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Old 10-03-2019, 07:45 PM
SamuelA is online now
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So even with 8 streaming services, it's a bargain compared to cable, but...


Welcome to the streaming wars, 2019!

There are now at least eight streaming services, each of which has some exclusive content that is pretty good and a bunch of trash!

The contestants are :

CBS All Access - $6 a month (Star Trek)
Disney (unreleased) - $7 a month (all the new live action Marvel shows and live action Star Wars shows)
Amazon Prime - $9 a month but most people will have the full prime service (Grand Tour AND The Boys)
Hulu (ad free) - $12 a month (Marvel's Runaways and South Park)
HBO Go - $15 a month (Game of Thrones and that Vampire show and that other great show and ...)
Netflix mid-tier - $13 a month (Stranger Things)
Youtube Red - $10 a month (that Karate Kid sequel)
ESPN+ - $6 a month (sports news?)

Total : $80 a month. Plus, the internet access to enjoy this will be at least $50 a month. (Comcast, it's possible to eternally be on the "first year" rate)

Surprisingly $130 a month is a great deal! Consumer Reports investigated and found the real average cable bill in the USA is $217 a month.

There's just a few small problems...

Getting nickel and dimed for 8 services that you probably don't all use in one month feels like a ripoff. And 8 services means 8 different apps on your Roku, 8 sets of passwords, 8 billing accounts, 8 different UIs...it's just a big huge hassle.

I personally have just 3 of the above services and I don't even log in to some of them on a given month.

Last edited by SamuelA; 10-03-2019 at 07:48 PM.
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Old 10-03-2019, 08:31 PM
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I currently have shudder at $5/month so I can watch the creepshow TV series. Not sure if its worth it.

For most people they seem to stick to the big 3 (netflix, hulu and amazon prime).
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Old 10-03-2019, 08:47 PM
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YouTube TV will soon add PBS stations to their lineup, at which point it will have all of the channels Mrs. C and I ever watch. For $50 month, not counting internet access which we already have regardless.
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Old 10-03-2019, 10:38 PM
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I was going to start a thread about this a few months ago but figured I was in the minority. I'm glad to see I'm not the only one who feels this way.

Not only does it feel like a ripoff, I wonder how sustainable it is? As a consumer I refuse to pay for all those streaming services because a), it's a pain in the ass to pay a monthly bill (no matter how small it is) for something that I may not use every month, and b) streaming services tend to drop programs that I may want to revisit.

For example, years ago King of the Hill was released on DVD. I created a thread about it here and someone basically said "yer an idiot because it's available on Amazon and iTunes." Well, it's certainly not available on Amazon anymore. But I bought the DVD's, so when I want to watch them I dont have to worry about if the streaming service I subscribe to still has them.

As a consumer I refuse to play that game. I'm not a big TV watcher so it doesnt affect me much. I suppose if I was the Homer Simpson type I might be more pissed than I am. Of course, I may have and subscribe to the new Disney service, which will bring my streaming subscription to 3: Amazon, Netflix, and Disney. If it wasn't for The Simpsons I would have no interest in Disney+. Even with them I'm not sold on it... see the DVD comment above.

$217 a month is average for cable bills in the U.S.?! So half those people pay more... amazing. That's an (admittedly inexpensive) car payment. For TV. I think not.
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Old 10-03-2019, 11:33 PM
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its going to get worse for a few years as any studio with more than 5 tv shows or movies will start their own streaming service then they'll buy each other out or let the bigger ones have the rights to their shows like Disney and nat geo
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Old 10-03-2019, 11:41 PM
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our cable bill runs about 280 a month but we have the "best" internet along with our phone too on it oi thats about 100 but we have every channel spectrum has for la county
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Old 10-04-2019, 12:01 AM
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Originally Posted by Lancia View Post
For example, years ago King of the Hill was released on DVD. I created a thread about it here and someone basically said "yer an idiot because it's available on Amazon and iTunes." Well, it's certainly not available on Amazon anymore. But I bought the DVD's, so when I want to watch them I dont have to worry about if the streaming service I subscribe to still has them.
Is this the thread? If so, you misinterpreted my post. I thought it was weird that they went straight to full season streaming/downloads without trying to cash in on DVD sales first, I wasn't taking a shot at you.
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Old 10-04-2019, 12:37 AM
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I am feeling really special. I pay

$6.00/month for internet. Not real fast, but I have no problem streaming. I share the cost with two neighbors. $6/each.

