Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #201  
Old 09-06-2019, 10:30 AM
eschereal's Avatar
eschereal is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Frogstar World B
Posts: 16,501
Quote:
Originally Posted by Flower Waling View Post
[cringe]

Firing one's firearm into the air …
My bedroom ceiling was dripping. I went up on the roof and found a perfect little quarter-inch hole showing a slightly off-vertical angle of entry. It could have been a meteorite. I suspect not.

This was about a year ago. Maybe two.

Last edited by eschereal; 09-06-2019 at 10:31 AM.
  #202  
Old 09-06-2019, 11:18 AM
TRC4941's Avatar
TRC4941 is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: NE Minnesota
Posts: 1,262
How about calling the number for the "Time Lady"? When we wanted to set our watches/clocks to the exact time, we'd dial a number that we all had memorized and a recording would tell you the time. Towards the end, the Time Lady would even tell you what the current temp was.
  #203  
Old 09-06-2019, 11:57 AM
JohnT's Avatar
JohnT is online now
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: San Antonio, TX
Posts: 23,562
I may be mistaken, but I believe that service (the "time lady") was considered so valuable that it was required by regulation for service areas of a certain size.

https://www.latimes.com/archives/la-...s29-story.html

An article about this finally ending in CA back in 2007. Doesn't mention the regulatory requirement, so I may be wrong on that, but that is a good one.

Last edited by JohnT; 09-06-2019 at 11:59 AM.
  #204  
Old 09-06-2019, 12:04 PM
Thudlow Boink's Avatar
Thudlow Boink is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: Lincoln, IL
Posts: 27,581
Quote:
Originally Posted by TRC4941 View Post
How about calling the number for the "Time Lady"? When we wanted to set our watches/clocks to the exact time, we'd dial a number that we all had memorized and a recording would tell you the time. Towards the end, the Time Lady would even tell you what the current temp was.
I still remember the number for my city's time and temperature (747-1212), but it wasn't a Lady. You'd hear a man give a one-sentence plug for the Marine Bank, followed by "Marine Bank time" and "Marine Bank temperature."
  #205  
Old 09-06-2019, 01:47 PM
aurora maire's Avatar
aurora maire is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 941
Quote:
Originally Posted by Procrustus View Post
Around here that would not be uncommon. Day Drinking during the work week, however, has surely tapered off. When I started practicing law, several judges had lunch every day at the lounge across the street from the courthouse. This was in the 80s. I was told that in the 60s and 70s it was even more widespread.
During the summers when I was in college in the 70s, I worked for Kelly Girl temp services. Usually the job was holding down the desk of a secretary on vacation. I worked two weeks in an office where the bar was opened after lunch on Fridays. I drank Crown Royal and Coke and left there drunk off my ass both times. I figured they owed me for calling me "honey" and making me get them coffee.
  #206  
Old 09-06-2019, 01:50 PM
Mister Rik's Avatar
Mister Rik is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: The bunghole of WA
Posts: 12,607
Quote:
Originally Posted by kenobi 65 View Post
"Stronger than ever" is likely not, in fact, the case, for most fraternal and social organizations. Most of them peaked in the 1950s and 1960s, and have seen a steady decline in membership for decades, and few younger people have interest in joining organizations that seem to be more oriented towards their parents and grandparents.
I remember an article in the local paper a good number of years ago - late 90s or early-aughts - about a big controversy at the local Elks lodge. It seems they had decided to repeal a bylaw that required men to remove their hats when drinking at the club's bar. The reasoning behind the repeal was that it was an artifact of a different time and one more obstacle in the way of recruiting younger members.


Add in other "archaic" rules and rituals. The local chapter of the Lions Club holds their weekly lunch where I work. Every lunch includes a singalong, singing a cheesy little song about how great our community is, set to a tune that was popular in the 1930s. It's a practice that started in a time when that qualified as entertainment. I'm over 50, and that just feels really outdated to me, and not something I would want to do over lunch. And I'm good singer. I can completely understand younger people, particularly if they don't feel they can sing well, not wanting to participate in that.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Tamerlane View Post
I do recall that there seemed to be a meme where young girls were taught to "smile more" by their parents as an expression of good manners. I remember over-hearing little girls being told that by their mothers. Often as not it ended in a rebellious scowl, but sometimes a grudging and fake smile. Contrarily I've never heard that addressed to a little boy. So it may have been something programmed into the young girls that has faded away like other archaic mannerisms. "Show a happy face to the world and always wear clean underwear!"
I blame the lack of smiling on the now-omnipresent bombardment of advertising, specifically fashion-related advertising, featuring one glamorous model after another with "resting bitch face". It's convinced a couple generations of women that being unsmiling is part of being attractive.


