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Old 02-12-2018, 11:44 AM
aceplace57 aceplace57 is offline
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Why Have Small Bedroom TV's disappeared from the market?

Small Bedroom TV's have been a part of my life since age 12. My dad ran coax into my bedroom for my Christmas gift. They gave me a 15" tube set and stand from their bedroom. TV in bed. Awesome.

I currently have a 17" LCD flat screen purchased in 2007. The base is dual purpose. It sits on a table or wall mounts. I installed an electrical plug behind the tv and built a shelf for the DirecTV box. I also have micro speakers wall mounted for my mp3's.
https://i.imgur.com/g0lwJyV.jpg

I wanted to get a similar LCD for the bedroom I'll use at my mom's new house.

They aren't sold anymore! I wasted over an hour looking at TV's on Amazon, Walmart, and Sams Club.

I nearly bought this one with built-in dvd. But it's 24 inches!!!!! That's the same size as the Sony CRT (1998) in my living room. ::EEK::
https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B01JY...vtL&ref=plSrch

They do offer little 9" screens that are basically tablets on a stand. I own a tablet and I do use it to watch streaming video from A&E and HISTORY.

I finally went to Ebay and bought a used Flat Screen very similar to mine. $60

I have absolutely no interest in Smart TV's or High Def. All I care about is basic tv.

Last edited by aceplace57; 02-12-2018 at 11:48 AM.
  #2  
Old 02-12-2018, 11:52 AM
TimeWinder TimeWinder is offline
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I have absolutely no interest in Smart TV's or High Def. All I care about is basic tv.
I'm assuming by "High Def" you mean 4K, not "mere" HD. I don't think standard definition TVs are made any more, certainly not in LCD form. And once you've got the electronics for digital display, making the TV "Smart" in some sense doesn't cost much extra for the manufacturer, so that may be getting standard, too.

As for size; 17" hasn't been a standard in more than a decade, but Amazon's got tons of 19" ones.
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Old 02-12-2018, 11:58 AM
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I don't follow. Looking at the 32" and under page from Amazon, there are plenty of 19", 20" and 22" screens. I even see a few 16" screens.
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Old 02-12-2018, 12:00 PM
aceplace57 aceplace57 is offline
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I found this Sharp LCD used on Ebay. They were sold in 2007-08.
https://www.crutchfield.com/S-VTRwv9...LC-13SH6U.html

That should keep me happy for awhile.

Eventually I'll have to make the transition to the tech they sell today.
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Old 02-12-2018, 12:04 PM
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You can even still get pocket sized sets:https://www.amazon.com/Chaowei-DTV53.../dp/B0786F5SMZ
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Old 02-12-2018, 12:05 PM
aceplace57 aceplace57 is offline
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I don't follow. Looking at the 32" and under page from Amazon, there are plenty of 19", 20" and 22" screens. I even see a few 16" screens.
I clicked the link. Nearly all the tv's were 32 or 24". I did see that one Sceptre19.

14,15,17" were standard for decades. You'd think a 1020p with 14" screen would have a far superior picture compared to the CRT's in that size 25 years ago.

Seems like Hi Def and a small screen would go hand in hand. But it didn't work out that way.

I read this CNET article. He recommends larger screens.
https://www.cnet.com/topics/tvs/buying-guide/

Last edited by aceplace57; 02-12-2018 at 12:08 PM.
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Old 02-12-2018, 12:06 PM
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Because at the small sizes, you're competing with tablets, and you can't match price for performance with them selling TVs.
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Old 02-12-2018, 12:17 PM
aceplace57 aceplace57 is offline
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Because at the small sizes, you're competing with tablets, and you can't match price for performance with them selling TVs.
I did see several tiny tv's that reminded me of tablets with feet.

I see the appeal of Smart TV's. Being able to watch streaming video and also cable/satellite content is a plus. My DirecTV account lets me sign in to Discovery, History, A&E, Bravo etc. and watch shows on my tablet.

