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  #1  
Old 09-17-2017, 04:25 PM
DSeid DSeid is offline
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What uncommon/unusual jobs have you had?

Inspired by this thread on jobs now gone due to automation, I am curious about the uncommon jobs some of us may have had, which may still be around.

My entries: in med school I had part time jobs both as an intra-aortic balloon pump technician (making the rounds on the machines checking various readouts) and as a diener in the hospital morgue (morgue and autopsy lackey).
  #2  
Old 09-17-2017, 04:49 PM
Sticks and Scones Sticks and Scones is offline
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I was a cake decorator at a bakery for dogs.

I once decorated a "Sorry you were neutered" cake. It said, "No Testes Is The Bestes."
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  #3  
Old 09-17-2017, 05:16 PM
Ethilrist Ethilrist is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DSeid View Post
Inspired by this thread on jobs now gone due to automation, I am curious about the uncommon jobs some of us may have had, which may still be around.

My entries: in med school I had part time jobs both as an intra-aortic balloon pump technician (making the rounds on the machines checking various readouts) and as a diener in the hospital morgue (morgue and autopsy lackey).
Wait... so you were Igor? Like from the Frankenstein movies? Did it come with a liripipe hood and fake hunchback?

Dunno if I can top that...

Part of my job as an IT tech at Target was to call people up, all over the country, and tell them to reboot their computers.
  #4  
Old 09-17-2017, 05:23 PM
Derleth Derleth is offline
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A summer job I had during high school was as an intern at the Havre Daily News, where I was primarily a copy-editor. Not a bizarre job, really, but not a job most people can claim, and certainly not one most had in high school.

I also had a weekly opinion column for the Havre Daily News during some of my time at high school. From one perspective, I was well set-up to go into a job in the print journalism world, and in a different era, I might have, but from another perspective, when I graduated high school in 2002 the stench of death was already on that field, so I followed my passion for software into computer programming, where I'm employed now.
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  #5  
Old 09-17-2017, 05:32 PM
Rhiannon8404 Rhiannon8404 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sticks and Scones View Post
I was a cake decorator at a bakery for dogs.

I once decorated a "Sorry you were neutered" cake. It said, "No Testes Is The Bestes."
This is the best thing I've read on the internet today!
  #6  
Old 09-17-2017, 05:41 PM
Sunspace Sunspace is offline
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At one point a few years ago during a particularly broke phase, I was a professional guinea pig: that is, a paid medical test subject. I got to stay in a test facility for a week or so, take a preparation that may or may not have been the drug under test, then have my blood taken every hour to watch the drug levels (or lack thereof) in my system decrease over time. Made $2700 for a week's work.
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Old 09-17-2017, 05:51 PM
Colibri Colibri is offline
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I've worked on many exhibitions where part of my job was to be an "image and object finder" for things required for the show.

My first job of this kind was for a rainforest exhibit at the Smithsonian. I would start off the week with a list of things I needed to find that week. Examples of things on my list were a poison-dart frog, a recording of a jaguar's call, a recording of a jaguar's call, a forestry map of the Ivory Coast, and a thousand army ants (dead, fortunately).

We called it "Dialing for toucans." We would call all over the country, and sometimes the world, with bizarre requests. (This was long before the internet and Google.) My greatest triumph was finding an Amazonian fruit-eating fish at the Cleveland Aquarium that they were willing to give us.

I also had to find esoteric information. We had a diorama of a pygmy village, and we had to have a background mural painted for it. The mural would depict everyday life in the village, including a kid chasing a chicken. At the meeting with the artist to plan the mural, he turned to me and asked "What does a pygmy's chicken look like?" I was tempted to say, "Like a regular chicken, just really really big." But I had to go find out. It turns out they're like ordinary chickens.

