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Old 06-27-2018, 09:06 PM
enipla enipla is offline
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Cataract Surgery

Hi all. This is pretty much MPSIMS, but it is eye surgery.

I have a very fast developing cataract in my left eye. It's been confirmed (two visits over 6 months), and I have pre-surgery consultation scheduled for July 5th. So far so good.

My left eye is like looking out of a very, very dirty pair of glasses. It's certainly becoming a problem. Driving is OK, but won't be for long. I've been driving the same route for 25 years. Don't really need to read smaller street signs (Maple Ave). I'm a very cautious driver, and have never had an accident. I'm 57 years old.

My right eye is good. Work is tough as a computer programmer. I am a touch typist, but programming produces a lot of stuff that can contain unusual strings of characters. - Is that a {[)(}\ or | or !, a 3 or a 5. I joke that I should get an eye patch and just let my right eye do the work. But then I will need a sash, a sword and a parrot.

In all seriousness, my right eye is taking up the slack, and it' clearly (heh) getting tiring.

Anywho, I plan on getting the multi-focal lens. I'm told that my eye will be able to focus it for near or far. This will be amazing if true. I've been wearing glasses since 2nd grade.

I have had radial Keratotomy (lasic) and that went great. So I'm not nervous about it. But it is surgery...

I will of course have my Wife drive me to and from surgery, and will take any needed time off (long weekend, woo hoo.)

Any anecdotes out there? It's the most common surgery in the US, so I suspect a few on the SDMB has had it.
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Old 06-27-2018, 09:13 PM
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Had both eyes done a few years ago without issue. Immediate improvement to 20/20, which then degraded slightly. I opted out of the multi-focal lens, as there are too many stories out there of problems with them.

This year I noticed that things were getting cloudy again. My eye doctor told me that it happens in about 30% of people who get cataract surgery. The lens is fine, but the capsule gets foggy. I had a capsulotomy done on both eyes by laser, which took about five minutes total. Problem gone.
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Old 06-27-2018, 09:33 PM
Hari Seldon Hari Seldon is offline
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I had mixed success. Left eye was fine and I see better than I ever did, although there was one bout of post capsular opacification that was cleared in five minutes with a laser. But it was scary because I essentially have no useful central vision in the right eye. That surgery did not go well. The old lens disintegrated and the surgeon could not remove it all. I had to go back for a second op with a specialist (the first guy was an ophthalmological surgeon, but the second was a super specialist). At first it went well, but then I had a retinal tear. More surgery and it tore a second time. Yet more surgery, but this time an oil drop was left in to hold the retina in place. He could operate to remove the drop, but says that is likely to lead to the retina tearing again. So I am essentially seeing with one eye (although the peripheral vision is fine).
  #4  
Old 06-27-2018, 09:44 PM
enipla enipla is offline
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Originally Posted by Chefguy View Post
Had both eyes done a few years ago without issue. Immediate improvement to 20/20, which then degraded slightly. I opted out of the multi-focal lens, as there are too many stories out there of problems with them.

This year I noticed that things were getting cloudy again. My eye doctor told me that it happens in about 30% of people who get cataract surgery. The lens is fine, but the capsule gets foggy. I had a capsulotomy done on both eyes by laser, which took about five minutes total. Problem gone.
I'll ask about both issues. Thanks for heads up. I have been looking at this, but do like anecdotes.

I had the option with lasic, to do one for close vision, and one for far. Seems odd to me, but I guess many are fine with it. I already do wear reading glasses. It would be very nice to have one eye that could focus close. Say when I forget my readers for something simple like a grocery store visit. I can't really read anything with out reading glasses. Need a magnifier for say a medicine bottle. or fine instructions. But that is also a function of my recent cataract.

The very IDEA of going to 20/20 just in one eye, is stunning. Being able to read without glasses! (if I go with multi focal).

My history -

- Glasses in 2nd grade.
then
- Glasses always. Used those photochormic lenses that double as sunglasses for a long time. They used to take about 20 minutes to really change.
- Contacts.
- Then needed reading glasses.
- Decided to get lasic so I could ditch the contacts. I'm about 20/30 in my right eye now. It's was perfect distance vision to start with but my eyes have changed.
- and now... Well I'm pretty excited about it. It sucks, but I'm pretty excited.

As I said, this is a very fast developing cataract. This is probably good. I suspect many people just slowly get used to it and adapt. Since it happened quickly, I really, really notice it. And I can really tell since it's just in my left eye.

The optometrist said this kind (can't remember the type) of cataract is often the result of a head injury when you where younger. I had a major one when I was 11 that required 130 stitches in my scalp/forhead to, well ,keep me from bleeding to death (it was a bit close I think). It sort of lines up.
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Old 06-27-2018, 10:03 PM
enipla enipla is offline
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Originally Posted by Hari Seldon View Post
I had mixed success. Left eye was fine and I see better than I ever did, although there was one bout of post capsular opacification that was cleared in five minutes with a laser. But it was scary because I essentially have no useful central vision in the right eye. That surgery did not go well. The old lens disintegrated and the surgeon could not remove it all. I had to go back for a second op with a specialist (the first guy was an ophthalmological surgeon, but the second was a super specialist). At first it went well, but then I had a retinal tear. More surgery and it tore a second time. Yet more surgery, but this time an oil drop was left in to hold the retina in place. He could operate to remove the drop, but says that is likely to lead to the retina tearing again. So I am essentially seeing with one eye (although the peripheral vision is fine).
I'm sorry to hear that for you. My cataract seems to has made my central vision very blurry, but my peripheral vision seems fine. Hard to tell. Don't really read from the edge of the eye. This is one of the reasons that I still feel pretty good about driving. As long as I'm in a familiar place. And my right eye is fine.

