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  #51  
Old 03-13-2020, 04:10 PM
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Net streaming services will get a boost in membership.

We’ll leave bats the fuck alone.

As travel and production diminish air quality in large cities will improve.
  #52  
Old 03-14-2020, 12:51 PM
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Even at the worst, it doesn't look like any more than a few thousand elderly people could die in America from Covid-19. That won't even make a dent in Social Security funding.
At its worst 200 million people catch the virus and a million+ people die. That will make a dent in the social security liability.

If our health care system gets overwhelmed, that death toll could be 10 times that.

Last edited by Damuri Ajashi; 03-14-2020 at 12:54 PM.
  #53  
Old 03-14-2020, 12:57 PM
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At its worst 200 million people catch the virus and a million+ people die. That will make a dent in the social security liability.

If our health care system gets overwhelmed, that death toll could be 10 times that.
This is also assuming that our health care system doesn't get overwhelmed. if hospitals get swamped because we fail to flatten the curve, then the death toll could be several times higher.
  #54  
Old 03-14-2020, 01:44 PM
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I see many suggestions of anticipated consequences but few of those unanticipated. The rise of the frogs. Psychotic crop circles. Antidotes sprayed from helicopters over populated areas causing clothing to dissolve. Artistic beauty created by intelligent fungi. A trumpet fad. Disappearance of marshmallows from marketplaces. Squirrel shortage.

C'mon, let's have some brainstorming. What's the next unlikely teenage craze?
  #55  
Old 03-14-2020, 06:08 PM
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I see many suggestions of anticipated consequences but few of those unanticipated. The rise of the frogs. Psychotic crop circles. Antidotes sprayed from helicopters over populated areas causing clothing to dissolve. Artistic beauty created by intelligent fungi. A trumpet fad. Disappearance of marshmallows from marketplaces. Squirrel shortage.

C'mon, let's have some brainstorming. What's the next unlikely teenage craze?
The tourist-fed monkeys in Thailand will rise up in revolt.
  #56  
Old 03-14-2020, 06:17 PM
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Already mentioned by me.
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Here is an unanticipated consequence I don't think was mentioned previously and which I saw on a late-night chat show; monkeys in Thailand stampeding. The explanation was that normally they're fed bananas by tourists, but with no tourists, there are no free bananas.
  #57  
Old 03-14-2020, 06:25 PM
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* I recently read about how a police chief of a one man police department quit- I can't even figure out the reason for these tiny police departments. After all, it takes 21 8 hour shifts to have a single officer on duty 24/7 - if there are only one or two officers, it's seems like the police department is already not functioning for much of the time
It didn't happen to be the police chief that was forced to walk homein his underwear?

https://www.newsweek.com/fired-polic...erwear-1488313

Last edited by dorvann; 03-14-2020 at 06:25 PM.
  #58  
Old 03-14-2020, 06:34 PM
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I just hope it blows in a month or two and there aren't continued buying panics and shortages. And sure hope people don't start panic buying fuel leading to gas shortages because that would truly suck.
  #59  
Old 03-14-2020, 07:17 PM
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Already mentioned by me.
well I knew I read it somewhere.
  #60  
Old 03-14-2020, 07:18 PM
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I just hope it blows in a month or two and there aren't continued buying panics and shortages. And sure hope people don't start panic buying fuel leading to gas shortages because that would truly suck.
the Saudi's are dumping oil on the market. Panic all you want.
  #61  
Old 03-14-2020, 07:39 PM
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It didn't happen to be the police chief that was forced to walk homein his underwear?

https://www.newsweek.com/fired-polic...erwear-1488313
It was the same guy - but there's some dispute about whether he was forced to walk home in his underwear because he was told to turn in his uniform and equipment immediately (his version) or whether he was told the uniform could be returned at a later date and offered a ride home and insisted on stripping and walking home. A local newspaper article had this
Quote:
Lee said that as he was undressing, Edwards told him to turn in his uniform on a later day, but he declined.
“This is what they demanded and this is what I’m doing,” he said in the interview.
but Lee later denied saying that in the interview