$10.00/month for Netflix

$135.00/a season for MLB.TV. Yeah, I splurged here. But for 164 games, it is pretty cheap.

And my cup is full.
  #9  
Old 10-04-2019, 12:47 AM
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YouTube TV will soon add PBS stations to their lineup, at which point it will have all of the channels Mrs. C and I ever watch. For $50 month, not counting internet access which we already have regardless.
Quoting myself to add that once those PBS stations are on YouTube TV, we're ending our very long, expensive accout with DirecTv.
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Old 10-04-2019, 06:00 AM
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$217 a month is average for cable bills in the U.S.?! So half those people pay more... amazing. That's an (admittedly inexpensive) car payment. For TV. I think not.
My dad, who I lived with to take care of, died a couple of weeks ago and one of the things I've accomplished since then is changing cable/internet plans.

In the final 18 or so months of his life he was more or less home bound, but could still enjoy TV so I'm glad he was able to make himself happy with all the bells and whistles. He had the highest speed internet - which once they did a long over due upgrade to the cable lines in August to give our neighborhood the speeds we were paying for proved to be massive overkill - and sports channels and an elaborate HD package and a DVR to record said sports...On the other hand I rarely watch anything live or on demand and only recorded one show. I'm only interested in having the most basic cable package so the streaming channels that make you prove you have cable still work.

So, instead of paying $232/mo for cable & internet I'll be paying $112. I'm kind of bummed that the Food network seems like it won't let me see the Haunted Gingerbread Showdown, but I bet I'll be able to buy it on Amazon or Googleplay for a heck of a lot less than paying another $1440 to the cable company over the next year.
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Old 10-04-2019, 06:30 AM
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All that nickel and diming of those streaming services can get infuriating. Right now I have Netflix, it seems to be out go to service and does what we need. Amazon Prime, mostly for delivery reasons, I don't think we would pay for that if it was not included, but it might be fun to drop Netflix and just try to live with Amazon Prime as the main service. Hulu which is still currently $1/month, I don't think we would pony up for the regular price when this deal expires in November.

Beyond that we have dabbled with Philo and ATT streaming service, which it is nice to have a broadcast lineup similar to cable but even at the cheapest level it's expensive for what it is. The only other thing is CBS All access, which to me is the 'We have the only place for this show you want to see, so bend over and take it' channel. It's really for one show, and that really is the annoying part, when there is one network that wants to charge just for their network alone as much as a streaming service that offers so much more.
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Old 10-04-2019, 07:06 AM
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I don't mind having to pay 8 different streamers. The payments come directly out of my checking account. Not something I ever have to think about.
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Old 10-04-2019, 08:29 AM
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Getting nickel and dimed for 8 services that you probably don't all use in one month feels like a ripoff.
Who says you have to pay for all 8 at once? One of the great benefits of the streaming wars is that you aren't tied into contracts and can cancel and resign for streaming services when you want.

For example, I cancelled HBO Now after Game of Thrones and I'll pick it back up this month for The Watchman. That was multiple months I didn't pay for it.

I know people who signed up for CBS All Access only for Star Trek Discovery and cancelled after they watched all the season's episodes.

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Old 10-04-2019, 08:39 AM
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My wife pretty much only watches local network channels, CNN, MSNBC, Food network, etc and leaves the TV on 24/7. Is there a streaming service that covers all the "regular" live tv programming, and would also take into account the loss of "discount" from having TV and internet from the same company? If so, maybe I'd upgrade my internet and drop the TV, but it would be 100% useless if I can't have normal programming running on my living room tv.
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Old 10-04-2019, 08:39 AM
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Originally Posted by ISiddiqui View Post
Who says you have to pay for all 8 at once? One of the great benefits of the streaming wars is that you aren't tied into contracts and can cancel and resign for streaming services when you want.

For example, I cancelled HBO Now after Game of Thrones and I'll pick it back up this month for The Watchman. That was multiple months I didn't pay for it.

I know people who signed up for CBS All Access only for Star Trek Discovery and cancelled after they watched all the season's episodes.