My Mother (89yo) has Macular degeneration. The dry kind, but it is giving her problems. I have been taking her to her eye doc, but not much can be done. I do everything that I can to recommend options to help. Monster TV, adjust text sizes on computer and reading materials and such.

Marijuana tinctures under her tongue have kept migraines from MD at bay. It took a while to convince her to at least try it. MJ has really improved her life. Thank god we live in Colorado.

My father had bad cataracts. But tried to keep driving. We talked to him about it. He only went to the grocery store on slow residential roads. He said that he was fine. He just put his 4 way flashers on and drove slow. That was the end of the keys to his car. He did get them fixed and was very, very happy. But no more driving.
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Old 06-27-2018, 11:58 PM
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Subscribed — I’m 57 too and will need this surgery after having a torn retina 2 years ago. My retinal doc said it’ll likely be needed because of the the tear repair, and I’m seeing a serious degradation in my eyesight. Very annoying, especially since with eyeglasses my vision corrected to 20/15 — which was awesome! Alas, no more.

My surgery is not scheduled yet. For now I’ll follow along here.

enipla, I hope it goes well for you!
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Old 06-28-2018, 01:41 AM
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My mother got bad scarring and much worse vision. You're only doing one eye, so you've still got your good eye if the bad one goes worse. (Don't let them operate on the second eye if the first establishes a susceptibility to scarring).
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Old 06-28-2018, 03:29 AM
CairoCarol CairoCarol is offline
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I had pathological myopia (technically I stil do - my thin retinas can't be cured), retinal degeneration (still do, guess) premature nuclear sclerotic cataracts in both eyes, and a posterior polar cataract in one eye. By my mid-50s, no glasses or catracts could give me anything remotely resembling reasonable vission.

I had OIL survery and it was a life-saver. Sometimes I look at my drivers' license, which says "no restriction" (such as glasses, and I rejoice. The surgery can e really, really, rlally good.
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Old 06-28-2018, 05:50 AM
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Also following this thread. I have cataracts which don't seem to be affecting my vision much (yet).

Oh yeah, also glaucoma and macular degeneration as well. The opthomologic hat trick.

Anyway, my doc says to just let him know when I want to get the surgery done. Not sure if I want to go ahead and do it, or wait until I 'need' it.

Anyone have input on the multi-focal option? I suspect it's pricey.


mmm
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Old 06-28-2018, 06:23 AM
CairoCarol CairoCarol is offline
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I had OIL survery and it was a life-saver. Sometimes I look at my drivers' license, which says "no restriction" (such as glasses, and I rejoice. The surgery can e really, really, rlally good.
Sadly, the surgery has no effect on the likelihood of producing an embarrassing number of typos.
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Old 06-28-2018, 09:24 AM
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I had my second eye done a week ago today and couldn't be happier. The first was about a month earlier. I had ten percent vision on the first eye and 50 on the other. Again, I'm amazed that I waited for so long to do this, but I was friggin' scared. They will cut into my EYE! ARGH!
But standard practice here is to get benzodiazepines and I'm happy for that. It didn't hurt a bit, but I was scared stiff and was afraid of not being a good patient, i.e. not being able to relax and moving my eye around when I shouldn't.

I opted for long vision, since I only needed reading glasses and those are two bucks each at the gas station. Glasses for driving would cost a bundle and since I've been using reading glasses for about twelve years, I'm used to the slight hassle.

DO NOT go out in bright daylight the day after surgery, without some kind of protection. Sunglasses will not be enough, so that patch might be a good investment.
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Old 06-28-2018, 09:33 AM
enipla enipla is offline
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Originally Posted by Mean Mr. Mustard View Post
Also following this thread. I have cataracts which don't seem to be affecting my vision much (yet).

Oh yeah, also glaucoma and macular degeneration as well. The opthomologic hat trick.

Anyway, my doc says to just let him know when I want to get the surgery done. Not sure if I want to go ahead and do it, or wait until I 'need' it.

Anyone have input on the multi-focal option? I suspect it's pricey.


mmm
I'm not sure yet how much the mult-focal will cost. My optometrist could not give me prices. I will find out on the pre-surgery consult. I don't think it's that much, and my insurance won't cover it. I will report back.

And thanks everyone for your responses.
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Old 06-28-2018, 09:54 AM
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I have no experience with cataracts, beyond relatives who had the surgery and were thrilled with both the results and the relative comfort of the process.

But I do, after much research, have multi-focal contacts. What I found was that some people adjust quickly (me, thank goodness) and some with time, and some never do. The first day I was practically seeing double, and couldn't concentrate on reading a book for a month or so. Crocheting had to be large threads; lacework was out of the question.

Given that the contacts exist, and most ophthalmologists have a supply of samples in office, it seems obvious to me that you should ask for some and try them out to see how your specific brain reacts. Even with your vision partially occluded, you should be able to get an idea as to whether it works for you.

