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  #2601  
Old 11-14-2016, 11:01 AM
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Originally Posted by Recliner View Post
But, dammit, there was room for both of them on that door! Rose, you selfish bitch!

It wasn't lack of room, it was that it was unstable with two. (N.B. done carefully, they possibly could have managed it, but where's the drama in that?)
  #2602  
Old 11-14-2016, 11:05 AM
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Originally Posted by Exapno Mapcase View Post
Just thought of one. When I was I kid I spent endless amounts of time trying to figure out how to pronounce the apostrophes in J'onn J'onzz, Manhunter from Mars. Juh-honnn Jun-own-zezzz?

That was back when the audience for comic books was under ten, and they wrote at the right level for them. A Martian! Named J'onn J'onzz! Neat-o!
Sidebar to this:
Robert Heinlein made the statement that a librarian commented to him on the weird names used for aliens - so he wrote a book about a Martian named Smith.
  #2603  
Old 11-14-2016, 11:15 AM
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Originally Posted by Stoid View Post
Scarecrow wants a brain...yet he's the smartest guy in the group who comes up with all the ideas.
Tinman wants a heart, but he's a sentimental lug.
Cowardly lion wants courage, and he's the toughest SOB there.

Duh.
Kind of related in the obverse sense -

When I took my daughter to see "Wreck-it Ralph" I had to explain why I nearly lost it when the (cookie) guards in the Palace solemnly intoned "Ohh-Ree-Ohh".
  #2604  
Old 11-14-2016, 11:24 AM
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Originally Posted by Morbo View Post
I've owned Subarus for years...and only recently found out that "Subaru" is Japanese for Pleiades, hence the logo.
I did that one too. A Japanese exchange student we hosted tried to explain it to me, but we missed connecting due to linguistic barriers. The "penny dropped" when I noticed that the (old) logo was the constellation.
  #2605  
Old 11-14-2016, 11:29 AM
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Originally Posted by gigi View Post
Backfield in motion...?

I've posted this one before, but it took many years of listening and not hearing before I realized Scarborough Fair is about impossible demands:

Tell her to make me a cambric shirt,
Without no seams nor needlework
When you hear the ENTIRE folk song, it's much more obvious. The final verse explains the love asks the impossible, but if she is willing to try "Then she'll be a true love of mine."
  #2606  
Old 11-14-2016, 11:42 AM
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Originally Posted by MacLir View Post
Kind of related in the obverse sense -

When I took my daughter to see "Wreck-it Ralph" I had to explain why I nearly lost it when the (cookie) guards in the Palace solemnly intoned "Ohh-Ree-Ohh".
At the old Hollywood Library, before the fire, they had a original script for Wizard of Oz, with notes. That song was notated as having the lyrics of "Oh we love, no-one".
  #2607  
Old 11-14-2016, 11:51 AM
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Originally Posted by DWMarch View Post
No no, it's "Hurts So Good" that's about anal. Sometimes love don't feel like it should.

Apologies to all who will now never be able to hear that song without thinking of anal sex.
Slightly off on a tangent (which will be a pun based on the rest). I always enjoyed the song "A Time for Us", which uses Tchaikovsky's "Romeo and Juliet" as tune.

Then I learned that Tchaikovsky:
  • was gay
  • wrote it to a young prince who was probably his lover

Now when I hear it, the double meanings just keep coming.
♫… as we unveil the love we now must hide…♫
  #2608  
Old 11-14-2016, 12:35 PM
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Originally Posted by TreacherousCretin View Post
It bothers me that the Pleiades are commonly called "The Seven Sisters" (in the western hemisphere, anyway) but my Subaru's logo has only six stars.

