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Old 05-27-2019, 10:37 AM
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The "joys" of home ownership (getting tired of things breaking)


Within the last month or so, I've dealt with:
  • A bath tub that would not drain
  • A leak under the sink
  • A whistling toilet

And they all happened in series: As soon as I fixed one thing, the next malfunction would pop up.

So I woke up this morning happy to be "caught up". Flicked on the ceiling fan and heard a POP followed by a tripped breaker. Now the fan does not work.

It's always something.


mmm
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Old 05-27-2019, 11:03 AM
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It's always something.
Yes it is. I sympathize, but that's the truth about homes - like people they just keep deteriorating as they get older . Unlike people you can pretty much keep them going in perpetuity if you stay on top of the decay, but yeah it is a never-ending story. There will always be more to do. Always. Forever.

In our economic system at least it is usually better to be an owner than a renter. But of the several advantages to renting, not having to worry and budget for major upkeep is definitely a big one.

Last edited by Tamerlane; 05-27-2019 at 11:07 AM.
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Old 05-27-2019, 11:06 AM
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The front door with the broken door knob, the kitchen with a bad electrical circuit, the cheatgrass that took over the yard.

SIGH

I hear ya brother
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Old 05-27-2019, 11:11 AM
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And then the damned big-ticket items self-destruct at the worst times! The roof! The HVAC! The termites! The hundred dollar bills that must be thrown around regularly are bad enough, but those big-ticket jobbies send you to your bed, crying like a baby.

And then the cars in the driveway start talking to themselves, feeling lonely and ignored. Transmission! Serpentine belt! Suspension and tires!

Being a grown-up sure sucks sometimes!


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Old 05-27-2019, 11:46 AM
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We're just holding our collective breaths waiting for the 20yo hot water heater to give way.

And then there's the leak - somewhere - in the attic, that's causing damage to the 2nd floor ceilings.

And the basement walls that are self-destructing.

And the driveway that's decomposing.

And the ancient fuse box that needs replacing.

And... and... and...
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Old 05-27-2019, 11:54 AM
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OK, now I feel like a big baby fussing over minor repairs when y'all come in and start talking roofs and walls and HVAC.

Mine have all been small potatoes lately (knocks on head); it's just the one thing after another that's got me shaking my fist toward the sky.

As it turns out, I have been informed by She Who Knows that the ceiling fan is ugly and it's a good thing it bit it. Who knew?


mmm
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Old 05-27-2019, 11:57 AM
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She Who Knows is, quite naturally, correct. Ceiling fans are ugly, if you don't have high enough ceilings to carry the look
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Old 05-27-2019, 12:38 PM
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My house is falling down around me. I just don't care anymore.

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Old 05-27-2019, 12:40 PM
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I recently defrosted my fridge/freezer for the first time in 30 years.
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Old 05-27-2019, 12:54 PM
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To be fair, these things all happen to renters, too. They just get to wait three months for the repairs to happen.
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Old 05-27-2019, 12:57 PM
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There is always something broken in a house. Even when a house is brand new something will break right away. A lot of things will be simple, can even be ignored, but plumbing problems keep happening and can rarely be ignored.
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Old 05-27-2019, 01:12 PM
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Our fridge keeps making an anomalous *Click!* rrrrrrrrrrrrrr *Click!*. The sequence takes about five seconds in all. Then it remains silent for about a half hour or so. It sounds like something is trying to turn on and failing. Yet things seem to stay cold or frozen, depending on the compartment they're in. I fear for the day that is not so.

But I fear more for our chimney, which drips water into the fireplace during a good rain. It's over a century old and, man, is it gonna be pricey to fix. The kind of pricieness we can't afford right now.

These kinds of things make me miss being a renter.
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Old 05-27-2019, 01:23 PM
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But I fear more for our chimney, which drips water into the fireplace during a good rain. It's over a century old and, man, is it gonna be pricey to fix. The kind of pricieness we can't afford right now.
If you're only worried about using the chimney you can get a stainless steel liner installed. If the chimney is crumbling though it won't be cheap to replace it with masonry, but you can replace it with steel pipe. At least check with a good mason to see what your situation is. Sometimes chimneys just need re-pointing and/or minor repairs to hold up for a long time.