I'm betting that this is related to the stereotype of "nerds" being obsessed with Asian women. "Nerds" were the early internet adopters, which allowed them more opportunity to see images of Asian women who live in their native countries (as opposed to Asian-Americans/Europeans who are American/Western-socialized). I remember the very first thing I noticed about photos of Japanese models/actresses/celebrities was that they were always smiling. That made them seem friendly and approachable, as opposed to the unfriendly, vaguely-threatening image of Western models.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Crafter_Man View Post
Mustaches were very common among men in the 1970s. I think only state troopers have them now.
Fun fact: My dad is at least partly responsible for Washington State Patrol officers being allowed to wear mustaches. Up until the late 1980s, these guys were required to be completely clean-shaven. Somehow, my dad ended up on a "uniform committee". Most of his work on the committee involved bringing home a huge assortment of bulletproof vests and wearing them to work to assess the comfort level of different models for all-day wear. They discussed many other uniform options as well. At one meeting, he suggested changing the "no facial hair" regulation to allow mustaches, on the grounds that "this is the only thing we've discussed that won't cost the state a nickel".




One thing I noticed a while back is what products are advertised. My best example is canned tuna. During my childhood in the 1970s, TV commercials for Bumblebee, Star-Kist, and Chicken of the Sea were staples. The jingles are burned into my memory. I can remember freaking toys featuring Charlie Tuna. At some point in the late 1990s, it dawned on me that I couldn't remember the last time I saw a tuna commercial.
  #207  
Old 09-06-2019, 02:08 PM
Darren Garrison's Avatar
Darren Garrison is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Posts: 11,691
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mister Rik View Post
Add in other "archaic" rules and rituals. The local chapter of the Lions Club holds their weekly lunch where I work. Every lunch includes a singalong, singing a cheesy little song about how great our community is, set to a tune that was popular in the 1930s. It's a practice that started in a time when that qualified as entertainment. I'm over 50, and that just feels really outdated to me, and not something I would want to do over lunch.
That reminds me--do high schools still have school songs that they sometimes make you sing at assemblies?
(Also, the IBM songbook made the internet rounds a few years back.)
  #208  
Old 09-06-2019, 02:34 PM
kenobi 65's Avatar
kenobi 65 is offline
Corellian Nerfherder
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: Brookfield, IL
Posts: 15,737
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mister Rik View Post
One thing I noticed a while back is what products are advertised. My best example is canned tuna. During my childhood in the 1970s, TV commercials for Bumblebee, Star-Kist, and Chicken of the Sea were staples. The jingles are burned into my memory. I can remember freaking toys featuring Charlie Tuna. At some point in the late 1990s, it dawned on me that I couldn't remember the last time I saw a tuna commercial.
I suspect that that's the case for a lot of household staples -- the brand names are well-established (in part though those decades of past advertising), but a lot of people now buy those categories based on price, and the margins on those products don't allow for TV advertising. Plus, a lot of those categories (like old-school canned and frozen foods) are ones that aren't necessarily "on trend" for consumer preferences and tastes, and they may lack appeal to younger shoppers.

FWIW, StarKist still does some TV ads, though they're typically for line extensions (like this one for flavored tuna, in pouches), rather than the old-fashioned tuna in a can.
  #209  
Old 09-06-2019, 02:54 PM
SciFiSam is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Beffnal Green innit
Posts: 8,482
Quote:
Originally Posted by elmwood View Post
Did anyone mention granny carts yet? Through the 1970s and 1980s, in the neighborhood I grew up in, little old ladies pulling a bag or two of groceries down a sidewalk in two-wheeled wire baskets were a common sight. There were a LOT of older women on my block that didn't drive, too.