Last edited by doreen; 03-14-2020 at 07:42 PM.
  #62  
Old 03-14-2020, 09:11 PM
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* I recently read about how a police chief of a one man police department quit- I can't even figure out the reason for these tiny police departments. After all, it takes 21 8 hour shifts to have a single officer on duty 24/7 - if there are only one or two officers, it's seems like the police department is already not functioning for much of the time
We live in a rural area. The closest town police department has one full time officer (the chief) and 3 part timers. When, for instance, the chief is testifying at a trial and there aren't any other officers working, calls go through to the PA State Police. Then again, we've never had to call.

The police department still manages to generate revenue with a speed trap that everyone who lives here knows about, yet people driving through get nailed all the time.
  #63  
Old 03-15-2020, 02:38 AM
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I foresee a Mad Scientist re-engineering the virus to produce vivid multicolored welts over an infectious carrier's body. People must appear naked in public to prove they're not contagious. The clothed and welted will be shunted into colonies until they recover. Misfits and welfare kings will fake the markings and dress funny to obtain free food, lodging, meds, and cell service. Radical political-religious movements will worship hairless pets. Celebs will stream shave-every-square-inch videos. Sunburn will be chic. The FDA will target bootleg Albanian depilatory lotions.
  #64  
Old 03-15-2020, 05:25 AM
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I see many suggestions of anticipated consequences but few of those unanticipated. The rise of the frogs. Psychotic crop circles. Antidotes sprayed from helicopters over populated areas causing clothing to dissolve. Artistic beauty created by intelligent fungi. A trumpet fad. Disappearance of marshmallows from marketplaces. Squirrel shortage.

C'mon, let's have some brainstorming. What's the next unlikely teenage craze?
I just finished a serious scientific book on the bio- and mineralogical history of Earth that ended with a speculation that penguins might evolve into intelligent beings to take our place after we end as a species -- apparently penguins have been evolving more quickly than similar critters.
  #65  
Old 03-15-2020, 06:28 AM
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I just hope it blows in a month or two...
I don't think there is any scenario by which this blows over in a month or two.

There was a simulation model in the NY Times that had infections peaking in July and disappearing in October.

https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/...-response.html
  #66  
Old 03-15-2020, 08:33 AM
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I don't think there is any scenario by which this blows over in a month or two.

There was a simulation model in the NY Times that had infections peaking in July and disappearing in October.

https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/...-response.html
Thanks for that. I'm finally "getting" that the LONGER this episode goes on, the BETTER. Fewer people will get sick, and fewer will die, and there will be fewer severe "side effects" (e.g., people not being treated for OTHER, everyday problems), if the overall episode takes many months to "resolve," rather than simply many weeks.

That doesn't mean the major disruptions to our lives (school closings, broad travel restrictions, etc.) and to the economy must drag on for many months. These restrictions can likely be relaxed and removed gradually, through late spring and into early summer (but we'll see).
  #67  
Old 03-15-2020, 09:05 AM
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Thanks for that. I'm finally "getting" that the LONGER this episode goes on, the BETTER. Fewer people will get sick, and fewer will die, and there will be fewer severe "side effects" (e.g., people not being treated for OTHER, everyday problems), if the overall episode takes many months to "resolve," rather than simply many weeks.

That doesn't mean the major disruptions to our lives (school closings, broad travel restrictions, etc.) and to the economy must drag on for many months. These restrictions can likely be relaxed and removed gradually, through late spring and into early summer (but we'll see).
Really? Because i think the longer this goes on there will be more school closings and travel restrictions. And more panic buying resulting in food shortages and maybe even gas shortages. And even businesses going out of business and mass unemployment. I think it really depends on how many people end up actually getting sick and not able being able to work.

And also, god forbid, if another natural disaster occurs during the midst of this Corona Crisis.

Last edited by dorvann; 03-15-2020 at 09:07 AM.
  #68  
Old 03-15-2020, 11:38 AM
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American Airlines is shutting down 75% of it's wide-body fleet. I was hoping they'd run international flights with just freight loads with a temporary change in dim-weight charges (dimensional weight) to help cover the cost.