.
The original was a representation of the constellation and had seven, representing the seven partners. Then there were corporate changes, and now the logo is six stars, one larger than the rest, and not arranged in the constellation.
  #2609  
Old 11-14-2016, 12:37 PM
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Originally Posted by Lust4Life View Post
I always thought that Born in the U.S.A. was a celebration of being American until one day I actually listened to the words and realised that it was about a Special Forces veteran who was left on the scrap heap after he had finished his time.
And yet it seems to get heavily used in Fourth of July celebrations. Most folks also miss the revelation you found.
  #2610  
Old 11-14-2016, 12:45 PM
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Originally Posted by jefahrbach View Post

But especially the spells are like a slap in the face to one's intelligence. They all are merely the Latin translation of what the spell's effect is: "Lumos" means "light" and causes a light to appear, "Nox" means "darkness" and extinguishes that light, "Crucio" means "to torture" and is a curse that causes extreme pain, "Imperio" means "to command" and is a curse which puts someone under another's control, "Accio" means "to summon" and is a summoning charm, "Expelliarmus" means "to expel" (expello) "weapon" (arma), and so on and so forth.
In a simulation game I enjoy there is a spell for creating gold. When invoked, the narrator voice intones "Expressus Americanum".
  #2611  
Old 11-14-2016, 01:20 PM
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Originally Posted by Koxinga View Post
I wonder how many concertgoers listening to a performance of Wagner's Die Walküre can't help humming to themselves, "Kill the Wabbit! Kill the Wabbit!
Guilty as charged!
  #2612  
Old 11-14-2016, 01:23 PM
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Originally Posted by KneadToKnow View Post
I spend half the time I listen to Wagner singing Bugs Bunny's lyrics and the other half reciting Anna Russell's monologue.
"… Mrs. Freyda Wotan …"

Listened to it just the other day.
  #2613  
Old 11-14-2016, 03:42 PM
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Sherlock Holmes was actually a total jerk who treated Watson like a retarded child. "Elementary, my dear Watson" actually means "What an idiot you are, Watson." I figured this out after becoming a huge fan of House MD and learning it was based on Sherlock Holmes.
As Holmes puts it in the recent movie: "High-functioning sociopath"

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Originally Posted by Superhal View Post
(As a side note, this is also a very famous fact: House and Wilson are supposedly Holmes and Watson.)
Sir Arthur Conan Doyle indicated that Holmes was based on a doctor he had known

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Originally Posted by Superhal View Post
Calvin (of Calvin and Hobbes) has some severe emotional and psychological problems.
Named after John Calvin, a 16th-century French Reformation theologian, and Thomas Hobbes, a 17th-century English political philosopher, in this case Calvin is the one associated with the phrase "Nasty, brutish, and short."
  #2614  
Old 11-14-2016, 04:14 PM
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Originally Posted by Chronos View Post
Measures marked by brackets:

[Twinkle, Twinkle] [Little Star] [How I wonder] [what you are]
[Bah Bah black sheep] [Have you any wool?] [Yes, sir, yes, sir] [Three bags full]
[ABCD] [EFG] [HIJK] [LMNOP]
Twinkle and ABCD are the same, but in Black Sheep, the measures are inverted. If you sing/hum/play it as [Yes, sir, yes, sir] [Three bags full] [Bah Bah black sheep] [Have you any wool?] you get the other tune.
  #2615  
Old 11-14-2016, 04:14 PM
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Originally Posted by Superhal
Calvin (of Calvin and Hobbes) has some severe emotional and psychological problems.
Yup

Last edited by Peter Morris; 11-14-2016 at 04:15 PM.
  #2616  
Old 11-14-2016, 04:19 PM
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No no no, it was W-Carp. Don't you remember the carp mascot costume for public appearances? And wasn't there a carp-dropped-from-plane publicity stunt?
No that was turkeys.

