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  #251  
Old 09-10-2019, 07:49 PM
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Originally Posted by AnalogSignal View Post
In ye olden days, my family subscribed to TV Guide. I would look through the week's schedule and circle programs of interest. This was before VCRs so I had to watch these shows "live" which was a lot of effort to see something that was often disappointing.
I miss the "old " TV Guide as well. By "old" I mean the digest sized version that had localized listings for 24 hours of TV for seven days a week. The current version is mostly useless to use find programs to watch.
  #252  
Old 09-11-2019, 12:19 AM
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Things mighta been different in NC (because big tobacco) but the smoking segregation happened long before the 80's in my world (Chi, WI, L.A.)
Yeah, it was definitely tobacco, though I'm not sure how much was 'big tobacco' (as in the major cigarette companies) versus relatively small tobacco farmers. The state grew a lot of it, and anything anti-smoking was thought of as essentially shooting yourself in the foot. It would be like High Point, a major furniture center, deciding to pass zoning laws to limit how much furniture people put in their houses, it just didn't make sense to a lot of people. I distinctly remember my sex education/health teacher talking about how he would encourage the management of restaurants to adopt this new idea of non-smoking sections, and how many times they'd really catch on for non smoking customers.
  #253  
Old 09-11-2019, 06:37 AM
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I was in a dive bar/restaurant near Pittsburgh on Saturday that is smoker friendly, as in signage that reads "SMOKERS WELCOME". We were definitely in Allegheny County, and I thought all places that served food had to be no-smoking. We both took showers that night to wash off the smell, haven't had to do that in years.
  #254  
Old 09-11-2019, 08:26 AM
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Suburbia in ye olde days (circa 50’s, 60’s) was peppered with kids playing pick-up sports during the day and up to shenanigans at night, with just 2 interruptions: moms calling “DINNER!” at 6-ish and making curfew at bedtime. Miss the first, you go hungry. Miss the second, you get whooped.

Families had lots of kids back then and the kids had free reign of the neighborhood. Parents didn’t sequester their kids in the house for protection, they kicked them outside to stay out of their hair.

Pets also had free reign of the neighborhood. A house cat? What the hell kind of breed is that?

It was a big hodgepodge of kids and pets cavorting with each other in harmony, or sometimes in pitched battle.

Of course all this free-wheeling chaos didn’t come without a few hiccups:
Hey, what’s that squashed in the road over there?
Aw, that’s Binky...he was a good ol’ cat.

Hey, whats that big lump squashed in the road up ahead?
Aw, that’s Billy...he was a good ol’ kid.
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Last edited by Tibby; 09-11-2019 at 08:26 AM.
  #255  
Old 09-11-2019, 09:44 AM
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Buses and airplanes used to have smoking sections in the back. And at one time any woman smoking on the street was seen as "loose."
  #256  
Old 09-11-2019, 10:25 AM
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Newspapers used to be nearly ubiquitous- you'd find them, or parts of them everywhere- waiting rooms, bus/train stops, bathrooms, pretty much anywhere had to spend any amount of time would probably have that day's newspaper handy. And people would read them

While I still see people getting the paper in their yard, seeing them elsewhere in the wild is almost non-existent these days. As a matter of fact, when my sons were born, I had to go HUNT down newspaper copies of the day they were born (in case they're curious when they're older), while in years prior to that, it would have been a matter of just picking one up at a machine, convenience store, gas station, etc...
  #257  
Old 09-11-2019, 12:30 PM
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I've been watching the old Perry Mason series. They think of phone numbers as "Hollywood 5-3254".
Are you sure it wasn't KLondike 5-? KL-5 maps to good old 555. While HOllywood-5 maps to 465.

In Play It Again, Sam, Tony Roberts' character is always using a pay phone to call his office to let them know where he was and tells them the pay phone number. Lot of KL-5's IIRC.
  #258  
Old 09-11-2019, 02:16 PM
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After a long bit of traveling this summer, it occurred to me that, as a young person in the '60s and '70s, one thing that never would have occurred to us was the idea of zipping up a suitcase.
Or a suitcase with wheels.
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  #259  
Old 09-11-2019, 03:55 PM
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Or a suitcase with wheels.
Yeah, we would've thought that was some kind of pansy snowflake move.