When it came to glasses, I couldn't hack tri-focals or progressive lenses at all. But these are great after a month of slow increase to wearing time.

Last edited by TruCelt; 06-28-2018 at 09:55 AM.
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Old 06-28-2018, 11:02 AM
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I haven't had it, but my landlady's reaction after hers was to go through the house switching off the immense majority of the lamps. She went from not being able to tell the sun was shining (and man, in Miami, when it shines it bloody well shines) to seeing, well, normally. I've heard similar descriptions from my father's brother and from several neighbors.

My mother's cataracts can't be operated yet and it's a PITA, specially combined with hearing problems and avoidance of the hearing aids. Leaving the house with her is nerve wracking.
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Old 06-28-2018, 11:39 AM
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Originally Posted by enipla View Post
I'm not sure yet how much the mult-focal will cost. My optometrist could not give me prices. I will find out on the pre-surgery consult. I don't think it's that much, and my insurance won't cover it. I will report back.

And thanks everyone for your responses.
The regular lenses were $2500 each, but my insurance covered it. Even my regular ophthalmologist was not enthused about the multi-focal route. And 20-20 is not guaranteed at all. I can function without glasses, but prefer to just wear my mild prescription, particularly while driving.

Within a few hours of the surgery, the anesthetic wears off and you can remove the tape that holds your lid shut. It does take a bit to get used to the bright light and vivid colors, but sunglasses are plenty of protection.

The places that do eye surgery are all different. I've heard several versions of what happens for prep, even up to having an IV inserted, which is way overkill, IMO. For me, there were a series of numbing and dilating drops leading up to an actual injection in the inner part of the eyelid to deaden the optic nerve. That was the worst part, as nobody told me to expect that to happen. I was prepared for it with the second eye, so it wasn't as bad, just very uncomfortable. I was fully awake for the surgery, although I did accept the mild relaxant beforehand. Your un-anesthetized eye is covered, and you can't see anything out of the other one, so you just hear the noise of whatever they are using. Doesn't take long.
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Old 06-28-2018, 12:22 PM
enipla enipla is offline
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I have no experience with cataracts, beyond relatives who had the surgery and were thrilled with both the results and the relative comfort of the process.

But I do, after much research, have multi-focal contacts. What I found was that some people adjust quickly (me, thank goodness) and some with time, and some never do. The first day I was practically seeing double, and couldn't concentrate on reading a book for a month or so. Crocheting had to be large threads; lacework was out of the question.

Given that the contacts exist, and most ophthalmologists have a supply of samples in office, it seems obvious to me that you should ask for some and try them out to see how your specific brain reacts. Even with your vision partially occluded, you should be able to get an idea as to whether it works for you.

When it came to glasses, I couldn't hack tri-focals or progressive lenses at all. But these are great after a month of slow increase to wearing time.
Good idea. Thanks.

I'm building up some good questions to ask the doc/s
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Old 06-28-2018, 11:32 PM
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I'm not sure yet how much the mult-focal will cost. My optometrist could not give me prices. I will find out on the pre-surgery consult. I don't think it's that much, and my insurance won't cover it. I will report back.
I'm the same age and had mine done a bit over a year ago. I believe the multi focus was over a thousand per eye extra that the insurance wouldn't cover. I can buy a lot of readers at the drug store for that.
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Old 06-29-2018, 12:47 AM
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Indirect anecdote:

I know 7 people who have had cataracts removed. All went perfectly. As surgeries go, it has very good risk/benefit ratio.

As an added bonus, you will get to wear a patch of some sort for a little while. Maybe you could get a sash and a sword and just borrow a parrot
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Old 06-29-2018, 02:47 PM
Mama Zappa Mama Zappa is offline
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Very timely thread, as I'm looking at (hah) having it done to one eye soon.

I noticed a year or so back that it seemed my left eye's distance vision was maybe not as good as it should be. It's my weaker eye anyway, but for example my right eye was maybe -2 diopters and the left was maybe -4, and I think had settled around -3.5 or even better,

I'd had an optometrist exame not mich more than a year earlier, and no issues. So I went to an ephthalmologist who said "cataracts!:,

I'm well-controlled type 2 diabetic, but apparently that's what triggered this.

Doc said I did not, at that pointm "qualify" as she was able to get my vision to 20-20 with new glasses, though maybe I qualified because the two eyes were so different - certaibly it's been tough to get used to the glases.

By 5 months later it had degraded another diopter but the doc was STILL in no hurry (me, on the other hand, I wanted it DONE).

Finally last week, the eye has gotten enough worse that I don't think I could tolerate correction. So she wants to do the suirgery.... only I tend to have higher-than-average eye pressure (thick corneas, no evidence of actual glaucoma) so she wants me on beta blocker drops for 8 weeks before proceeding. Ugh. Meantime I'm actually beginning to be aware of the haze in that eye especially if I'm tired.

Now, I go this with a bit of trepidation, as my mother had it done and died shortly thereafter. I suspect the preexisting lung cancer had more to do with it than the the surgery ,

Doc said they normally do it with just numbing drops....but with my aversion to strong light (actually gets in the way of eye exams sometimes) she'd want me to have sedation.

Oh HELLLS yes. Ignoriing the "bright light" issue, I have to think it would be tough to do a successful surgery on me while I was running shrieking down the hall,

Do they *really* do this with no sedation at all??? That seems insane. Of course I've read that a large needle is involved to numb the optic nerve, and I sure as hell couldn't deal with that.