If you have a new masonry chimney built remember to pay the guy. The story goes like this, a man contracted a mason to build a new chimney for him The man had a reputation for not paying his bills. When the mason was done he asked for payment but the man asked if he could pay him after 30 days. The mason said "Sure you can, but don't use that fireplace until you pay me". The man agreed. After the mason left he stuck his head in the fireplace, looked up and saw daylight, so he lit up a fire. Instantly smoke came billowing out into the room, he had to douse the fire with water to stop it. He called up the mason and began yelling that the chimney must be blocked and it was no good. The mason said he'd fix it immediately, if he got paid. The man agreed. The mason came out, took the money, got out his ladder, and then climbed up to the top of the chimney with a single brick in his hand. Then he dropped the brick down the chimney breaking the pane of glass he had mortared across the opening.

Last edited by TriPolar; 05-27-2019 at 01:23 PM.
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Old 05-27-2019, 01:46 PM
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The chimney might also just need a new cap. If you're lucky.
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Old 05-27-2019, 02:08 PM
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Thanks for the advice, TriPolar, and for the great story.

Renee, I thought about the chimney cap. It's terra cotta, and could be cracked. The only way to get a look at it, since our ladder-climbing days are over, is from the property next door, which is about fifteen feet lower than ours. It looks OK but who really knows from that distance?

In the seventeen years the Big Crow has owned this house, I don't think he's ever used the fireplace and it's highly unlikely we ever will want to, so at least there's no worries there.
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Old 05-27-2019, 02:14 PM
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Our fridge keeps making an anomalous *Click!* rrrrrrrrrrrrrr *Click!*. The sequence takes about five seconds in all. Then it remains silent for about a half hour or so. It sounds like something is trying to turn on and failing. Yet things seem to stay cold or frozen, depending on the compartment they're in. I fear for the day that is not so.

But I fear more for our chimney, which drips water into the fireplace during a good rain. It's over a century old and, man, is it gonna be pricey to fix. The kind of pricieness we can't afford right now.

These kinds of things make me miss being a renter.
Get out your vacuum cleaner and pull off the grate that is at the bottom front of your fridge. With the crevice tool (the long skinny thing nobody is sure what to do with it) clean out the coils underneath. A long skinny duster is useful, too.

You will gets gobs and gobs of dust, fuzz, cat hair, and God knows what. Everything that has ever rolled under the fridge since The Beginnibg of Time will be under there. It will be disgusting.

The refrigerator will probably sigh in relief.

(BTW, I LOVE your sig line!)


~VOW
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Old 05-27-2019, 04:55 PM
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To be fair, these things all happen to renters, too. They just get to wait three months for the repairs to happen.
And damn little input on how the repairs are done. And they pay for it in the end, too.
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Old 05-27-2019, 05:49 PM
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My house is falling down around me. I just don't care anymore.
You and everyone I've tried to buy a house from lately. The first one had 5 layers of roof that rippled like the ocean and an active leak on to the wooden structural supports for house that they didn't repair for at least two weeks that I know of. The latest one has had their roof fail with active water dripping into the house and the thermal camera shows a 2' diameter puddle in the ceiling which of course they won't repair so its going to sit and get worse until we can buy it from them in 2 weeks.

After renting for 4 years I'm looking forward to working on this house slowly for the next decade to repair his neglect. At least unlike the first guy he's priced his house like it hasn't been touched since he inherited it 30 years ago.
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Old 05-27-2019, 08:24 PM
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Did we get this far into this thread and nobody's used this old line yet?

"When you get a house, you don't live in the house. You just sleep in the house. You live in the hardware store."
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Old 05-27-2019, 08:28 PM
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Our house celebrates its 100th anniversary this year. For decades it was owned by a dude who was a DIY enthusiast with the skillset of a drunken chimpanzee. We got things like a "French Drain" in the backyard that was really just a series of 50-gallon oil drums laid end to end, or a shingled roof that was really just a bunch of shingles nailed into corrugated tin using cheap nails that rusted away to nothing, turning the roof into a watering can, or a floor underlayer consisting of equal parts asbestos tiles and 1970s-style wood paneling.

