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  #51  
Old 01-10-2019, 03:26 PM
Enright3 Enright3 is offline
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Originally Posted by Elendil's Heir View Post
Gladly!:

The Sherlock Holmes stories of A. Conan Doyle - still great period mysteries
The Spenser series by Robert Parker - an ex-cop Boston P.I. solves crimes, makes wisecracks
The Aubrey/Maturin series by Patrick O'Brian - the friendship of a Royal Navy captain and a surgeon/naturalist/spy against the backdrop of the Napoleonic Wars at sea
Sherlock Holmes. Good Idea! I'll have to check that out. I've read a few, but it's been years ago.

Spenser... I've read them all! Actually my favorite Robert B Parker books were the Jesse Stone and then the Sunny Randall books. If you haven't read them, I highly recommend them. The made-for-tv movies about Jesse Stone are pretty good (Tom Selleck as the main character).

I think I tried to get into the Aubrey/Maturin series; but was just so-so on those. Those are characters in the Master and Commander series, right? Maybe I need to give them another go.

Thanks for the suggestions!
  #52  
Old 01-10-2019, 03:30 PM
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The Virgil Flowers series by Sandford is still pretty good. The Dublin Trilogy (four books, actually), by Caimh McDonnell is entertaining. You might also look at the Joe Pickett series by C.J. Box, and of course the Longmire series by Craig Johnson (although the latest one got mixed reviews). The David Robicheaux series by James Lee Burke were good up until (IMO) they jumped the shark. And lastly, one of my favorites was the James Brodie four-book series by Kate Atkinson.
I forgot about Longmire. I've really enjoyed those stories. It's been a while since I read Craig Johnson; so I probably haven't seen his last book. I'll have to check it out.

Thanks for the suggestions on the others. I'll definitely check them out.
  #53  
Old 01-10-2019, 04:48 PM
Dendarii Dame Dendarii Dame is offline
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Oh, I'm a fan of the Judge Dee mysteries, too.

Finished The Daleth Effect by Harry Harrison, which wasn't bad, although not his best work.

Now I'm reading Robert B. Parker's Old Black Magic by Ace Atkins. I'm also a fan of Parker's Spenser novels, and Ace Atkins is doing a pretty good job of continuing the series. If you like Westerns, Parker wrote those too (Virgil Cole and Everett Hitch), and Robert Knott is doing a good job continuing them.
  #54  
Old 01-10-2019, 05:40 PM
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I would really like to find a book series that I can get into.
If you're up for more legal thriller stuff...

Tyler Dilts's Long Beach Homicide series: the first one, published in 2010, is called A King of Infinite Space.

David Baldacci's Memory Man series: the first one, from 2015, is called (appropriately) Memory Man.
  #55  
Old 01-11-2019, 12:21 AM
Elendil's Heir Elendil's Heir is online now
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Sherlock Holmes. Good Idea! I'll have to check that out. I've read a few, but it's been years ago....
You're in for a treat! I would suggest starting with the short stories "A Scandal in Bohemia," "The Red-Headed League," "The Blue Carbuncle," "The Speckled Band" and "The Musgrave Ritual." If you love 'em, next go for his best novel, The Hound of the Baskervilles.

Enjoy! If you want more Holmesian suggestions, just PM me.
  #56  
Old 01-11-2019, 07:51 AM
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Oh, I'm a fan of the Judge Dee mysteries, too.


.
Me three!

I read a lot of gay fiction last year so I dunno if it's up your alley or not, but The Snow & Winter books by CS Poe are good mysteries, there is m/m sex in them.
  #57  
Old 01-11-2019, 08:52 AM
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Started this morning on The Shadows We Hide by Allen Eskens. I was hoping to not like it because it's due back at the library, but gosh darn it, it's good. It's about a reporter investigating the death of his father, who he never knew.
  #58  
Old 01-11-2019, 09:53 AM
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If Elendil's Heir can suggest older series, so can I:

The Horatio Hornblower novels by C.S. Forester. I could never get into the Patrick O'Brian series of sea stories, but I found Forester's irresistible. Eleven books plus "The Hornblower companion".
Ha, see the other post I just wrote. I couldn't get into the Patrick O'Brian books either; so this might be a good choice for me.
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The Judge Dee mysteries written by Hans van Gulik. Djien-Djieh Dee was a real historical individual living in T'ang dynasty China. He was both judge and detective. Van Gulik first translated an 18th century novel about him, then wrote five new mysteries, using ideas from other Chinese stories. Then he wrote a series of other novels, creating a life story that was internally consistent and had surprising continued arcs in it. Since his death, a few other people hve written mysteries involving Dee, and there have been two Chinese movies featuring him (but making him into a martial arts expert, which he's not in anyone's books, although he is skilled with the sword.)
Sounds good! I was worried they wouldn't be available on Kindle, but there are several Dee books on Kindle, so I might be OK.
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The Ed and Am Hunter mysteries written by Fredric Brown, start with his Edgar-winning The Fabulous Clipjoint. Pretty hard to get, since he's unfortunately been out of print for a couple of decades, but Brown's mysteries, science fiction, and fantasy are definitely worth looking up. He once wrote a story in which the victim is the reader.
Ha! Easy to get on Kindle. I just found The Fabulous Clipjoint on Amazon for $1.99.

Thanks!
  #59  
Old 01-11-2019, 10:01 AM
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Originally Posted by Dung Beetle View Post
Started this morning on The Shadows We Hide by Allen Eskens. I was hoping to not like it because it's due back at the library, but gosh darn it, it's good. It's about a reporter investigating the death of his father, who he never knew.
That same description perfectly fits Fredric Brown's The Fabulous Clipjoint, which I mentioned above, especially the "who he never knew", in this case in the sense that, although the character knew his father as somebody in his life, he never really knew his personality or much of his biography until he investigated his death. Also, Ed Hunter doesn't start the book as a detective, but ends up as one. Highly recommended.
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  #60  
Old 01-11-2019, 01:12 PM
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Audible has a complete Sherlock Holmes for 1 credit.
  #61  
Old 01-11-2019, 04:22 PM
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Just finished John Grisham's The Brethren, about three disgraced judges running a con game by mail from inside a Federal low-security prison. It took some interesting twists and turns and I enjoyed it, although the ending was a little disappointing.

I'm almost done with Patrick O'Brian's Desolation Island. Capt. Aubrey, Dr. Maturin and the crew of the hard-luck HMS Leopard have just barely survived a major (and vividly described) storm.

Next up: a re-read of John Scalzi's excellent The Collapsing Empire, so it's fresh in my mind before I go on to the sequel, The Consuming Fire.
  #62  
Old 01-13-2019, 11:43 AM
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Just finished A Different Flesh by Harry Turtledove. Seven short stories, in chronological order from 1610 to 1988, set in an alternative time-line in which the Americas, discovered from Europe from the late 15th century on, are found to be inhabited not by Homo sapiens, but by Homo erectus (the latter called "sims", by the people in the stories). Still abundant at the time of discovery, are megafauna which the "sims" have had neither the brawn nor (unlike "our time-line" 's Hom. sap. Native Americans) the ingenuity to exterminate. The stories explore the ramifications of things being found thus, when Europeans reach the Americas. In the country overall quite like the USA (differing in many details) which develops in median North America; predictably, the "sims" are, in the main, not treated well by the colonising Hom. sap.

A quite absorbing read; but, to me, with its disappointing side. For a generally acclaimed "master of alternative history", Turtledove's imagination-supply appears IMHO, frankly somewhat limited -- he seems more prolific, and on easier ground, writing with "real history" 's events as a quite close template; making greater use of his imagination and coming up with more-original material -- as in these stories -- has him producing excellent stuff, but rather meagrely. I feel that I could have happily devoured twice the number of stories on this theme, than the collection actually holds; and with his having established the survival of the megafauna, I find it disappointing how relatively little Turtledove exploits this feature.
  #63  
Old 01-13-2019, 12:26 PM
Enright3 Enright3 is offline
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The Ed and Am Hunter mysteries written by Fredric Brown, start with his Edgar-winning The Fabulous Clipjoint. Pretty hard to get, since he's unfortunately been out of print for a couple of decades, but Brown's mysteries, science fiction, and fantasy are definitely worth looking up. He once wrote a story in which the victim is the reader.
I just finished The Fabulous Clip Joint. Fun read. Thanks for the suggestion!
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  #64  
Old 01-13-2019, 03:42 PM
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Next up is Land Sharks, a first novel by local writer Katharine M. Nohr. A female triathlete who is also a lawyer teams up with another lawyer who is also a Hawaiian TV star to solve a high-profile case involving a man who claims he was paralyzed during the Honolulu Olympic triathlon trials. Supposed to be the first of a series. I obtained this book in a novel (heh) way. On Christmas Eve last month, the wife and I attended our neighbor's Christmas party, where there was a gift exchange. You know the kind -- you bring a gift, put it with the others, everyone draws a number etc. I ended up with this book, which on the front had a note stuck on saying the author was here to sign it. "You mean here in Hawaii?" I asked. No, she was there at the party. And she did sign it and included a nice note. So this is one book I can't sell or give away. Hope it's good!