Last edited by Colibri; 09-17-2017 at 05:57 PM.
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Old 09-17-2017, 06:06 PM
Kropotkin Kropotkin is offline
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Bridgetender: sat in a shack at the end of the swing bridge and walked out to the middle to disconnect the water pipe to the island and open the bridge for marine traffic. Once went 3 months without an opening.

Blacksmith in a heritage village

Hand-set type and hand-fed a letterpress printing press, in the 1970s, when this was pretty much a dead technology

Washed and delivered to the stalls numbered saddle cloths worn by horses in harness racing

Busker
  #9  
Old 09-17-2017, 06:22 PM
Patx2 Patx2 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sticks and Scones View Post
I was a cake decorator at a bakery for dogs.

I once decorated a "Sorry you were neutered" cake. It said, "No Testes Is The Bestes."

This made my day, perhaps even my week 😊!
  #10  
Old 09-17-2017, 07:31 PM
Flyer Flyer is offline
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One thing that I never stopped to think about was--
Where do all the price signs for gas stations come from?

That is, until I worked for a company that makes those signs. I was basically a parts/inventory control guy. When a sign was being built, I would collect the wires, LED panels, etc., and deliver them to people who did the assembling. This particular company is in Colorado Springs. They also make the huge signs that hang over highways and can be programmed to show various messages.
  #11  
Old 09-17-2017, 07:34 PM
Iggy Iggy is online now
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I held a work study position in a poultry genetics lab. One project I worked on required controlled breeding of the hens and roosters, artificial insemination style.

So, yes, every Tuesday was the day to f--- a chicken. Multiple hens. And worse...
SPOILER:
Every Monday we had to collect from the roosters that which we would give to the hens on Tuesday. Monday was wank off the rooster day. Multiple roosters.
  #12  
Old 09-17-2017, 07:47 PM
running coach running coach is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Iggy View Post
I held a work study position in a poultry genetics lab. One project I worked on required controlled breeding of the hens and roosters, artificial insemination style.

So, yes, every Tuesday was the day to f--- a chicken. Multiple hens. And worse...
SPOILER:
Every Monday we had to collect from the roosters that which we would give to the hens on Tuesday. Monday was wank off the rooster day. Multiple roosters.
So your job was to choke the chickens?
  #13  
Old 09-17-2017, 07:50 PM
blondebear blondebear is offline
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Busboy in a theme park saloon (Frontier Village).
  #14  
Old 09-17-2017, 07:59 PM
Senegoid Senegoid is offline
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Busboy in a theme park saloon (Frontier Village).
That was that little theme park just off Monterey Highway (what was U.S. 101 at the time, IIRC?) a few miles south of downtown?

Yikes. Our age is showing.
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  #15  
Old 09-17-2017, 08:08 PM
running coach running coach is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by blondebear View Post
Busboy in a theme park saloon (Frontier Village).
Quote:
Originally Posted by Senegoid View Post
That was that little theme park just off Monterey Highway (what was U.S. 101 at the time, IIRC?) a few miles south of downtown?

Yikes. Our age is showing.
Damn, i remember that place.

Frontier Village Main Gate.
Quote:
Howdy Pardners! Welcome to Frontier Village of San Jose, Californee. This here website is dedicated to the memory of a mighty fine little family amusement park that existed from 1961 to 1980. On September 16th of 2000, a posse of amusement park/roller coaster enthusiasts gathered at the site of the long-missed park. At the suggestion of Frontier Village fan Elliott Fong, we met to commemorate that 20 years had passed since Frontier Village had its "Last Roundup." We shared souvenirs, photographs, memories and came away thinking that there are probably lots of other folks that would enjoy remembering Frontier Village, too.

Last edited by running coach; 09-17-2017 at 08:08 PM.
  #16  
Old 09-17-2017, 08:09 PM
Miss Mapp Miss Mapp is offline
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In grad school, I had a job in a library for the blind. We mailed out copies of book-on-tapes; I made the requested copies on a giant tape machine which had about 8 copy-bays to one master.

