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Old 03-24-2020, 12:15 AM
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Businesses that either won’t be hurt or will profit during the COVID-19 crisis


Off the top of my head:

ANYONE involved in healthcare, from hospitals to suppliers to pharmacies I think is the most obvious one.

Grocers and food producers

Online television and movie on demand companies

News media

Book publishers

Video game providers

Toilet paper manufacturers

Alcohol makers that can deliver

Who am I missing? I’m sure many!


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Old 03-24-2020, 12:19 AM
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Hospitals will get hurt- staffs will be significantly infected. But yes, they will be doing more business.
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Old 03-24-2020, 12:29 AM
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My roommate is a dispatcher for a concrete company and they have been and will be working a lot more because business owners I guess think, "hey the office is closed! Might as well get that parking lot re-done!" My poor diabetic, in-poor-health roommate thought until this afternoon they would be closing up because you'd think construction wouldn't be "essential" other than for emergencies but no, he'll be working.
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Old 03-24-2020, 01:18 AM
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As a primary care doctor, I'm already hurting. We are cancelling all appointments for elderly patients. Most routine things we are handling over the telephone, for which we do not get paid. I am not seeing enough patients to cover overhead but am doing twice as much work with all the telephone calls. Not everybody in healthcare is cleaning up.
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Old 03-24-2020, 01:30 AM
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I hope my company still profits. It's how I get paid. Maybe the OP was poorly worded. Or companies are supposed to lose money. Not sure where this is going. Sorry.
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Old 03-24-2020, 01:54 AM
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Mortuaries

Cemeteries

Casket companies

Crematoriums


~VOW
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  #7  
Old 03-24-2020, 04:47 AM
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Originally Posted by russian heel View Post
ANYONE involved in healthcare, from hospitals to suppliers to pharmacies I think is the most obvious one.
Well... except for the ones who catch the virus and die of it....

Quote:
Grocers and food producers
In another thread I've already pointed out that while more money is coming in a lot of it is going right out the door again because of increased costs for extra delivery, more cleaning, overtime for employees, hiring new staff for employees being quarantined for 14 days, and providing sick pay for those employees ("no paid leave" was standard in the industry up until now). So, sure, we're bringing money in but all this is costing us more, too.

Quote:
Online television and movie on demand companies
Yeah, maybe.

Quote:
News media
Except for the reporters who get exposed and come down with the virus. Don't think any of them have died yet but it could just be a matter of time.

Quote:
Book publishers
yeah, maybe

Quote:
Video game providers
Except for folks like GameStop ordered to close.

Quote:
Toilet paper manufacturers
They were already running at full capacity - there's no way to increase that short term so no, they aren't going to make any more money than they otherwise would have.

Quote:
Alcohol makers that can deliver
Except for the ones switching over to hand sanitizer - some are selling it and some are donating it. Also, some states don't allow alcohol delivery.

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Who am I missing? I’m sure many!
Probably not as many as you think, or as much.
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Old 03-24-2020, 06:22 AM
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An online vegetable seed merchant I know said they're currently flat out keeping up with their increased demand- a lot of people stuck at home are working in the garden, worried about getting fresh vegetables in the months to come, or teaching the kids to grow stuff while they're off school.
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Old 03-24-2020, 06:34 AM
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Zoom, and other telecommuting platforms. Tens of millions of people are exploring the brand new world of telecommuting for the first time.

A lot of these platforms have expanded their free level of service to help out. I assume in addition to altruism, one motive is that this is a great time to get people used to the platforms. And more power to them. This goes for distance learning resources, as well.
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Old 03-24-2020, 09:06 AM
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Hospitals will get hurt- staffs will be significantly infected. But yes, they will be doing more business.
I imagine hospitals also will be stuck with a bunch of unpaid bills, either from people who are out of work and have no insurance, or people who are insured, but have really crappy insurance.
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Old 03-24-2020, 09:21 AM
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Probably not as many as you think, or as much.

I disagree, true that in a recession most industries will suffer, but there’s a LOT of different kinds businesses out there, I’m sure there are thousands that will prosper as a result of current events. Some nefariously, some just as a lucky-for-them consequence, but the actual number is likely more than we can list here in an afternoon
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Old 03-24-2020, 09:25 AM
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My client buys and sells industrial manufacturing equipment. Stuff used in pharmaceutical, chemical & food plants. Almost everything in their business can be done without human contact, except maybe someone has to physically sign for the machines at some point.