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Absolutely you can do this. And what the streaming providers are banking on is you forgetting.

Also it's a mega hassle.

I wonder : maybe you could pay for each service with a time limited virtual credit card. This way you only pay for as many months as you intend, ahead of time.
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Old 10-04-2019, 08:45 AM
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I just don't get the hassle argument. Get a service to watch a few things and then when you get bored of it, cancel. And then look for another service to watch.

Maybe keep a few constantly going services (that's Netflix and Amazon for me - but Amazon is for the shipping and the video is added benefit) and then cycle through the rest one at a time.

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Old 10-04-2019, 08:55 AM
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I still have a cable subscription with a couple of premium channels and no streaming subscriptions at all. The eight services listed in the OP are only some of the options; there are lots more, for various genres and interests. And the OP mentioned HBO Go, but their new one is HBO Max, which will also have Sesame Street, The Big Bang Theory, Friends, HBO series, and series from TBS and other Time-Warner networks. I don't know if HBO Go will still be offered, or if it's being replaced by HBO Max, and I'm interested to find out whether my HBO cable subscription gives me any access to HBO Max and whether the fact that I pay Comcast (which owns NBC Universal) for cable service will give me any access to Peacock, the new streaming service from NBC.
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Old 10-04-2019, 09:08 AM
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Absolutely you can do this. And what the streaming providers are banking on is you forgetting.

Also it's a mega hassle.
It might be a mega-hassle if you are constantly signing up and canceling each service. But there's only one show I watch on CBS all access , so every year, I sign up for a month , watch the whole season and cancel till next year. As far as Amazon and Netflix, I actually got the Prime account for shipping so video is a bonus, and I watch Netflix every week so I don;t cancel those and HBO Go and Showtime Anytime come with my cable subscription*, so no need to cancel those.





* I still have cable and will have it until there is some cheaper way to get all the sports my husband wants , including in-market games.
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Old 10-04-2019, 09:16 AM
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Originally Posted by actualliberalnotoneofthose View Post
My wife pretty much only watches local network channels, CNN, MSNBC, Food network, etc and leaves the TV on 24/7. Is there a streaming service that covers all the "regular" live tv programming, and would also take into account the loss of "discount" from having TV and internet from the same company? If so, maybe I'd upgrade my internet and drop the TV, but it would be 100% useless if I can't have normal programming running on my living room tv.
DirecTV Now offers this kind of service for about $45 - $60 a month. I signed up for a trial for a few months. I canceled it for a couple of reasons:
  • The selection of cable channels wasn't great - no Smithsonian channel, for example
  • The price was about the same as adding a TV option to my internet
  • the on screen guide was slow and froze up sometimes. It would also take a while when switching channels

YMMV
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Old 10-04-2019, 09:17 AM
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There is also PBS passport - $5 a month for access to many PBS shows.

https://help.pbs.org/support/solutio...-pbs-passport-
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Old 10-04-2019, 10:08 AM
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We do hulu, amazon where we also pay for pbs kids, and out internet provider offers a basic streaming cable package for like $20 per month that give us our local channels plus TBS and Discovery. We're under a $100 per month for the whole package.
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Old 10-04-2019, 10:50 AM
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I subscribe to one or two at a time and rotate through them. I currently do Amazon Prime ($10 per month) and PBS passport ($5). When I run out of things I want to watch on those, I'll cancel them and switch to Netflix and/or CBS All Access.

I also have an antenna for free over-the-air broadcasts from CBS, ABC, NBC, PBS, a couple of independent stations, and their subsidiary channels, which include MeTV and AntennaTV. Most days I only watch Jeopardy and the news over-the-air. If you miss a show, you can often stream it from the network's website (with ads) after a delay of a day or a week.

There are also free streaming services with limited ads (way less than broadcast TV). I'm currently working through Fringe, The Rockford Files, and Columbo on IMDb TV. They also have some movies on my watchlist. Crackle, Pluto, Tubi, and Popcornflix all have a similar business model, but I haven't checked out what they offer recently.
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Old 10-04-2019, 11:41 AM
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To be fair the "nickle and diming" was still happening with the giant cable bill and a bunch of channels you (the general "you") didn't care about, you just couldn't see it as easily as having a bunch of different companies bill you directly. But I'll agree that the difference accounts, UI, sign-ins, etc. are more of a hassle (although I think the UIs have matured somewhat and most of the them are so much better than the old cable box UIs I remember).