Granny carts seemed to be on the decline in the 1990s, but I still saw them a lot in Polish neighborhoods. It was as if it was illegal to pull a granny cart without wearing a babushka kerchief. Today, granny cart sightings are rare. Why? A few guesses -- gender equality behind the wheel; supermarkets are larger and beyond little old lady walking distance; and better paratransit.
IME in London they went on the decline in the 80s, and then resurged in the 2000s. They're fairly common here now, in my neighbourhood, even for young people, and you can get them in trendy designs. I used one less than an hour ago and I wasn't the only one there to have one, but when I first got one about 18 years ago people - always young women about my age - sometimes stopped me to ask where I'd got it because they wanted one.

But it's a very different sort of neighbourhood, with good public transit, not many people owning cars, and I have five supermarkets within an average person's five minute walk of my house. They're probably still unusual in more suburban areas where, like you say, large out of town supermarkets and car ownership is the norm.
  #210  
Old 09-06-2019, 03:59 PM
kayaker's Avatar
kayaker is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Rural Western PA
Posts: 32,821
Quote:
Originally Posted by aurora maire View Post
During the summers when I was in college in the 70s, I worked for Kelly Girl temp services. Usually the job was holding down the desk of a secretary on vacation. I worked two weeks in an office where the bar was opened after lunch on Fridays. I drank Crown Royal and Coke and left there drunk off my ass both times. I figured they owed me for calling me "honey" and making me get them coffee.
My gf works in advertising. Fridays after lunch they bring out the bar and everyone helps themselves. Twice over the years I've had to drive down to Pittsburgh to bring my sweetie home. No biggie, except the next morning I have to take her to work, since that's where her car is.
  #211  
Old 09-06-2019, 08:07 PM
thorny locust's Avatar
thorny locust is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2019
Location: Upstate New York
Posts: 1,276
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mister Rik View Post
I blame the lack of smiling on the now-omnipresent bombardment of advertising, specifically fashion-related advertising, featuring one glamorous model after another with "resting bitch face". It's convinced a couple generations of women that being unsmiling is part of being attractive.
.
Oh, good grief.

Women out in public very often have other things on our minds and are not thinking at all about whether you, or any random stranger, finds us attractive.

Men don't go around with fake smiles on their faces all the time. Why should women?
  #212  
Old 09-06-2019, 08:29 PM
Ulf the Unwashed is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 3,493
Quote:
Originally Posted by asahi View Post
I never see neighborhood kids outside playing random games, random contests like 3-on-3 or 4-on-4 football games stretching across two neighbor's lawns, regardless of whether we'd asked permission to use their property or not. No kids biking around the neighborhood. It's all organized now: kids join squads or clubs.
In my experience, or at least in my community, this is strongly class-based. In the middle- and upper-middle-class areas in and around my city, this is absolutely the case--and this has changed even in the lifetimes of my own kids, who are now in their early thirties. If kids are out doing things like that, and that's seldom, there's usually a parent hovering nearby. It's even rare to see a couple of kids walking along the sidewalk without a parent present, at least up through age 11 or so.

But in the poorer sections of town, it's quite common to see kids riding their bikes around, shooting hoops in someone's driveway, jumping rope on the sidewalk, playing various ball games in the street, making their way down the sidewalk. Usually without any indication of adult supervision. It's an interesting dichotomy.
  #213  
Old 09-07-2019, 10:29 PM
carrps is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 850
Quote:
Originally Posted by thorny locust View Post
Oh, good grief.

Women out in public very often have other things on our minds and are not thinking at all about whether you, or any random stranger, finds us attractive.

Men don't go around with fake smiles on their faces all the time. Why should women?
Thank you. Nothing riles me up faster than some entitled ass asking me to smile. Maybe my mom just died!
  #214  
Old 09-07-2019, 11:03 PM
Darren Garrison's Avatar
Darren Garrison is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Posts: 11,691
But you might get a free churro!
  #215  
Old 09-07-2019, 11:10 PM
Kimstu is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Dec 1999
Posts: 22,857
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mister Rik View Post
I blame the lack of smiling on the now-omnipresent bombardment of advertising, specifically fashion-related advertising, featuring one glamorous model after another with "resting bitch face". It's convinced a couple generations of women that being unsmiling is part of being attractive.
Nonsense. Models not smiling in high-end fashion ads is not merely "a couple generations" old.
1940s model not smiling

Another 1940s model not smiling

1953 model not smiling

Another 1953 model not smiling

And no, today's women are not going around in public with carefully arranged unsmiling faces in the hopes that random men like you will find them attractive. The vast majority of women going around in public don't care whether you or other randos on the street find them attractive, and don't see why they should have to take your preferences into account in arranging their facial features.