We also did magazine subscriptions. Whenever a new issue on a master tape cassette came in, I used the tape machine to make enough copies to send out to everyone on the subscription list. It could be handful, or a hundred, depending on the magazine. When the readers sent the cassette tapes back after they'd listened to them, I'd erase the tapes in batches with a magnet so we had a good supply of blank ones at hand. I got good at taking apart and fixing cassettes, although after a point the tape always got too worn or damaged and couldn't be reused anymore.
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Old 09-17-2017, 08:28 PM
Hopeful Crow Hopeful Crow is offline
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I made pine shavings all night long on a drill press for a potpourri company. We'd make the shavings and they'd go into vats to be dyed for product filler.

It wouldn't have been a bad job, really, if the owners hadn't been on the shady side and safety was more of a priority. Also, it would have been nice to have had some sharp routing bits. All the ones we had were so dull they could barely cut butter, much less soft, dry pine.
  #18  
Old 09-17-2017, 08:36 PM
seal_cleaner seal_cleaner is offline
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I spent a summer scrubbing intake pipes at a water treatment plant in a suburb north of Chicago. There was no point to the job, I think the city just committed to hiring a certain amount of college students on summer break.
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  #19  
Old 09-17-2017, 09:07 PM
running coach running coach is offline
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I spent a summer scrubbing intake pipes at a water treatment plant in a suburb north of Chicago. There was no point to the job, I think the city just committed to hiring a certain amount of college students on summer break.
I thought it would involve scrubbing ocean critters.
  #20  
Old 09-17-2017, 09:09 PM
nearwildheaven nearwildheaven is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Iggy View Post
I held a work study position in a poultry genetics lab. One project I worked on required controlled breeding of the hens and roosters, artificial insemination style.

So, yes, every Tuesday was the day to f--- a chicken. Multiple hens. And worse...
SPOILER:
Every Monday we had to collect from the roosters that which we would give to the hens on Tuesday. Monday was wank off the rooster day. Multiple roosters.
Mike Rowe did a "Dirty Jobs" episode at a turkey farm, and this was one of the duties he performed.

My most unusual job was my first, at age 14; I spent a 2-week summer session working as a dishwasher at Girl Scout camp. It wasn't as bad as it sounds, and the counselors treated me like a little sister.

Last edited by nearwildheaven; 09-17-2017 at 09:10 PM.
  #21  
Old 09-18-2017, 12:06 AM
Gatopescado Gatopescado is offline
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For some reason, I want to say, Whale Boat Captain.
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  #22  
Old 09-18-2017, 12:42 AM
Rhiannon8404 Rhiannon8404 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by blondebear View Post
Busboy in a theme park saloon (Frontier Village).
I remember Frontier Village! We went there often when I was a kid.
  #23  
Old 09-18-2017, 01:28 AM
panache45 panache45 is offline
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Kerning. I spent 7.5 years kerning every character against every other character, on over 6,000 fonts.

And when I was in college, I had a summer job in a die-casting company, operating a machine that made aluminum bases for bronzed baby shoes.
  #24  
Old 09-18-2017, 02:48 AM
ioioio ioioio is offline
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Long long ago, my first job was as a corn detasseler in the rural Midwest. In the summer, teenaged boys baled hay, and teenaged girls detasseled corn.

When we first became old enough to hire, my friends and I were thrilled that we'd be able to get wonderful tans from working in the sun in our bathing suits. Not such a good idea. The first day we were cut to shreds. The second day everyone had a lot more clothing on.

It didn't pay much, but for us it was a fortune.