Every time we have work done on the house, it's a guarantee that the repair folks will call out at some point, "Uh, could you come in here and take a look at this?" They invariably follow it up with, "I've never seen anything like this before...."

Good times!
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Old 05-27-2019, 08:42 PM
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It's always something.
We had a succession of plumbing problems. Things have stopped dripping and leaking for now. But...

The A/C is out. And I've got to call the Gutter Man tomorrow to clean out the gutters.
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Old 05-27-2019, 08:50 PM
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Get out your vacuum cleaner and pull off the grate that is at the bottom front of your fridge. With the crevice tool (the long skinny thing nobody is sure what to do with it) clean out the coils underneath. A long skinny duster is useful, too.

You will gets gobs and gobs of dust, fuzz, cat hair, and God knows what. Everything that has ever rolled under the fridge since The Beginning of Time will be under there. It will be disgusting.

The refrigerator will probably sigh in relief.

(BTW, I LOVE your sig line!)


~VOW

Thanks for the help and motivation, VOW. I doubt the fridge has been cleaned underneath since the Big Crow's previous wife passed away seven or eight years ago. There's probably an entire cat's worth of hair under there, considering how much ours sheds. Not to mention other (Ugh!) stuff.

Glad you like the sig line. Heard it somewhere and knew I had to steal it, at least for a while.
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Old 05-28-2019, 11:00 AM
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...that's the truth about homes - like people they just keep deteriorating as they get older . Unlike people you can pretty much keep them going in perpetuity if you stay on top of the decay, but yeah it is a never-ending story.
This. And I wish more people understood the rigors of home ownership. I have a good female friend, age 65, who has never been a DIY person. Never. Her financial picture is fair, but not spectacular. Six months ago, living in the Los Angeles area, she decided to become a homeowner and purchased a place in a small Oregon coastal town. I visited a month ago. I thought the place in pretty good condition, but for three days all I heard was how much something cost, how poorly something was done by contractors, and how would she ever be able take care of the place? Poor me!

Some people should not be homeowners.
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Old 05-28-2019, 11:20 AM
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Sometimes I think of everything we'd have to do if we wanted to sell our house. UGH! Our house isn't falling down around us. We keep it up nicely, but there are things that we've ignored that will bite us in the butt someday. We have 2 bathrooms. The one on the second floor doesn't have a shower, just a tub. The house was built in 1936 and the tub is original to the house. There is a leak somewhere in the piping that would require us to take out the entire tub and/or the floor which is above the kitchen. We don't ever use the tub since we only take showers, so it's something we've just put off doing because it would be a major repair.

Our huge backyard is slowly being taken over by creeping charlie. We've put off doing something for too long. Now I'm sure it would cost a fortune for a professional to come out and fix it. The big problem is the backyard has 4 acres of woods behind it with all manner of weeds. So if we do spend a lot of money getting rid of the yard weeds, it won't be long before they're back again.

Our basement leaks from a corner whenever we have a big rain or if the ground is still frozen when it rains. Another major repair.

And I can't forget about the painting! We have 4 rooms that should be painted
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Old 05-28-2019, 12:13 PM
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Right now there is an excavator parked in my back yard with its claw poised over a great dirt pit.

There was an aging in-ground pool in my yard when we bought this place twenty years ago, and I have spent the past two decades tending it carefully, fixing the pump every couple of years, replacing the motor a few times, replacing the liner, monitoring the chemistry, endless cleaning, and many other things that are part of pool ownership.

It brings a tear to my eye to remember how many children learned to swim in that pool, but it brings me great joy to see it gone!

It occurs to me that there is a nonzero possibility of the workmen finding bones while they are moving dirt around to fill in the hole (apparently when it was built forty years ago they dug out the pit and used the the 100 cubic yards of freshly dug dirt to raise the whole yard a bit around it.)