That's not to say you personally can't walk around wearing a smile if you want to, of course, but women in general are not being discourteous or misguided just because they're not constantly smiling in public.
  #216  
Old 09-08-2019, 01:32 PM
ChockFullOfHeadyGoodness's Avatar
ChockFullOfHeadyGoodness is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Hollywood Riveria, CA
Posts: 2,116
I just remembered that prior to the mid-90s or so, I would always wait until 5 pm or 8 pm to make a non-local phone call. The rates dropped at those times. Do measured plans even still exist? I know GTE stopped offering them when they were bought out by Verizon. I haven't seen anything other than flat-rate by the month with long distance included in over 20 years.

Now I use the phone to call whenever. The only time I check the clock before dialing is if I'm calling someone in another time zone and want to be sure it's not too late.

Last edited by ChockFullOfHeadyGoodness; 09-08-2019 at 01:34 PM.
  #217  
Old 09-08-2019, 02:23 PM
kenobi 65's Avatar
kenobi 65 is offline
Corellian Nerfherder
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: Brookfield, IL
Posts: 15,737
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChockFullOfHeadyGoodness View Post
I just remembered that prior to the mid-90s or so, I would always wait until 5 pm or 8 pm to make a non-local phone call. The rates dropped at those times. Do measured plans even still exist? I know GTE stopped offering them when they were bought out by Verizon. I haven't seen anything other than flat-rate by the month with long distance included in over 20 years.

Now I use the phone to call whenever. The only time I check the clock before dialing is if I'm calling someone in another time zone and want to be sure it's not too late.
Knowing me, I probably already posted this upthread , but when I was a college freshman ('83/'84), I was dating a girl who lived back in my home town. I'd call her, once a week, at like 6:30am, to take advantage of the lowest long-distance rates.
  #218  
Old 09-08-2019, 03:00 PM
susan's Avatar
susan is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Coastal USA
Posts: 9,601
Quote:
The only time I check the clock before dialing
Many of my students don't understand why we say "dial the phone" or "dial tone."
  #219  
Old 09-08-2019, 03:04 PM
JohnT's Avatar
JohnT is online now
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: San Antonio, TX
Posts: 23,562
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChockFullOfHeadyGoodness View Post
I just remembered that prior to the mid-90s or so, I would always wait until 5 pm or 8 pm to make a non-local phone call. The rates dropped at those times. Do measured plans even still exist? I know GTE stopped offering them when they were bought out by Verizon. I haven't seen anything other than flat-rate by the month with long distance included in over 20 years.

Now I use the phone to call whenever. The only time I check the clock before dialing is if I'm calling someone in another time zone and want to be sure it's not too late.
You did NOT call my grandmother at 6:59pm Eastern Time, on Sunday, else the rest of the call will be about why you're paying more to make the same phone call you could have made 2 minutes later. And, of course, if you called at 7:05pm, the call would be about how late the call came.

However, it just occurred to me that with all the analog clocks set by the fallible hand of Man, we probably should've played it safe and called at 7:30.
  #220  
Old 09-08-2019, 03:22 PM
california jobcase is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: S. GA
Posts: 3,397
How about those 10-10-xyz long distance numbers? Anyone remember them? I guess they were in the 90s, but they seem to be gone now.
  #221  
Old 09-08-2019, 10:32 PM
Seanette is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 4,668
Quote:
Originally Posted by elmwood View Post
Did anyone mention granny carts yet? Through the 1970s and 1980s, in the neighborhood I grew up in, little old ladies pulling a bag or two of groceries down a sidewalk in two-wheeled wire baskets were a common sight. There were a LOT of older women on my block that didn't drive, too.