I'm kinda surprised not all major school districts have shut down nationally. I'd think an extended Spring Break would be a natural response. We've had a mild winter this year so the 5 calamity days set aside for this would be available without any changes to scholastic requirement. I'm assuming all schools have some kind of calamity day set-asides for weather emergencies.

Last edited by Magiver; 03-15-2020 at 11:39 AM.
  #69  
Old 03-15-2020, 11:45 AM
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American Airlines is shutting down 75% of it's wide-body fleet. I was hoping they'd run international flights with just freight loads with a temporary change in dim-weight charges (dimensional weight) to help cover the cost.

I'm kinda surprised not all major school districts have shut down nationally. I'd think an extended Spring Break would be a natural response. We've had a mild winter this year so the 5 calamity days set aside for this would be available without any changes to scholastic requirement. I'm assuming all schools have some kind of calamity day set-asides for weather emergencies.
Explanation from my local county Board of Education.
Quote:
• Available modeling data indicate that early, short term to medium (2-4 weeks) school closures do not
impact the mitigation or spread of the disease.
• Data also show that countries that closed schools, (Hong Kong) have not had success in reducing the
spread of the disease than those that did not close schools, (Singapore).
• Closing schools may increase risk to older adults or those with underlying health conditions, due to
increased social mixing (example: grandparents providing care to children).
• Closing schools will increase social mixing of populations, which may increase the spread of disease
and lessen ability to monitor students – social mixing of populations are those places where people not
typically associated with each other come together, such as theme parks and other large gathering
venues. Closure of these venues are more likely to prevent the spread of disease.
• There is a disproportionate impact to children whose parents/care givers are hourly and low-wage
workers.
• Students who rely on key services (meals, mental health, social services and other programs) are put
at greater risk.
  #70  
Old 03-15-2020, 12:15 PM
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Thanks for the cite. Not sure I'd agree with the statement: • Closing schools will increase social mixing of populations, which may increase the spread of disease and lessen ability to monitor students – social mixing of populations are those places where people not typically associated with each other come together, such as theme parks and other large gathering venues. Closure of these venues are more likely to prevent the spread of disease.
  #71  
Old 03-15-2020, 12:16 PM
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nm

Last edited by Magiver; 03-15-2020 at 12:17 PM.
  #72  
Old 03-15-2020, 01:13 PM
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Explanation from my local county Board of Education.
And there's another issue that I didn't see explicitly in that explanation- some of those parents affected by childcare issues will be healthcare workers and first responders. They won't be able to work if they have to stay home with their children because the schools are closed.

and about this

Quote:
Closing schools will increase social mixing of populations, which may increase the spread of disease and lessen ability to monitor students – social mixing of populations are those places where people not typically associated with each other come together, such as theme parks and other large gathering venues. Closure of these venues are more likely to prevent the spread of disease.
The mayor of the township where my daughter lives asked residents to self-quarantine today after seeing people congregating at parks and going to each other's homes on Saturday. He was quoted as saying "We didn't close schools so your kids can have playdates or play basketball.We did this because it's a public health crisis." I am absolutely certain that any district that closes schools but not malls and parks and bowling alleys will have teenagers congregating even though schools are closed. In NYC, there's talk about shutting down bars and restaurants as well as movie theaters and gyms because people are still packing them.

Last edited by doreen; 03-15-2020 at 01:14 PM.
  #73  
Old 03-15-2020, 02:32 PM
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Mini baby boom. Also, divorce increase.

World wide tobacco use will diminish, also smokable weed in the US. Edibles will increase.
  #74  
Old 03-15-2020, 02:49 PM
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Explanation from my local county Board of Education.
Something is being missed, or one should give an "Incomplete" to that board of education; yes, there is modeling evidence that a short 2-4 weeks of school closures will not be effective, although that is forgetting how in Singapore all have access to care and testing (knowing who is actually sick is half the battle); what is missing is what the CDC is saying now:

https://www.click2houston.com/news/l...avirus-spread/
Quote:
Closing schools for eight weeks or more may have a greater impact on mitigating the spread of the novel coronavirus than two- to four-week closures, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has said.