According to wikipedia, this job is not obsolete:
Quote:
Detasseling work is usually performed by teens; as such, it serves as a typical rite of passage in rural areas of the Corn Belt of the Midwestern United States. For many teens in these areas it is their first job.
  #25  
Old 09-18-2017, 03:21 AM
jtur88 jtur88 is offline
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First thing I ever got paid to do, at about 12, I was a rock loader at a trap shoot. My dad ran the trap shoot on Sunday mornings, for local hunters to practice bird shooting. I sat in the trap house and manually loaded clay pigeons on the trap platform, and randomly aimed the trajectory. Got paid a quarter a Sunday morning.
  #26  
Old 09-18-2017, 03:33 AM
jtur88 jtur88 is offline
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I'll mention my ex-wife's job here. She was on the staff at a medical school as a "guinea pig". The med school had students from Asian countries, who had no first hand knowledge of human female anatomy. To familiarize them, my wife would be a practice gynecological patient, for the Egyptian and Pakistani students to fumble around with until they had some sense of what they were doing, and the reactions to expect. She drove 120 miles to the university every weekend, and was paid good money.
  #27  
Old 09-18-2017, 04:34 AM
pullin pullin is online now
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I worked one summer at a yacht club, firing their cannon to start races. The guy before me hadn't watched his aim and blew off part of the railing of a boat. He was sacked and I got the job.

During the early eighties, I worked as a crane operator for submarine construction. "Submarine" as in under water, not the navy boats. I was positioning equipment for divers 600 hundred feet below me. It was interesting to listen to Daffy Duck* on the radio telling me where to position the block. When we sent down the block (with or without equipment) the deckhands would festoon it with glo-sticks so the divers could see it coming. I had to know their depth and watch the payout counter to know when to slow down, so as not to bonk anyone on the head.


*The divers lived in a high compression area of the vessel full time (traveled to and from the seabed via diving bell). As a result they were always on a helium gas mix and quite literally, sounded like Daffy Duck on the radio.
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  #28  
Old 09-18-2017, 08:11 AM
DummyGladHands DummyGladHands is offline
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Press clipping service reader. You haven't lived until you read magazines for funeral directors and embalmers.

We read for everything and anything and clipped out what people ordered. Like a street sweeper company who wanted all mentions of any street sweeper accidents, I guess so they could make a sale. Authors and actors wanting their reviews. Could be interesting, could be deadening.
  #29  
Old 09-18-2017, 08:22 AM
enipla enipla is offline
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Some of these are great.

While no longer done because of large format inkjet printers, I hand painted maps. Oil on linen. Geomorphic landsat maps - Soil types. They where VERY detailed and one could take a couple of weeks to finish. Pretty much paint by number. Very cool looking maps, but god was it boring.
  #30  
Old 09-18-2017, 09:49 AM
Kelevra Kelevra is offline
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My first job out of college I counted fish on a Russian fishing boat in the Bering Sea. They would bring in about 300 tons a day and I would identify about 1.5 tons of it. The daily tally was used for management of the fishery.
This was back in 1989 so it was still the USSR. They had a political officer on board. It was a very cool experience.
  #31  
Old 09-18-2017, 09:51 AM
Poysyn Poysyn is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
I'll mention my ex-wife's job here. She was on the staff at a medical school as a "guinea pig". The med school had students from Asian countries, who had no first hand knowledge of human female anatomy. To familiarize them, my wife would be a practice gynecological patient, for the Egyptian and Pakistani students to fumble around with until they had some sense of what they were doing, and the reactions to expect. She drove 120 miles to the university every weekend, and was paid good money.
I was asked to do that, since I was a simulated patient for other things already. The pay was very good, but I turned it down. I don't enjoy it when my experienced doctor does all the examinations there, why would I want inexperienced ones fumbling around?