Granny carts seemed to be on the decline in the 1990s, but I still saw them a lot in Polish neighborhoods. It was as if it was illegal to pull a granny cart without wearing a babushka kerchief. Today, granny cart sightings are rare. Why? A few guesses -- gender equality behind the wheel; supermarkets are larger and beyond little old lady walking distance; and better paratransit.
I see those carts on the bus a lot. Older women, older men, people whose dress and accents suggest they're immigrants...
  #222  
Old 09-08-2019, 11:47 PM
digs's Avatar
digs is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: West of Wauwatosa
Posts: 9,991
Speaking of long distance, it was so expensive that we'd often wait to call someone until we were in their town. I have vivid memories of standing at a bank of payphones in the Minneapolis airport, with a stack of quarters (and a notebook full of phone numbers - directory assistance cost good money, too!). Dialing everyone we knew there between flights: "Cousin Beth, how are you...Is that a baby? Whoops, gotta call a list of other people! Frat bro Chuck, how d'ya like the Twin Cities?... Great, gotta run! Aunt Audrey, how are... yes, I called Beth, but how are you? Yes, I heard about Beth's baby, but how... oh, they just called our plane, bye!"

I remember biking Cape Cod back in the 70s, and calling my girlfriend in Seattle. Now, it'd be no big deal, pull out my phone. No romance. Then, it was me at the only payphone I could find, alone on the end of a pier at midnight. Counting my fistful of change to rent three minutes of her voice, by the light of a flickering 30 watt bulb, the only thing visible on that coast.
  #223  
Old 09-09-2019, 05:19 AM
Crafter_Man's Avatar
Crafter_Man is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 1999
Location: Ohio
Posts: 11,422
Quote:
Originally Posted by TRC4941 View Post
How about calling the number for the "Time Lady"? When we wanted to set our watches/clocks to the exact time, we'd dial a number that we all had memorized and a recording would tell you the time. Towards the end, the Time Lady would even tell you what the current temp was.
I still remember the phone number for time & temperature from where I grew up in Dayton, OH: 937-499-1212.

Out of curiosity I just called it. It is still time & temperature! Albeit there is a pretty long ad you're forced to listen to before the crucial data is revealed.
  #224  
Old 09-09-2019, 08:55 AM
digs's Avatar
digs is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: West of Wauwatosa
Posts: 9,991
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crafter_Man View Post
I still remember the phone number for time & temperature from where I grew up in Dayton, OH: 937-499-1212.

Out of curiosity I just called it. It is still time & temperature! Albeit there is a pretty long ad you're forced to listen to before the crucial data is revealed.
"At the tone, the time will be two minutes after you called..."

Ooh, I'd forgotten; when I was a kid, ours had that beep!
"At the tone, the time will be Eight Forty-Two... beep!"
I always pictured spies synchronizing their watches before the big caper...

By the way, I live near a public park on a lake, with piers full of boats and people fishing. I'm always heartened to see kids (yep, unaccompanied grade schoolers) walking/biking down to the park. With fishing poles, footballs, baseball bats, soccer balls, or frisbees. And sometimes I've noticed those same kids returning home for dinner, now wet and sunburned with a gang of frisbee/fishing friends. ("Hey, mom, can Matt'n'Jake'n'Anna'n'Jake'slittlebrother stay for supper?")

I'm so happy that raising "free range children" still happens.
  #225  
Old 09-09-2019, 10:49 AM
Annie-Xmas is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 56,492
Bottled water has been mentioned, but what about Snapple? When did bottled Kool-Aid for grownups become so popular?

I wish I had thought up that idea.
  #226  
Old 09-09-2019, 12:08 PM
JohnGalt's Avatar
JohnGalt is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: Med city USA
Posts: 2,230
What happened that grocery stores no longer stock cut-up chicken pieces of the WHOLE chicken, not just a package of legs or wings or breasts? I have to buy a whole chicken and cut it apart (something that takes some practice to get right; I'm almost there...) Or is it just my grocery store?

Since I'm talking about chickens, when did chicken breasts grow so huge? They are no longer small enough for a single serving; they're almost the size of a small turkey. To get smaller pieces, I have to buy a "young" chicken, whole, and cut it apart.
  #227  
Old 09-09-2019, 01:07 PM
Eyebrows 0f Doom is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: NYC
Posts: 6,328
Quote:
Originally Posted by Annie-Xmas View Post
Bottled water has been mentioned, but what about Snapple? When did bottled Kool-Aid for grownups become so popular?