Shorter-term closures will likely make little difference in the spread of the disease, new CDC guidance states, even as K-12 school districts across the country began announcing school closures within the shorter time frame.

Further, short-term closures may actually have detrimental effects, negatively impacting older caregivers at home, the CDC said.
  #75  
Old 03-15-2020, 04:25 PM
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Massive disruption of supply chains in the short term; political instability; mortality spikes; then normality and prosperity. We can look at the Black Death and 1918 Flu as models. Terrible at the time, then back to something like normal - till the next event.
I'll let others speak to the Spanish Flu but the Black Death depopulated much of the world by almost 50%. It took a couple of centuries to reach pre-plague levels. the Plague wasthe main factors in the weakening of feudalism (labor shortage), and the consequent rise of guilds, the middle class, etc. It also intensified prejudice against Jews, causing a diaspora from the worst of it, and weakened faith in the Catholic Church, causing some other permanent changes.

There isn't really a thing called "normality" anyway, and "prosperity" fluctuates for many reasons. So, not really buying your argument.

Major events like this do cause permanent social changes, and we don't know what they will be.

I remember the day after 9/11 grocery shopping (in California) and being kind of shocked that people -- mostly young, college town -- seemed so unstunned. I felt very disoriented myself, like I'd been in a car crash. An older guy, my dad's age which would mean he lived through WWII, in the check out line turned to me and said quietly, "everything's changed now."

And it was.

Last edited by Ulfreida; 03-15-2020 at 04:28 PM.
  #76  
Old 03-15-2020, 04:31 PM
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Something is being missed, or one should give an "Incomplete" to that board of education; yes, there is modeling evidence that a short 2-4 weeks of school closures will not be effective, although that is forgetting how in Singapore all have access to care and testing (knowing who is actually sick is half the battle); what is missing is what the CDC is saying now:

https://www.click2houston.com/news/l...avirus-spread/
That is what the CDC is saying, but the schools in my area that are closing are planning to close for 1-2 weeks. I haven't seen one planning to close for four weeks, much less eight. Even people who are upset about districts that haven't closed yet are clearly envisioning 2-3 week closings - they're talking about "5 snow days and extend the year 5-10 days at the end and maybe that will bring us to spring recess". Nobody seems to really be considering closing schools until mid-May - just the shorter timeframe that is unlikely to have much benefit, if any. And there may be any number of good reasons why that's not being considered - but I'm not going to fault the Stanislaus County Department of Public Health ( the origin of that guidance although it was on the BOE website) ) for not discussing the impact of longer-term closures that were probably never under consideration.
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Old 03-15-2020, 04:57 PM
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Ok, so that's changed- NYC schools will be closed at least until April 20 and possibly until the end of the year, but some campuses will reopen as enrichment centers and they're working on a plan for childcare for essential workers who attend public schools. But in truth, I don't quite comprehend how having some kids in enrichment centers and providing childcare for others is different from those same kids attending school - it almost has to be school buildings and school personnel being used. If 90% of kids come from families where it's possible for a parent to arrange some kind of childcare, I can see how that could work but I'd really be surprised if even half of the families could arrange something on short notice.
  #78  
Old 03-15-2020, 05:18 PM
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I didn't think it would take long for NYC to reconsider but that was pretty quick.
  #79  
Old 03-15-2020, 06:27 PM
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Explanation from my local county Board of Education.
Just got a text message from the Track head coach. The School District is closing all sites on Thursday, slated to re-open April 19 (maybe).
  #80  
Old 03-15-2020, 07:19 PM
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Like I said, just 2 weeks was not going to be enough, as I also did say IMHO we can return to normal faster than that once testing and more access to treatment is widely available.