Web browsing on a tv doesn't do much for me. I already spend too much time browsing on my phone, tablet and laptop. I don't need another device to browse the web. Installing Apps on a smart tv is just extra work that I already do on my phone & tablet.

Last edited by aceplace57; 02-12-2018 at 12:20 PM.
  #9  
Old 02-12-2018, 12:18 PM
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A couple points for you to consider:

1. TV and monitor screen sizes are measured on the diagonal. My extremely modest and somewhat old computer monitor that I'm looking at right now is 20" on the diagonal.
2. The TV you linked to from Crutchfield has a 4:3 screen aspect ratio. 4:3 hasn't been the standard for more than a decade now. Most content you watch will either be shrunk with bars on the top, chopped off on the sides or squished from a rectangle to a square (your choice!)
3. Someone will be by to do the math.

Here's a calculator for you http://www.displaywars.com/
  #10  
Old 02-12-2018, 12:18 PM
enalzi enalzi is offline
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Because no one is buying them. Why get a 13 inch TV when you can get a 24 inch TV for $20 more? You figure most office workers are looking up close at a 19+ inch monitor every day. I couldn't imaging looking at a 17 inch TV from across the room.
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Old 02-12-2018, 12:30 PM
aceplace57 aceplace57 is offline
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Ok. It'll take awhile for the Tech Shock to wear off.

I hadn't paid any attention to tv's in several years. I thought my LCD flat panel from 2007 was pretty current. It can even double as a pc monitor. It has a VGA port. Although, I did mess up not buying a widescreen. They were more expensive in 07 compared to the old standard.

The lesson here is you can't ignore tech for long before it totally changes while you're preoccupied with other things.

Last edited by aceplace57; 02-12-2018 at 12:34 PM.
  #12  
Old 02-12-2018, 12:35 PM
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Ok. It'll take awhile for the Tech Shock to wear off.

I hadn't paid any attention to tv's in several years. I thought my LCD flat panel from 2007 was pretty current. It can even double as a pc monitor. It has a VGA port. Although, I did mess up not buying a widescreen. They were more expensive in 07 compared to the old standard.

The lesson here is you can't ignore tech for long before it totally changes while you're preoccupied with other things.
If you look at a technology once a decade, you'll have practically no frame of reference; almost everything will have changed to some degree, and some of it to an incomprehensible degree.
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Old 02-12-2018, 12:38 PM
aceplace57 aceplace57 is offline
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Uh, yes. I'm learning that lesson the hard way.

The first time I looked at the new tv's was quite surreal.

I'll eventually buy one of the 24" sets. I'm building a wall shelf big enough to handle one that size.

I should plan on a smart set. They still sell dumb TV's but they'll be obsolete very soon.

Last edited by aceplace57; 02-12-2018 at 12:42 PM.
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Old 02-12-2018, 12:48 PM
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What about computer monitors? Some have sound, you would need a tuner if you are using a antenna or cable input.

Second thought, just update to a 24' or so. Just easier all around.

Last edited by kanicbird; 02-12-2018 at 12:49 PM.
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Old 02-12-2018, 12:53 PM
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Originally Posted by gnoitall View Post
If you look at a technology once a decade, you'll have practically no frame of reference; almost everything will have changed to some degree, and some of it to an incomprehensible degree.
Fortunately I did make the conversion to a smart phone a few years ago. Learning Android kept me in the tech loop. I have ignored hi def tv.

A lot of the Smart Tv's run Android. So, I'll be reasonably comfortable. But, Hooking the thing up. :EEK: may be very challenging.

I may have an installer take care of it.

Last edited by aceplace57; 02-12-2018 at 12:56 PM.
  #16  
Old 02-12-2018, 01:14 PM
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Best Buy has a 19" TV (in real dimension that's 11"x17".)

Walmart has a 16" (12"x16") with (or without) a built in DVD player and even a 13.3" (11.5"x13.6").

What kind of screen size/overall dimensions are you looking for?
  #17  
Old 02-12-2018, 01:24 PM
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That 13.3 fits the bill perfectly.