I was a serving wench at a medieval dinner theatre, and also worked as a "Department of Refreshment Agent" as a summer promotion for Coke.
  #32  
Old 09-18-2017, 09:55 AM
Procrustus Procrustus is offline
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I cleaned fish for a summer in Ketchikan, Alaska at age 16. My first job, my first apartment of my own. I loved it. Smelly and demanding work, however.
  #33  
Old 09-18-2017, 10:09 AM
shunpiker shunpiker is offline
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I used to do security/support for a regional promotion company, working at local venues when they had rock shows. This, in itself, isnít so different and probably doesnít qualify. But there was this one night (Kix was performing) where a group of 4 of us had to carry a (purpose-built) platform through the crowd while the singer stood up there, shook his ass and sang. We only did this for a couple of songs, thankfully.
  #34  
Old 09-18-2017, 10:10 AM
Clothahump Clothahump is offline
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I teach martial arts. According to the Martial Arts Teachers Association, as of Jan. 2016 there were just under 16000 of us in the country.
  #35  
Old 09-18-2017, 11:36 AM
Skywatcher Skywatcher is offline
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I temped for a bit when I was between jobs. Most memorable of that time was spending a few days as a can sorter in the local Coca-Cola distribution warehouse.
  #36  
Old 09-18-2017, 11:45 AM
Chefguy Chefguy is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Procrustus View Post
I cleaned fish for a summer in Ketchikan, Alaska at age 16. My first job, my first apartment of my own. I loved it. Smelly and demanding work, however.
On the slime line! Never tried it, but after a stint in a cannery, a lot of young people get their first glimpse of why it's a good idea to get an education.

I don't think it's particularly uncommon, but just before I went in the military in the 60s, I worked for the State of Alaska highways department. I ended up cooking dirt in a trailer on the Kenai Peninsula. We would go out and get samples from the road that was being prepared for paving, weigh it, bake it, then weigh it again, checking for moisture content. We also did compaction testing using a Washington Densometer.
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  #37  
Old 09-18-2017, 11:48 AM
kenobi 65 kenobi 65 is offline
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It was a volunteer thing, not a paid job, but...

For about six months, I worked as a reader at a specialized radio station, on which we read articles from newspapers, magazines, etc., so that the blind and vision-impaired, who could not otherwise read said articles, could hear the content of them.
  #38  
Old 09-18-2017, 01:03 PM
Sir T-Cups Sir T-Cups is offline
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Not too terribly unusual, but I worked at the portrait studio in the local JCPenney in college. The kicker was that the pictures I took were mostly of kids, and I'm not really a big fan of kids.

Frankly the only reason I took it was cuz they were hiring and hired me. Wasn't terrible to do for a summer.
  #39  
Old 09-18-2017, 01:21 PM
blondebear blondebear is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Senegoid View Post
That was that little theme park just off Monterey Highway (what was U.S. 101 at the time, IIRC?) a few miles south of downtown?
Yep, that's the place. Worked there in the early 70s. The busboy part of the job wasn't anything exciting but they would occasionally recruit me as a player in the "drunken outlaw vs sheriff" drama. I'd confront the badly-behaving outlaw in the saloon and give him the bum's rush out into the street where the sheriff was waiting and the gunfight would commence.

Besides the Frontier Village website noted earlier, there is also a book that chronicles the theme park's history: Frontier Village (Images of America)
  #40  
Old 09-18-2017, 02:12 PM
Yllaria Yllaria is offline
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The oddest temp jobs I know of were jobs that people I know did. My personal oddest was feeding a pilot scale high solids anaerobic digester. It included occasionally collecting 500+ pounds of fresh dairy manure. If you're in the pen with bored cows, they'll come up and lick your shovel. I eventually learned when the guy with the bobcat there clearing the pend. He could give me a scoop and I'd have enough in two minutes or less.

Odder jobs that others did:

Mite sexer. They were trapped in sticky tape. It required a microscope.

Fuzz plucker. This was on election day job for the County because the tear-off strip from the ballot (that they hand you to show that you voted) didn't tear of cleanly. It left fuzz behind. And the fuzz would jam up the counting machine. So my son was paid to pluck fuzz off of the ballots before they were fed into the machine.