The author is herself a lawyer, an insurance defense attorney. The jacket blurb also describes her as -- and maybe Elendil's Heir can shed some light on exactly what this is -- "a former District Court (per diem) Judge." Not sure what the "per diem" refers to. Temporary? Fill in? The book also seems to be a first edition, published in May 2016, hardback, but already there are three pages of blurbs praising the book in front. I thought those appeared in subsequent printings or the paperback version? And oddly, almost all of them are from officers of insurance professionals' organizations, insurance company executives, physical therapists and athletes, even an "HR Professional." I'm guessing she may have handed out copies to friends and colleagues beforehand for feedback. One of the blurbs suggests Nohr may be the next John Grisham. Well, we'll see. She seems like a very nice lady, and I hope I enjoy the read.
Finished the above book, Land Sharks, by Katharine M. Nohr. This was very good. I enjoyed it immensely. Great story, held my interest from beginning to end. During the Honolulu Olympic trials, a car plows into the bicycling hopefuls, causing death and injury. One seriously injured participant sues the event organizers claiming negligence, and the insurance litigators must prove it was no accident but an intentional criminal act. The "land sharks" in the title refers to overly aggressive attorneys, although lawyers in general are portrayed largely as good guys. Nohr may very well be Hawaii's answer to John Grisham. An insurance attorney herself as well as a sometime judge, she owns her own law firm and one or two other claims agencies and is an expert on sports and triathlon risk management. It's always fun to read of locations I am very familiar with in real life in a novel.

That said, I have to say the editing is terrible. Misspellings, grammatical errors and odd punctuation are all too common throughout. Even a case or two that looks like a Spell Check error such as "candidacy" where "candor" was obviously meant. I blame the publishing house, WD Publishing. It's odd there is no other publishing info at the beginning of the book, no place of publication, nothing like that. I assumed it was published locally, but googling I see the WD stands for Written Dreams, and they are a small house in Green Bay, Wisconsin apparently specializing in new writers. I've seen the same thing with small houses in Bangkok, not much care taken with the editing.

My neighbor who hosted that Christmas party the author and I both attended asked me the other day how I liked the book. I said it was great but a shame about the editing. To my embarrassment, she went and told the author, "Siam Sam loves your book but says the editing is bad." Wonderful. But she apparently took it in stride, telling my neighbor she already knew but that it had been too late to fix. Contract already signed or something. She's generously offered to loan me the other two books in what is a trilogy, already published too, and I think I will take her up on that.

Meanwhile, speaking of John Grisham, next up is his The Rooster Bar. But it will probably be a few days before I can start that, as this will be an exceptionally busy week for me.
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  #65  
Old 01-14-2019, 09:26 AM
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This morning I finished Patrick O'Brian's Desolation Island. A very interesting, satisfying book about life aboard a British warship during the Napoleonic Wars.

Also just finished John Scalzi's excellent sf adventure The Collapsing Empire, and have begun the next book in what was supposed to be a two-book series but may, I've read, become a trilogy, The Consuming Fire. Good stuff: political intrigue, hardball mercantilism, religious mysticism and piracy in a distant-future interstellar empire.

Next up: Joe Hill's horror novel Heart-Shaped Box, about which I've heard good things.

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...speaking of John Grisham, next up is his The Rooster Bar....
My wife's book club just started that, too.
  #66  
Old 01-14-2019, 02:18 PM
Dendarii Dame Dendarii Dame is offline
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Finished Robert B. Parker's Old Black Magic by Ace Atkins. While it had some enjoyable moments, the plot of everyone chasing a McGuffin was too convoluted and uninteresting.

Next up: Howards End, by E.M. Forster.
  #67  
Old 01-14-2019, 02:54 PM
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I just finished The Fabulous Clip Joint. Fun read. Thanks for the suggestion!
I like that fact that one of the crooks is named "Dutch" Reagan.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dutch:..._Ronald_Reagan
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  #68  
Old 01-15-2019, 03:35 AM
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Iím listening to Blood Meridian on audiobook. I tried the paperback but got pissed off with McCarthy never using speech marks, which makes it really hard to follow whose saying what. The audiobook is much easier and Iím really liking it. Iím about halfway in at the moment.
  #69  
Old 01-15-2019, 04:51 AM
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I am halfway through Hari Kunzru's White Tears. It is a terrific confection of thriller and ghost story. The writing races along and apparently there are many twists and turns ahead.