Thank you. I'll talk to my SO and we'll probably order it.

The spare bedroom at my moms new house is pretty small. Roughly 12x12 and it has a queen size bed.

Anything too big will overwhelm it.

Last edited by aceplace57; 02-12-2018 at 01:26 PM.
  #18  
Old 02-12-2018, 01:28 PM
Chimera Chimera is offline
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Walmart has a 16" (12"x16") with (or without) a built in DVD player and even a 13.3" (11.5"x13.6").
Awesome catch there! Not a bad price either.
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Old 02-12-2018, 01:31 PM
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Are A/v inputs the yellow jack for video and two jacks (red, white) for audio? That's how I connect currently to my DirecTV receiver.

Inputs: Usb, Sd Card, Vga, A/v, Pc & Hdmi

Outputs: Headphones & Digital Audio

Supports 480i, 480p, 720p, 1080i & 1080p

Last edited by aceplace57; 02-12-2018 at 01:34 PM.
  #20  
Old 02-12-2018, 01:34 PM
Chimera Chimera is offline
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Are A/v inputs the yellow jack for video and two jacks (red, white) for audio?
Yes.
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  #21  
Old 02-12-2018, 01:36 PM
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Awesome.

The Straight Dope comes through again.

I spent hours researching tv's and looked at dozens of listings.

Never saw that one at Walmart.

I really appreciate the help.

Last edited by aceplace57; 02-12-2018 at 01:38 PM.
  #22  
Old 02-12-2018, 01:46 PM
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Fortunately I did make the conversion to a smart phone a few years ago. Learning Android kept me in the tech loop. I have ignored hi def tv.

A lot of the Smart Tv's run Android. So, I'll be reasonably comfortable. But, Hooking the thing up. :EEK: may be very challenging.

I may have an installer take care of it.
It's really not hard. Get an HDMI cable. Plug one end into the tv and one into the direct TV box. Plug in the TV. That's about all there is to it.
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Old 02-12-2018, 02:03 PM
Mdcastle Mdcastle is offline
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25" TVs used to be what you got if you were well off. I looked in the final, 1989 Sears catalog and a store brand 25" TV was about $800 in today's money. Google tells me you can get a store brand 24" TV today for about $80. The people that actually wanted small TVs were dwarfed by the people that just couldn't afford big ones.

By 1989 black and white TV production was about extinct. Beforehand few people wanted them but bought them because they couldn't afford color but by 1989 technology had improved such that just about anyone could afford at least a 13" color set, just anyone can get a 24-25" TV. And the much smaller size means you can fit them into the same spot in the bedroom that formerly held a much smaller viewing area tube TV.
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Old 02-12-2018, 02:17 PM
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Just because a TV is 'smart' and can make the tea, stack the dishwasher and walk the dog, does not mean that you have to use those features. As said above - plug it in and ignore the rest (you may want to tone down the brightness a bit though).
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Old 02-12-2018, 02:32 PM
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It's really not hard. Get an HDMI cable. Plug one end into the tv and one into the direct TV box. Plug in the TV. That's about all there is to it.
This is true, itís actually easier now than it used to be because what required multiple cables is consolidated into one.

I remember having to hook up an RF adapter to an antenna with coax then attach it with 2 screws onto the back of a TV. Iíll take a modern TV setup over that.