I have no idea if they'll do well or do poorly in all this. On one hand, they touch industries that could be booming. On the other hand, with the global economy being off, I'm not sure how much companies want to invest in new (used) machinery.
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Old 03-24-2020, 09:28 AM
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Most routine things we are handling over the telephone, for which we do not get paid.
Can you explain why not? I was chatting with a friend who is an MD in Europe. He has offered some form of telemed for a while now. He is doing phone consults almost exclusively right now and refers things that need seen to the ER.

I'm in PA and my recent appointment for Medical Marijuana Re-certification was done over the phone. The receptionist called me at my appointment time, took my credit card information, then transferred me to the doctor's phone (she was at home). We talked for five minutes and I was good to go! She was paid $125 for 5 minutes of her time.
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Old 03-24-2020, 09:48 AM
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My son flies cargo, and his company is currently hauling a lot of medical supplies. Unlike his passenger-hauling compatriots, business is way up, and cargo loads have increased about 20-30% per plane. He recently got another raise, they're still hiring, and he expects to upgrade to left seat within a month or so. I have no idea if this will last, but the company is taking steps to lease additional airplanes as well.
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Old 03-24-2020, 10:05 AM
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Most of the closures have not included alcohol and beer sales (or pot in the jurisdictions where it's legal). Those people will make out ok as long as they can keep enough of their workforce. And even those producing hand sanitizer, I don't think they're shutting down all their booze operations.
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Old 03-24-2020, 10:09 AM
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Toilet paper manufacturers aren't going to benefit, if anything they may suffer in the long run.

They'll eventually overproduce too much, and it'll have to go on sale to get rid of it all. Then they'll have a multi month slump in sales.

Yeah they're doing well now, but they will pay with lower sales in the coming months ahead because toilet paper isn't something where you actually use more than you need. Eventually people will start burning through their surplus rather than going out and buying more.

I think delivery drivers will benefit. I'm guessing more deliveries and larger tips.
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Old 03-24-2020, 10:24 AM
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Why will they eventually overproduce? They see what's happening, probably in a lot better detail than you.
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Old 03-24-2020, 10:32 AM
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Originally Posted by russian heel View Post
ANYONE involved in healthcare, from hospitals to suppliers to pharmacies I think is the most obvious one.
My optometrist's office is closed. My dentist's office is closed. My allergy/immunology doctor is having to limit patients, and I ended up cancelling office visits. I suspect my dermatologist's office is closed as well.

Quote:
News media
Their primary source of revenue is advertising. If their customers (advertisers) are losing money and spending less on advertising, the media will lose money too.

Last edited by scr4; 03-24-2020 at 10:33 AM.
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Old 03-24-2020, 10:37 AM
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I'm not sure about online media streaming either. Sure, there are a lot more people with time to kill. But there are also a lot more people who become unemployed or furloughed, and desperately cutting down on unnecessary expenses.
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Old 03-24-2020, 10:44 AM
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Mortuaries

Cemeteries

Casket companies

Crematoriums


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OK I know you somewhat joking but they are probably aren't going to be doing as good business as you think.

Mostly because the economic downturn means people aren't going to be able to afford expensive caskets, funerals, and cemetary plots.

The crematoriums and mortuaries maybe busy but they could end being stuck with people unable to pay.
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Old 03-24-2020, 11:33 AM
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My client buys and sells industrial manufacturing equipment. Stuff used in pharmaceutical, chemical & food plants. Almost everything in their business can be done without human contact, except maybe someone has to physically sign for the machines at some point.

I have no idea if they'll do well or do poorly in all this. On one hand, they touch industries that could be booming. On the other hand, with the global economy being off, I'm not sure how much companies want to invest in new (used) machinery.
Well, I'm in pharmaceutical development. So we're seeing all our clinical trials come to a screeching halt. Because who is going to participate in a trial in this environment? Thing is, some substantial portion of the pharma industry is developing, making, and testing products that aren't yet marketed, and therefore aren't essential*


*Unless you just happen to be working on a product that might help with this particular pandemic.
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Old 03-24-2020, 11:47 AM
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OK I know you somewhat joking but they are probably aren't going to be doing as good business as you think.

Mostly because the economic downturn means people aren't going to be able to afford expensive caskets, funerals, and cemetary plots.