Simulating sheep grazing. There was an ecology experiment set up in a sheep pasture to test how big and how close protected, fenced off islands needed to be to develop habitat. Unfortunately, the sheep were also part of an experiment and went to sheep heaven a few weeks before the ecology experiment was over. They hired a student to simulate sheep grazing with a weed whacker to keep the wild islands separated by "grazed" sheep pasture.
  #41  
Old 09-18-2017, 03:16 PM
kenobi 65 kenobi 65 is offline
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My sister has had a far more interesting job history than I have.

She spent six months working as a dog handler at a greyhound racetrack. The "fun" part of the job was trying to round up her assigned dogs after they finished their races -- particularly the ones who didn't want to stop running, and would jump the fence and head off into the parking lot or the farmland next to the track.

But, her best story was when she was working for Manpower (the temporary job service) in Milwaukee in 1991. She and her friend got a job assignment to spend a few days at a chocolate manufacturing plant, cleaning up the factory floor and equipment before a health inspection (which mostly consisted of scraping up dripped chocolate and rat droppings).

The two of them noted one of the plant employees, a quiet, kind of creepy young man who sat by himself in the cafeteria, and would stare at the other employees. My sister and her friend (who were a pair of bubbly, pretty girls in their early 20s) would tease each other about him, accusing each other that the creepy guy was their "boyfriend."

A couple of months later, my sister got a phone call from her friend. "Ohmygod! You have to turn on the TV! Remember the boyfriend from the chocolate company? He's a mass murderer! He EATS PEOPLE!!!"

Yup, it was Jeffrey Dahmer.

Last edited by kenobi 65; 09-18-2017 at 03:16 PM.
  #42  
Old 09-18-2017, 04:21 PM
KlondikeGeoff KlondikeGeoff is offline
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When in H.S. I got my first job at a coal yard (anybody know what coal is?). Loved it as could get filthy and my mother could not complain. Shoveled coal into the truckss, road shotgun and then backed up to the little windows, put in a slide, and dumped the load down into the coal bin in the basement. Got really strong.

Does Army service count? I was in the Army Air Corps (before they changed it to the Air Force) At the tail end of WWII I was sent to Fairbanks, Alaska. After a few days, they sent me down to the dog camp. Dog? Great, I loved dogs, thought probably they were K9s being trained.

No, it was the Search and Rescue service with malmute dogs. I mushed a dog team all winter, as consdtamtly had to go out for training. There was one old Sergeant and two young Eskimo guys. We had 40 dogs, so two of us would go out, and when we came back, we stayed to feed the dogs in the long kennel plus, of course, clean up.

In the summer (yeah, they had a short one) we had a "sled" with wheels, so continued to take them out on two week or so trips. It was a perpetual hunting and fishing trip.
I would have stayed in for 20 years if I could keep that job. Coldest I saw it there was-68F

In two years only one plane went down and by the time we got there, the pilot had walked back.

Last edited by KlondikeGeoff; 09-18-2017 at 04:23 PM.
  #43  
Old 09-18-2017, 08:08 PM
panache45 panache45 is offline
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Oh, I just remembered another one:

I got a job operating a limousine-sized dinner-roll machine in a bakery. I had to put in the ingredients at one end, and the dinner rolls came out the other end. I was supposed to put them in a rack and take the rack to the freezer room. The only problem was nobody told me what to do when the rack was full, i.e. where to instantaneously find another rack, or at least to halt the machine. So the dinner rolls started to pile up at the end, and I was like Lucy and Ethel at the candy factory. The supervisor came and turned the machine off, then yelled at me in 4-letter words, assuring me that I wouldn't get paid for the shift. I walked out and didn't look back; shortest job I ever had.
  #44  
Old 09-18-2017, 08:35 PM
DSeid DSeid is offline
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SD fiction writers ... there's some good stuff to integrate into stories here ...
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  #45  
Old 09-18-2017, 09:50 PM
nearwildheaven nearwildheaven is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ioioio View Post
Long long ago, my first job was as a corn detasseler in the rural Midwest. In the summer, teenaged boys baled hay, and teenaged girls detasseled corn.