I have a ďsmartĒ TV also and I donít bother hooking it to WiFi. My Xbox One handles all that streaming/browsing stuff for me.
  #26  
Old 02-12-2018, 04:09 PM
Tom Tildrum Tom Tildrum is offline
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You figure most office workers are looking up close at a 19+ inch monitor every day. I couldn't imaging looking at a 17 inch TV from across the room.
It was a few years ago, but there was an episode of the Office where we saw Steve Carell at home, and the TV he had mounted over his fireplace was so small that he had to watch it standing up.
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Old 02-12-2018, 04:18 PM
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It was a few years ago, but there was an episode of the Office where we saw Steve Carell at home, and the TV he had mounted over his fireplace was so small that he had to watch it standing up.
That is a $200 plasma screen TV that you just killed!
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Old 02-12-2018, 04:20 PM
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Just because a TV is 'smart' and can make the tea, stack the dishwasher and walk the dog, does not mean that you have to use those features. As said above - plug it in and ignore the rest (you may want to tone down the brightness a bit though).
'Smart' in the context of a TV really just means it spies on you and reports your habits back to the manufacturer. It also integrates things like Netflix into the TV. Maybe I'm just turning curmudgeonly, but I would much prefer to have a dumb TV with several HDMI ins and use a Roku for streaming. I've resigned myself to knowing my next TV will be 'smart', since dumb TVs are going the way of the dodo, but under no circumstances will it know my wifi password.
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Old 02-12-2018, 04:39 PM
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'Smart' in the context of a TV really just means it spies on you and reports your habits back to the manufacturer. It also integrates things like Netflix into the TV. Maybe I'm just turning curmudgeonly, but I would much prefer to have a dumb TV with several HDMI ins and use a Roku for streaming.
I'm curious why you don't trust smart TVs but you trust the Roku which is doing the same thing. In fact, many smart TVs today have Roku software inside, so such a smart TV is essentially identical to a dumb TV with an external Roku. Now, I work for Roku, and I'm certainly not saying you _shouldn't_ trust them, but I'm just wondering why you trust software when it's a box but not when it's in a TV.
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Old 02-12-2018, 04:56 PM
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I'm curious why you don't trust smart TVs but you trust the Roku which is doing the same thing. In fact, many smart TVs today have Roku software inside, so such a smart TV is essentially identical to a dumb TV with an external Roku. Now, I work for Roku, and I'm certainly not saying you _shouldn't_ trust them, but I'm just wondering why you trust software when it's a box but not when it's in a TV.
The scope is more limited. My roku only knows about apps I use on the Roku, such as Netflix, and not about things I watch on TV. It doesn't know about things I watch on my laptop on the TV screen. It doesn't have a mic. I'd love to trust Roku - or any tech - absolutely, but I don't, so limiting its scope limits the damage.
  #31  
Old 02-12-2018, 08:41 PM
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You don't need TV because nobody watches TV. They watch cable, or satellite, or DVD/Blu-Ray, or stuff streamed from Netflix. All you need is a screen. My Blu-Ray and Apple TV and (and I assume Roku and its ilk) all do Netflix. My TV comes over a wire to a box with HDMI out; and it does Netflix now too. And so on.

In the good old days, the trick was to force that feed into a gizmo that received over-the-air TV channels. Today, the roles are reversed. All you need is a screen that will show what's coming out of the box beside it. There are dozens of these things - they are called "monitors" when the box beside them is a computer.

(BTW, I'm typing this using a 43" 4K LG TV I bought at Costco over a year ago for $US379. It's like having 4 1080P monitors glued together, but no seam...)

The only downside is ... no remote. Well many of those 15-inch TVs didn't have remotes because they sat beside your bed, so you could reach over and change the channel. Your cable box or Apple TV has its own remote. The only thing you need to do with the screen itself is turn it on and off. Guess what? Many monitors do that automatically.
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Old 02-12-2018, 11:31 PM
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Like md2000, I’m using what we would have called computer monitors 10 years ago for small TVs. One in the kitchen and on in my office. HDMI cable from the Dish Joey with the Joey handling volume control, auto-sleep handles the on-off duties.

Last edited by gotpasswords; 02-12-2018 at 11:33 PM.
  #33  
Old 02-13-2018, 12:09 AM
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Since this question seems to have been solved...