I wish I had thought up that idea.
  #228  
Old 09-09-2019, 01:59 PM
KneadToKnow is offline
Voodoo Adult (Slight Return)
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: Charlotte, NC, USA
Posts: 26,578
Quote:
Originally Posted by Annie-Xmas View Post
Bottled water has been mentioned, but what about Snapple? When did bottled Kool-Aid for grownups become so popular?

I wish I had thought up that idea.
Snapple has been popular for long enough that it was one of the more frequently "placed" products in early seasons of Seinfeld, ca. 1991-1995.
  #229  
Old 09-09-2019, 02:06 PM
kenobi 65's Avatar
kenobi 65 is offline
Corellian Nerfherder
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: Brookfield, IL
Posts: 15,737
Quote:
Originally Posted by KneadToKnow View Post
Snapple has been popular for long enough that it was one of the more frequently "placed" products in early seasons of Seinfeld, ca. 1991-1995.
Agreed, it was really in the early '90s when it gained national prominence. it was originally a New York brand (which might help explain the Seinfeld references), but had achieved national distribution by around 1992, and was purchased by Quaker Oats in '94.
  #230  
Old 09-09-2019, 05:58 PM
eschereal's Avatar
eschereal is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Frogstar World B
Posts: 16,501
After a long bit of traveling this summer, it occurred to me that, as a young person in the '60s and '70s, one thing that never would have occurred to us was the idea of zipping up a suitcase.
  #231  
Old 09-09-2019, 06:37 PM
P-man is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Washington, DC area
Posts: 1,788
Quote:
Originally Posted by kenobi 65 View Post
Knowing me, I probably already posted this upthread , but when I was a college freshman ('83/'84), I was dating a girl who lived back in my home town. I'd call her, once a week, at like 6:30am, to take advantage of the lowest long-distance rates.
I thought about that when our son came home from college, where he had a new girl friend. They just face timed every couple of days, and it cost nothing.
  #232  
Old 09-09-2019, 07:27 PM
eschereal's Avatar
eschereal is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Frogstar World B
Posts: 16,501
Yeah, well, when was the last time you (in the US) dialed a 7-digit phone number?
  #233  
Old 09-09-2019, 08:16 PM
AnalogSignal is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 1,664
Quote:
Originally Posted by eschereal View Post
Yeah, well, when was the last time you (in the US) dialed a 7-digit phone number?
I regularly call numbers in my area code with 7 digits.
  #234  
Old 09-09-2019, 08:45 PM
thorny locust's Avatar
thorny locust is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2019
Location: Upstate New York
Posts: 1,276
Quote:
Originally Posted by eschereal View Post
Yeah, well, when was the last time you (in the US) dialed a 7-digit phone number?
This afternoon.

You can still dial numbers that are in the same area code with seven digits around here; at least, if you're dialing from a landline. (Though I'm not entirely living in the 1970's; "dialing" is figurative, I punched buttons.)
  #235  
Old 09-09-2019, 09:09 PM
AnalogSignal is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 1,664
In ye olden days, my family subscribed to TV Guide. I would look through the week's schedule and circle programs of interest. This was before VCRs so I had to watch these shows "live" which was a lot of effort to see something that was often disappointing.
  #236  
Old 09-09-2019, 09:10 PM
Seanette is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 4,668
In my area, we can no longer do 7-digit phone numbers, even in the same area code.
  #237  
Old 09-09-2019, 09:10 PM
kenobi 65's Avatar
kenobi 65 is offline
Corellian Nerfherder
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: Brookfield, IL
Posts: 15,737
Quote:
Originally Posted by AnalogSignal View Post
I regularly call numbers in my area code with 7 digits.
As I understand it, in the US, it depends on whether a particular area code was split up geographically when more numbers were needed, or if an overlay was used (i.e., adding a second area code to the same geographic area). If the former, dialing a local number without the area code (i.e., just 7 digits) is likely still possible.
  #238  
Old 09-09-2019, 09:18 PM
kenobi 65's Avatar
kenobi 65 is offline
Corellian Nerfherder
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: Brookfield, IL
Posts: 15,737
(sorry, double post)