Been thinking about the fancier lenses e.g. that deal with reading. Until I have the other eye done, it seems unnecessary since I can read with that eye.
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Old 06-29-2018, 03:08 PM
enipla enipla is offline
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Indirect anecdote:

I know 7 people who have had cataracts removed. All went perfectly. As surgeries go, it has very good risk/benefit ratio.

As an added bonus, you will get to wear a patch of some sort for a little while. Maybe you could get a sash and a sword and just borrow a parrot
Yeah. I suspect they will just tape gauze over my eye. How boring is that.
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Old 06-29-2018, 03:16 PM
enipla enipla is offline
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Very timely thread, as I'm looking at (hah) having it done to one eye soon.

I noticed a year or so back that it seemed my left eye's distance vision was maybe not as good as it should be. It's my weaker eye anyway, but for example my right eye was maybe -2 diopters and the left was maybe -4, and I think had settled around -3.5 or even better,

I'd had an optometrist exame not mich more than a year earlier, and no issues. So I went to an ephthalmologist who said "cataracts!:,

I'm well-controlled type 2 diabetic, but apparently that's what triggered this.

Doc said I did not, at that pointm "qualify" as she was able to get my vision to 20-20 with new glasses, though maybe I qualified because the two eyes were so different - certaibly it's been tough to get used to the glases.

By 5 months later it had degraded another diopter but the doc was STILL in no hurry (me, on the other hand, I wanted it DONE).

Finally last week, the eye has gotten enough worse that I don't think I could tolerate correction. So she wants to do the suirgery.... only I tend to have higher-than-average eye pressure (thick corneas, no evidence of actual glaucoma) so she wants me on beta blocker drops for 8 weeks before proceeding. Ugh. Meantime I'm actually beginning to be aware of the haze in that eye especially if I'm tired.

Now, I go this with a bit of trepidation, as my mother had it done and died shortly thereafter. I suspect the preexisting lung cancer had more to do with it than the the surgery ,

Doc said they normally do it with just numbing drops....but with my aversion to strong light (actually gets in the way of eye exams sometimes) she'd want me to have sedation.

Oh HELLLS yes. Ignoriing the "bright light" issue, I have to think it would be tough to do a successful surgery on me while I was running shrieking down the hall,

Do they *really* do this with no sedation at all??? That seems insane. Of course I've read that a large needle is involved to numb the optic nerve, and I sure as hell couldn't deal with that.

Been thinking about the fancier lenses e.g. that deal with reading. Until I have the other eye done, it seems unnecessary since I can read with that eye.
I was a bit surprised that you said yours was being corrected with glasses. Reading further, I see you are jus starting to see the 'haze'. I'm way beyond that. Eye doc can't even see in to do a proper retinal exam. I can 'read' the top, single letter line on an eyechart with the left eye, but it's a half guess. Right eye is good still, or I'd be pretty helpless.

I had LASIC done and was not put under. I think they gave me a valium. And numbing drops. No problem.

I do find this to be quite a good image though - "I have to think it would be tough to do a successful surgery on me while I was running shrieking down the hall"
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Old 06-29-2018, 03:22 PM
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Had both eyes done about a year ago at age 57, and like most of you I am still ecstatic. No need for reading glasses or anything and I too had terrible vision all my life.
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Old 06-29-2018, 08:14 PM
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My mom had this done last December, first one eye and then the other. She seems to be doing very well, and can see without glasses or contacts for the first time since she was a child. She's 76 now.

She tells me that she has lost that very-up-close vision for fine reading, though--the kind of thing nearsighted people have when you put the book or other object with text on it right up to your eyes without your glasses to read the small print.
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Old 06-30-2018, 12:57 PM
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NB: if you have an astigmatism in either eye, that eye will likely not correct to 20/20.
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Old 06-30-2018, 07:48 PM
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[..]
Do they *really* do this with no sedation at all??? [..]
Yes, they do. Someone I know had it done just last week. No sedation because there was no need for sedation. It's pretty much an in and out job, home in time for tea.

I'm not sure if I could have it done without sedation. Other stuff, yes, but eyes? I'm a bit twitchy at parts of an eye test. Although not as much as I am at the price Due to my unusually bad eyesight with multiple defects (my natural vision is classed as "functionally blind" and I don't fit on the "20/20" scale at all because it only goes up to 20/800 and I'm worse than that) the lenses I need are not cheap.

Having said that, I have claustrophobia and was rather perturbed at the thought of an MRI. I don't know if the tech has improved since then, but when I had an MRI it was half an hour fully inside a space about the same size as a coffin. I think I could have licked the top if I stuck my tongue out hard enough. But I managed because it was necessary. I needed it done and the staff didn't need the hassle of me freaking out.
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Old 07-06-2018, 08:24 PM
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Yes, they do. Someone I know had it done just last week. No sedation because there was no need for sedation. It's pretty much an in and out job, home in time for tea.

I'm not sure if I could have it done without sedation. Other stuff, yes, but eyes? I'm a bit twitchy at parts of an eye test. Although not as much as I am at the price Due to my unusually bad eyesight with multiple defects (my natural vision is classed as "functionally blind" and I don't fit on the "20/20" scale at all because it only goes up to 20/800 and I'm worse than that) the lenses I need are not cheap.