The crematoriums and mortuaries maybe busy but they could end being stuck with people unable to pay.
Also, in many of the newspaper obits I’ve read recently, the families of the deceased are opting to forgo or at least postpone services due to the risks of exposure to those who attend.
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Old 03-24-2020, 12:11 PM
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As a primary care doctor, I'm already hurting. We are cancelling all appointments for elderly patients. Most routine things we are handling over the telephone, for which we do not get paid. I am not seeing enough patients to cover overhead but am doing twice as much work with all the telephone calls. Not everybody in healthcare is cleaning up.
You should count your lucky stars. In some places they are calling up retired Doctors and nurses as well as medical students, in Italy they have put psychiatrists on duty.
Pray it remains the same, since I suspect that if it gets worse you might be called up.


OP. Lawyers are hurting now, but when this ends, the litigation due to cancelled, underperformed and frustrated contracts will be huge and a lot of lucrative business.

Accountants are busy right now.
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Old 03-24-2020, 12:14 PM
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I hope my company still profits. It's how I get paid. Maybe the OP was poorly worded. Or companies are supposed to lose money. Not sure where this is going. Sorry.

This wasn’t a poll about who cares if there are companies that profit in these circumstances or how it effects employees personal lives. It is a cold hard profit/loss question.


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Old 03-24-2020, 12:30 PM
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Hospitals will get hurt- staffs will be significantly infected. But yes, they will be doing more business.
I imagine hospitals also will be stuck with a bunch of unpaid bills, either from people who are out of work and have no insurance, or people who are insured, but have really crappy insurance.
Some hospital systems announced they won't pursue patients for COVID-19 related care. So in addition to that loss in revenue, some hospitals are cancelling elective surgeries during the crisis, so they're not getting revenues from that. And they are incurring all sorts of additional expense due to the crisis; additional cleaning, additional staff, additional PPE. I expect many hospitals are going to lose money during the crisis.
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Old 03-24-2020, 12:32 PM
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I'm not sure about online media streaming either. Sure, there are a lot more people with time to kill. But there are also a lot more people who become unemployed or furloughed, and desperately cutting down on unnecessary expenses.

https://finance.yahoo.com/news/netfl...123801623.html


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Old 03-24-2020, 12:34 PM
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Some hospital systems announced they won't pursue patients for COVID-19 related care. So in addition to that loss in revenue, some hospitals are cancelling elective surgeries during the crisis, so they're not getting revenues from that. And they are incurring all sorts of additional expense due to the crisis; additional cleaning, additional staff, additional PPE. I expect many hospitals are going to lose money during the crisis.

Yeah I may actually have that one wrong. A local hospital is threatening to close if it doesn’t get a $40 million bailout:

https://www.mcall.com/coronavirus/mc...szy-story.html


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Old 03-24-2020, 01:05 PM
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Crude oil tankers.

There's a huge over-supply of oil on the global market due to the Saudi increase in production and the drop off in demand due to the virus. A month ago Very Large Crude Carriers were being chartered for $20k/day. Last week that number was $300k+/day.
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Old 03-24-2020, 01:46 PM
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You should count your lucky stars. In some places they are calling up retired Doctors and nurses as well as medical students, in Italy they have put psychiatrists on duty.
Pray it remains the same, since I suspect that if it gets worse you might be called up.
Believe me-we are well aware. A colleague of mine has described is as a war in which we're just waiting for our draft numbers to be called. The question is-what happens if we are drafted. Obviously, my private practice will go bankrupt and who knows how or even if I would be paid for my work. As far as telemedicine goes, there is only so much you can do over the phone. If you are dealing with private pay patients or people who need things like marijuana prescriptions and are willing to pay, it's feasible but it's harder dealing with insurances. Up until recently, Medicare only paid if the patient was located in an area without access to doctors. Here are their previous rules:
Quote:
What it is
Medicare telehealth services include office visits, psychotherapy, consultations, and certain other medical or health services that are provided by an eligible provider who isn't at your location using an interactive 2-way telecommunications system (like real-time audio and video).