Last edited by kenobi 65; 09-09-2019 at 09:18 PM.
  #239  
Old 09-09-2019, 09:25 PM
eschereal's Avatar
eschereal is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Frogstar World B
Posts: 16,501
Yeah, and my cell phone has a different area code from my home phone. ISTR a scene in Pulp Fiction where Jules was saying that he did not know anyone in <certain area code>, which is to say that in major urban areas, making 7-digit calls is becoming increasingly difficult. But, on the other hand, most of the numbers one calls are stored in the phone or handset, so using 10-digit numbers is hugely less burdensome than it used to be. Storing 10 digits is not more difficult and is generally more reliable than storing 7. And, on cell phones, you can store the lead "1", but it is never necessary anymore.
  #240  
Old 09-10-2019, 04:49 AM
purplehorseshoe is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Texas, USA
Posts: 10,105
Quote:
Originally Posted by thorny locust View Post
This afternoon.



You can still dial numbers that are in the same area code with seven digits around here; at least, if you're dialing from a landline. (Though I'm not entirely living in the 1970's; "dialing" is figurative, I punched buttons.)
Okay.

But for the trillions of folks living in the DFW metroplex, that shit went away in the 90s.
__________________
I can haz sig line?
  #241  
Old 09-10-2019, 06:44 AM
kayaker's Avatar
kayaker is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Rural Western PA
Posts: 32,821
I used to know people's phone numbers. The other day I had to give someone my gf's phone number, but my phone wasn't handy. I had no idea what her number was, even though I text to that number multiple times a day.

I've been watching the old Perry Mason series. They think of phone numbers as "Hollywood 5-3254".
  #242  
Old 09-10-2019, 09:22 AM
TRC4941's Avatar
TRC4941 is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: NE Minnesota
Posts: 1,262
Quote:
Originally Posted by kayaker View Post
I used to know people's phone numbers. The other day I had to give someone my gf's phone number, but my phone wasn't handy. I had no idea what her number was, even though I text to that number multiple times a day.

I've been watching the old Perry Mason series. They think of phone numbers as "Hollywood 5-3254".
Yes! I can still remember my best friend's and my grandma's old landline numbers from when I was a kid, but I don't know anyone's current cell phone numbers.
  #243  
Old 09-10-2019, 09:23 AM
digs's Avatar
digs is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: West of Wauwatosa
Posts: 9,991
Quote:
Originally Posted by kayaker View Post
I've been watching the old Perry Mason series. They think of phone numbers as "Hollywood 5-3254".
For landlines, almost all telephone exchanges (the three number prefixes) started as letters.

I love researching what they were. The landlines in our neighborhood start with 272 or 233. Back in the day, that was "BRoadway 2" (named after a street that was later renamed Main St.), or "CEntral 3". That one's amusing because our old downtown area is no longer central; thanks to the expansion on the western side, we've been called "eastenders" since the 60s.
  #244  
Old 09-10-2019, 09:36 AM
pulykamell is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: SW Side, Chicago
Posts: 47,943
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crafter_Man View Post
I still remember the phone number for time & temperature from where I grew up in Dayton, OH: 937-499-1212.

Out of curiosity I just called it. It is still time & temperature! Albeit there is a pretty long ad you're forced to listen to before the crucial data is revealed.
Here (Chicago) it was 976-1616 for time, and I think 976-1212 for weather. Note that they were 976 numbers, so they triggered an extra charge. Speaking of, I can't remember hearing an ad for a 976 number since probably the 80s or early 90s at the latest.
  #245  
Old 09-10-2019, 11:41 AM
Pábitel is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: Hardwick, VT
Posts: 1,456
Quote:
Originally Posted by Annie-Xmas View Post
And people could give their child a good, well deserved whack in public and not have people call the cops.
Ah, the good old days, when casual child abuse was the norm.