Knowing then where the disease is and what controls are in place will allow schools and other places to open sooner rather than later as it is taking place now. Just never forget that that took place mostly because we still don't know about the real extent and locations where the contagion is.
  #81  
Old 03-15-2020, 08:41 PM
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Really? Because i think the longer this goes on there will be more school closings and travel restrictions. And more panic buying resulting in food shortages and maybe even gas shortages. And even businesses going out of business and mass unemployment. I think it really depends on how many people end up actually getting sick and not able being able to work.

And also, god forbid, if another natural disaster occurs during the midst of this Corona Crisis.
That's all true, but if they flatten the curve than the number of severe cases at any one time will decrease, which will avoid overwhelming the healthcare system, which will reduce fatalities. In Italy doctors are doing triage now. We don't want that here.
  #82  
Old 03-16-2020, 05:49 PM
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I suspect some governments are going to collapse, and you will see a rise in extremist nationalist governments.
  #83  
Old 03-17-2020, 06:52 PM
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On Marketplace today (a public radio program about the economy, stock market and the like), they were talking about how many of the big ISPs in the US are suspending data caps. (For example, I get home internet, cable and phone service from Comcast. Normally, there is a one-gigabyte limit before they start charging extra, but for two months, they're lifting the limit.) The reporter mentioned that the big ISPs claim the data caps are necessary to prevent network congestion but so far at least, that hasn't been a problem. So perhaps there will be a push to eliminate these caps.
  #84  
Old 03-17-2020, 07:06 PM
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I'm divorced and share custody. For the foreseeable future, I'm COMPLETELY a single parent. Which is fine with me generally so I don't have to worry about safety issues, but it does have drawbacks. One of which is that I'm already fucking exhausted and it's only been two weeks. All. Day. Every. Day. No one to take some of the burden except Uncle Disney+ and Auntie Netflix. And I guess their relationship is going to be permanently changed depending on how long this goes. Six weeks no physical contact? Six months? A year? (A bad case scenario that is being floated out there on Vox today).

There are thousands of children of divorce or other split households now stuck like this. I mean, some people are always like this because of distance, but my kid was gone weekly and now is here, puberty-ing everything up in my face and making our small space even smaller oh god please someone help.
  #85  
Old 03-18-2020, 12:49 AM
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I foresee a glut of office space on the market, as companies are forced to admit that working from home has worked just fine. The environmental toll of commuting will be a thing of the past for a vast swath of office workers. Those buildings will eventually be converted into larger apartments with office space and dedicated internet cabling.

Handshakes will be old fashioned and frowned upon by everyone under the age of 50.

It will be the final death knell for most retail stores. Malls will be a thing of the past in all but the most northern climates.

The CDC will be re-funded and scholarships for epidemiology will crop up everywhere.

Voters will begin to take science cred seriously in their representatives.
  #86  
Old 03-18-2020, 01:23 AM
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There are thousands of children of divorce or other split households now stuck like this. I mean, some people are always like this because of distance, but my kid was gone weekly and now is here, puberty-ing everything up in my face and making our small space even smaller oh god please someone help.
Hang tough. I feel your pain.
  #87  
Old 03-18-2020, 01:28 AM
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I have seen a couple funny short videos about social distancing. I will be curious to see what other flowers bloom. A lot of creative people, cooped up: I can only imagine there will be a lot of interesting art and writing that will come out of it. It will certainly be a cultural touchstone for everyone who lives through it: in ten or fifteen years there will be a lot of young people who "just don't get it".
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  #88  
Old 03-18-2020, 01:49 AM
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If I get sent home from work (still working on the assembly line at an auto-parts factory, but how long will that last?), I expect to spend even more time writing. But my planned book will... mutate.
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  #89  
Old 03-18-2020, 07:13 PM
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Hang tough. I feel your pain.
Thanks. Yesterday was hormonal and involved several crying jags.

I can relate to a lot of what the kid goes through, as a child of divorce myself. My ex is morphing into my father, which is fucking astonishing because I did my best to make sure that didn't happen and I guess I really dropped that ball. So I can really empathize with a lot of the tween/teen things. I feel a lot of people really do forget what it FEELS like to be a kid. But being housebound for weeks on end, no social contact except house-family and digitally... I can't relate to that. I can't share some funny story of my youth or recommend a great story I read that explained it to me.