What would we have thought of my coworker who has a rolling briefcase?
  #260  
Old 09-11-2019, 04:26 PM
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The CD slot in so many car stereos is not needed by so many people that "mech-less" stereos are commonly sold. No CD slot, certainly no tape slot.

And in addition, most of these people don't use the radio either. From the point of view of someone from the 70s/80s they'd wonder what you use it for if none of those.

And then there's the touch screen thing. Um, where's all the knobs?
  #261  
Old 09-11-2019, 04:59 PM
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DH and I still use the radio in our car (2016 model), and occasionally the CD player.
  #262  
Old 09-11-2019, 06:06 PM
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Speaking of cars, I just saw one with a "For Sale" sign in the window. There used to be vast swaths of intersections and supermarket parking lots with rusting hulks sitting around, each with a red and white sign showing the year, mileage, price and phone number to call. They'd sit there for weeks until someone got piqued and called up the number to make an offer. Now it's all CarMax and websites.

Of course, once somebody did drive the car home, all the guys on the street would come out, pop open the trunk and stand around pointing at stuff.
  #263  
Old 09-11-2019, 06:21 PM
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Speaking of cars, I just saw one with a "For Sale" sign in the window. There used to be vast swaths of intersections and supermarket parking lots with rusting hulks sitting around, each with a red and white sign showing the year, mileage, price and phone number to call. They'd sit there for weeks until someone got piqued and called up the number to make an offer. Now it's all CarMax and websites..
I still see the "for sale" car signs occasionally around here, but they've been illegal for at least a decade in the city of Chicago, as far as I know. You probably won't get ticketed if it's on a side street, but off a main street, I have seen the cops ticket them.
  #264  
Old 09-11-2019, 06:33 PM
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For that matter, here in the U.S., men's suits are certainly far less common now. Up until the 1990s, business attire was the norm in professional environments; many businesses which had been "business attire" fairly rapidly changed over to "business casual" 20 years ago, more or less. Certainly, there are still some professions and firms which expect men to wear suits, but even then, it's often been loosened -- for example, many lawyers now only wear a suit and tie when they actually go to the courthouse.
A few years ago I showed up to a job interview on a hot day wearing a suit, because I was always taught that that's what you're supposed to wear to a job interview. I got there and the interviewer was like "Oh, you didn't have to wear a suit." This was at a tech company in notoriously casual Silicon Valley, though, so I don't know if that's the norm everywhere.

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The "white pages," though isn't just gone, but there's a whole societal change since then. Can you imagine what people would say today if you suggested that every single person's name, address, and phone number should be printed in a book and delivered to every household? Privacy advocates would get it shut down instantly, and the company that did it would probably be out of business.
I remember in the late 1990s when the internet was still a new and scary thing to a lot of people, and online phone directories were starting to become a thing, some of my classmates thought that was a huge violation of their privacy, even though they had no problem with the exact same information being listed in the phone book. They were like "Oh my god, they're putting people's phone numbers on the internet! Then just anyone can find it." I pointed out that they already could do that, using the phone book.

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Originally Posted by Les Espaces Du Sommeil View Post
Some time around the early 2000s, pubes started being considered as dirty. That's quite a 180° from my youth, though I hear there's been a (most welcome in my view) pushback against that trend recently.
That reminded me of a conversation with a girl in college (so that would make it early 2000s) about how she thought body hair of any kind was "gross". We were just platonic friends, so we weren't intimate enough for me to learn if this opinion extended to pubes (the conversation was about leg shaving).