When we first became old enough to hire, my friends and I were thrilled that we'd be able to get wonderful tans from working in the sun in our bathing suits. Not such a good idea. The first day we were cut to shreds. The second day everyone had a lot more clothing on.

It didn't pay much, but for us it was a fortune.

According to wikipedia, this job is not obsolete:
Around here, temp agencies advertise for corn detasselers, because at least in cities, kids aren't as willing to do it, so they are more likely to be adults.
  #46  
Old 09-18-2017, 09:53 PM
nearwildheaven nearwildheaven is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kenobi 65 View Post
It was a volunteer thing, not a paid job, but...

For about six months, I worked as a reader at a specialized radio station, on which we read articles from newspapers, magazines, etc., so that the blind and vision-impaired, who could not otherwise read said articles, could hear the content of them.
I did that too, on a school-district owned radio station, for extra credit. Because I didn't have a driver's license, a classmate drove me to the school that had the station, also for extra credit.

One Sunday, an elderly woman at my church who was legally blind from cataracts walked up to me and told me that she'd heard me on the radio, and a blind man my brother and I befriended several years later exclaimed, after I told him I'd done this, "That's where I've heard your voice before!"



Our local public radio station now has APRIS, which requires a special radio receiver to hear.
  #47  
Old 09-19-2017, 12:05 AM
Colibri Colibri is offline
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One summer I worked for an Environmental Assessment and Management company in Denver. This was during the late 1970s coal boom and most of our work was on open-pit mining concessions in Wyoming. Before mining started, we had to evaluate the productivity of the grassland so that it could be restored to its original state after mining was finished. This consisted of installing little cages of rebar and wire mesh at random points on the prairie in the spring to prevent cattle from grazing the grass. We would trudge off across the plains with a bundle of rebar, wire mesh, and a hammer, all the while dodging any bulls. Three months later we would return, take the cages up, and clip all the grass and other plants in the cage, separate them out by species, put them in paper bags, and bring them back to the lab so the caloric value could be measured. I got so that I could tell the difference between a dozen species of grass by a single blade.

Another contract we had was evaluating abandoned mine sites for possible restoration. There were hundreds of sites that had identified from air photos that we had to drive out to and assess, often in the middle of nowhere. Most of them were abandoned gravel pits, but in some areas there were old coal mines that had caught fire underground and were still burning years later. In another area there were hundreds of old bentonite pits, a very slippery mud used to lubricate oil drills. It was a nightmare to drive on the dirt roads in that area when it got wet. Another hazard was grizzled ranchers who didn't want any damn "environmentalists" creeping about their property.

Last edited by Colibri; 09-19-2017 at 12:07 AM.
  #48  
Old 09-19-2017, 06:58 AM
longhair75 longhair75 is offline
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In the late seventies, work was scarce. I spent a year running the Tongue Saw at a local slaughter house.
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(Sister Winifred said I would never learn to type....)
  #49  
Old 09-19-2017, 07:19 AM
brainstall brainstall is offline
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I spent part of a summer with a Pony Ride and Petting Zoo. I liked working with the animals, but it was hard work - drive a few hours to whatever small town fair we were hired for, set up the pony ride wheel, and all the animal pens, then spend long days counting how many times the ponies went around before helping that round of kids off and lifting another set on the ponies. Then put the critters up for the night, sleep in my car or the pony trailer and do it all over again the next day, then tear down and go home.
Shit pay, long hours and I was so covered in bruises that people started looking at my boyfriend funny.
  #50  
Old 09-19-2017, 12:08 PM
dalej42 dalej42 is offline
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Standardized test essay scorer. Before it all went online, there were massive centers full of computers. The temporary employees were usually a mix of recent college grads, teachers on summer break, and retirees. I still do the job a few weeks out of the year, but it's all online and done from home. I did meet some friends as well as some very 'interesting' people that'll probably be temp employees for life


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