"I swear to God I thought they could fly!"
  #2617  
Old 11-14-2016, 04:27 PM
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Originally Posted by Peter Morris View Post
I'm native British, and I've never heard the phrase. I know what a duvet is, but not a comforter. Must be an American thing.
My connotation of the terms is that the fluffy thing is the comforter, and the "pillowcase" thing over it is the duvet.
  #2618  
Old 11-14-2016, 04:35 PM
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You missed the point. Nobody stole anything from him: he made a mistake in placing his bet. Of course, he doesn't like loosing money, even when it's his own fault, and he's the kind of guy who might just lean on you, or steal the money back --- And then the place was busted by the Fed's, so there was nobody and nothing left.
Lonnegan is probably going to figure out what happened at some point. There'll be no mention of the killings in the next day's newspapers. If Snyder (Charles Durning) calls in some backup there'll be no one at the crime scene when they get there. Someone is liable to recognize the name Henry Gondorff and tell him he's a con man. And when Lonnegan does find out, the fact that he made the last bet to win and the horse finished second is probably not going to help. He doesn't strike me as the forgiving sort.
  #2619  
Old 11-14-2016, 04:36 PM
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MacLir, please note that the posts you are quoiting are several years old. The conversation has moved on since then. Some of the people might not even be here any longer.

And if you really feel a need to reply, please don't use a separate post for each. Please put them all in a single post.
  #2620  
Old 11-14-2016, 05:56 PM
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Guilty as charged!
Pepper Mill, too.


She also goes "Quack quack quack ...quack quack...quack quack..." when I have The Blue Danube playing.*



*From "A Corny Concerto", a Bob Clampett cartoon from the 1940s parodying Disney's "Fantasia". "Kill the Wabbit!" is from Chuck Jones' 1950s cartoon "What's Opera, Doc?"
  #2621  
Old 11-14-2016, 05:58 PM
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Are you talking about Asians in Asia or Asian-Americans? Asian pop is more likely to be fruit-flavored but I think Asian-American's taste in soda doesn't vary that much from the rest of the populace.
They tend not to like root beer. The wintergreen reminds them of Salonpas liniment.
  #2622  
Old 11-14-2016, 06:04 PM
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Originally Posted by MacLir View Post
As Holmes puts it in the recent movie: "High-functioning sociopath"



Sir Arthur Conan Doyle indicated that Holmes was based on a doctor he had known



Named after John Calvin, a 16th-century French Reformation theologian, and Thomas Hobbes, a 17th-century English political philosopher, in this case Calvin is the one associated with the phrase "Nasty, brutish, and short."
I always got the impression that Watterson named his characters after getting a look at The Britannica Great Books collection (not to be confused with The Harvard Classics). One volume is devoted to the writings of John Calvin, and has "Calvin" on the spine. Not far away is a volume of Macchiavelli and Hobbes, with those two name on the spine. And the very next volume is the works of Herman Melville. (Melville is the name of Calvin's imaginary little brother)

https://www.librarything.com/publish...+Western+World
  #2623  
Old 11-14-2016, 08:33 PM
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Originally Posted by MacLir View Post
My connotation of the terms is that the fluffy thing is the comforter, and the "pillowcase" thing over it is the duvet.
I don't know that this is official, but it's how I see them sold:

Comforter- the filling is permanently encased in a cover , which may be in any color or pattern including those that coordinate with sheets.When it needs to be washed, you wash the whole thing.You could probably use a duvet cover on it to avoid washing the whole thing,but then it would no longer match the sheets.*

Duvet - just the filling. It's white and comes in different weights, but it's usually thinner than a comforter. It doesn't get cleaned frequently and probably needs dry cleaning. Sometimes called a "duvet insert".


Duvet cover- covers a duvet like a pillowcase. Various colors and patterns , including patterns that coordinate with sheets. Bought separately from the duvet, so if you have three sets of sheets you can have three matching covers for a single duvet.