Last edited by WildaBeast; 09-11-2019 at 06:35 PM.
  #265  
Old 09-11-2019, 06:57 PM
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I think this has a lot more to do with people hating the way their bodies look, as opposed to any notion of being naked is shameful, or prudery.
The 4th graders in our local school all had compulsory swim lessons this year (the government is trying to stem the increase in child drownings ) the boys all wore underwear under their swimsuits, and each/all changed under a towel. That wasn't body image issues -- it was social pressure, which is to say shame and prudery.
  #266  
Old 09-11-2019, 07:02 PM
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Buses and airplanes used to have smoking sections in the back. And at one time any woman smoking on the street was seen as "loose."
On a big enough plane it was the back of each class. I was in the front row of coach one time and the row in front of me, the last row in business class, was a smoking row. Unlike the people in business class, their smoke was perfectly happy to mix with us commoners in coach.

But the best was when I flew Lufthansa from Frankfurt to Stockholm - the right side of the plane was smoking and the left side was non-smoking.
  #267  
Old 09-11-2019, 07:25 PM
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Newspapers used to be nearly ubiquitous- you'd find them, or parts of them everywhere- waiting rooms, bus/train stops, bathrooms, pretty much anywhere had to spend any amount of time would probably have that day's newspaper handy. And people would read them

While I still see people getting the paper in their yard, seeing them elsewhere in the wild is almost non-existent these days. As a matter of fact, when my sons were born, I had to go HUNT down newspaper copies of the day they were born (in case they're curious when they're older), while in years prior to that, it would have been a matter of just picking one up at a machine, convenience store, gas station, etc...
Must depend on where you are. They're still all over the place here; maybe somewhat less so than they used to be, but I see them for sale in drugstores, gas stations, groceries, etc. all the time.
  #268  
Old 09-11-2019, 11:15 PM
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Are you sure it wasn't KLondike 5-? KL-5 maps to good old 555. While HOllywood-5 maps to 465.
555 numbers came about in the 1960s; the first usage seems to have been 1961, after most seasons of Perry Mason had been broadcast. They don't seem to have become ubiquitous until the early 1970s.

TV Tropes says that

Another fake number used back in the 1950s through the 1970s when most of Southern California was entirely one area code, 213, was to reserve the extension 1 plus the prefix in every prefix, so that the number 462-1462 or 733-1733 was never a working number. . . . A number of TV shows and made-for-tv movies took advantage of this fictional number feature.


I'll have to listen for that.
  #269  
Old 09-12-2019, 12:39 AM
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My 2001 Corolla (and probably every car manufactured before it) came with an ashtray and a cigarette lighter. My 2018 Mazda3 has neither. (There's a 12v outlet into which I suppose you could plug an aftermarket cigarette lighter, but it's inside the center console so rather inconvenient for that.) I barely remember smoking sections in California restaurants; I was still a kid when it was banned. I clearly remember when smoking in bars was banned in Massachusetts; I wasn't old enough to be there legally, but I was old enough to get away with it.

NPR had an interview the other day with a high school kid talking about how an e-cigarette company representative had spoken to his class about how safe their product was, in the context of a story about the FDA warning them to knock it off. I don't often scream at the radio these days unless it's one of Trump's defenders, but that one got me. The more things change, the more those purveyors of poison stay the same.
  #270  
Old 09-12-2019, 09:26 AM
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Or a suitcase with wheels.
When did those come about? I remember seeing them in the 1990s and thinking they were a little 'too much' - not necessarily a dumb idea, but something you kind of smirk at and make jokes about how they're taking the luggage for a walk. Now they're just standard.
  #271  
Old 09-12-2019, 09:30 AM
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When did those come about? I remember seeing them in the 1990s and thinking they were a little 'too much' - not necessarily a dumb idea, but something you kind of smirk at and make jokes about how they're taking the luggage for a walk. Now they're just standard.
I got a set of luggage when I graduated high school* in 1986, and the largest suitcase has wheels, so they had come to be by then. This was the era of "four tiny wheels on the bottom, forcing you to make turns very carefully" wheeled luggage though. "Two big wheels with a pull-handle" came later, I think.

ETA: I just did a quick search and found a ad in the Charlotte Observer from 1978 for "jumbo wheeled luggage."

*From my parents, no less. Nothing says "when are you moving out?" like the gift of luggage.