I have been imagining one of those police shows with the narrator saying "Mr. Jones' wife disappeared in 1980 and he told her co-workers she had gone to care for a sick relative...but some didn't believe that, and some were suspicious of Mr. Jones' new pool. Four decades the new owners were demolishing the pool when..."
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Old 05-28-2019, 12:18 PM
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Last month my water heater broke. Dealing with my warranty company, it took something like three weeks to get it replaced. On the first full day with a working water heater, my air conditioning system broke. In the meantime, I also had to get a plumber in to clear blockages in the kitchen and bathroom basins. Two of my windows won't close properly. My back door has soaked up the humidity and won't budge.

Fuck home ownership.
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Old 05-28-2019, 12:49 PM
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OK, now I feel like a big baby fussing over minor repairs when y'all come in and start talking roofs and walls and HVAC.

Mine have all been small potatoes lately (knocks on head); it's just the one thing after another that's got me shaking my fist toward the sky.

As it turns out, I have been informed by She Who Knows that the ceiling fan is ugly and it's a good thing it bit it. Who knew?


mmm
When we first moved into this fine abode the previous owner had installed dropped ceilings in the upper bedrooms, and one of them had a ceiling fan in the middle.
That might not have been a problem except that the dropped ceiling was 7 feet high (213cm in metric land).

Even though the fan was bolted flush with the ceiling, the blades came to forehead height on me.
That was fixed in the first wave of home repairs.

By the way, if you ever see a dropped ceiling in a home, you absolutely must ask yourself "what are they hiding".
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Old 05-28-2019, 01:33 PM
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I own a four-plex, so I have four water heaters, four stoves and refrigerators and showers and washer/dryers. Thirty-two bloody doors (I hate replacing doors), something like 88 outlets. I've got it running pretty smoothly now, but the prior owners if they "fixed" anything they did it so shittily I had to fix their fix.

At least there's income from rent, but it doesn't cashflow. When something does break it can be a big hit. But hey, I'm a much better handyman now.
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Old 05-31-2019, 08:27 PM
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Update.

Bought a new ceiling fan and commenced the install, but not before telling myself "this is not going to go smoothly, it never goes smoothly, there is always a problem".

Sure enough, after pulling the old fan I was very unhappy to see how flimsily the electrical box was mounted. It wiggled like a baby tooth ready to fall out.

So I need to get that box out and install a new box with a brace. Ordered a nifty looking one from Amazon that does not require attic access.

We'll see how that goes.

It never goes smoothly.


mmm
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Old 05-31-2019, 08:54 PM
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Update.

Bought a new ceiling fan and commenced the install, but not before telling myself "this is not going to go smoothly, it never goes smoothly, there is always a problem".

Sure enough, after pulling the old fan I was very unhappy to see how flimsily the electrical box was mounted. It wiggled like a baby tooth ready to fall out.

So I need to get that box out and install a new box with a brace. Ordered a nifty looking one from Amazon that does not require attic access.

We'll see how that goes.

It never goes smoothly.


mmm
When I encountered one like that I sprayed fireproof expanding foam in the cracks around the box, locking it in place within the ceiling.
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Old 05-31-2019, 10:13 PM
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Our fridge keeps making an anomalous *Click!* rrrrrrrrrrrrrr *Click!*. The sequence takes about five seconds in all. Then it remains silent for about a half hour or so. It sounds like something is trying to turn on and failing. Yet things seem to stay cold or frozen, depending on the compartment they're in. I fear for the day that is not so. <snip>
Check your fridge's owner's manual (online if necessary). Our says, rather nonchalantly, that the fridge may make strange noises while still running normally. I wish they would put THAT on the signs in the store, so you know before you buy.
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Old 06-01-2019, 06:15 AM
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When I encountered one like that I sprayed fireproof expanding foam in the cracks around the box, locking it in place within the ceiling.
I would not trust that in this case. The house was built in the 1950s and the electrical box was designed to hold a light, not a spinning 50 lb. fan.


mmm
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Old 06-01-2019, 04:59 PM
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I would not trust that in this case. The house was built in the 1950s and the electrical box was designed to hold a light, not a spinning 50 lb. fan.


mmm

Our electrician says one of his most dreaded service visits is for the Handy Homeowner who decides to hang a ceiling fan all by himself from an unsupported ceiling electrical box.