*I've never seen a set of sheets that had both a matching comforter and a matching duvet cover.
  #2624  
Old 11-15-2016, 02:08 AM
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I don't know that this is official, but it's how I see them sold:

Comforter- the filling is permanently encased in a cover , which may be in any color or pattern including those that coordinate with sheets.When it needs to be washed, you wash the whole thing.You could probably use a duvet cover on it to avoid washing the whole thing,but then it would no longer match the sheets.*
That is what in the UK I think we would call either a bedspread (if it didn't have a fluffy filling) or an eiderdown if it did.
  #2625  
Old 11-15-2016, 03:18 AM
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Originally Posted by CalMeacham View Post
I always got the impression that Watterson named his characters after getting a look at The Britannica Great Books collection (not to be confused with The Harvard Classics). One volume is devoted to the writings of John Calvin, and has "Calvin" on the spine. Not far away is a volume of Macchiavelli and Hobbes, with those two name on the spine. And the very next volume is the works of Herman Melville. (Melville is the name of Calvin's imaginary little brother)
I've heard the story that when L. Frank Baum was trying to come up with a name for his imaginary land, he happened to look at his file cabinet; the first was labeled A-N, the second was O-Z.
  #2626  
Old 11-15-2016, 04:10 AM
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Took me longer than I care to admit to finally figure out that in The Hunger Games, 'Panem' comes from 'panem et circenses', bread and games, a way to appease the populace. I mean, they could've introduced some subtle references to ancient Rome in order to drop a hint, no?
  #2627  
Old 11-15-2016, 08:41 AM
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Originally Posted by Peter Morris View Post
Years ago when the San Jose Mercury picked up C&H after it had been running a while, they just started it, no introductory strips or anything. For about a week I was puzzling over the premise (Why does the kid have a pet tiger, albeit a friendly one?). The penny dropped when came the strip where Calvin was bashing a monster under the bed until his father hauled up the (stuffed) Hobbes saying, "It's not a monster, it's just your stuffed toy." Last panel the (live) Hobbes is next to him in bed.

"Heh, heh. Sorry, buddy. Good thing I missed once in a while, huh."

"Yeah. Gimme that stick a minute, would ya?"

Last edited by DesertDog; 11-15-2016 at 08:42 AM.
  #2628  
Old 11-15-2016, 10:05 AM
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I have two.

[...]

Also, the Neighborhood Watch eye. I didn't realize it was an eye with the pupil off center, you know, as when someone is "WATCHING". until I was a teenager. I always saw it as a spinner of some sort, the pupil being the axis on which the spinner spun.
The neighborhood watch signs here have a guy like a slender Boris Badenov.

It has only been in the last year or so I've been thinking the guy is a bad guy and the good guys are watching for him--I assumed he was a cloak and dagger neighborhood watcher and that it was a bad-arse neighborhood so look out!
  #2629  
Old 11-15-2016, 10:23 AM
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I see.

Would you believe there are no cats named Grimalkin on Petfinder? I mean, a whole database full of animal shelters, and not one think to name a kitteh Grimalkin. Or Schrodinger, for that matter.
OMG, thank you - my next cat will be named Schrodinger (Ding, for short)!
  #2630  
Old 11-15-2016, 02:12 PM
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Me, too!

For the record, I think misle (v. to cheat or fool) SHOULD be added to the English language ASAP.

Lastly, in the context of the trading card game , Magic, I understand that "to Mise" means to win by luck or to win undeserveely, named after a player who won some (many?) matches where observers thought he was sure to lose.
No, it's not named after a person. It's a shortening of "Might as well", as in, "I guess I might as well just win this, am I right?". An overly casual phrasing of a difficult achievement. Shortened to "Mise well, amirite?" and then to just "Mise."

A lot of Magic slang involves cutting out words. "Must be nice to run so well" became "Must be nice" which became "Must". And then the response to "Must" naturally just became "Is".
  #2631  
Old 11-15-2016, 04:57 PM
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No, it's not named after a person. It's a shortening of "Might as well", as in, "I guess I might as well just win this, am I right?". An overly casual phrasing of a difficult achievement. Shortened to "Mise well, amirite?" and then to just "Mise."



A lot of Magic slang involves cutting out words. "Must be nice to run so well" became "Must be nice" which became "Must". And then the response to "Must" naturally just became "Is".