I have checked out on Amazon the intro sample for each of Kunzru's other books and look forward to reading them as well. All seem intriguing.
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Old 01-15-2019, 09:54 AM
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Suitcase Charlie - A Noir Crime Thriller, John Guzlowski
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Old 01-16-2019, 10:11 AM
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Started this morning on The Shadows We Hide by Allen Eskens. I was hoping to not like it because it's due back at the library, but gosh darn it, it's good. It's about a reporter investigating the death of his father, who he never knew.
It was SO freakin' good. Five stars.


Next up: Uncommon People: the rise and fall of the rock stars. Recommended by Misnomer. I'm really liking it.
  #72  
Old 01-16-2019, 10:32 AM
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Suitcase Charlie - A Noir Crime Thriller, John Guzlowski


I just sent a sample (of a different book) to my Kindle, and Suitcase Charlie was among the "Top Picks For You" books on the confirmation page! Woah!

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Next up: Uncommon People: the rise and fall of the rock stars. Recommended by Misnomer. I'm really liking it.
I think that's a first for me in these threads!

Meanwhile, I've sent a sample of The Shadows We Hide to my Kindle. No idea when I'll get around to it, but it's on the list! Did you also read The Life We Bury? Normally I wouldn't be willing to start with the second book in a series, but it seems like the stories aren't connected except for the protagonist...?

Last edited by Misnomer; 01-16-2019 at 10:36 AM.
  #73  
Old 01-17-2019, 01:00 PM
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It's entirely possible that I missed someone mentioning this last year, but I just discovered that Robert Galbraith (aka J.K. Rowling) released book #4 in the Cormoran Strike series in September: Lethal White. I sent a sample to my Kindle, and will most likely start reading it whenever I finally finish The Brethren -- which is taking a while not because of the book itself, but because lately I've been falling asleep without reading first.
  #74  
Old 01-17-2019, 02:44 PM
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Meanwhile, I've sent a sample of The Shadows We Hide to my Kindle. No idea when I'll get around to it, but it's on the list! Did you also read The Life We Bury? Normally I wouldn't be willing to start with the second book in a series, but it seems like the stories aren't connected except for the protagonist...?
I did read The Life We Bury and rated it highly also, but it's been so long ago I remembered absolutely nothing about it. So you could read Shadows as a stand-alone. I hope you like it as much as I did.
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Old 01-17-2019, 02:56 PM
Dendarii Dame Dendarii Dame is offline
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Finished Howards End, by E.M. Forster. Brought back memories of the English courses I took in college. I kept seeing things I would've written a paper about, had I been assigned this particular book back then.

Now I'm reading Mr. Penumbra's 24-Hour Bookstore, by Robin Sloan.
  #76  
Old 01-17-2019, 09:26 PM
Elendil's Heir Elendil's Heir is online now
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I finished John Scalzi's excellent sf adventure, The Consuming Fire. A worthy sequel to The Collapsing Empire (with some interesting parallels to Brexit and global climate change, although it's not strictly allegorical), and it ended just abruptly enough that I suspect and hope that a third book will be along eventually.

Gave up on Joe Hill's horror novel Heart-Shaped Box after more than my customary 50 pages. Despite good reviews, I was unimpressed with the writing, and the story itself never really hooked me.

Next: Robert Parker's 1981 Spenser private-eye book, Early Autumn.
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Old 01-21-2019, 05:55 PM
Dendarii Dame Dendarii Dame is offline
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Early Autumn is the first Spenser I read. It's excellent.

Finished Mr. Penumbra's 24-Hour Bookstore, by Robin Sloan. Not bad, but it didn't interest me as much as Sourdough, which was the best book I read last year. One thing that interested me was that the books depicted on the cover glow in the dark--that was a surprise when I was carrying it down a dark hall.

Now I'm reading Smoke, a science fiction novel by Donald E. Westlake.
  #78  
Old 01-21-2019, 06:43 PM
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I finished Ghost Detective by Scott William Cater last night. I loved the set up, that the dead are ghosts going about their everyday lives alongside the living, and the mystery was fairly decent, but the characters were incredibly flat and rather boring. And I was totally sick of the MC's ghost wife picking a fight with him continuously.