Having said that, I have claustrophobia and was rather perturbed at the thought of an MRI. I don't know if the tech has improved since then, but when I had an MRI it was half an hour fully inside a space about the same size as a coffin. I think I could have licked the top if I stuck my tongue out hard enough. But I managed because it was necessary. I needed it done and the staff didn't need the hassle of me freaking out.
I've had a few MRIs. The first was on my feet, so my shoulders and head weren't even in the machine.

Next couple, I asked for drugs in advance. I'd once gone to one of those "human Habitrail" play structures with the kids and found that I did not like it at all, so it was a safe bet I'd have trouble with the MRI. I'm also a larger-than-healthy person so there's really NO spare room in there. I have to hunch my arms together to keep them from getting caught on the walls.

So, I'd always asked for benzos beforehand.

The last time I had one, evidently there was an artifact in the machine and they made me come back again. Sigh. That time I decided I was gonna bull through it. I closed my eyes before they slid me in (and that one involved some kind of cage over my face too) - and managed just fine. I think for me that's the trick: if I don't look, I am less likely to panic.

Kinda hard to "not look" for eye surgery though!! Between the whole "EYES EEEEEEEK" thing, my light sensitivity, and an unpleasant history of local anesthesia not working well on me, there will be DRUGS involved. Which reminds me, I need to make sure the doctor knows about the anesthetic failures.

I also need something more than local for dental work, due to a well-earned terror (due to numerous instances of injections doing fuck-all to stop the pain). When I switched dentists, the new one scoffed at my suggestion of horse tranquilizers and a ball-peen hammer to the head, and instead offered oral sedation and nitrous. When she sold her practice and retired, the first time the new dentist had to work on me I asked for nitrous. She seemed surprised. I assured her "you do NOT want me undrugged. It'll be easier on BOTH of us. Gimme the nitrous".
  #27  
Old 07-07-2018, 09:15 AM
DummyGladHands DummyGladHands is offline
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My doc was of the self-proclaimed "new school" of cataract thought. Where it comes off the minute you notice something in your eye. No waiting for it to get bigger which he calls silly.
Your brain adapts to the damn thing growing, and you don't realize you're losing color and 3-D vision. My issue was the feeling that I had somehow gotten face cream in my eyes.
So easy peasy, and BIONIC LENSES!!!!
I couldn't be happier. Colors!!! 3 dimensions!! Night driving!!!
I bumped my laptop up to 125% and really don't need readers, although I carry dollar store readers for medicine labels and paperbacks, phone games stc.
I did have to go back in for laser zapping of protein, as mentioned above.

ETA
I had had RK years ago, knives not lasers, and they corrected me to 1 eye for far and 1 for close. I went back to the same doc. for this procedure, and I think I still have that, although your brain figures it out quickly and I hardly notice.

Last edited by DummyGladHands; 07-07-2018 at 09:20 AM.
  #28  
Old 07-07-2018, 09:48 AM
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Ann Hedonia Ann Hedonia is online now
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I had cataract surgery twice last year - I had both eyes done, about 3 weeks apart.

Mine developed fast, too - and the one in the bad eye had almost completely obstructed my vision in that eye. It was causing me a lot of problems - my brain typically adapted but sometimes when I was tired it just stopped adapting and my vision crashed.

Yet I couldn’t jump the line for the first surgery, despite my insistence that it was really bad. The doctors kind of freaked out at the thickness of that cataract- she said it was almost too bad for outpatient surgery. So I DID jump the line for the second one.

The procedure was annoying, I put a lot of that on the doctors surgical nurse that did the scheduling. She was a nasty woman. I always got conflicting information between her and the surgical center. She was determined that I was going to be the last patient of the day — so she told me to come at 1. But the hospital told me to come at 10. I did and they took me first. This nurse scolded me the next time I saw her — for coming when the hospital said instead of listening to her

And the sedation was really light but they insisted on it and made me fast for a day. It’s was so light I didn’t really feel it when they did the first eye. They had to sedate me more for the second eye because I got hiccups in the OR.

I’m generally happy with the result, although some days my vision is better than others. But even on the worst day it’s better than it ever was.

Trivia — I did not have any discomfort after the first eye. After the second eye, I did, I felt some roughness and itchiness. I mentioned it to the doctor. She said it’s because since she has to work with her dominant hand, the incision is at the bottom when she does the left eye and at the top when she does the right. And you will feel the incision more when it’s on the top than the bottom.

Last edited by Ann Hedonia; 07-07-2018 at 09:50 AM.
  #29  
Old 07-11-2018, 04:36 PM
Mama Zappa Mama Zappa is offline
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I....
They had to sedate me more for the second eye because I got hiccups in the OR.
....