How do you keep kids from being with other kids? One the one hand I'm glad I only have the one because fighting kids would cause me to lose it, but on the other the loneliness is really hard to watch. All those older kids with their proms canceled and school trips. First dates. Concerts and games and plays and art shows etc etc. It's heart breaking.

ps if any of you have daughters who are tween/teens and haven't gotten their periods yet, how about you get some supplies? Pharmacies might stay open in the trying times ahead, but it doesn't mean your nearest one would have them if you needed them. One should have that around anyway with girls but this is abnormal times.
  #90  
Old 03-18-2020, 07:54 PM
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I just got an email from the operators of my storage area, saying that given the shelter in place order they can't supervise it any more and so have locked it down. No one can get to their stuff. No problem for me, but I suspect some people might have stuff they'd want to use during the shutdown.
  #91  
Old 03-18-2020, 10:06 PM
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I'm divorced and share custody. For the foreseeable future, I'm COMPLETELY a single parent. Which is fine with me generally so I don't have to worry about safety issues, but it does have drawbacks. One of which is that I'm already fucking exhausted and it's only been two weeks. All. Day. Every. Day. No one to take some of the burden except Uncle Disney+ and Auntie Netflix. And I guess their relationship is going to be permanently changed depending on how long this goes. Six weeks no physical contact? Six months? A year? (A bad case scenario that is being floated out there on Vox today).

There are thousands of children of divorce or other split households now stuck like this. I mean, some people are always like this because of distance, but my kid was gone weekly and now is here, puberty-ing everything up in my face and making our small space even smaller oh god please someone help.
Why is your child confined to your house? Is your area under total house arrest?
  #92  
Old 03-19-2020, 10:35 AM
Dewey Finn is offline
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In terms of unanticipated consequences, I wonder if I'll have a job six months or a year from now. I am fairly secure in my job (or I thought I was), but this thing has upended a lot of plans of people, companies and institutions. And the effect on the economy is going to be severe. So even aside from those like restaurant workers whose employers are closed for the duration, some number are going to lose their jobs even after the crisis is over.
  #93  
Old 03-19-2020, 01:39 PM
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Originally Posted by doreen View Post
Ok, so that's changed- NYC schools will be closed at least until April 20 and possibly until the end of the year, but some campuses will reopen as enrichment centers and they're working on a plan for childcare for essential workers who attend public schools. But in truth, I don't quite comprehend how having some kids in enrichment centers and providing childcare for others is different from those same kids attending school - it almost has to be school buildings and school personnel being used. If 90% of kids come from families where it's possible for a parent to arrange some kind of childcare, I can see how that could work but I'd really be surprised if even half of the families could arrange something on short notice.
The model for childcare and school will probably have to change to be much more compartmentalized and less varied.

Small groups of children, 10 or less say, who have a few caregivers and don't interact with other groups is much lower epidemiological risk than a bigger group.

Elementary schools, where you have a group of kids that mostly stays in the same place with one teacher, might not have to change much. Maybe a dedicated bathroom per class and rolling recess times so they are only outside playing with their class. Even then, 30ish kids might be too many.

The Jr. High and High school model where kids go all over the place and switch classes and have interactions with 100s of people a day is almost certainly too risky, and will have to be massively overhauled.

All of this with heightened vigilance for hygiene and signs of illness.
  #94  
Old 03-19-2020, 02:10 PM
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Hoarding may become the norm after this pandemic, like how many survivors of the Great Depression would amass huge stores of canned food, etc. in their cellars for the rest of their lives afterwards.
  #95  
Old 03-19-2020, 03:51 PM
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I doubt hoarding will become the new normal, but having an emergency stock on hand just might be, and that's not a bad thing.

Anyone with means (tens of millions of dollars) will be seriously considering a lot somewhere in South Dakota to escape to - at which time they'll find out that their (financial) dicks aren't nearly as big as they thought.