I am now reading a fun little paranormal mystery called Not a Werewolf by Madeline Kirby. She's a cat lover...
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Old 01-21-2019, 07:26 PM
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I just finished The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night by Mark Haddon.
Plot Overview
The fifteen-year-old narrator of the story, Christopher John Francis Boone, discovers the slain body of his neighborís dog and sets out to uncover the murderer. His investigation is at times aided, and at other times hampered, by the mild form of autism he lives with.
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Old 01-21-2019, 11:39 PM
Siam Sam Siam Sam is offline
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Finished The Rooster Bar, by John Grisham. A small group of third-year law students who collectively owe several hundred thousand dollars in student loans decide to drop out at the beginning of their final semester, pose as actual lawyers and hit the criminal courts to troll for DUIs and other low-level offenders, bypassing the need to pass any pesky bar exams. What could possibly go wrong? After all, who really bothers to check a lawyer's credentials? Chaos ensues. There is a subplot in which one of the group was born in the US but whose parents and siblings are undocumented aliens from Senegal. This was a very good story, enthralling from beginning to end. Grisham got too preachy for a while in some of his books 10 or 15 years ago but avoids that in this subplot, in which the travails of illegals and their treatment by ICE are explored. Quite a find for me too, as I picked up the hardback in a used-book store for just $1. With this novel and Camino Island before it, Grisham is on a roll.

Next up is Ragtime, by EL Doctorow.
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Old 01-22-2019, 08:32 AM
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I picked up several books at the Arisia convention this past weekend. After reading things about Poul Anderson's "Operation" stories, I found that they were "fixed up" into a novel that I'd never read, Operation Chaos, which I found there right off the bat. People seeing me reading this kept telling me "You know, he wrote a sequel...." I did, but tht doesn't stop them. So eventually I bought a copy of the sequel, Operation Luna that I also found there.

My friend Jeff Hecht wrote a book Beam Weapons ages ago, which I read before I met him. There's been a lot of water under the bridge since then, and he finally wrote a new book, Lasers, Death Rays, and the Long Strange Quest for the Ultimate Weapon, that just came out. (I'd covered the cultural history of the ray gun in my own book How the Ray Gun Got Its Zap!, which Jeff had attended one of my talks about. we traded information on Ray Gun History).

I also picked up a copy of Terrytoons: the Story of Paul Terry and his Classic Cartoon Factory by the unlikely-named W. Gerald Harmonic. I've read several books about the Disney cartoons and Warner Brothers cartoons, and Leslie Cabarga's great book on the Fleischer studios, but AFAIK there hasn't been one out about Terrytoons. I grew up watching Mighty Mouse, Deputy Dawg, Tom Terrific, Heckle and Jeckle, Hashimoto Mouse, and others from his stable (He called it "the Woolworth of animation" , in comparison to Disney's "Tiffany" studio. But Terry started making cartoons seven years before Disney ever did,) This incredibly detailed book grew out of interviews Harmonic and earlier historians conducted with Terry and those who worked with him, research at cartoon collections, and twenty years of writing. It looks interesting.
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Old 01-22-2019, 08:04 PM
Ulf the Unwashed Ulf the Unwashed is offline
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Finished The Rooster Bar, by John Grisham. A small group of third-year law students who collectively owe several hundred thousand dollars in student loans decide to drop out at the beginning of their final semester, pose as actual lawyers and hit the criminal courts to troll for DUIs and other low-level offenders, bypassing the need to pass any pesky bar exams. What could possibly go wrong? After all, who really bothers to check a lawyer's credentials? Chaos ensues. There is a subplot in which one of the group was born in the US but whose parents and siblings are undocumented aliens from Senegal. This was a very good story, enthralling from beginning to end. Grisham got too preachy for a while in some of his books 10 or 15 years ago but avoids that in this subplot, in which the travails of illegals and their treatment by ICE are explored. Quite a find for me too, as I picked up the hardback in a used-book store for just $1. With this novel and Camino Island before it, Grisham is on a roll.

Next up is Ragtime, by EL Doctorow.
I enjoyed The Rooster Bar too. Haven't read Ragtime in a while, but really liked it when I read it a while back. I haven't been moved much by Doctorow's other novels; this one was terrific. (Look up, or read, Heinrich von Kleist's novella Michael Kohlhaas after you finish if you want a little literary background...)