Consider me "schooled". ty
  #2632  
Old 11-15-2016, 10:55 PM
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Airplane! Late in the movie, the nun is playing guitar and singing to the two black guys. The skinny guy, the one with food poisoning, doubles over and vomits while the large guy pats his shoulder sympathetically. It was a few years before I caught on that it was her take on "R-E-S-P-E-C-T" that was making him sick.
  #2633  
Old 11-19-2016, 09:58 AM
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Just discovered another one. Apparently I've been reading and hearing "Dr. Strangelove" with an extra G for the last forty-odd years. It's "Strange Glove", isn't it? No?

This must be related to the Berenstain Bears time rift. I always remembered them as the Berenstein Bears, and I also thought that Nelson Mandela died long before 2013.
  #2634  
Old 11-20-2016, 02:46 AM
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Originally Posted by Blue Blistering Barnacle View Post
For the record, I think misle (v. to cheat or fool) SHOULD be added to the English language ASAP.
Sounds very Yiddish:

Oy, vey! That verkakte shlep just misled me! Such a nogoodnik!
  #2635  
Old 11-21-2016, 09:05 AM
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So the other day I was listening to some Beatles song and someone sang the lyric "What would you do if I sang out of tune? Would you stand up and walk out on me?" That sounded strangely familiar and it took me a few days to figure out: Its the Wonder Years theme! All this time, I've thought the words to that theme was "Watch what you do with that zang attitude"
The story I heard was that the original lyrics were: "What would you do if I sang out of tune / would you throw ripe tomatoes at me?"

However the group thought it best to change that, since, in the past, ardent fans had thrown "jelly babies" (jelly beans) at them in concert, after they had mentioned that they enjoyed that kind of candy.
  #2636  
Old 11-21-2016, 09:33 AM
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Pepper Mill, too.


She also goes "Quack quack quack ...quack quack...quack quack..." when I have The Blue Danube playing.*



*From "A Corny Concerto", a Bob Clampett cartoon from the 1940s parodying Disney's "Fantasia". "Kill the Wabbit!" is from Chuck Jones' 1950s cartoon "What's Opera, Doc?"
If you and Pepper Mill ever want some more (mostly very good) earworms along this line, check out Beethoven's Wig. Richard Perlmutter, the guy responsible for this bit of enjoyable lunacy, has added lyrics to a fair number of well-known classical numbers. For instance:

Eine Kleine Nachtmusik:

Please don't play your violin at night
Wolfgang, go to bed, turn out the light...


March of the Toreadors from Carmen:

Please keep your bull outside the china shop,
No bulls allowed, that's where they stop...
  #2637  
Old 11-21-2016, 01:40 PM
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The original was a representation of the constellation and had seven, representing the seven partners.
Not actually so.

The original version of the logo was laid out like the constellation, but...

The Subaru logo has never had 7 stars. The traditional Japanese interpretation of the constellation only has 6 stars, and the logo matched that.

There were no 7 partners. Subaru is a division of Fuji Heavy Industries, which was merged from of 5 companies. One interpretation of the logo, which comes close to the '7 partners' idea, though I don't know how official it is, is that the large star in the logo represents FHI, and the others represent the original 5 companies.
  #2638  
Old 11-21-2016, 01:47 PM
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This is entirely folk etymology, but years ago I came to the conclusion that the piggys rhyme is an anti-gluttony fable. It tells in alternate lines the fate of two pigs.

The first pig ate a lot
The second pig didn't
The first pig was taken to market
The second pig wasn't
The first pig screamed as he was slaughtered.

Which would you rather be, my child?

I have mentioned this theory before.
Or, as Leiber and Stoller had it:

One little piggy ate pizza
One piggy ate potato chips
This little piggy's coming over your house
He's gonna nibble on your sweet lips.
  #2639  
Old 11-21-2016, 02:18 PM
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Airplane! Late in the movie, the nun is playing guitar and singing to the two black guys. The skinny guy, the one with food poisoning, doubles over and vomits while the large guy pats his shoulder sympathetically. It was a few years before I caught on that it was her take on "R-E-S-P-E-C-T" that was making him sick.
Given that it's Airplane I suppose anything is possible, but I don't think this is right.

