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  #1  
Old 10-05-2019, 04:44 PM
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Top 25 Movies of the 1970s


1. Harry and Tonto
2. Nashville
3. One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest
4. Network
5. A Woman Under The Influence
5. Harold and Maude
6. Mikey and Nicky
7. The Godfather
8. McCabe and Mrs. Miller
9. A Clockwork Orange
10. Taxi Driver
11. The Godfather: Part II
12. One Is A Lonely Number
13. Chitchat On The Nile
14. Fat City
15. Sunflower
16. Autumn Sonata
17. Five Easy Pieces
18. Stroszek
19. Annie Hall
20. A Brief Vacation
21. Next Stop, Greenwich Village
22. An Enemy of the People
23. Dog Day Afternoon
24. Barry Lyndon

(I just realized I made a mistake with two #5's, but my back hurts, and it was hard not only limiting my options to 25, and also tough using IMDB scores as a reference, and deviating from it based on how I feel right now)
  #2  
Old 10-05-2019, 06:09 PM
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What a difference a decade makes! If France owned the 60s, the US owned the 70s.

Adding fewer than 25 to make up for the other thread:

Il Giardino Dei Finzi-Contini (1970) Vittorio De Sica
Jeanne Dielman (1976) Chantal Akerman
Love And Death (1975) Woody Allen
Mad Max (1979) George Miller
Monty Python Life of Brian (1979) Terry Jones
Network (1976) Sidney Lumet (just mentioned in another thread)
Pasqualino Settebellezze (1975) Lina Wertmuller
Pink Floyd (Live) At Pompeii (1972) Adrian Maben
Rollerball (1975) Norman Jewison
Série noire (1979) Alain Corneau
Solaris (1972) Andrei Tarkovsky
The Deer Hunter (1978) Michael Cimino
The Emigrants (Utvandrarna) (1971) and The New Land (Nybyggarna) (1972) Jan Troell
The Spirit of the Beehive (1973) Victor Erice

And a quick shout-out to actors becoming auteurs like Jean-Louis Trintignant, Paul Newman or Barbara Loden and far-from-unanimous auteurs Jodorowsky or Fassbinder or Pasolini.
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Old 10-05-2019, 06:13 PM
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Originally Posted by eunoia View Post
What a difference a decade makes! If France owned the 60s, the US owned the 70s.

Adding fewer than 25 to make up for the other thread:

Il Giardino Dei Finzi-Contini (1970) Vittorio De Sica
Jeanne Dielman (1976) Chantal Akerman
Love And Death (1975) Woody Allen
Mad Max (1979) George Miller
Monty Python Life of Brian (1979) Terry Jones
Network (1976) Sidney Lumet (just mentioned in another thread)
Pasqualino Settebellezze (1975) Lina Wertmuller
Pink Floyd (Live) At Pompeii (1972) Adrian Maben
Rollerball (1975) Norman Jewison
Série noire (1979) Alain Corneau
Solaris (1972) Andrei Tarkovsky
The Deer Hunter (1978) Michael Cimino
The Emigrants (Utvandrarna) (1971) and The New Land (Nybyggarna) (1972) Jan Troell
The Spirit of the Beehive (1973) Victor Erice

And a quick shout-out to actors becoming auteurs like Jean-Louis Trintignant, Paul Newman or Barbara Loden and far-from-unanimous auteurs Jodorowsky or Fassbinder or Pasolini.
I love Série noire, and Patrick Dewaere.
  #4  
Old 10-05-2019, 06:22 PM
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I love Série noire, and Patrick Dewaere.
The US owned the 70s, but Dewaere owned 1979, two movies at Cannes and Coup de tête isn't one of them?

Last edited by eunoia; 10-05-2019 at 06:25 PM.
  #5  
Old 10-05-2019, 06:37 PM
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Some of my favourites not mentioned

Apocalypse Now
Poseidon Adventure
The French Connection
The Black Stallion
Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory
Airport
Airport 77'
The Towering Inferno
Juggernaut
  #6  
Old 10-05-2019, 06:53 PM
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Some of my favourites not mentioned



Apocalypse Now

Poseidon Adventure

The French Connection

The Black Stallion

Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory

Airport

Airport 77'

The Towering Inferno

Juggernaut
Who knew Airport 77 was a 60s film?