Last edited by KneadToKnow; 09-12-2019 at 09:31 AM.
  #272  
Old 09-12-2019, 09:45 AM
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Must depend on where you are. They're still all over the place here; maybe somewhat less so than they used to be, but I see them for sale in drugstores, gas stations, groceries, etc. all the time.
You can still buy them, but it's not at all common to see people reading them, see them as litter blowing around, or find newspapers in public areas anymore.

I mean, I still read the Dallas Morning News, but I do it on my phone or desktop. The actual printed paper would be pretty inconvenient by comparison.

Nationwide, newspaper circulation is about half what it used to be, and ad revenue is about a third. Printed magazines are just as badly affected, with a lot of formerly popular magazines going web-only(Newsweek, Redbook, Teen Vogue) or having much reduced circulation(Time), reducing publication frequency(Seventeen), or folding altogether(Life).
  #273  
Old 09-12-2019, 01:16 PM
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I got a set of luggage when I graduated high school* in 1986, and the largest suitcase has wheels, so they had come to be by then. This was the era of "four tiny wheels on the bottom, forcing you to make turns very carefully" wheeled luggage though. "Two big wheels with a pull-handle" came later, I think.
I did a little googling, the patent on wheeled suitcases was in the early 70s, but the 'two wheels with a pull handle" wasn't invented until the late 80s, which fits with them catching on in the 90s like I remember. It was the pull handle and two wheels that jumped out at me when it came out.

http://www.cnn.com/2010/TRAVEL/10/04...ary/index.html
  #274  
Old 09-12-2019, 04:14 PM
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How about calling the number for the "Time Lady"? When we wanted to set our watches/clocks to the exact time, we'd dial a number that we all had memorized and a recording would tell you the time. Towards the end, the Time Lady would even tell you what the current temp was.
Similar to this service was something, at least in Indianapolis when I was growing up, where you could call an automated system at the newspaper and get news and sports information. I called it every day to get the Pacers and Colts scores and standings.
  #275  
Old 09-12-2019, 05:02 PM
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Similar to this service was something, at least in Indianapolis when I was growing up, where you could call an automated system at the newspaper and get news and sports information. I called it every day to get the Pacers and Colts scores and standings.
I do believe it was CE6-2200 in Chicago. The Daily News or the Sun-Times, can't remember which. The other had one beginning WH3. Might have ended 3080.

It's possible I called for updates a little too frequently.
  #276  
Old 09-12-2019, 08:10 PM
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I was in a dive bar/restaurant near Pittsburgh on Saturday that is smoker friendly, as in signage that reads "SMOKERS WELCOME". We were definitely in Allegheny County, and I thought all places that served food had to be no-smoking. We both took showers that night to wash off the smell, haven't had to do that in years.
As a former columnist for the Philadelphia Inquirer used to say in reference to our politics, "Pennsylvania, Land of Giants." Bars can request an exemption from the smoking ban if they ban anyone under 18 and get less than 20% of their revenue from food.
  #277  
Old 09-13-2019, 06:48 AM
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As a former columnist for the Philadelphia Inquirer used to say in reference to our politics, "Pennsylvania, Land of Giants." Bars can request an exemption from the smoking ban if they ban anyone under 18 and get less than 20% of their revenue from food.
Huh. Well, nobody there under 18 who didn't have ID saying they were 21, but they sell a ton of food. It was a real throwback kinda day.
  #278  
Old 09-13-2019, 12:00 PM
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I heard somewhere that, in my state, bars that serve cocktails and shots (distilled spirit) are required to have a major portion of their revenue coming from gnosh. Taverns (beer/wine only), not so much.
  #279  
Old 09-13-2019, 01:56 PM
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I realized this morning that I don't think I've heard anyone talk about a six-pack of beer in decades.
  #280  
Old 09-13-2019, 02:06 PM
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Huh. I just bought beer and the sign referred to 6-packs.
  #281  
Old 09-13-2019, 02:15 PM
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I realized this morning that I don't think I've heard anyone talk about a six-pack of beer in decades.
How is the beer packaged where you are from? Here it's typically (but not exclusively) 6 packs.
  #282  
Old 09-13-2019, 02:21 PM
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I realized this morning that I don't think I've heard anyone talk about a six-pack of beer in decades.
I haven't bought a "six-pack" of beer in a long time. I do buy cases, half cases, and mix-6s though.