Trivia ó I did not have any discomfort after the first eye. After the second eye, I did, I felt some roughness and itchiness. I mentioned it to the doctor. She said itís because since she has to work with her dominant hand, the incision is at the bottom when she does the left eye and at the top when she does the right. And you will feel the incision more when itís on the top than the bottom.
Hiccups - now that's a scary thought!!!! I tend to get them, a lot - and will occasionally utter DAMMIT when one catches me by surprise. My daughter has taken to calling them "the dammits" as a result

But it would seem like a Very Bad Idea to get hiccups while having eye surgery. Of course, it wouldn't be great if the *doctor* had hiccups then either, but I'd rather they not sedate her!!
  #30  
Old 07-14-2018, 09:45 AM
enipla enipla is offline
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Hiccups - now that's a scary thought!!!! I tend to get them, a lot - and will occasionally utter DAMMIT when one catches me by surprise. My daughter has taken to calling them "the dammits" as a result

But it would seem like a Very Bad Idea to get hiccups while having eye surgery. Of course, it wouldn't be great if the *doctor* had hiccups then either, but I'd rather they not sedate her!!
The 'dammits'. That's quite cute. And appropriately named.

Just thought I would update if any one is still watching.

Had second pre-surgery visit yesterday to get eye measured. Very easy. I will be getting a multi-focal lens. It's called the Symfony Yep that's the way they spell it.

It will cost a few thousand out of pocket, but I'm quite excited about it. Surgery in just over 3 weeks.

Work (GIS programmer) is becoming more difficult it seems every day. Seems like my right eye is working overtime. Thank god I'm a touch typist, and for spell check. The thing about programming is that a lot of stuff is odd, and critical, and doesn't work so well with spell check. Heh.

Driving is still good. But I don't have to go anywhere that I haven't been going for the last 30 years (same job, same house since 1992). It does take more concentration though. That I can tell.

Not apropos of anything, but I must share with someone, so I will do it here. I hope I don't sound sexist, but my eye doc could have taken a different career path if she chose to. Supermodel. I just... wow. It's not that unusual to run into attractive people, but holy moly. Please don't flame me for that observation. I'm nearly half blind, but not that blind.

The eye doc is just 2 blocks away from 'Wings over the Rockies' air and space museum. Yesterday, I had an hour to kill and walked over. Pretty cool. It's not nearly as big as Dayton Ohio's museum, but they have for instance a B52 a B1A an F111 a Tomcat and Starfighter just to remember a few. I didn't have that much time to spend there. I'll be going back.
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  #31  
Old 07-22-2018, 08:26 PM
Mama Zappa Mama Zappa is offline
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Just one eye? will the other one be worked on soonish after?

My eye doc seems overcautious about surgery - it's nearly a year since she first told me, and though I met the criteria (2 eyes 2+ diopters apart) she wasn't in a hurry to schedule it. Even 5 months after that when the eye was a full diopter worse, she was in no hurry. She finally agreed, last month.

I'm considering going with a single focus lens in the bad eye versus a multifocal, then when the other eye is done getting it set for computer distance - i.e. monovision. I've basically had monovision going on for a while now anyway - I'd been very, very skeptical about it until this happened.

My understand with the multifocal lenses is that they require a fair bit of brain adaptation and there's no way to tell in advance who will have trouble and who won't.
  #32  
Old 07-22-2018, 11:05 PM
nelliebly nelliebly is offline
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Glad the first one went well for you. The second one should be just as easy. I won't go into my experiences since I have some rare vision issues, so my case is atypical and wouldn't be of any use.

I think the reason you used to have to wait for a cataract to "ripen" (ew--always hated that term.) was because docs couldn't get it out of the eye unless the lens was hardened enough from cataracts. With newer surgical techniques, that's no longer the case. Good thing!
  #33  
Old 07-23-2018, 06:55 PM
Mama Zappa Mama Zappa is offline
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....
Work (GIS programmer) is becoming more difficult it seems every day. Seems like my right eye is working overtime. Thank god I'm a touch typist, and for spell check. The thing about programming is that a lot of stuff is odd, and critical, and doesn't work so well with spell check. Heh.....
Hah - forgot to comment on that part of your post.

I too am an IT person. A few months ago, I had wrist surgery and my right hand was completely unusable for typing.

So I got Dragon software (voice to text... very powerful).

Well, Dragon doesn't speak SQL. And even if it did, it doesn't know my database's table names. That was "fun".
  #34  
Old 07-24-2018, 03:47 PM
Darryl Lict Darryl Lict is offline
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NB: if you have an astigmatism in either eye, that eye will likely not correct to 20/20.
Yeah, I was extremely myopic but didn't have astigmatism. My cataract surgery improved my vision to a -2 dioptic, but with pretty bad astigmatism. I can sort of walk around without glasses and read up close without glasses.

In any case, my vision is far from perfect, but it's perfectly tolerable wearing glasses.
  #35  
Old 07-26-2018, 12:42 PM
Mama Zappa Mama Zappa is offline
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Yeah, I was extremely myopic but didn't have astigmatism. My cataract surgery improved my vision to a -2 dioptic, but with pretty bad astigmatism. I can sort of walk around without glasses and read up close without glasses.

In any case, my vision is far from perfect, but it's perfectly tolerable wearing glasses.
Huh so the surgery *gave* you astigmatism???? I hadn't read of that occurring.

Did they intentionally correct you to -2 diopters or was that just how it worked out?
  #36  
Old 08-04-2018, 10:17 AM
enipla enipla is offline
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I'm shamelessly bumping this thread, that I started. For two reasons. - I will have a few days of downtime after the surgery, and I want to let others that may have questions about it to be able to ask them. I'll be answering them here.

My surgery is scheduled for Tuesday, Aug 7th 2018. So far I've had two visits to the folks doing the surgery. Measuring my eyes and such.