I expect the office will become a more hybridized environment, with businesses thinking of ways not to be disrupted by pandemics ever again. The "office" could be redefined.

I do expect pandemic threats to be taken more seriously in the future. As Bill Gates pointed out, it's far, far more expensive to react to a pandemic too late than it is to over-prepare for one that may never come. If the money is "wasted" on preparation, so what? Look at how much money's being blown now? A few billion versus trillions.

The COVID-19 pandemic of 2020 will have potentially seismic geopolitical consequences. When this crisis first began, I thought China was going to be taken down a notch. But not even 2 months later, I'm seeing the possibility of China winning a propaganda war with the United States - they're fighting dirty and they're lying their asses off, but nobody ever said you couldn't win an information war that way - they absolutely can.

But right now I'm most worried about Europe. Nothing can shake a society to its core like a silent murderer of millions, and with a foreign origin no less. This could be the end of the European Union, and the beginning of another dark period not just in Europe's history but a dark chapter for the globe.

Never before has global cooperation been more important, but this crisis could end up having the exact opposite impact, and if it fractures global partnerships and cooperation, that would have dire consequences on everything from pandemics to global climate change.

Last edited by asahi; 03-19-2020 at 03:54 PM.
  #96  
Old 03-19-2020, 05:59 PM
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Expect mandatory wearing of a monitor displaying one's vitals - temp, pulse, BP - but immunizations will be hard to show. And expect those devices to be hacked.

Expect invasive screening at portals to schools, offices, events, transit, shopping, where we give a skin flake (for DNA checks for positive ID) and be swabbed for instant disease detection.

Expect to be shunned if you sneeze or cough in public. Expect hazardous biohacks to suppress sneezes and coughs. Expect jokers spraying cough-and-sneeze-inciting powder.

Expect suppression of sexworkers. Expect workarounds.
  #97  
Old 03-19-2020, 07:20 PM
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Why is your child confined to your house? Is your area under total house arrest?
We have this thing called winter. It's not quite over. It's cold and wet. We may leave the house for important errands and daily exercise, but it's not exactly like the before times. And again: single parent. I don't have someone to entertain and enrich when I'm busy doing something else. I can't give my kid $20 to go to the mall or movies, drop at a friend's house, stay after school for an activity, spend an extra afternoon at dad's. I'm not quite sure what you seem to think we should be doing that doesn't give us more exposure than is necessary. There are only so many hikes one can do in a day.
  #98  
Old 03-19-2020, 07:30 PM
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But wait, there's more! Some boffins grabbed by POLITICO predict Coronavirus Will Change the World Permanently. Here’s How. Overview:

* The personal becomes dangerous. No more complacency.
* A new kind of patriotism. Civilian service, not just military.
* A decline in polarization. Cooperate, work together, or die.
* A return to faith in serious experts. Science WORKS, bitches!
* Less individualism. It takes a village to gain herd immunity.
* Religious worship will look different. Go pray by yourself.
* New forms of reform. We'll have to fix society differently.

Little is really unanticipated. Bolds are section titles. The rest are my takes. YMMV.
  #99  
Old 03-19-2020, 07:33 PM
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Fair Rarity, I could be wrong but the way I understood the question was as to why your child couldn't do visitation with their father on the same schedule as had been observed in the past.
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  #100  
Old 03-19-2020, 07:35 PM
iamthewalrus(:3= is offline
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Originally Posted by RioRico View Post
Expect mandatory wearing of a monitor displaying one's vitals - temp, pulse, BP - but immunizations will be hard to show. And expect those devices to be hacked.

Expect invasive screening at portals to schools, offices, events, transit, shopping, where we give a skin flake (for DNA checks for positive ID) and be swabbed for instant disease detection.
Is this how you imagine things will be in 30 years? If instant disease detection swabs existed, we wouldn't be in this mess.

I expect that a temperature check will be part of the standard security process for getting on an airplane, and possibly also for entering public buildings, schools, and some businesses for a while. I don't think any of the rest of that stuff will happen any time soon.
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