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Old 10-05-2019, 06:54 PM
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Good picks


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  #8  
Old 10-05-2019, 07:23 PM
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Car Wash (1976)

For the nine second shot where The Waitress (Tracy Reed) is hurrying to work in the blue minidress. Ay caramba.
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  #9  
Old 10-05-2019, 11:36 PM
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Last Tango in Paris (1972)
  #10  
Old 10-06-2019, 02:33 AM
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In no particular order:

Kelly's Heroes (I had this on my 1960s' list as I thought it was a 1969 film, but it's from 1970. I'll replace it with Women in Love, the Oliver Reed movie from 1969)
MASH
A Man Called Horse
Harold and Maude
The Omega Man
The Devil in Miss Jones
Deliverance
Sleuth
Coffy
Charlotte's Web
The Last Detail
The Paper Chase
Papillon
Scorpio
Blazing Saddles
Thunderbolt and Lightfoot
Three Days of the Condor
The Bad News Bears
Silver Streak
Slap Shot
Smokey and the Bandit
The Deer Hunter
Hardcore
Monty Python's Life of Brian
Norma Rae

This was more difficult than the 1960s. I had to pare the list down from 33.
  #11  
Old 10-06-2019, 04:13 AM
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Godfather 1
Godfather 2
Apocalypse Now
The Conversation
Taxi Driver
Annie Hall
Nashville
Mccabe and Mrs Miller
Chinatown
Jaws
Star Wars
Close Encounters of the Third Kind
French Connection
The Sting
Patton
Barry Lyndon
All that Jazz
Days of Heaven
Five Easy Pieces
Spirit of the Beehive
Life of Brian
The Europeans
Amarcord
The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie
Day for Night

Undoubtedly a great decade for American cinema and quite remarkable how so many young filmmakers emerged at the same time: Coppola, Scorcese, Spielberg, Lucas, Woody Allen, along with Robert Altman who was a bit older but emerged then. Also remarkable that Scorcese and Spielberg in particular are still going quite strong.

Last edited by Lantern; 10-06-2019 at 04:13 AM.
  #12  
Old 10-06-2019, 08:12 AM
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Last Tango in Paris (1972)
This almost made my list.
  #13  
Old 10-06-2019, 10:33 AM
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Not in order and based on both being well made movies that have held up and movies I enjoy re-watching.

1. The Godfather 1972
2. The Godfather: Part II 1974
3. Jaws 1975
4. The Exorcist 1973
5. Rocky 1976
6. Bad News Bears 1976
7. The Muppet Movie 1979
8. Alien 1979
9. Close Encounters of the Third Kind 1977
10. The Sting 1973
11. One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest 1975
12. Harold and Maude 1971
13. Monty Python and the holy Grail 1975
14. Animal house 1978
15. Blazing Saddles 1974
16. Young Frankenstein 1974
17. Murder by Death 1976
18. M*A*S*H 1970
19. Kelly’s Heroes 1970
20. Bedknobs and Broomsticks 1971
21. Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory 1971
22. Patton 1970
23. A Bridge Too Far 1977
24. The Outlaw Josey Wales 1976
25. Fiddler on the Roof 1971

Honorable mentions: Taxi Driver, Network, Life of Brian, Godspell, 1776, The Legend of Hell House, All the President's Men, Apocalypse Now
  #14  
Old 10-06-2019, 12:36 PM
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I'm trying to find ANY of these on Netflix... HA!
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Old 10-06-2019, 01:21 PM
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Patton (1970)
Beyond the Valley of the Dolls
Gimme Shelter
Dirty Harry (1971)
The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie (1972)
The Harder They Come
And Hope to Die
Enter the Dragon (1973)
Golden Voyage of Sinbad
Blazing Saddles (1974)
Chinatown
Blood for Dracula, a.k.a. Andy Warhol’s Dracula
Lenny
The Parallax View
Monty Python and the Holy Grail (1975)
All the President’s Men (1976)
Network
The Man Who Fell to Earth
Master of the Flying Guillotine
Close Encounters of the Third Kind (1977)
Dawn of the Dead (1978)
The 36th Chamber of Shaolin
Bandits vs. Samurai Squad

The Tin Drum (1979)
Hunter in the Dark


Hon. Mention:

F for Fake (1973)
Godzilla vs. Mechagodzilla/Terror of Mechagodzilla (1974/1975)
Andy Warhol’s Bad (1977)
Apocalypse Now (1979)
  #16  
Old 10-06-2019, 01:39 PM
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Quote:
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(snip)
Pasqualino Settebellezze (1975) Lina Wertmuller
I wanted to highlight this and thank you for reminding me. Also, for anyone who's interested, the film is known as Seven Beauties in English (and is available on YouTube gratis). Outstanding movie.
  #17  
Old 10-06-2019, 03:15 PM
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I am surprised only one person has so far mentioned Star Wars(1977).

Also the first Christopher Reeve Superman film --Superman was released in 1978.
  #18  
Old 10-06-2019, 03:20 PM
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...
Also the first Christopher Reeve Superman film --Superman was released in 1978.
Superman was a mediocre movie overall that hasn't held up at all.
  #19  
Old 10-06-2019, 03:27 PM
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Superman was a mediocre movie overall that hasn't held up at all.
It was one of my favorite movies growing up and it's probably the second best Superman movie ever made(after Superman II). Though to be fair most of the other Superman films were horrible.