Mr VOW's handy days are over (Parkinson's) but he said even HE knew better th
An that!


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Old 06-01-2019, 05:10 PM
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I would not trust that in this case. The house was built in the 1950s and the electrical box was designed to hold a light, not a spinning 50 lb. fan.


mmm
Get one of these

The previous owners of my home had rather incompetently installed a ceiling fan by mounting it to the electrical box, which was sitting on the top side of the drywall unsecured to anything.

This thing basically expands to grip the ceiling joists and allows you to(IIRC) move the box to correctly place it for your hole.

My fan's rock-solid and doesn't move/wobble at all even when on high now.
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Old 06-01-2019, 05:45 PM
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Get one of these

The previous owners of my home had rather incompetently installed a ceiling fan by mounting it to the electrical box, which was sitting on the top side of the drywall unsecured to anything.

This thing basically expands to grip the ceiling joists and allows you to(IIRC) move the box to correctly place it for your hole.

My fan's rock-solid and doesn't move/wobble at all even when on high now.
That is exactly what I ordered from Amazon. I went to plan B, though, when I could not remove the old box from below

Put another way, I bought the "old work" brace thinking I could avoid accessing the attic. Once I knew I had to (to remove the existing box), I decided to go the the Depot of Homes to buy a standard (new work) brace.

What fun, crawling around in a blistering hot attic rubbing up against and breathing in insulation.

Anyway, the job is done. The only question now is what's going to break next?


mmm
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Old 06-01-2019, 05:50 PM
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When I first became a homeowner 25 years ago, my line was, "now I never need to go looking for a hobby as long as I live." And it's still true: the needs of the house will fill your spare time.

There's the routine tasks, of course: mowing the lawn, trimming the shrubbery,shoveling snow in winter, etc. that are Somebody Else's Problem when you live in a garden apartment complex. But then there are the things that break down and need to be fixed or replaced, as y'all have been discussing in this thread.

Lately we've been on a roll: the clothes dryer died, right after its 5-year warranty expired. I gave a couple of tries at fixing it, and the fixes only kinda sorta worked, so I said the hell with it, and we bought a new dryer.

Then one day I noticed some water around where the drain pipe goes through the basement floor on its way to the septic tank. Smelly water. Fortunately just a few ounces' worth, but I was on the phone the next morning with the people who pump out our tank every 3 years. It had been only 2 years and 4 months since the last time it was pumped out, but I figured better to have them come out 8 months early than run the risk of shit backing up into the house.

I've been having some minor back problems, and our queen mattress, which we'd had long enough that we couldn't remember when we'd bought it, was clearly a contributing factor. So after reading what Consumer Reports had to say about mattresses, we bought a new foam mattress that they recommended. Bought it via Amazon, and even though I don't have Prime, it was there two days later. So far, so good, right?

Two things: (1) a foam mattress is heavy. Shipping weight 143 lbs, in our case. A few pounds of that may have been the cardboard box and plastic wrap, but the rest was all mattress. And of course, ordering it via the Web, there aren't any friendly installers; there's just you. I was up to wrestling it into position - just barely.
(2) The second thing was, the damn thing reeked when we first unpacked it. Consumer Reports didn't say anything about that, and neither did the manufacturer, whose materials said it was ready to use the moment it arrived. Bullshit! It had been delivered late in the evening, so I dragged the mattress into another room, and pulled the old mattress out of the basement where I'd already moved it to, so it would be out of the way when the new one came, and put it back on the bed. While I was wrangling mattresses, my wife did some Web research, and apparently "off-gassing" is a common problem with new foam mattresses: it seems that ideally, you should give them a few days to air out before you cover them up with sheets and blankets, and you might want to sprinkle baking soda on them, leave it there for a few hours to absorb the odors, then vacuum it up. so we gave it a couple of airing-out days, and did the baking soda thing both days, and after that, a hint of the smell was still there (still is, a week and a half later), but not at a bothersome level. But the mattress sleeps great, and my back is a lot happier, so all's well that ends well.

Until the next thing that breaks or needs replacing, of course.

Oh, did I mention that all of that has been in the last month or so? Yeppers.