American Psychological Association
__________________
"Those that would give up Essential Liberty for a little Temporary Safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety."
--- Ben Franklin
  #246  
Old 09-10-2019, 01:31 PM
Pantastic is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Posts: 4,293
Quote:
Originally Posted by Taesahnim View Post
Agreed. I hit my teens in the 60s...
People were politer and nicer to each other back then, too. I miss that.
As long as you knew your place, that is. If you were a black kid going to a newly integrated school or drinking from the white water fountain, or a woman wearing a crew cut and 'men's' clothing, or an interracial or gay couple trying to have dinner as a couple, somehow you wouldn't have this experience people being politer and nicer to you.

Along those lines, I'm glad that the behavior of treating 'politeness' as something that is only accorded to people who conform to certain narrow social expectations for their demographic has subsided. In most places today, you don't get away with calling black men 'boy' while expecting a 'sir' from them or groping single women as long as you wink at them while you do it. There's a lot of 'people were so nice' that really, really wasn't.
  #247  
Old 09-10-2019, 01:39 PM
Pantastic is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Posts: 4,293
Quote:
Originally Posted by Railer13 View Post
When I was a kid, EVERYWHERE in a restaurant was a smoking section. I don't remember exactly when non-smoking sections started to become a thing.
I remember that when I was growing up (in North Carolina in the 80s) non-smoking sections started becoming common, but weren't universal until the 90s. Then by the 2000s pretty much everywhere in the larger cities was non-smoking indoors except for bars, it was a very sudden shift. That's one thing that stands out in movies from the early 80s or before, like the Christopher Reeves Superman movies - you'll see ashtrays at every desk, often built-in to them, and that came to a full stop rather rapidly.

Quote:
I used to write several checks a week, now, it's maybe one a month, if at all.
I pretty much only use paper checks for exceptional circumstances now. Contractors tend to prefer checks over credit, and big things like car and house loans use them, but nothing that recurs regularly. Technically my mortgage and utilities use checks, but it's all electronic withdrawals from an account, not paper.
  #248  
Old 09-10-2019, 02:18 PM
KneadToKnow is offline
Voodoo Adult (Slight Return)
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: Charlotte, NC, USA
Posts: 26,578
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pantastic View Post
I remember that when I was growing up (in North Carolina in the 80s) non-smoking sections started becoming common, but weren't universal until the 90s.
Remember when Cracker Barrel made customers walk through the smoking section to get to the non-smoking section? Good >cough< times.
  #249  
Old 09-10-2019, 03:10 PM
Pantastic is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Posts: 4,293
Quote:
Originally Posted by KneadToKnow View Post
Remember when Cracker Barrel made customers walk through the smoking section to get to the non-smoking section? Good >cough< times.
So many times the nonsmoking section was just a little area with a rope divider and a sign, nothing that actually kept the clouds of smoke from wafting in. I know a lot of people with asthma or smoke allergies who just had to avoid eating out because they couldn't get a genuine 'no cigarette smoke in my face' zone to eat in.

Last edited by Pantastic; 09-10-2019 at 03:10 PM.
  #250  
Old 09-10-2019, 03:55 PM
mikecurtis is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Location: chicago
Posts: 1,518
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pantastic View Post
I remember that when I was growing up (in North Carolina in the 80s) non-smoking sections started becoming common, but weren't universal until the 90s. Then by the 2000s pretty much everywhere in the larger cities was non-smoking indoors except for bars, it was a very sudden shift. That's one thing that stands out in movies from the early 80s or before, like the Christopher Reeves Superman movies - you'll see ashtrays at every desk, often built-in to them, and that came to a full stop rather rapidly.
. . .
Things mighta been different in NC (because big tobacco) but the smoking segregation happened long before the 80's in my world (Chi, WI, L.A.) I remember non smoking sections on planes! Planes! One time on a family trip we ended up in the non smoking section on a plane and my mother (a professional smoker) complained and the stewardess picked the "non smoking section" placard off the back of the seat in front of us and moved it to the row behind us and, voila, we were in the smoking section.

mc
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:45 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

Send questions for Cecil Adams to: cecil@straightdope.com

Send comments about this website to: webmaster@straightdope.com

Terms of Use / Privacy Policy

Advertise on the Straight Dope!
(Your direct line to thousands of the smartest, hippest people on the planet, plus a few total dipsticks.)

Copyright © 2019 STM Reader, LLC.

 
Copyright © 2017