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Old 02-16-2018, 02:59 PM
Steven Estes Steven Estes is offline
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Safest Plce in U.S.

In terms of natural disaster, which U.S. state and which foreign nation are safest (i.e., least vulnerable to hurricanes, floods, etc.)?
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Old 02-16-2018, 03:04 PM
sitchensis sitchensis is offline
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It's not a State but the intermountain regions of Washington and Oregon are pretty stable
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Old 02-16-2018, 03:21 PM
Ashtura Ashtura is online now
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https://www.bestplaces.net/docs/stud...disasters.aspx

I'll let you find the state with the least number of dots yourself.
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Old 02-16-2018, 03:40 PM
enalzi enalzi is offline
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https://www.bestplaces.net/docs/stud...disasters.aspx

I'll let you find the state with the least number of dots yourself.
Those dots just represent metro areas, so it wouldn't really show which state is safer.
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Old 02-16-2018, 04:07 PM
Ashtura Ashtura is online now
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Those dots just represent metro areas, so it wouldn't really show which state is safer.
Honestly, that's kind of like the "if a tree falls..." thing. Sure, "natural disasters" happen out in the middle of nowhere. But if nobody's there, who cares? Are they really THAT "disastrous"? Sure, I wouldn't have wanted to be around the Tunguska event, but I don't think it was a disaster.

Your risk of getting killed in an earthquake out in the middle of nowhere is going to be less than if you're surrounded by high rises. At the same time though, if something bad does happen, you're kind of on your own. I think it comes down to how resourceful and prepared you are.

Last edited by Ashtura; 02-16-2018 at 04:11 PM.
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Old 02-16-2018, 04:12 PM
enalzi enalzi is offline
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Honestly, that's kind of like the "if a tree falls..." thing. Sure, "natural disasters" happen out in the middle of nowhere. But if nobody's there, who cares? Are they really THAT "disastrous"?

Your risk of getting killed in an earthquake out in the middle of nowhere is going to be less than if you're surrounded by high rises. At the same time though, if something bad does happen, you're kind of on your own. I think it comes down to how resourceful and prepared you are.
I'm saying that the number of dots is in not correlated with number of natural disasters. so counting up the dots on the list won't tell you anything.
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Old 02-16-2018, 04:20 PM
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I'm saying that the number of dots is in not correlated with number of natural disasters. so counting up the dots on the list won't tell you anything.
Alright, raw occurrences. Then we can deduce, I suppose, that WA looks pretty safe. But I wouldn't want to be anywhere near there during the next "big one," or if Mt. Rainier goes off. Yikes. At least that crap can't happen where I live.
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Old 02-16-2018, 04:53 PM
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It's not a State but the intermountain regions of Washington and Oregon are pretty stable
Umm...EXCUSE ME?!?!?
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Old 02-16-2018, 05:34 PM
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Would you count susceptibility to drought? That might include more places.
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Old 02-16-2018, 06:05 PM
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Depends on how finely you define natural disaster, A summer heat wave in the Midwest always generates news reports of people who died from the heat. What about winter blizzards, do they count as natural disasters?
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Old 02-16-2018, 06:58 PM
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Big Island of Hawaii several miles north of Hilo (where my home is).

Hurricane? No major ( or even minor) hurricanes in recorded history, (Hundreds of years.)

Tsunami? Eighty foot cliff above the ocean 3/4 mile from home.

Volcanic eruption? Mauna Kea (behind home) last erupted 5000 years ago. Its terrain would block any lava flow from Mauna Loa.

Tornado? Terrain is too mountainous.

Flooding? Island is made from very porous volcanic rock. Even after an historic 26 inch rainfall in 24 hours, there was no standing water on property.

Drought? Last year 185 inches of rain, Year before 235'.

Earthquake? Was here for a major 7.2 earthquake. So what? The ground shook violently for almost a minute, but there was no damage to home.

Food shortage? Year round growing season. Fertile soil with plenty of rain for irrigating crops.
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Old 02-16-2018, 08:10 PM
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Big Island of Hawaii several miles north of Hilo (where my home is).
Assuming those volcanoes continue to mind their manners, your particular plot of ground on the Big Island seems fairly safe. (I'm familiar with that area, and know it to be also quite beautiful - in my admittedly outside-the-mainstream view, among the best locations in Hawaii).

But the OP specified a state, and taken as a whole Hawaii probably doesn't qualify as the safest. Among other possibilities, there's the threat of a megatsunami. This could come from a seismic event elsewhere (e.g. Alaska), or could be "home-brewed".