Last edited by RTFirefly; 06-01-2019 at 05:54 PM.
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Old 06-01-2019, 06:27 PM
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I would not trust that in this case. The house was built in the 1950s and the electrical box was designed to hold a light, not a spinning 50 lb. fan.


mmm
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Originally Posted by VOW View Post
Our electrician says one of his most dreaded service visits is for the Handy Homeowner who decides to hang a ceiling fan all by himself from an unsupported ceiling electrical box.

Mr VOW's handy days are over (Parkinson's) but he said even HE knew better th
An that!
I definitely would go the safest route, and MMM is the one “on scene” so if it looks sketchy put in a solid brace.

I did three fixtures in my home, with the first two using that gadget you ordered. Those are rock solid, and I would trust hanging anything on them. The ceilings are sloped, but that doesn’t matter, they still hold solid on the angle.

The third was a slightly wobbly box that I was pretty confident was well attached. There were complications such as a textured ceiling and no attic that made it much more difficult to replace the thing, so I filled the space behind the box with foam and the wiggle is gone forever. Had that box been about to fall out, I would have opted for the spreader gadget for that one too.
  #38  
Old 06-01-2019, 06:33 PM
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Originally Posted by RTFirefly View Post
...
Lately we've been on a roll: the clothes dryer died, right after its 5-year warranty expired. I gave a couple of tries at fixing it, and the fixes only kinda sorta worked, so I said the hell with it, and we bought a new dryer.
...
A familiar tune!

Ours has an interesting twist: the old owners finished half of the basement, leaving the laundry side “in the raw”
The door going to the laundry area is 24” wide. Most washers and dryers are 25” or more wide and deep.

This means that every time a washer or dryer dies I need to remove the door frame to the rough opening, and replace after the job.

I always replace those machines in pairs.
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Old 06-01-2019, 07:19 PM
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Originally Posted by minor7flat5 View Post
A familiar tune!

Ours has an interesting twist: the old owners finished half of the basement, leaving the laundry side “in the raw”
The door going to the laundry area is 24” wide. Most washers and dryers are 25” or more wide and deep.

This means that every time a washer or dryer dies I need to remove the door frame to the rough opening, and replace after the job.

I always replace those machines in pairs.
Or, you know, you could put in a proper 3' door.

I understand why many live in rentals. I could never do it.
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Old 06-01-2019, 08:44 PM
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Way too much effort for little return, when someone puts in a 24” door it’s because something was in the way, such as a pole.
I’m pretty good at pulling the door frame apart and putting it back every five or ten years.
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Old 06-01-2019, 10:09 PM
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For me, nothing worse than replacing some remodel where the previous owner either did a job on the cheap or had some wild hair to do something super cool and now it has to be replaced. Things like dark wood and shag carpet. For me its this crappy textured wall stuff that is very rough and you just cant sand the crap off. You have to replace all the drywall.

One house we looked at had a hole in the living room floor which lead to a tiny spiral staircase descending into a basement bar.

Or some dummy saw an idea of turning a garage into a bedroom and now its a mess to turn back into a garage.
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Old 06-01-2019, 11:12 PM
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My son and his bride discovered the joys of home ownership with their first house. The electricity went out on HALF the house. They called in a (real) electrician, who explained to them their house and contents were classified as "homeowner's special." That meant the quality of the work was one step above "Mickey Mouse."


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Old 06-02-2019, 12:03 AM
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Originally Posted by VOW View Post
My son and his bride discovered the joys of home ownership with their first house. The electricity went out on HALF the house. They called in a (real) electrician, who explained to them their house and contents were classified as "homeowner's special." That meant the quality of the work was one step above "Mickey Mouse."


~VOW
Two steps above "We wire for fire"?
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Old 06-02-2019, 01:42 AM
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Originally Posted by VOW View Post
My son and his bride discovered the joys of home ownership with their first house. The electricity went out on HALF the house. They called in a (real) electrician, who explained to them their house and contents were classified as "homeowner's special." That meant the quality of the work was one step above "Mickey Mouse."


~VOW
Losing power to half of the house is not an indication of sketchy workmanship, as you seem to imply; it's a result of how houses are wired.

