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  #1051  
Old Today, 03:29 PM
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Upon reflection, a 14-50 is probably against code, due to the presence of the neutral pin--which I do not have (only a ground) and would have to leave disconnected. I'd have to use a 6-50 or perhaps a 10-30 instead.

The 10-30 is a bit confusing as the third pin is designated neutral, not ground, although apparently old code revisions allowed using neutral as ground. Weird, and probably to be avoided if I want to pass an inspection. The 6-50 plug explicitly declares the third pin to be ground and is probably the better way to go. Tesla has adapters for both of those.
  #1052  
Old Today, 04:07 PM
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Originally Posted by Bone View Post
I think a reasonable request includes utilizing the services of a licensed electrician. YMMV.
You win the donut. The HOA manager says it's actually part of "building code" to only use licensed electricians. That sounds a little dubious but in the interest of keeping everyone happy I guess I'll stick with the electrician. They don't in fact need approval since it's not in a common area.

That said, I think it's still possible to build the relay box and have the electricians install it and the rest of the stuff. Won't be as cheap but whatever. It's not far off from what they suggested anyway; it's just that it'll be automatic as opposed to a manual switch.
  #1053  
Old Today, 04:59 PM
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Originally Posted by Dr. Strangelove View Post
You win the donut. The HOA manager says it's actually part of "building code" to only use licensed electricians. That sounds a little dubious but in the interest of keeping everyone happy I guess I'll stick with the electrician. They don't in fact need approval since it's not in a common area.

That said, I think it's still possible to build the relay box and have the electricians install it and the rest of the stuff. Won't be as cheap but whatever. It's not far off from what they suggested anyway; it's just that it'll be automatic as opposed to a manual switch.
It's also in the law I cited earlier. In my experience HOAs will require licensed contractors to do all work that touches common areas. For things inside the residence, I believe there is a dollar threshold and type of activity threshold that would require permitting as well which means licensed contractors, but that is less stringently enforced.
  #1054  
Old Today, 05:00 PM
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Originally Posted by gnoitall View Post
This is pretty Neanderthal-level circuit design. The relay IS the isolation, and the 24v relay drive IS the low voltage. (But I acknowledge that it must feel weird if a lot of your prior design work is semiconductor low-voltage stuff; you isolate the external inputs like hell in that setting, using optoelectronics like you describe.)
Right. The "philosophy" of safe electrical work is actually pretty logical and easy to understand, but it's a few steps below what I'd consider best practices for, say, PCB design. From my viewpoint, I'm only an insulation-width away from a 240v shock, but in reality there are a number of passive aspects to the design that make that highly unlikely.
  #1055  
Old Today, 05:03 PM
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It's also in the law I cited earlier. In my experience HOAs will require licensed contractors to do all work that touches common areas.
Yes--they cited the same law to me. There is clearly a big difference between common areas and personal, however, and this work will be entirely within my individual garage.

This is the first I've heard of a dollar threshold, though. Any cite on that?
  #1056  
Old Today, 05:08 PM
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Why would anyone carry their 240V charging cord with them? It might make sense to carry a 120V charger around (mine is in my Volt, though I can't remember the last time I used it). But where would you find a 14-50 plug by a parking space?
I visit my parents a fair amount and they have a 14-50 for a welder handy. Also, the "mobile charger" for the Tesla is the same for all plug types; it just has a few swappable pigtails on it. I'd take the whole thing if I expect to do any non-public charging on a trip.
  #1057  
Old Today, 05:27 PM
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Originally Posted by Dr. Strangelove View Post
Yes--they cited the same law to me. There is clearly a big difference between common areas and personal, however, and this work will be entirely within my individual garage.

This is the first I've heard of a dollar threshold, though. Any cite on that?
Actually, I think I'm wrong on that. For some reason in my head I had it that over a certain dollar threshold there was a permit required, but I can't find that as related to electrical work. I think for general construction it may be the case. Here's something from Seattle:
Quote:
Minor repairs or alterations. You don't need a permit for minor repairs or alterations that cost $6,000 or less in any 6-month period. The $6,000 limit is based on fair market value of labor and parts, even if you do the work yourself.
But I think you are closer to Fremont if I recall correctly. Fremont has specific permits for electric vehicle charging stations. But generally for electrical work, the City of Fremont will require a permit for most things above very minor items.
Quote:
An electrical, mechanical, and plumbing permit is required for most work.
An electrical permit is required for any change to a wiring system.
Though relating to electrical work, Fremont also identifies these things that do not require a permit (pdf):
Quote:
Electrical:
1. Repair and Maintenance: Minor repair work, including the replacement of lamps or the
connection of approved portable electrical equipment to approved permanently installed
receptacles.
2. Radio and television transmitting stations: The provisions of this code shall not apply to
electrical equipment used for radio and televisions, but do apply to equipment and wiring for
a power supply and the installations of towers and antennas.
3. Temporary testing systems: A permit shall not be required for the installation of any
temporary system required for the testing or servicing of electrical equipment or apparatus.
What I don't know is if a permit can be pulled from the owner if unlicensed. Perhaps you can get the permit without the aid of an electrician, but I can't seem to find that.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr. Strangelove View Post
I visit my parents a fair amount and they have a 14-50 for a welder handy. Also, the "mobile charger" for the Tesla is the same for all plug types; it just has a few swappable pigtails on it. I'd take the whole thing if I expect to do any non-public charging on a trip.
The idea is you have your home charging station where the wire doesn't leave. You keep the cord that came with the vehicle in the vehicle in case you are out and about and need to charge.
  #1058  
Old Today, 05:59 PM
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Actually, I think I'm wrong on that. For some reason in my head I had it that over a certain dollar threshold there was a permit required, but I can't find that as related to electrical work.
I looked around and there is apparently a $500 threshold for contracted services--work under that amount can be done by unlicensed workers. The law only applies to advertised services, though, not people doing their own work.

I believe that I can get a permit without being a licensed electrician. In fact, I think I can get a permit online. I'm in San Jose and they have this website. They have a table for what permits can be applied for online: although the "Electric Vehicle Charging Station" category is not checked for "Multifamily properties", it is checked for "Receptacles / Switches - New". And really this is just a new receptacle installation, not a real EV charging station. Though the relay box may be a complication.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bone View Post
The idea is you have your home charging station where the wire doesn't leave. You keep the cord that came with the vehicle in the vehicle in case you are out and about and need to charge.
The cord is the charger, though. There are just two home charger styles: the "wall connector" and the "mobile charger". The wall connector is hardwired and can charge at 60A or so. The mobile charger is limited to 32A and has a variety of pigtails to change the plug style (from a standard 120v plug to a 14-50).

Since the wall charger is massive overkill in any case, the plan is to just use the mobile charger. I haven't decided whether to buy a second one or not--if I do, it would just be for the convenience of not having to take it down from the wall and roll it up every time I go on a longer trip. But regardless, I'd be using the same "cord" for both home and away charging (when a real EV station is not available).
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