I think he's just another passenger who has food poisoning.

He did complain earlier that he got the "pain runnin' down to the bone".
  #2640  
Old 11-21-2016, 03:51 PM
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Given that it's Airplane I suppose anything is possible, but I don't think this is right.
Nah, Rilchaim has this one right. Yeah, the guy also has food poisoning, but the joke is that on top of that, he has to listen to the most bland, soulless version of an Aretha song imaginable, and that just makes him sicker.

Another homage I just realized:

Old school adventure hero The Phantom was very obviously the inspiration for goofy Venture Brothers badguy The Phantom Limb.
  #2641  
Old 11-22-2016, 05:23 PM
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I remember from my astronomy days that there was once a seventh star in the Pleiades cluster, but it has apparently faded away until it's no longer visible to the naked eye.

Listening to the soundtrack of The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly, I just realized that "The Story of a Soldier," dedicated to "our comrades out there who sleep," was written and sung in the style of a lullaby.
  #2642  
Old 11-22-2016, 07:30 PM
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And the showdown at the end of For a Few Dollars More is completely unrealistic. No way you could accurately pick off your opponent with a Colt .45 (or whatever he was using) at that distance!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-xPxMAhMRfk
  #2643  
Old 11-22-2016, 09:20 PM
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I remember from my astronomy days that there was once a seventh star in the Pleiades cluster, but it has apparently faded away until it's no longer visible to the naked eye.
The story is that one of the Seven Sisters was invisible, so I guess they're the Ancient Greek version of the Fantastic Four.
  #2644  
Old 11-22-2016, 09:58 PM
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Holy crap! I always thought Hadji on Jonny Quest was Hindu or Sikh. I just now realized that the name means he completed the pilgrimage to Mecca. So he's actually a Muslim!

Who'da thunk it?!? DUH!!!

Last edited by terentii; 11-22-2016 at 09:58 PM.
  #2645  
Old 11-22-2016, 10:27 PM
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It wasn't until a few weeks ago that I finally realized what this line in Simon & Garfunkel's Big Bright Green Pleasure Machine meant.

Quote:
Are you worried cause your girlfriend's just a little late?

Last edited by Morgyn; 11-22-2016 at 10:28 PM.
  #2646  
Old 11-23-2016, 02:38 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Telperion View Post
The story is that one of the Seven Sisters was invisible, so I guess they're the Ancient Greek version of the Fantastic Four.
Actually I believe the seventh sister was sick or weak thus making her star virtually invisible. Or maybe she was a literal shrinking violet.
  #2647  
Old 11-23-2016, 02:49 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by furryman View Post
Actually I believe the seventh sister was sick or weak thus making her star virtually invisible. Or maybe she was a literal shrinking violet.
Good site on this:


http://earthsky.org/favorite-star-pa...rldwide-renown
  #2648  
Old 12-04-2016, 08:22 AM
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From Bob Dylan's Subterranean Homesick Blues:

"Better stay away from those who carry 'round a fire hose..."

It was just five minutes ago that I realized he was referencing civil rights protesters being sprayed with fire hoses. I had thought it was just a nonsense rhyme.



As for With a Little Help from My Friends, I originally thought the line was:

"What would you think if I sang out a tune..."


mmm
  #2649  
Old 12-04-2016, 11:43 AM
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Not a creative work, as such, but I just realized yesterday, after hearing a local supermarket ad touting their sale on Ore-Ida products this week, where the brand name Ore-Ida came from. Oregon-Idaho. As it turns out after researching it after having that revelation, the company was named that because their two biggest factories were in Oregon and Idaho.
  #2650  
Old 12-04-2016, 11:57 AM
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Since Jayjay broke the creative barrier, I realized yesterday that UPS's phone #, 1-800-PICK-UPS can be pronounced both "pick UPS" (how I always "heard" it) or "pickups", which is what the person in the van will do to many packages - pick them up.
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