I learned this when it happened to me years ago.


mmm
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Old 06-02-2019, 09:17 AM
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Originally Posted by Mean Mr. Mustard View Post
Losing power to half of the house is not an indication of sketchy workmanship, as you seem to imply; it's a result of how houses are wired.

I learned this when it happened to me years ago.


mmm
The kids had been running into problem after problem; the wiring just seemed to be the icing on the cake. The electrician showed them the questionable stuff.

I'm certainly not discounting the house itself for many of their difficulties. Theirs was a tract house built in postwar years, and those were thrown together faster than humanly possible.


~VOW
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Old 06-02-2019, 10:06 AM
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Bought my house about 3˝ years ago. Since then I have replaced the water heater (crapped out a week after moving in), the furnace, a sky light, both garage doors, 2 of the 3 toilets, the gas fireplace insert and the front porch. Next week about half of the siding on the back of the house is being replaced, it dry rotted due to leaks around windows that were fixed when I had the house painted. I am also dealing with a deck that was built with crappy lumber and an ancient cherry tree whose roots are damaging a bulkhead between my back yard and the dillweed that lives behind me. The only good side to this is the value of my home has gone up about 33% in the short time I have owned it.
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Old 06-02-2019, 10:28 AM
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Originally Posted by racer72 View Post
Bought my house about 3˝ years ago. Since then I have replaced the water heater (crapped out a week after moving in), the furnace, a sky light, both garage doors, 2 of the 3 toilets, the gas fireplace insert and the front porch. Next week about half of the siding on the back of the house is being replaced, it dry rotted due to leaks around windows that were fixed when I had the house painted. I am also dealing with a deck that was built with crappy lumber and an ancient cherry tree whose roots are damaging a bulkhead between my back yard and the dillweed that lives behind me. The only good side to this is the value of my home has gone up about 33% in the short time I have owned it.
Hey, Racer72, is the "dillweed" actual vegetation, or are you casting aspersions in your neighbor?


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Old 06-02-2019, 06:45 PM
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We've been pretty lucky so far I guess. Although last month the dishwasher and oven doors both broke within weeks of our draining the house account to put in a new heat pump.
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Old 06-02-2019, 08:13 PM
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I knew my house was kind of a fixer-upper when I bought it, but with housing prices in California that was all I could afford, even after the 2008 housing crash. But now I've apparently been here long enough that stuff I fixed or added shortly after I moved in is now beginning to break:
  • I finally got around to replacing the broken latch on the gate a few weeks ago -- the gate that was broken when I bought the place and had replaced after I moved in.
  • Last night the wand on the vertical blinds that cover the large glass patio door popped out of its socket, and I can't seem to get it back in. These are blinds I put up after I moved in.
  • Since having such a big glass door basically turns the dining room into a greenhouse in the afternoon during the hot Sacramento summer, I put up one of those outdoor roll-up sun shades. Since the weather is starting to get warm I decided it was time to roll it down today. As I did so, the whole thing came tumbling down. I managed to put it back up for new but I'm unsure of how well it's going to stay up.
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Old 06-03-2019, 05:51 AM
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Originally Posted by WildaBeast View Post
I knew my house was kind of a fixer-upper when I bought it, but with housing prices in California that was all I could afford, even after the 2008 housing crash. But now I've apparently been here long enough that stuff I fixed or added shortly after I moved in is now beginning to break:
  • I finally got around to replacing the broken latch on the gate a few weeks ago -- the gate that was broken when I bought the place and had replaced after I moved in.
  • Last night the wand on the vertical blinds that cover the large glass patio door popped out of its socket, and I can't seem to get it back in. These are blinds I put up after I moved in.
  • Since having such a big glass door basically turns the dining room into a greenhouse in the afternoon during the hot Sacramento summer, I put up one of those outdoor roll-up sun shades. Since the weather is starting to get warm I decided it was time to roll it down today. As I did so, the whole thing came tumbling down. I managed to put it back up for new but I'm unsure of how well it's going to stay up.
Good examples. These are all minor, but when they come at you one after the other it just wears your brain out.


mmm
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