ETA: and bomber bottles, and growlers.

Last edited by kayaker; 09-13-2019 at 02:22 PM.
  #283  
Old 09-13-2019, 02:29 PM
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How is the beer packaged where you are from? Here it's typically (but not exclusively) 6 packs.
Honestly, I have no idea. I assume still in 6-packs and 12-packs and cases. I just mean that I haven't heard people in real life or in movies or TV talk about "grabbing a six-pack" in ages. Perhaps I just don't move in the right circles anymore.

I would liken this to way that no one talks about buying weed in lids, dimebags or nickelbags anymore: it's all eighths, quarters, ounces etc. or by gram weight.

Last edited by Snowboarder Bo; 09-13-2019 at 02:29 PM.
  #284  
Old 09-13-2019, 02:31 PM
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Honestly, I have no idea. I assume still in 6-packs and 12-packs and cases. I just mean that I haven't heard people in real life or in movies or TV talk about "grabbing a six-pack" in ages. Perhaps I just don't move in the right circles anymore.

I would liken this to way that no one talks about buying weed in lids, dimebags or nickelbags anymore: it's all eighths, quarters, ounces etc. or by gram weight.
Maybe it's regional. I don't buy a lot of beer, but I would certainly say 6-pack if I wanted 6 beers packaged together. Same for soda.
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Old 09-13-2019, 02:35 PM
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Yes, if i wanted to buy six beverages packaged together I'd call it a six-pack; I'm saying this term isn't as common as it used to be, IME. I buy sodas in 12-packs. When I was in college I bought beer in cases. At one time (the 70s and 80s) "six-pack" was the default configuration (IME) and today that just isn't the case (again, IME).
  #286  
Old 09-13-2019, 02:41 PM
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Am I the only one remembering 4-packs? It seems that it was a thing in the late 70s / early 80s.
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Last edited by Les Espaces Du Sommeil; 09-13-2019 at 02:44 PM.
  #287  
Old 09-13-2019, 03:14 PM
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Are you sure it wasn't KLondike 5-? KL-5 maps to good old 555. While HOllywood-5 maps to 465.

In Play It Again, Sam, Tony Roberts' character is always using a pay phone to call his office to let them know where he was and tells them the pay phone number. Lot of KL-5's IIRC.
I know why Hollywood uses fake numbers - so innocent people don't get endless crank calls from bored yayhoos calling 343-2794 and asking for Charlie Brown.

But when it's a pay phone, why not use the real number? So what if some teenage calls and asks for Dick. Chances are, no one will answer, and if they do, he's not there.

Hollywood should pool its money and get a range of phone numbers set up, so that if some peckerwood calls the number and tried to get Tony Stark, they eother get a rude message calling them stupid, or they get a prerecorded message of Stark telling them he's out but they can leave a message, or get bonus information on the next movie, or whatever. It can't cost that much.
  #288  
Old 09-13-2019, 03:21 PM
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Am I the only one remembering 4-packs? It seems that it was a thing in the late 70s / early 80s.
Four-packs are back -- they're not uncommon these days for craft breweries (especially the ones that are using cans instead of bottles).
  #289  
Old 09-13-2019, 09:42 PM
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I heard somewhere that, in my state, bars that serve cocktails and shots (distilled spirit) are required to have a major portion of their revenue coming from gnosh. Taverns (beer/wine only), not so much.
Not so much these days. Comedy clubs lobbied, successfully in many states, to get that food percentage lowered so that it would be easier for comedy clubs to sell liquor. Because nobody goes to a comedy club to eat, but they want cocktails with their comedy.


Of course, that spilled over into allowing traditional beer & wine bars to serve liquor, though at least around here, while most of these places now offer liquor, they've retained mostly the same clientele who were coming in because they preferred beer in the first place, and so they continue to sell mostly beer.
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Old 09-13-2019, 10:00 PM
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Yeah, well, when was the last time you (in the US) dialed a 7-digit phone number?
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I regularly call numbers in my area code with 7 digits.
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This afternoon.