I do wonder about the sustainability of having dozens and dozens of separate streaming services. Right now things work great for us: we subscribe to the "big ones" (e.g. Netflix, Amazon, Hulu) and HBO for a few of their interesting shows. Our internet is currently $65 per month (incl. taxes and fees!) for a gigabit fiber service. I'd pay that much for internet even if I didn't use streaming, so I don't really count it as a "cable" expense.

One of the side effects of a more fractured landscape is that the pressure I feel to make sure I'm not missing out on shows has greatly diminished. Even with just 3-4 subscriptions there's no chance I'm going to watch even a fraction of what is popular. And there are so many shows that are so niche I'm actually discovering a lot of shows that seem specifically designed for me to love (e.g. Patriot on Amazon, Chernobyl on HBO). So it's easy to stick to a few subscriptions, watch a couple of shows that I love, and just forget that CBS, Disney, etc. even exist. Maybe I miss something great. Who cares, probably didn't have time for it anyway.

The one downside I can think of is if the contracts between content providers and streaming services become more adversarial and restrictive. Right now it seems that Netflix and Amazon can more than cover my television entertainment needs. If they're cut off from a lot more content because it's only available on CBSDarkComediesSetInLosAngeles.net (only $5 per month!), etc. then I can see that getting annoying. There does seem to be some of that happening. But I think there's a limit to just how much they can get away with that with the "nickle and diming" so much more out in the open.

And I think I'll take the disadvantages of a fractured landscape over the disadvantages of a more centralized closer-to-a-monopoly structure any time. I think we're seeing a lot more interesting, experimental shows as a result.
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Old 10-04-2019, 12:20 PM
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There are also free streaming services with limited ads (way less than broadcast TV). I'm currently working through Fringe, The Rockford Files, and Columbo on IMDb TV. They also have some movies on my watchlist. Crackle, Pluto, Tubi, and Popcornflix all have a similar business model, but I haven't checked out what they offer recently. 22
There are also the apps which can be downloaded via the Amazon Fire Stick (and probably with other setups, idk). Each app corresponds to a separate channel - TLC, Discovery, et cetera, and each has a limited set of free shows you can watch. New shows are added occasionally.
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Old 10-04-2019, 12:39 PM
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My wife pretty much only watches local network channels, CNN, MSNBC, Food network, etc and leaves the TV on 24/7. Is there a streaming service that covers all the "regular" live tv programming, and would also take into account the loss of "discount" from having TV and internet from the same company? If so, maybe I'd upgrade my internet and drop the TV, but it would be 100% useless if I can't have normal programming running on my living room tv.
We have Youtube TV and get the channels you mentioned plus our local stations (except PBS, we get that through a separate app on our Roku).
  #26  
Old 10-04-2019, 01:57 PM
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I'm still waiting for everything to be pay-per-view. I mean absolutely everything--any TV show, movie, live TV, sporting event, etc., would be available for a set price any time you want it.

The price could range from around $50-100 per view for some huge, live boxing match, down to about $0.02 per episode for re-runs of WHMB-40 (Indianapolis) 3rd rate preacher show from the 1980's.

The streaming companies and cable don't want this though... because it would mean they could no longer package metric tonnes of garbage with one or two hit shows. But I think the Invisible Hand would take care of that. The profits would be assured as long as the Hand set the price at the perfect place.

I used to think this pricing was inevitable. Now I'm not so sure.
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Old 10-04-2019, 02:11 PM
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Wow, now I feel extra-smart for just getting all of my "TV" by buying DVDs and blu-rays. I always thought I was blowing money on the indulgence of permanently owning the shows, but now it seems I'm saving money too!
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Old 10-04-2019, 02:22 PM
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I'm still waiting for everything to be pay-per-view. I mean absolutely everything--any TV show, movie, live TV, sporting event, etc., would be available for a set price any time you want it.