Also Star Trek: The Motion Picture was released in 1979. And like the Superman(1978) it was exceeded in quality by its first sequel. Though Star Trek: The Motion Picture does deserve some credit for reviving the whole Star Trek franchise.

Last edited by dorvann; 10-06-2019 at 03:27 PM.
  #20  
Old 10-06-2019, 03:31 PM
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It was one of my favorite movies growing up and it's probably the second best Superman movie ever made(after Superman II). Though to be fair most of the other Superman films were horrible.

Also Star Trek: The Motion Picture was released in 1979. And like the Superman(1978) it was exceeded in quality by its first sequel. Though Star Trek: The Motion Picture does deserve some credit for reviving the whole Star Trek franchise.
I love Star Trek, but ST:TMP nearly killed the franchise. Wrath of Khan was made on a much lower budget and with Gene Rodenberry pushed aside.

For the 1980s I will list both Khan & The Voyage Home. 2 of my favorite movies. But ST:TMP was a terrible movie.
  #21  
Old 10-07-2019, 01:48 PM
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I really liked Paper Moon. Still do.
  #22  
Old 10-07-2019, 03:57 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eunoia View Post
What a difference a decade makes! If France owned the 60s, the US owned the 70s.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lantern View Post
Undoubtedly a great decade for American cinema and quite remarkable how so many young filmmakers emerged at the same time: Coppola, Scorcese, Spielberg, Lucas, Woody Allen, along with Robert Altman who was a bit older but emerged then. Also remarkable that Scorcese and Spielberg in particular are still going quite strong.
Not so remarkable in that the Hays Code ended in 1968, which had stifled Hollywood movies with moral requirements since the 30s. Of course the 70s saw an explosion of creativity and quality.

How many of the movies listed in this thread would have passed muster under the Hays Code? It essentially required every movie to be rated G.

Last edited by Ellis Dee; 10-07-2019 at 03:57 PM.
  #23  
Old 10-11-2019, 08:55 AM
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I’d add The Spy Who Loved Me to the list.
  #24  
Old 10-14-2019, 10:37 AM
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These are the 1970's films among my 100 favorite films:

Alien (1979, U.S., dir. Ridley Scott)
Amarcord (1974, Italy, dir. Federico Fellini)
Annie Hall (1977, U.S., dir. Woody Allen)
Apocalypse Now (1979, U.S., dir. Francis Ford Coppola)
Barry Lyndon (1975, U.K., dir. Stanley Kubrick)
Carrie (1976, U.S., dir. Brian De Palma)
Chinatown (1974, U.S., dir. Roman Polanski)
Chungking Express (1994, Hong Kong, dir. Kar Wai Wong)
A Clockwork Orange (1971, U.K./U.S., dir. Stanley Kubrick)
Dark Star (1974, U.S., dir. John Carpenter)
Fantastic Planet (1973, France, dir. Rene Laloux)
The Godfather (1972, U.S., dir. Francis Ford Coppola)
The Godfather Part II (1974, U.S., dir. Francis Ford Coppola)
The Last Picture Show (1971, U.S., dir. Peter Bogdanovich)
A Little Romance (1979, U.S., dir. George Roy Hill)
Macbeth (1971, U.K./U.S., dir. Roman Polanski)
McCabe & Mrs. Miller (1971, U.S., dir. Robert Altman)
Monty Python and the Holy Grail (1975, U.K., dir. Terry Gilliam, Terry Jones)
Monty Python’s Life of Brian (1979, U.K., dir. Terry Jones)
My Brilliant Career (1979, Australia, dir. Gillian Armstrong)
Nashville (1975, U.S., dir. Robert Altman)
One Flew over the Cuckoo's Nest (1975, U.S., dir. Milos Forman)
Play it Again, Sam (1972, U.S., dir. Herbert Ross)
The Private Life of Sherlock Holmes (1970, U.K./U.S., dir. Billy Wilder)
Saturday Night Fever (1977, U.S., dir. John Badham)
Seven Beauties (1976, Italy, dir. Lina Wertmuller)
Star Wars (1977, U.S., dir. George Lucas)
Starting Over (1979, U.S., dir. Alan J. Pakula)
Taxi Driver (1976, U.S., dir. Martin Scorsese)
The Tree of Wooden Clogs (1978, Italy, dir. Ermanno Olmi)
  #25  
Old 10-14-2019, 04:59 PM
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Some good movies of the 1970's not yet mentioned:
Marathon Man
The Conversation
Cabaret
Mean Streets
Serpico

With the possible exception of Marathon Man, none of these would make my Top Hundred All Time list, but all five would likely make my Top 25 of the 1970's.
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