1969. I was 9 years old. My brother and I got a 12" RCA BW TV to use. It was 'cheap' enough and we where big enough to carry it and move it around. Mom and Dad didn't know that I was staying up watching Johnny Carson on an ear plug. Gosh, it even had UHF! Collapsible, retractable antenna! Wood grained plastic box!
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Old 02-13-2018, 12:22 AM
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I nearly bought this one with built-in dvd. But it's 24 inches!!!!! That's the same size as the Sony CRT (1998) in my living room. ::EEK::
https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B01JY...vtL&ref=plSrch
But a modern 24-inch TV takes up far less space than a 24" CRT. That's why there's so little demand for small TVs. You couldn't fit a 24" CRT in a small spare bedroom or kitchen counter, but a modern 24" LCD will fit in most places.
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Old 02-13-2018, 01:51 AM
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[QUOTE=aceplace57;20783294I'm building a wall shelf big enough to handle one that size.[/QUOTE]

Quote:
Originally Posted by aceplace57 View Post
The spare bedroom at my moms new house is pretty small. Roughly 12x12 and it has a queen size bed.
Have you looked into an actual wall mount, rather than a shelf? They often are under $30. Since the size of the room is an issue, having the TV mounted on the wall gets it out of the way.

Do an Amazon search for TV mounts, and select the size range you are looking for. Something like this would even let you push the TV flat against the wall when not in use, and put it out to a better viewing angle when you want to. You will still need some place to put any cable boxes that you need.

Last edited by Tastes of Chocolate; 02-13-2018 at 01:51 AM.
  #36  
Old 02-13-2018, 03:37 AM
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That 13.3 fits the bill perfectly.

Thank you. I'll talk to my SO and we'll probably order it.

The spare bedroom at my moms new house is pretty small. Roughly 12x12 and it has a queen size bed.

Anything too big will overwhelm it.
I would never in a million years buy a no-name electronic device from Walmart. IMHO, you are throwing that money down the drain. The TV will die within months. Here is a thread in which we discussed how Walmart pressures manufacturers into producing shoddier versions of their products.

And notice that its rating with Walmart customers, not exactly the most tech savvy people in the world, is pretty crappy: 3.7 out of 5 five stars. So even if it keeps working for a while, it will probably not have a great looking picture.

For $130 you can get a Samsung 24-inch set that I guarantee will have a vastly better picture and keep working after the trash truck has carted away the box. LG has similar sets at similar prices. Spend up to $150, and you can get a 32-inch TCL smart TV recommended by Amazon. All have user ratings of four stars or higher.

In addition to these three brands, you could trust Vizio (a slight step down in quality and reliability, IMHO) as well as Sony and Panasonic, which are at least as good as Samsung, but don't have anything in the price range we're talking about. Supersonic and Spectre? No-name garbage.

You believe that larger sets will "overwhelm" the room, but trust me, it is very easy to get used to a larger picture. When I moved in with my wife about 7 years ago, she had a 32-inch set in her bedroom, and was appalled when I replaced it with my 55-inch set. Within a few weeks it became her new normal, and she couldn't imagine how she lived with the little 32-incher. Our current TV is 70 inches.

The main reason you can't find many small sets: bigger ones are cheap and everyone loves bigger pictures. You will too, once you try it.

Last edited by commasense; 02-13-2018 at 03:39 AM.
  #37  
Old 02-13-2018, 08:06 AM
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commasense is right on. You're buying this TV for your mother, who I'm guessing is at least in her 60s, and she'll be watching it from 12 ft away? 13" will be useless. Get a 30" name brand with a wall mount and she'll actually be able to enjoy it.
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Old 02-13-2018, 08:39 AM
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The OP asks "Why Have Small Bedroom TV's disappeared from the market?", mentions tablets and doesn't think his question has been answered? People who want to watch TV in bed can easily do so on their tablet or phone. The Galaxy View has an 18.4'' screen. People who are very particular about having a device that's 1: a TV 2: small 3: in the bedroom aren't enough of a market. Maybe there's a niche market for selling to old people who recoil at changing their media/bedroom habits. Make sure to give it an 80s or 90s feel by changing channels with clickety knobs or a brick-like remote.
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Old 02-13-2018, 09:28 AM
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Yes, the only difference between a TV and a monitor is the one has a tuner to get over-the-air. Since analog disappeared, that's less of an issue. Fancier TV's used to have a "cable TV in" to allow you to get the basic channel set (and sometimes, higher channels) direct from the Coax cable - but then along came pay-to-view, cable bundles, etc. and a separate box is needed to do all that work of filtering and decoding cable signals. So again - the main role of a screen nowadays is to be a screen and let some other box be the decoder or whatever to convert cable, streaming internet, discs, etc. to a simple video signal. Add to that if you want DVR, then something else has to do the same job for the recorder... so a built-in tuner on the screen is redundant mostly unnecessary.