One scenario is that the southern flank of Mauna Loa slumps off, with many dozens of cubic miles of rock and soil sliding into the ocean. The resulting wave could be hundreds of feet high (the extreme estimates run to 1000m). Such a wave would cause catastrophic damage thousands of miles away; closer to home, it would pretty much erase Honolulu from the map.
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Old 02-16-2018, 08:58 PM
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Ohio
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Old 02-16-2018, 09:04 PM
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Any place you can quickly flee to Canada? It just feels like it ought to be safer up there.
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Old 02-16-2018, 10:06 PM
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Any place you can quickly flee to Canada? It just feels like it ought to be safer up there.
Well, your feelings are less likely to be hurt in Canada.

I moved to Santa Fe a couple of years ago, which I now realize is one of the few places that is out of range of both hurricanes and (probably) N Korea. It's in the lowest risk category for natural disasters (it's the small dark green circle NE of the large pale green circle that is Albuquerque.)

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2...ew/01safe.html

Climate change presents some risk to water supplies, but at 7000' with mountains nearby it probably has more secure water supplies than many desert areas.

Or they could do something really dumb at Los Alamos, but it's 30 miles away.
http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2017/...rica-s-arsenal

So, I plan to die either of old age or base jumping.

Last edited by Riemann; 02-16-2018 at 10:10 PM.
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Old 02-17-2018, 11:42 AM
dorvann dorvann is offline
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It's not a State but the intermountain regions of Washington and Oregon are pretty stable

Aren't those areas prone to the massive wild fires that occur throughout much of The West?

Last edited by dorvann; 02-17-2018 at 11:43 AM.
  #17  
Old 02-17-2018, 11:43 AM
dorvann dorvann is offline
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Well, your feelings are less likely to be hurt in Canada.

I moved to Santa Fe a couple of years ago, which I now realize is one of the few places that is out of range of both hurricanes and (probably) N Korea. It's in the lowest risk category for natural disasters (it's the small dark green circle NE of the large pale green circle that is Albuquerque.)

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2...ew/01safe.html

Climate change presents some risk to water supplies, but at 7000' with mountains nearby it probably has more secure water supplies than many desert areas.

Or they could do something really dumb at Los Alamos, but it's 30 miles away.
http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2017/...rica-s-arsenal

So, I plan to die either of old age or base jumping.
Doesn't New Mexico also routinely have massive wildfires?
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Old 02-17-2018, 12:12 PM
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Doesn't New Mexico also routinely have massive wildfires?
Cacti and sand don't burn well.
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Old 02-17-2018, 12:27 PM
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Assuming those volcanoes continue to mind their manners, your particular plot of ground on the Big Island seems fairly safe. (I'm familiar with that area, and know it to be also quite beautiful - in my admittedly outside-the-mainstream view, among the best locations in Hawaii).

But the OP specified a state, and taken as a whole Hawaii probably doesn't qualify as the safest.
No one lives in a State. Many States are huge with northern portions differing greatly from southern areas. No one really even lives in a city. People live in neighborhoods in a city. If your neighborhood is near the river that flows through the city, your home could be flooded, but someone who lives in the same city far from the river would be unaffected.
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Old 02-17-2018, 12:36 PM
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Doesn't New Mexico also routinely have massive wildfires?
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Cacti and sand don't burn well.
We do have forests, and dorvann is right that we do seem to have rather a lot of fires in proportion to the amount of forest we have.
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Old 02-17-2018, 01:41 PM
Si Amigo Si Amigo is offline
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Ohio
Michigan has fewer tornadoes than Ohio. Winters not to bad in Southeast Michigan.
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Old 02-17-2018, 03:18 PM
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In terms of natural disaster, which U.S. state and which foreign nation are safest (i.e., least vulnerable to hurricanes, floods, etc.)?
Maybe the USA states with the most DUMB's. Deep Underground Military Bases. Maybe Denver or Utah.
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Old 02-18-2018, 10:02 AM
Mr Quatro Mr Quatro is offline
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Russia, China or North Korea could nuke the USA including Hawaii (USN) Alaska (USAF), Montana (USAF), Idaho (USAF), North Dakota (USAF), Colorado (Norad), Missouri (USAF), Texas (USN and US Army), California (USN and USAF), Virginia (USN), Florida (USN and USAF) Georgia (USN and USAF), New York and Conn (USN).

Where would be a safe place to live then?
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Old 02-18-2018, 12:17 PM
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Russia, China or North Korea could nuke the USA including Hawaii (USN) Alaska (USAF), Montana (USAF), Idaho (USAF), North Dakota (USAF), Colorado (Norad), Missouri (USAF), Texas (USN and US Army), California (USN and USAF), Virginia (USN), Florida (USN and USAF) Georgia (USN and USAF), New York and Conn (USN).

Where would be a safe place to live then?
Russia, China or North Korea?
Ok, maybe I haven't thought this through.