The price could range from around $50-100 per view for some huge, live boxing match, down to about $0.02 per episode for re-runs of WHMB-40 (Indianapolis) 3rd rate preacher show from the 1980's.
That's the business model I dreamed of; you the consumer access a front-end service where you tell it what you want to watch, it figures out who owns the streaming rights and tells you what it would cost to watch that movie/TV episode or whatever. You don't need to know and don't really care whether the program is at Netflix, Amazon, Hulu or whatever.
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Old 10-04-2019, 03:14 PM
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We have Youtube TV and get the channels you mentioned plus our local stations (except PBS, we get that through a separate app on our Roku).
As I mentioned above, YouTube TV says they'll have PBS by sometime in November.
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Old 10-04-2019, 03:48 PM
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That's the business model I dreamed of; you the consumer access a front-end service where you tell it what you want to watch, it figures out who owns the streaming rights and tells you what it would cost to watch that movie/TV episode or whatever. You don't need to know and don't really care whether the program is at Netflix, Amazon, Hulu or whatever.
The search function on roku mostly does this. It'll list what apps carry the movie or TV show and how much they charge.
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Old 10-04-2019, 04:17 PM
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I just don't get the hassle argument.
Yeah, me neither. It takes less than a minute for me to add or cancel a streaming service via my Roku account.

And when you cancel one, you get to keep watching it until the current month is up, so you can literally do it in one step if you want to just watch one show for a month!
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Old 10-04-2019, 04:20 PM
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I don't own one, but I've read that AppleTV does a better job of unifying interfaces of different apps compared to other streaming platforms. The UIs will look more similar, the way FF/REW works will be more similar, etc. And I think AppleTV itself may have a list of the shows you're watching and you can get to them straight from the AppleTV list instead of having to go into each app. If you want that more cable-like unified interface, that might be your best option.
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Old 10-04-2019, 09:33 PM
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Apple has tried to do that with the TV app, but then neutered it. It used to be unifying your apps, but then they put in a ton of ads for shows for services you don't have. TVOS13 got even worse with that.

Oh and Netflix never agreed to participate in the TV app, so that was a big miss from the get go.

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Old 10-04-2019, 10:18 PM
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Yeah, me neither. It takes less than a minute for me to add or cancel a streaming service via my Roku account.
I did not know you can do this. I just bought a Roku, actually. So Roku is providing that streaming service your payment information and handling login for you? That would go a long way towards making this painless. Just subscribe for 1 month whenever a service has something I want.

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Old 10-05-2019, 06:05 PM
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Does HBO go allow you to watch old shows, or just the current lineup? $15 isn't too bad, I thought it would be more than that. Might be worth it for a couple of months.

We have netflix and Prime (I'd have prime for the shipping, anyway.) I tried to watch something at my mom's house on Hulu the other day and it wouldn't allow us to skip commercials, which I found absolutely maddening. She pays for the super-premium Hulu, too. Some of the shows skip commercials, some don't. I cannot abide advertisements; I'd rather read a book.
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Old 10-05-2019, 06:33 PM
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The hell were you watching on Hulu with ads? Do you mean, like, in between shows the way HBO does, or like, commercial breaks mid-show?

I've never had to sit through mid-show commercials on Hulu. Maybe I'm not watching the cool stuff.
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Old 10-05-2019, 06:37 PM
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The hell were you watching on Hulu with ads? Do you mean, like, in between shows the way HBO does, or like, commercial breaks mid-show?

I've never had to sit through mid-show commercials on Hulu. Maybe I'm not watching the cool stuff.
Hulu has a tier that has ads. They are awful and are mid program and also come up whenever you want to seek looking for a specific joke in South Park, etc.

A few more bucks a month makes it ad free- but the "free" Hulu included with Spotify has ads.

You cannot upgrade but must pay for a full separate subscription to Spotify if you want the ads gone.