These services are available in rural areas, under certain conditions, but only if you're located at one of these places:

A doctor's office
A hospital
A critical access hospital (CAH)
A rural health clinic
A federally qualified health center
A hospital-based dialysis facility
A skilled nursing facility
A community mental health center
They have loosened this up for the current crisis to include visits with the patient at home, but most doctors not in rural areas are not set up for telemedicine. In addition, not every patient is tech savvy enough to have video conferencing available at home.
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Old 03-24-2020, 03:41 PM
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Sure, Netflix stock is doing OK (it's still down from 2 weeks ago but not as much as others). But that's just the short-term response. It will probably change as this situation drags on and more people lose jobs.
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Old 03-24-2020, 05:28 PM
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The crematoriums and mortuaries maybe busy but they could end being stuck with people unable to pay.
My grandparents were funeral directors during the Great Depression. Oh, sure, they had plenty of customers but supposedly more than one funeral/burial was paid for by chickens or similar barter. They did alright, but they didn't get rich.
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Old 03-24-2020, 11:07 PM
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How about this article, which claims that bored people are shopping for entertainment. An anonymous Lowe's employee said they did $100,000 more than usual in one day of business, and people weren't buying cleaning or other essential supplies. So, some places may do well just because they're open, and people aren't bothering to isolate
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Old 03-24-2020, 11:28 PM
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Can you explain why not? I was chatting with a friend who is an MD in Europe. He has offered some form of telemed for a while now. He is doing phone consults almost exclusively right now and refers things that need seen to the ER.

I'm in PA and my recent appointment for Medical Marijuana Re-certification was done over the phone. The receptionist called me at my appointment time, took my credit card information, then transferred me to the doctor's phone (she was at home). We talked for five minutes and I was good to go! She was paid $125 for 5 minutes of her time.
There's a big difference between a telemedicine visit which is, I presume, billed to the patient or the insurer, and a routine call for something like a prescription refill. I've never been charged a fee when I leave a message saying I need a prescription refill to be phoned in (some doctors to say that they'll assess a fee but it's usually nominal).

I expect a LOT of patients who otherwise would have seen the doctor (i.e. a fee would be involved) are doing what I did today, and contacting the doctor to get prescriptions filled to tide them over. So my doctor had to spend a few minutes of her time today looking at the message and authorizing some prescriptions.

My dentist is probably losing her shirt in this, ditto my eye doctor - most things there are postponable and I'm sure some things won't even get rescheduled.

I don't think grocers etc. will profit in the long term. Yes, they're selling everything they can get in stock now, so their cash flow is doubtless up even if they are hiring people for overtime - but all that food I bought this week will reduce what I need next week and so on. They'll also likely have some losses in terms of paid sick time (if they offer it) since more employees will be getting sick than usual.

Delivery services will doubtless profit, at least from a fee standpoint, since a lot more people are ordering food deliveries from groceries and/or restaurants. Of course, the actual providers of the goods they are delivering are taking a hit (restaurants) or at best a temporary bump (grocers).

Auto shops will be losing business. If I don't have to go to the office (or if I've been furloughed), I'll be driving a lot less, and likely postponing some maintenance. Ditto gas stations and the attached convenience stores.

Companies that offer hotelling-type workspaces for their employees may decide that they can do with less fixed space since more people can telework. Good news for the companies, bad news for their landlords.

From a longer-term perspective: grocers etc. will generally outlast recessions: doesn't matter what else you have to give up, you have to eat something. My mother grew up during the Great Depression, and her family ran a large bakery that provided bread etc. for a fairly large area. People always needed bread. They lived in a large-ish house and had a full time maid.

Last edited by Mama Zappa; 03-24-2020 at 11:30 PM.
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Old 03-25-2020, 02:57 AM
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IT companies that provide Remote Access Solutions that support remote working. Like the one I work for.

We have been so busy supporting customers that need new solutions (often built on extended time eval licenses) or have over-stressed their existing solution and need to upgrade/scale up.

It will be the same at our competitors, and at the companies that sell hypervisors for virtual infrastructure, and cloud server providers as people build new solutions on AWS/Google/Amazon ...

And at the end of all this, some employers are going to find it hard to pry employees from their new home office. This will mean a good proportion of those eval licenses will turn into real licenses, support contracts and hardware.

I was always resistant to working from home, but it isn't bad at all, and I get heaps more sleep. Our physical office space is going to downsize, I suspect.
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Old 03-25-2020, 03:10 AM
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White goods are still moving out the door, triple demand for washing powder, detergents, any cleaning product, I guess there might be a slump later. I relatively lucky working harder than ever although the ten percent pay rise due soon has evaporated.
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Old 03-25-2020, 10:10 AM
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How about this article, which claims that bored people are shopping for entertainment. An anonymous Lowe's employee said they did $100,000 more than usual in one day of business, and people weren't buying cleaning or other essential supplies. So, some places may do well just because they're open, and people aren't bothering to isolate