You can still dial numbers that are in the same area code with seven digits around here; at least, if you're dialing from a landline. (Though I'm not entirely living in the 1970's; "dialing" is figurative, I punched buttons.)
A college friend of mine is a Universalist minister. His ordination twenty years ago took place in a historic church in the tiny town of Canon, Georgia, population 725. The church - a classic white clapboard one-room building that would not look out of place on the set of Little House on the Prairie - did not have air conditioning (and the ceremony took place on a sweltering July day), so alongside the hymnals in the pews, the church provided paper fans. Apparently donated by the local funeral home, which listed its phone number...of four digits.

I felt like I had stepped back into the 1910s.
  #291  
Old 09-13-2019, 10:36 PM
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That's classic. "Robertson's Funeral Home, just dial 7823, then hang up, drive to Canon, Georgia, and dial 7823."

The tiny town I went to college in used only 5 digits, in the 70s/early 80s. I'll check and see if they still do.
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Old 09-14-2019, 12:08 AM
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Have no idea if this is subtle, but the idea of a 1981-era teen female (of the Atlanta suburbs variety) being interested in any two (or, hell, one) of the following would've astounded me:

1. Tolkein
2. Star Wars
3. Video Games
4. Superheroes

Last edited by JohnT; 09-14-2019 at 12:09 AM.
  #293  
Old 09-14-2019, 12:21 AM
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I read The Hobbit and LOTR when I was 7-10 years old in the 1960s. My female sitter turned m on to Tolkien. I don't know what "of the Atlanta suburbs variety" means, but in the early 1970s a few states north of there, I knew plenty of other girls and teens who read Tolkien and watched Star Trek. I was always able to find other girls who read science fiction and, a few years later, played Dungeons and Dragons.

When the first movie came out, lots of young women liked Star Wars. Some for the story, many for Han Solo.
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Old 09-14-2019, 10:24 AM
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Originally Posted by JohnT View Post
Have no idea if this is subtle, but the idea of a 1981-era teen female (of the Atlanta suburbs variety) being interested in any two (or, hell, one) of the following would've astounded me:

1. Tolkein
2. Star Wars
3. Video Games
4. Superheroes
That's largely because of stereotypes, pushing gender roles, and the hostility of visible parts of various fandoms to female fans. Women have long been active in various fandoms, but a tendency for outside media to portray them as completely male hobbies and for large chunks of organized fandom to push women away and/or not acknowledge their existence leads to the appearance that no women are into these sort of things. Marion Zimmer Bradley was a major defender of Tolkein in articles going back to 1962, In 1981 Pat Nussman did an informal article about the lack of men in active Star Wars Fandom, https://fanlore.org/wiki/Where_the_Boys_Are . Even as far back as 1948 women made up 10-15% of science fiction authors, and Frankenstein (written by a woman) is often considered the first science fiction novel. The Sumerian Game in 1964 was one of the first computer strategy games and was written by a woman, one of the co-designers of Centipede Dona Bailey (1981, a popular arcade game) was female, as was Dani Berry the creator of MULE (1983, a popular multiplayer trading game). Dorothy Woolfolk was an editor at DC Comics as far back in the 1940s.
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Old 09-14-2019, 11:19 AM
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The discussion of the Mary Tyler Moore Show (which followed this recent thread on the death of actress Valerie Harper) mentioned Sue Ann Nivens (the character played by Betty White).

Sue Ann was a comically exaggerated example of a stereotype which has pretty much gone away: the Marriage-Hungry Woman (MHW). Another example was Sally Rogers (played by Rose Marie) on the Dick Van Dyke Show.

Once common in fiction, the MHW was comical in her desire to drag a man -- any man with a pulse -- to the altar. The MHW was a product of an era when unmarried people -- particularly women -- were looked at as somehow failed and flawed. Matter of fact, the Mary Richards character was a major blow against such an attitude.