Last edited by SamuelA; 10-05-2019 at 06:40 PM.
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Old 10-05-2019, 07:21 PM
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Does HBO go allow you to watch old shows, or just the current lineup? $15 isn't too bad, I thought it would be more than that. Might be worth it for a couple of months.
It's not totally clear but I believe that existing HBO series (Rome, True Blood, Game of Thrones, etc) will be available to watch, along with stuff from the CW, TNT and TBS. As for the fifteen dollar per month charge, I read someplace that they had to price it that high to avoid pissing off the cable companies that charge people that much for an HBO subscription. (Because if they priced it at less than fifteen bucks, some people would cancel their HBO subscriptions in favor of an HBO Max subscription.)
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Old 10-05-2019, 10:36 PM
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Originally Posted by Renee View Post
Does HBO go allow you to watch old shows, or just the current lineup? $15 isn't too bad, I thought it would be more than that. Might be worth it for a couple of months.
There are currently two HBO streaming services, soon to be three. HBO Go is the online streaming service you get from HBO for free if you already subscribe to HBO via satellite or cable. It includes (I'm pretty sure) most of their original series, documentaries, etc. and movies that rotate in and out. HBO Now is (again, I'm pretty sure) the exact same thing as HBO Go except you don't need a cable or satellite subscription, so you pay the $15/month. HBO Max is WarnerMedias all-encompassing streaming service that will arrive in Spring 2020 and include all the HBO stuff plus WarnerMedia catalog stuff like Friends and The Big Bang Theory and original content. Seeing as how HBO Now alone is $15/month, it's hard to see how HBO Max won't be more expensive. Yet if it is, that will make it look much less attractive than, say, Disney+ at $7/month.

May you stream in interesting times.

Last edited by zbuzz; 10-05-2019 at 10:37 PM.
  #40  
Old 10-06-2019, 06:36 AM
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Personally I have Netflix and that's it. I did subscribe to HBO Now during the last season of Game of Thrones, but with the free week I saw the entire series and only paid for one month (I also watched the first season of Westworld)
I watch most of my TV OTA which does have ads but is free.
I use my internet for a lot more than streaming, so I'm not sure I would allocate all of that cost to that.

Brian
  #41  
Old 10-06-2019, 07:07 AM
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I have a mixed streaming/over the air/buy disks strategy. I have an antenna that provides free major network shows at their broadcast times. I mostly use it for Olympics and political debates. I also subscribe to Netflix, and I have Amazon prime for shopping, and sometimes use it, although I don't like their interface. (Hey, maybe it's better now that I've upgraded my Roku.) When I decided to watch game of thrones, I looked at my options and bought a box of Blu Ray disks. Same with Downton Abbey.

Mostly, I'm sad that Disney is pulling the marvel universe from Netflix. I'm probably just going to stop watching that.
  #42  
Old 10-06-2019, 10:53 AM
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Originally Posted by Lancia View Post
For example, years ago King of the Hill was released on DVD. I created a thread about it here and someone basically said "yer an idiot because it's available on Amazon and iTunes." Well, it's certainly not available on Amazon anymore. But I bought the DVD's, so when I want to watch them I dont have to worry about if the streaming service I subscribe to still has them.

As a consumer I refuse to play that game. I'm not a big TV watcher so it doesnt affect me much. I suppose if I was the Homer Simpson type I might be more pissed than I am. Of course, I may have and subscribe to the new Disney service, which will bring my streaming subscription to 3: Amazon, Netflix, and Disney. If it wasn't for The Simpsons I would have no interest in Disney+. Even with them I'm not sold on it... see the DVD comment above.
The problem there being, The Simpsons is 12 seasons behind on DVDs (Season 19 will be released in December), and there's every chance that they're just going to stop making them at some point.

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Originally Posted by zbuzz View Post
Is this the thread? If so, you misinterpreted my post. I thought it was weird that they went straight to full season streaming/downloads without trying to cash in on DVD sales first, I wasn't taking a shot at you.
I remember when Ally McBeal was released to DVD pretty much right after it was released, and the thought was that it was weird that this happened without trying to cash in on syndication, as was happening with other shows - the usual "waiting period" before a video release was eight years. When Fox discovered that it didn't really affect syndication, other shows - Futurama and Family Guy come to mind - soon followed with "immediate" releases.
  #43  
Old 10-06-2019, 02:40 PM
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I recently upgraded my TV to a Toshiba Fire and added my Netflix and Amazon Prime log-ins. When I got he TV ATT was having a contract dispute with Nexstar so I didn't have access to CBS, and after a little thought I decided to purchase CBS All Access so I could watch the shows I was missing, as well as Twilight Zone, STiscovery and the upcoming Picard show. Unfortunately, I've been having a lot of trouble with All Access buffering and sometimes even locking up. A little online research shows that this is not an uncommon problem.