We didn't get the stay at home requirement until this week. I've been hitting the home improvement stores to get remodeling supplies for when I do have to stay home.
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Old 03-25-2020, 10:15 AM
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Grocers and food producers
Some. I work for a food producer. We can barely keep up with retail sales. Unfortunately a majority of our sales are commercial and will take some time to rebound after this is over. There aren't enough retail sales to compensate for the loss of commercial sales. We are planning for layoffs if this lasts into summer.
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Old 03-25-2020, 10:32 AM
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I don't think grocers etc. will profit in the long term. Yes, they're selling everything they can get in stock now, so their cash flow is doubtless up even if they are hiring people for overtime - but all that food I bought this week will reduce what I need next week and so on. They'll also likely have some losses in terms of paid sick time (if they offer it) since more employees will be getting sick than usual.
With restaurant and bar closings, the grocery stores are capturing more of the food market. And once this blows over, I doubt everyone is going to finish off that last can of ravioli they bought "just in case" before they start shopping normally again.

Last edited by CarnalK; 03-25-2020 at 10:34 AM.
  #39  
Old 03-25-2020, 12:20 PM
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Banks are gonna keep on bankin' through this. Good news for me, since I'm in the business of keeping the bad guys out of the bank's computers and being sure the good guys can get in. All I ask is you think about the guy in Northern California that kept things running so your debit card worked at the grocery store.

Thinking 3M may be seeing a small blip in sales of their blue painters' tape. Miles of the stuff have been laid out on grocery store and pharmacy floors to mark social distancing positions. 3M's also selling every N95 mask they can make right now. AFAIK, they are the dominant manufacturer of them.

Anyone who sells medical supplies, particularly masks, eye shields, gowns, etc. Especially the big wholesale guys like McKesson, Covidien, and Medline.
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Old 03-25-2020, 12:32 PM
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I work for a major manufacturer of medical supplies in the UK, including ventilators and respirators. The messages going out are being very, very careful to avoid any suggestion of crisis profiting, and indeed we (like others in our position) are giving stuff away.
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Old 03-25-2020, 03:54 PM
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Pet food suppliers because doggies are being walked more.
Kit and sexbot makers as isolated folks seek distraction at home.
Suppliers of fences, GO AWAY doormats, electroshock doorknobs, etc.
Makers of self-sterilizing single-occupancy vehicles and dining nooks.
Suppliers of hula-hoops, juggling swords, and ugly face masks.
Makers of autonomous-driving kits to retrofit dumb vehicles.
  #42  
Old 03-25-2020, 09:19 PM
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I think there will be a big shift to online retail. So the obvious winners here are Amazon, eBay and other online retailers and shippers like Fedex and UPS.
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Old 03-25-2020, 11:06 PM
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Is there an economist here? Of all of these businesses iisted, what percentage of GDP are they normally, and how much will that increase? A lot pf people are predicting a depression and I'm wondering how likely that is. Pretty much guaranteed? Very likely? 50/50? How many people are not working now, or will not be working , in the next 2- 3 months as the virus growns to states not severly affected now? And what percentage of GDP is that?

In NJ where I live and in NYC, there is no retail. The employees are not going into the stores. But Amazon, or Ebay, can pick up some of that if people order online. Now of course some of these companies will go out of business, because people don't know they can, or don't bother to, order online. There is a store that sells hats for cats (Is that real, or did I see that on a sitcom?) Probably going out of businees. But other, larger companies will be able to survive.

When this over, (I don't mean entirely over, I mean to the point where there aren't massive shutdows), let's be optimistic and assume three months, won't many companies need to either hire additional workers, or have large amounts of overtime, to catch up? if Hats for Cats survives, the store may be flooded with customers. They may not have enought hats to sell, because the factories that made them have been closed. When this is over, milions of people will go back to work. And they won't be putting their paycheck into 401ks, they will be putting them into the economy. They will pay back rent, and make up for payments on their car loans. Millions of people will be going to restaurants, and bars, and movies, and any form of entertainment you can name.

I know none of this will make up for all of the GDP that is being lost, but how much of a percentage will it make up for?
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Old 03-25-2020, 11:13 PM
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With restaurant and bar closings, the grocery stores are capturing more of the food market. And once this blows over, I doubt everyone is going to finish off that last can of ravioli they bought "just in case" before they start shopping normally again.
We’ve already decided that when this blows over, we’re going to have “pantry night” twice a week until we consume all the excess.