Often the MHW was quite attractive, and more desirable than the men she was willing to settle for, which may have been a device to make the character more appealing to men. This is like 'Hollywood ugly', where a beautiful actress like Tina Fey is portrayed as being unattractive.

The MHW gradually disappeared with the advent of the sexual revolution and increased career opportunities for women.
  #296  
Old 09-14-2019, 11:41 AM
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Am I the only one remembering 4-packs? It seems that it was a thing in the late 70s / early 80s.
There are a few brands of root beer that sell in 4-packs but for the most part I still associate 4-packs with wine coolers.

Last edited by Snowboarder Bo; 09-14-2019 at 11:42 AM.
  #297  
Old 09-14-2019, 11:47 AM
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Fever Tree sodas/tonics come in 4-packs.
  #298  
Old 09-14-2019, 04:24 PM
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Originally Posted by F. U. Shakespeare View Post
Sue Ann was a comically exaggerated example of a stereotype which has pretty much gone away: the Marriage-Hungry Woman (MHW). Another example was Sally Rogers (played by Rose Marie) on the Dick Van Dyke Show.

...

The MHW gradually disappeared with the advent of the sexual revolution and increased career opportunities for women.
Sue Anne was not interested in marriage. Definitely interest in men, but not for the purposes of marriage. She was in fact an exemplar of the sexual revolution. It was surprising for many at that time to see a woman her age act so brazenly in her sexual desires (without a thought of a getting a husband).

In the finale, after being fired, she took a job as a "sort of a practical nurse" to a rich old dude. I don't think marriage was on the table.

Cf. Jennifer Marlowe on WKRP but older.
  #299  
Old 09-14-2019, 10:34 PM
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One thing my grandparents’ WWII generation seemed a lot more interested and concerned about than now was the ethnicity or religion of people. It was something they thought important to know and discuss; for example, if a family who was catholic moved in to the neighborhood, they would have been identified and appraised as the “the Catholic family” - with that characteristic given primary importance - whereas now I think somebody’s non-‘wasp’y qualifies would be an afterthought. Certainly, Black skin was even more notable back then, but being of other identifiable ethnicities like Italian (what my grandmother would refer to as Eye-talian) or Irish was considered an important part of describing a person.

Obviously, there’s a lot of discussion today about diversity, but back then it was more likely to be a shorthand for explaining how the person thought or acted. At least, that’s the impression I get.
  #300  
Old 09-15-2019, 01:36 AM
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One thing my grandparents’ WWII generation seemed a lot more interested and concerned about than now was the ... religion of people. It was something they thought important to know and discuss; for example, if a family who was catholic moved in to the neighborhood, they would have been identified and appraised as the “the Catholic family” ....
Somewhat similarly, one thing I've noticed is that the post-WWII generation attended church regularly and wasn't afraid to say so ("Well, I was talking to Bill at church last Sunday, and he said ...").

When I was a child in the 1960s, everybody went to church every Sunday. Our street practically cleared out Sunday mornings, as most every family went to church. The churches that families on our street attended may have been Protestant or Catholic, but they were churches, it was Sunday, and not attending church was out of the question. As I recall, from my own childhood attendance at church, it was packed every Sunday, with perhaps three hundred to four hundred people. Our church had plenty of social clubs for all ages that didn't focus on religion--Cubs, Scouts, the Teen Club (wholesome activities such as bowling, for teens, always accompanied by pizza), the Badminton Club (in the church gym), the Couples Club (for newlyweds), the Senior Ladies Bridge Club, and so on.

I sang in the choir of a Protestant church in the 1990s, and noticed the dropoff in attendance. The church was not as big as the one I attended as a child, but still, it might have been half-full at best on an ordinary Sunday, and most of the congregation was at least fifty years old. There were few families with young children, and any social clubs the church had, were geared towards the demographic that was attending--that is, seniors. The Senior Ladies Bridge Club was there, but no Teen or Badminton clubs.

Nowadays, neither me, nor anybody I know, goes to church regularly. If they do, they don't talk about it. A sharp contrast from my childhood and teen years.
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