I am thinking of adding HBO Now to the TV, rather than adding it to my cable service.
  #44  
Old 10-06-2019, 06:34 PM
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Originally Posted by purplehorseshoe View Post
The hell were you watching on Hulu with ads? Do you mean, like, in between shows the way HBO does, or like, commercial breaks mid-show?

I've never had to sit through mid-show commercials on Hulu. Maybe I'm not watching the cool stuff.
She has the Hulu that gives you access to local channels and sports. It's like, $40 a month or something ridiculous. I think it was an HGTV show that was current? The commercials were where regular commercial breaks were, and were 90 seconds, counted down with a little timer on the top left of the screen. I was appalled.

Last edited by Renee; 10-06-2019 at 06:35 PM.
  #45  
Old 10-07-2019, 11:20 AM
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I did not know you can do this. I just bought a Roku, actually. So Roku is providing that streaming service your payment information and handling login for you? That would go a long way towards making this painless. Just subscribe for 1 month whenever a service has something I want.
Yep. I assume Roku takes a small cut.

I believe you can add new channels from the device itself, but you have to go to the web page to cancel. But it's not jumping through hoops or anything to cancel. It's just going to a list of subscriptions and pressing the cancel button.
  #46  
Old 10-07-2019, 11:39 AM
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For the Roku managing subscriptions, it can be a little confusing since the Roku device allows you to add the app manually or to add a subscription to the "Roku Channel" app.

The Roku device itself allows you to add apps to the Roku itself. Those subscriptions wouldn't be managed by Roku. Those manually managed apps are what you see on the title screen of the Roku. You may see things like Netflix, YouTube, Prime, etc. Those apps you have to create individual accounts for each one and manually manage payments.

Roku also has an app called "Roku Channel". The Roku Channel is a streaming umbrella sort of like Amazon Prime. It has some content you can watch directly and you can also add premium subscriptions to Roku Channel. It's sort of like having cable. From within Roku Channel, you can easily add and remove subscriptions to premium channels without having to create individual accounts and payments. It's all under the Roku Channel control.

You can see the difference on these Roku screens. You can see the manually managed apps on the title screen, like Hulu and Amazon. You can also see the Roku Channel app. If you went into Roku Channel, you could add premium channels like HBO, Showtime, etc. I don't think all apps are available within Roku Channel. Like, I don't think Hulu and Amazon are enabled under Roku Channel. They have to be manually managed.
  #47  
Old 10-07-2019, 01:44 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Renee View Post
She has the Hulu that gives you access to local channels and sports. It's like, $40 a month or something ridiculous. I think it was an HGTV show that was current? The commercials were where regular commercial breaks were, and were 90 seconds, counted down with a little timer on the top left of the screen. I was appalled.
It was probably a live show. The highest tier Hulu is "Hulu with Live TV" meaning its broadcasting the channels. Some Network On-Demand content, which is not a part of the Hulu service, also has ads due to Network contracts.
  #48  
Old 10-13-2019, 10:44 AM
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Originally Posted by filmore View Post
For the Roku managing subscriptions, it can be a little confusing since the Roku device allows you to add the app manually or to add a subscription to the "Roku Channel" app.

You can see the difference on these Roku screens. You can see the manually managed apps on the title screen, like Hulu and Amazon. You can also see the Roku Channel app. If you went into Roku Channel, you could add premium channels like HBO, Showtime, etc. I don't think all apps are available within Roku Channel. Like, I don't think Hulu and Amazon are enabled under Roku Channel. They have to be manually managed.
This is less than optimal and not as convenient as it should be...
  #49  
Old 10-14-2019, 12:03 PM
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Originally Posted by SamuelA View Post
This is less than optimal and not as convenient as it should be...
I'm sure it could be improved, but it's really not that bad.

It's certainly not as bad as adding and removing channels used to be with cable. You had to call them on the phone. And often you had to buy a whole additional "premium" bundle that included a bunch of stuff you didn't care about and also HBO. And sometimes you had to agree to pay for them for a period of time. And you had to call them to cancel.

In contrast, on my Roku, I can just go to the app icon for the streaming service I want. If my subscription isn't active, I can press a button and reactivate it. Roku bills me. When I want to cancel it, there's a simple button to press on the website. It took me just 4 clicks from the Roku landing page (log in, my account, subscriptions, cancel).
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