It is just one eye. But as it gets worse (it seems like every day it gets worse) I'm having a harder and harder time doing daily tasks. Broke a butter dish the other day because I didn't see it was sitting on a dish towel I picked up. It's very odd. The blurred vision on one side is really throwing off my balance and I think distance perception. My good eye often waters, gets blurry. I think from over work.

Work/job is getting very difficult. I'm a programmer. Driving now is ok, but I have done the same route every day for 25 years. I'm about ready to cut myself off from driving. But I only go into work one more time, and that will be all the driving I will do before this is fixed.

Everything is all set to go. My Wife will drive me to surgery, 100 miles away. And then I have two days at home. I will be seeing a 'local' (25 miles away) optometrist the day after surgery, and my Wife can drive me to that if need be.
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  #37  
Old 08-04-2018, 10:36 AM
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RivkahChaya RivkahChaya is offline
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Just some more reassurance-- my mother had this surgery, and everything went perfectly for her. She never needed glasses in her life until she needed reading glasses in her 60s (! I needed then in my late 40s), and however the surgery corrected her vision, she needed glasses for distance vision afterwards, because she wore them for driving, but she did not wear them around the house. She had the surgery around age 69-70 for one eye, then needed the other one done a few years later.

She kept separate distance glasses and reading glasses; never had progressives or bifocals made. Her reading glasses were never prescription; she bought them at the Dollar store, or some place like that, for just a few bucks, and she still did that, even after the surgery.

So basically, even after the surgery, she could see better than I do. Our family has an odd progressive myopia that often results in people not needing glasses as children, but needing them as older teens, or in their early 20s, and the myopia just progresses. Of all my cousins on that side of the family, only one does not wear glasses, and all of us, plus my brother, started wearing them between ages 16-22. It was 18 for me. College did it. Couldn't see the boards in my lecture halls. My mother's siblings have it, but she didn't.

Having especially good vision to begin with might have helped her to have a very good outcome, but she also is the sort of person who is obsessive about following doctor's orders to a T. So anything you are told to do-- drops, darkened rooms, eye patches, dietary restrictions, FOLLOW THEM. I'm sure my mother did.

And good luck!
  #38  
Old 08-04-2018, 10:40 AM
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Let us know, enipla. Hope it goes very well!
  #39  
Old 08-05-2018, 08:52 AM
enipla enipla is offline
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Thanks for reassurance and kind thoughts. I had LASIK done about 12 years ago, so I'm OK with the surgery. As well as one might be.

I kinda excited about this. I've needed vision assistance since 2nd grade. This may end up being the best vision I've ever had.

Wife and I worked on some drainage problems in the yard yesterday, and that went fine. Just have to be very deliberate with every action because of distance perception being off. Moved about 12 yards of gravel with tractor. But blew out hydraulic line that I need to fix today. That's gonna be interesting, but needs to be done as we have another 30 yards of gravel that needs to be spread. Would like to finish up next weekend. NAPA says they can build me a new hydraulic line.

I'm generally a pretty good wrench, but have never worked on hydraulics. I know to be very careful, and will be sure system is not under any pressure. It's one of those jobs that either gonna be real easy, or a real pain in the ass. Don't know yet.
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  #40  
Old 08-05-2018, 01:02 PM
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Everything is all set to go. My Wife will drive me to surgery, 100 miles away. And then I have two days at home. I will be seeing a 'local' (25 miles away) optometrist the day after surgery, and my Wife can drive me to that if need be.
Break an eye!

I, too, have cataracts. Really tiny ones in both eyes and likely have been present for a couple of decades. They're off to the side so the cloudiness is typically not in my field of vision unless I specifically look for 'em.
  #41  
Old 08-05-2018, 01:50 PM
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Thanks Enipla for starting this thread. I am looking at cataract surgery for both eyes. I have an astigmatism and had lasik surgery, which corrected it for a while anyway. I was back to wearing both computer and distance glasses within 6 years of the lasik. But now, I have a chance for a do-over because I know what my pre-lasik prescription was. They can replace my cloudy lenses with toric lenses. Getting the special lenses is an OOP expense that I'm not looking forward to but, for the same reason I got lasik, I'm willing to pay the OOP price. I just want to get back to a single pair of glasses. I hope to have the surgery later this year or early next year. It might be a bit of a challenge because of a self-healed retinal tear in one eye. I'll continue following this thread with great interest.
  #42  
Old 08-06-2018, 01:53 PM
Mama Zappa Mama Zappa is offline
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Good luck tomorrow!! Are you opting for sedation of any sort?

I see my eye doc early next week. I'm "looking forward" to the surgery, as I'm getting less comfortable driving in low light situations. Friday I needed to pick my husband up at work (he'd had to work late and missed the late bus) and it was twilight by the time he was ready; I became VERY uncomfortable driving to get him.

Then I parked, and realized **I'd forgotten to put my distance glasses on**! (I have "room distance" progressives that serve for computer / reading, that I wear around the house, and I keep my true distance glasses in the car). I still don't like driving when it's dark though.
  #43  
Old 08-06-2018, 04:29 PM
teela brown teela brown is offline
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. . . I'm getting less comfortable driving in low light situations. . . .
Me, too, a bit. Your post prompted me to Google around and see if my crummy night vision is something to mention at my next ophthalmologist appointment.