But it’s not all panic shopping, people legitimately need more of everything because the entire family is home all day. That translates to needing more food and yes, more toilet paper. I probably should get up early tomorrow and see if I can score some at Walmart, the only place I’ve had any luck. But they limit the quantity so I already need to replenish.
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Old 03-25-2020, 11:28 PM
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IT companies that provide Remote Access Solutions that support remote working. Like the one I work for.

We have been so busy supporting customers that need new solutions (often built on extended time eval licenses) or have over-stressed their existing solution and need to upgrade/scale up.

It will be the same at our competitors, and at the companies that sell hypervisors for virtual infrastructure, and cloud server providers as people build new solutions on AWS/Google/Amazon ...

And at the end of all this, some employers are going to find it hard to pry employees from their new home office. This will mean a good proportion of those eval licenses will turn into real licenses, support contracts and hardware.

I was always resistant to working from home, but it isn't bad at all, and I get heaps more sleep. Our physical office space is going to downsize, I suspect.
That is true for me. I am a project manager for a translation company in health care. We are all on-call on the weekends for possible urgent translation needs, and we are all working from home. I've worked from home before, from 2009 to 2014 in Rhode Island, but when I moved back to NJ I started going into the office. I don't have to, half of our staff lives in Argentina, but I need to get out of the apartment. But for now I am loving the extra 45 minutes of sleep I get every day. And also, in normal times, we sometimes have slow periods during the day, I think most companies do. If that happens, I can lie down on the couch for 20 minutes. Can't do that in the office, there, it's like in Office Space - "I just stare at my desk, it looks like I'm working." And you are right, many employees will want to continue working from home, and many companies will realize it's OK. Which could lead to a huge increase in people working from home, which could save companies money on office space.
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Old 03-25-2020, 11:35 PM
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We’ve already decided that when this blows over, we’re going to have “pantry night” twice a week until we consume all the excess.

But it’s not all panic shopping, people legitimately need more of everything because the entire family is home all day. That translates to needing more food and yes, more toilet paper. I probably should get up early tomorrow and see if I can score some at Walmart, the only place I’ve had any luck. But they limit the quantity so I already need to replenish.
You can get napkins on Amazon. I know you are not normally supposed to flush napkins, but I tear them into 4 pieces and they are very thin. They are less dense than the 3 sections of TP that I have left. And I only flush 2 at a time. If you can get real TP get it, I can't any anywhere around here.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1
  #47  
Old 03-26-2020, 12:56 AM
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How about this article, which claims that bored people are shopping for entertainment. An anonymous Lowe's employee said they did $100,000 more than usual in one day of business, and people weren't buying cleaning or other essential supplies. So, some places may do well just because they're open, and people aren't bothering to isolate
Maybe they're also doing home repairs and need supplies?
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Old 03-26-2020, 12:24 PM
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An online vegetable seed merchant I know said they're currently flat out keeping up with their increased demand- a lot of people stuck at home are working in the garden, worried about getting fresh vegetables in the months to come, or teaching the kids to grow stuff while they're off school.
I can believe it.

The local place where I usually get my seeds and plants is also a feed store, so they are probably open. But since we have more time at home, I just bought my Marionberry plants on line. They will be here in a couple of days without me having to interact with anyone other than the delivery person, who will probably just leave them.

And spring will not wait until this all blows over, the next 4-8 weeks are the critical gardening time, and we seem to have more spare time right now.
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Old 03-26-2020, 01:07 PM
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You can get napkins on Amazon. I know you are not normally supposed to flush napkins, but I tear them into 4 pieces and they are very thin. They are less dense than the 3 sections of TP that I have left. And I only flush 2 at a time. If you can get real TP get it, I can't any anywhere around here.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1
No need. I got out early and scored big, 28 “mega rolls” total between 2 different stores. Now I won’t have to get up at 6AM again for a while, I hope. I can find most everything else most of the time later in the day, but the early bird gets all the TP.

Last edited by Ann Hedonia; 03-26-2020 at 01:11 PM.
  #50  
Old 03-26-2020, 03:33 PM
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My grandparents were funeral directors during the Great Depression. Oh, sure, they had plenty of customers but supposedly more than one funeral/burial was paid for by chickens or similar barter. They did alright, but they didn't get rich.
Speaking funeral directors.....

We live not so far from a crematorium, so occasionally when I'm out on the bike I will cycle past a hearse and funeral cortege, making it's way there. It's just something I notice once in a while.

Today, on the bike, I cycled past three.

Fluke? Confirmation bias? I hope so.

j
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