I assume Los Alamos is not a worthwhile military target. So I think I'm still relatively safe in northern NM, to the extent that anywhere is remotely safe under those circumstances. A little ironic, as NM is the site of Trinity.

Last edited by Riemann; 02-18-2018 at 12:20 PM.
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Old 02-18-2018, 01:05 PM
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Russia, China or North Korea could nuke the USA including Hawaii (USN) Alaska (USAF), Montana (USAF), Idaho (USAF), North Dakota (USAF), Colorado (Norad), Missouri (USAF), Texas (USN and US Army), California (USN and USAF), Virginia (USN), Florida (USN and USAF) Georgia (USN and USAF), New York and Conn (USN).

Where would be a safe place to live then?
OP "In terms of natural disaster, ..."
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Old 02-18-2018, 01:25 PM
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OP "In terms of natural disaster, ..."
But the title did just say "Safest Place", so I think it's a natural direction for the conversation to go. Nuclear was is somewhat similar to a natural disaster, in the sense that it's likely to be a massive event that comes unpredictably and is completely outside of our control. It's certainly much closer to the OP than something like the local crime rate.

Last edited by Riemann; 02-18-2018 at 01:27 PM.
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Old 02-18-2018, 02:24 PM
k9bfriender k9bfriender is offline
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Ohio
Second that.



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Michigan has fewer tornadoes than Ohio. Winters not to bad in Southeast Michigan.
Yeah, but it's Michigan, that really counts as its own natural disaster doesn't it?

I'll take the very occasional tornado that makes the headlines because it ripped off someone's roof over getting buried in snow 6 months of the year. You don't get that much fewer tornadoes, 16, rather than 19.
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Old 02-19-2018, 04:51 AM
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Big Island of Hawaii several miles north of Hilo (where my home is).

Hurricane? No major ( or even minor) hurricanes in recorded history, (Hundreds of years.)

Tsunami? Eighty foot cliff above the ocean 3/4 mile from home.

Volcanic eruption? Mauna Kea (behind home) last erupted 5000 years ago. Its terrain would block any lava flow from Mauna Loa.

Tornado? Terrain is too mountainous.

Flooding? Island is made from very porous volcanic rock. Even after an historic 26 inch rainfall in 24 hours, there was no standing water on property.

Drought? Last year 185 inches of rain, Year before 235'.

Earthquake? Was here for a major 7.2 earthquake. So what? The ground shook violently for almost a minute, but there was no damage to home.

Food shortage? Year round growing season. Fertile soil with plenty of rain for irrigating crops.
Works for me! (said your neighbor in Honomu). We have landslides sometimes, but AFAIK they are not epic. Our area is too wet for wildfires, though there are other places on island where there are serious fire hazards at times.

Do you subscribe to the County of Hawaii civil defense alerts? (If not, and you'd like to, go to this site.) They are always warning about severe weather, floods, possible tsunamis, etc. Nonetheless, I feel pretty safe. Can't get a pizza delivered, though
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Old 02-19-2018, 05:00 AM
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Russia, China or North Korea could nuke the USA including Hawaii (USN) Alaska (USAF), Montana (USAF), Idaho (USAF), North Dakota (USAF), Colorado (Norad), Missouri (USAF), Texas (USN and US Army), California (USN and USAF), Virginia (USN), Florida (USN and USAF) Georgia (USN and USAF), New York and Conn (USN).

Where would be a safe place to live then?
Nowhere on the planet, so let's ignore that option.
  #30  
Old 02-19-2018, 08:40 AM
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Second that.





Yeah, but it's Michigan, that really counts as its own natural disaster doesn't it?

I'll take the very occasional tornado that makes the headlines because it ripped off someone's roof over getting buried in snow 6 months of the year. You don't get that much fewer tornadoes, 16, rather than 19.
Yeah. The Cincinnati area in particular is pretty safe. Most tornadoes and even really deep snows (usually) peter out to the west in Indiana. No real earthquake threat here, closest is probably the far SW region of Kentucky. Yeah, summers are a hot slog sometimes, but humidity is everywhere in the Midwest, and winters are generally fairly mild.

The only real threat around here is the Ohio River flooding, and most people don't live in the floodplain, and the USACE has helped mitigate the floods with the dams up and down the river as well.

The worst threat to my well being is the state of professional sports in my city.
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Old 02-19-2018, 09:09 AM
Ashtura Ashtura is online now
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Okay, I know this is anectodal, but what about delaware? We've been grazed by hurricanes a couple times since I've lived there, but not enough to give us more than 5 minute blackouts. There's been like 6 deaths by hurricane since 1789. Certainly very low risk for any other type of natural disasters (earthquakes, tornadoes, etc.)
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