I turned up a very interesting article written by an eye doctor about his own cataract surgery. It's worth a read.
  #44  
Old 08-08-2018, 08:42 AM
enipla enipla is offline
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Ok. Surgery was yesterday. Everything went according to plan and no problems.

I'll just give a run down...

Arrived as scheduled at 10am. Surgery at 11:30. Was out of there by 12:30.

A run down -

Got into pre-op and only had to take off shirt and put gown on. Kept my pants. Got the usual pre-op stuff. BP, heart rate, temp and saline IV. Then 4 rounds of three eye drops. Had to wait a good hour for eyes to dialate properly, and what ever else the drops do.

Then to a laser to measure things again. Then to operating room for the procedure. I was what the call put in 'twilight' as far as sedation. But I don't think I felt a bit different at all. I heard everything everyone said. Even at one point tried to cross my legs to get more comfy. :shrug:

The eye itself was numbed with drops. May have been a little uncomfortable a few times. No worse than getting splashed by water. Mostly it was like a concert light show.

Wore an eye shield all day yesterday and need to sleep with it for a week just to protect it. I have to put drops in my eye 4 times a day for 3 weeks.

Results (so far) - It's not yet been 24 hours, and my near vision is much better than expected. To the point that for the surgery eye I don't need readers. The surgery eye without reading glasses is as good or better than the 'good' eye with readers. I'm gonna have to figure out how that's gonna work.

Distance vision no longer cloudy, but it is quite blurry. That's to be expected and should clear up in the next 8-10 days. I have a multi-focal lens made by 'Symphony'. I'm sure my eye is adjusting and probably inflamed.

I go in for a post op check up today. I'll report back as I find out new info.
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  #45  
Old 08-08-2018, 09:04 AM
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Thanks for the update. Sounds lie it went well. Good!

You got to keep your pants on — a good thing. Those stupid flimsy gowns are humbling.

One hour for eyes to fully dilate(!). That sounds like a long time.

Get good rest, and whatever you do, be sure to follow the doc’s post op instructions!
  #46  
Old 08-08-2018, 09:33 AM
enipla enipla is offline
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Thanks for the update. Sounds lie it went well. Good!

You got to keep your pants on ó a good thing. Those stupid flimsy gowns are humbling.

One hour for eyes to fully dilate(!). That sounds like a long time.

Get good rest, and whatever you do, be sure to follow the docís post op instructions!
Yeah, it does sound long. But they did want to start prepping anyone 1.5 hours before surgery. Different meds you may be on make it take longer. Flowmax is one. The worst part was being a bit bored. I had my kindle with me, but they recommended keeping my eye closed so it would dialate quicker. :shrug: as I wanted the best outcome, I just closed my eyes and layed there.
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  #47  
Old 08-08-2018, 09:38 PM
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Thanks for the details. Please let us know how you like the multi-focus lens once your distance vision clears.
  #48  
Old 08-10-2018, 10:30 PM
Mama Zappa Mama Zappa is offline
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Yeah, it does sound long. But they did want to start prepping anyone 1.5 hours before surgery. Different meds you may be on make it take longer. Flowmax is one. The worst part was being a bit bored. I had my kindle with me, but they recommended keeping my eye closed so it would dialate quicker. :shrug: as I wanted the best outcome, I just closed my eyes and layed there.
Good to know about that! I'll remember to bring an iPod with an audiobook or something when my time comes.
  #49  
Old 08-11-2018, 10:53 AM
enipla enipla is offline
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OP here. All is great.

Four days after surgery. No discomfort. Never really had any. Redness in eye is going away.

I don't really need reading glasses anymore as my 'new' eye is great up close. Distance is nearly as good as my old eye. The close sight is very nice as I can very quickly and easily see gauges and speedo in car. I don't wear readers while driving and I do know where the gauge should be at, but it's nice to see the numbers again with a very quick glance.

I keep putting on my reading glasses out of habit, but don't really need them. I have taken out the left lens of two pair for any long time on computer. Left eye doesn't need correction for reading any more so it's a bit... odd.
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  #50  
Old 08-13-2018, 01:28 PM
Mama Zappa Mama Zappa is offline
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OP here. All is great.

Four days after surgery. No discomfort. Never really had any. Redness in eye is going away.

I don't really need reading glasses anymore as my 'new' eye is great up close. Distance is nearly as good as my old eye. The close sight is very nice as I can very quickly and easily see gauges and speedo in car. I don't wear readers while driving and I do know where the gauge should be at, but it's nice to see the numbers again with a very quick glance.

I keep putting on my reading glasses out of habit, but don't really need them. I have taken out the left lens of two pair for any long time on computer. Left eye doesn't need correction for reading any more so it's a bit... odd.
How is your nighttime vision?

I keep reading of the multifocals causing issues with halos etc. especially at night and that's concerning to me - right now I'm leaning toward a single vision lens; perhaps getting the other eye done as slightly nearsighted when the time comes.

I might consider an accommodating lens (adjusts *somewhat* for nearer vision) though from what I read, those don't work quite as well for people who started out nearsighted.

I see the eye doc tomorrow, in fact, so I'm piling up the questions. I'm hoping to come away with a surgery date scheduled.

Oooh - forgot to ask: if you don't mind spilling, how much did the premium lens cost you out of pocket vs. a plain one?

Last edited by Mama Zappa; 08-13-2018 at 01:30 PM.
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