I'm curious whether anyone actually watches TV over the air? I'm guessing since the analog apocalypse the proportion si fairly small.
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Old 02-13-2018, 10:12 AM
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I'm curious whether anyone actually watches TV over the air? I'm guessing since the analog apocalypse the proportion si fairly small.
A "how do I cut cable?" thread pops up weekly in a local Facebook group I'm on, and everyone ends up with an antenna. It's really hard to get local news without one, and at least here you need it for Browns and most Ohio State football games. I've been using mine daily to watch the Olympics, used it for the Super Bowl and all the award shows. You know that OTA is digital now right? I get some 30 channels with my rabbit ears. I don't know if actually watching OTA is anywhere near as hours spent watching via Roku et al, but as far as I know an antenna is an important part of the cable-cutting setup.
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Old 02-13-2018, 10:22 AM
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I'm curious whether anyone actually watches TV over the air? I'm guessing since the analog apocalypse the proportion si fairly small.
Several source I can find suggest that 15 to 17% of US households are only using an antenna (i.e., no cable or satellite dish) to watch "linear" channels (their local broadcast stations), and that that number has gone up in recent years as people cut the cord.

However, some of those articles do also indicate (as ZipperJJ notes) that, while all of those households have antennas, they may not be actually using them (or watching those stations) very often.

http://www.sandiegouniontribune.com/...120-story.html
http://www.tvtechnology.com/news/000...otaonly/278987
  #42  
Old 02-13-2018, 11:02 AM
Do Not Taunt Do Not Taunt is offline
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I'm curious whether anyone actually watches TV over the air? I'm guessing since the analog apocalypse the proportion si fairly small.
Yes. I 'cut the cord' a couple years back, mostly out of annoyance at Comcast, and use Netflix/Amazon for general TV watching, SlingTV for ESPN and - on very rare occasion - CNN, and broadcast for NFL games. CBS is mediocre here, but fortunately, we're an NFC city, so most of the time I don't care. FOX and NBC come in great.

That said, broadcast pumps through my TiVo, so I don't care if my TV has a tuner or not. I really just want a dumb display. Today, I use its speakers, but I wouldn't care if it didn't have them. I can attach external speakers just as easily.

The only thing I can ever imagine wanting that I don't have with my current setup is Mariners games, and if they ever decide to be good again, I may have to start looking at ways to get those. Until then, I don't care enough.
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Old 02-13-2018, 02:09 PM
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Yeah, watching over the air channels in Austin used to get me three and a half channels. the PBS station never came in well. Now, there are three or four dozen. With the switch to HD, one station is sending out three or four over the air signals.

Check your area; there's probably a lot more than you'd think:
https://www.tablotv.com/tools/
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Old 02-13-2018, 02:15 PM
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I'm not sure I'd trust that tablotv page. Where I live there are a lot of hills and therefore I get basically no OTA reception. Yet the tablotv page says there are 28 stations available to me, all with 5 star strength. I think it's basing the results on distance, with no concern for terrain. This FCC page seems better: https://www.fcc.gov/media/engineering/dtvmaps. It shows only 2 stations in my area, both of "moderate" strength, which seems more accurate.
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Old 02-13-2018, 02:34 PM
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Actually, the FCC site is less accurate for me than the tablotv one. It shows I should only be able to pick up three stations with a total of nine subchannels watchable. In reality, I can pick up seven stations with 22 subchannels, all clear and strong with an indoor set of rabbit ears. What the FCC site does not take into account is that five of the stations in my area have fill-in translators, which I get most of my channels from. The tablotv site does indicate those fill-in transmitters that hit the "dead" spots that the main transmitters don't reach.
  #46  
Old 02-13-2018, 02:39 PM
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If you're curious markn+, and live within driving distance of a retailer that sells them (definitely Best Buy and Wal Mart), it wouldn't be too much of a hassle to purchase an antenna, hook it up and try it out. Return it if your reception is as bad as you think.

