamerlane View Post
"Not at all" apparently is increasing common, with occasional exceptions for swim days in schools that have a pool( and even then sounds like kids rinse off with their suits on, which was verboten by some teachers at my school ). Which I don't find surprising because even in my day many kids tried to dodge it because they found it embarrassing. To the point where sometimes gym teachers would stand by the locker-room doors and check if you had wet hair as you left.
That's exactly how it was when I was in high school (early-mid 90s). There just wasn't time to shower, unless it was after swimming, and then it was just really quick to wash your hair and maybe warm up a little after getting out of the pool.

Plus we rarely, if ever, broke a sweat.
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Old 08-31-2019, 05:06 PM
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Good one. As a kid on a family road trip ("vacation"), I'd often see cars pulled over. A lot of people working a jack, trying to change a tire on the uneven shoulder of the road. And the ubiquitous overheating. Just like an old cartoon; the hood up, steam escaping from the engine as the dad wrapped his hand in a rag and tried to get the radiator cap off. We carried a milk jug full of water just in case.


Ah, yes, overheating is another one!

It happened once in my 1997 Ford F-150, after some major component in the cooling system actually cracked, and needed to be replaced.

It almost happened once on a trip, driving a rented SUV. Climbing out of Death Valley, in July, with near-50C external temperatures, and (as I found out after pulling over to figure out why the temperature was spiking) a large sheet of paper under the hood, covering just about all of the radiator*, so there was virtually no airflow to cool it down. So I spent most of the day driving through Death Valley like that, and only had a problem when we started driving uphill. That's pretty amazing when you think about it.

*I really don't know how it got there, but it must have been there from before I picked the SUV up at the rental place. The chance that it ended up so perfectly covering the radiator by accident is basically zero. The best I can figure, a mechanic must have put it there for some reason, and forgotten to remove it after they were done.
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Old 08-31-2019, 05:08 PM
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Originally Posted by Crafter_Man View Post
Mustaches were very common among men in the 1970s. I think only state troopers have them now.
I assume, by this, you mean "mustaches with no beard." Facial hair, in general, was "out" in the 1980s and 1990s, but has certainly seen a big comeback in the last decade -- however, in most cases, it's a full mustache+beard.

But, don't tell Aaron Rodgers that.
  #50  
Old 08-31-2019, 05:10 PM
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With reference to Kenobi65's post #25, I don't doubt that national membership in those organizations has declined. But locally, in my neighborhood, it has not happened, at least over the last 20 years. It's always possible that my neighborhood is 20 years behind the times (and it won't be the first time).

With reference to neighborhood associations, membership locally has increased over the past 40 years, probably because the number of residents and homes has increased, and formerly summer residents have been converted into year-round ones.

So I guess the moral of the story is: national trends and behaviors aren't universal, and generalizations, including this one, are always wrong.
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