I did this myself some 10 years ago, with an extremely cheap "rabbit ears" set from Best Buy, and have had the same setup ever since. Never returned it. There have been much better antennas released since I bought mine (people particularly like the Mohu brand) but with digital you either get the signal or you don't, and I'm fortunate enough that all of my local channels hit me and hang on.
  #47  
Old 02-13-2018, 02:41 PM
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Originally Posted by md2000 View Post
Yes, the only difference between a TV and a monitor is the one has a tuner to get over-the-air. Since analog disappeared, that's less of an issue. Fancier TV's used to have a "cable TV in" to allow you to get the basic channel set (and sometimes, higher channels) direct from the Coax cable - but then along came pay-to-view, cable bundles, etc. and a separate box is needed to do all that work of filtering and decoding cable signals. So again - the main role of a screen nowadays is to be a screen and let some other box be the decoder or whatever to convert cable, streaming internet, discs, etc. to a simple video signal. Add to that if you want DVR, then something else has to do the same job for the recorder... so a built-in tuner on the screen is redundant mostly unnecessary.

I'm curious whether anyone actually watches TV over the air? I'm guessing since the analog apocalypse the proportion si fairly small.
I do, as I mentioned. I use a digital converter box hooked to a 2000 Panasonic CRT television. No cable, no satellite, or other apps. Just an antenna, like when I was a kid in the 60s. My converter box even has a basic PVR so I can record shows to watch later.
  #48  
Old 02-13-2018, 02:45 PM
jnglmassiv jnglmassiv is offline
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Originally Posted by md2000 View Post
Yes, the only difference between a TV and a monitor is the one has a tuner to get over-the-air. Since analog disappeared, that's less of an issue. Fancier TV's used to have a "cable TV in" to allow you to get the basic channel set (and sometimes, higher channels) direct from the Coax cable - but then along came pay-to-view, cable bundles, etc. and a separate box is needed to do all that work of filtering and decoding cable signals. So again - the main role of a screen nowadays is to be a screen and let some other box be the decoder or whatever to convert cable, streaming internet, discs, etc. to a simple video signal. Add to that if you want DVR, then something else has to do the same job for the recorder... so a built-in tuner on the screen is redundant mostly unnecessary.
TVs have built in audio and remote control which most monitors lack. There may be some differences in the inputs, too. For example, you couldn't plug a Nintendo NES into a monitor without some converters.
  #49  
Old 02-13-2018, 03:51 PM
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If you're curious markn+, and live within driving distance of a retailer that sells them (definitely Best Buy and Wal Mart), it wouldn't be too much of a hassle to purchase an antenna, hook it up and try it out.
Oh, I tried this when I first moved here. Got nothing. I went and talked to a guy at a local electronics store about a better antenna and he basically just said forget it, there's no reception in this area. There are hills between me and the transmitters, and no antenna is going to change that.
  #50  
Old 02-15-2018, 09:05 AM
SciFiSam SciFiSam is offline
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Originally Posted by muldoonthief View Post
commasense is right on. You're buying this TV for your mother, who I'm guessing is at least in her 60s, and she'll be watching it from 12 ft away? 13" will be useless. Get a 30" name brand with a wall mount and she'll actually be able to enjoy it.
Yep. The bedroom isn't that small by British standards and a 32" TV really doesn't overwhelm the room at all. TV shows these days expect you to have a largish screen - when I has a small one I found I kept missing details and it was impossible to read credits or read the questions on quiz shows.

Also, if you need or want to use subtitles/closed captions for whatever reason then you absolutely need a larger screen.
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