I read a potato chip mystery--Simon Brett's most recent novel about actor-slash-alcoholic Charles Paris, A Deadly Habit. The mystery is a little light, as it often is, but the theatrical background is always fun, and Charles is an interesting guy in his own rather pathetic way. "Oh, Charles," I typically sigh when I finish one of these novels, and this one was no exception.

I read L'Engle's A Wrinkle in Time when I was a boy, and loved it. Read it again as an adult, twice, and still like it a lot (though I see its flaws more clearly than I did at age ten). L'Engle wrote a couple of sequels which I only read in my early twenties, Wind in the Door and A Swiftly Tilting Planet. I recalled liking the latter and not thinking much of the former, but couldn't have told you why lo these many years later. So I decided to try rereading Wind in the Door and--

oh, good Lord, it's awful. I'm about a third of the way through and maybe it gets better later, but I ain't counting on it. Repetitive, wordy, and did I say repetitive? The characterizations seem random and the plot equally so; the dramatic tension is lacking; the author seems more interested in telling rather than showing. I'll probably finish it, because I can't believe it's going to remain this dreadful, but wow, it's bad.
  #83  
Old 01-26-2019, 12:07 AM
Elendil's Heir Elendil's Heir is online now
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...Next: Robert Parker's 1981 Spenser private-eye book, Early Autumn.
Finished it. Pretty good, although there's a weird homoerotic vibe in the scenes where Spenser is teaching a teenage dweeb, caught in a custody dispute between his parents, how to be a man. A bit too many mentions of them exercising shirtless together, their chests gleaming with sweat.

Next up: A Man Called Ove by Fredrik Bachman, a novel about a Swedish curmudgeon. My sister loved it.
  #84  
Old 01-26-2019, 11:52 AM
Dendarii Dame Dendarii Dame is offline
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Finished Smoke by Donald Westlake. Not bad, but not very original. Some amusing moments.

Started I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings, by Maya Angelou.
  #85  
Old 01-26-2019, 12:40 PM
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susan susan is offline
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Finished N. K. Jemisin's lovely Inheritance trilogy. Now reading the associated novella and three short stories.
  #86  
Old 01-26-2019, 06:14 PM
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DZedNConfused DZedNConfused is offline
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I finished the Not a... series by Madeline Kirby about a cat shifter cop and his oddly psychic boyfriend (Jake's dreams take him inside the heads of dogs). The premise sounds too weird, but the series is a lot of fun. She has a great ear for realistic dialogue and realistic feeling relationships between characters.

Last edited by DZedNConfused; 01-26-2019 at 06:15 PM.
  #87  
Old 01-26-2019, 11:47 PM
Elendil's Heir Elendil's Heir is online now
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I finished the Not a... series by Madeline Kirby about a cat shifter cop....
What's a cat shifter? Google and Urban Dictionary have failed me.
  #88  
Old 01-27-2019, 12:48 AM
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A human who shape shifts into a cat.
  #89  
Old 01-27-2019, 11:04 PM
Elendil's Heir Elendil's Heir is online now
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Got it! Thanks.
  #90  
Old 01-28-2019, 02:02 PM
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Dung Beetle Dung Beetle is offline
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Currently reading After the Fire by Will Hill, a YA novel about a girl who survived a Branch Davidian-like commune.
  #91  
Old 01-28-2019, 03:15 PM
Max Torque Max Torque is offline
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Finished Daughter of Smoke and Bone and Days of Blood and Starlight by Laini Taylor. Started the final book in the trilogy, Dreams of Gods and Monsters, today. There's also a side novella, Night of Cake and Puppets, that I'll get to sometime, but it's not critical to the central story.
  #92  
Old 01-28-2019, 08:03 PM
Dendarii Dame Dendarii Dame is offline
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Finished I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings, by Maya Angelou. Brilliant, and highly recommended.

Next up: Fashion Climbing: A Memoir with Photographs, by Bill Cunningham.
  #93  
Old 01-28-2019, 08:09 PM
Sefton Sefton is offline
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Reading Shadows Linger, the second military fantasy novel in Glen Cook's The Black Company series.

I'm a third of the way into it and I love it. I can't believe it took me so long to start reading Glen Cook.
  #94  
Old 01-31-2019, 08:05 AM
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Currently reading After the Fire by Will Hill, a YA novel about a girl who survived a Branch Davidian-like commune.
Finished After the Fire; it held my interest but was unremarkable. Then I started on Echo Room, by Parker Peevyhouse. After 25 pages, I was having to backtrack and re-read because my mind was wandering everywhere. Ditched.
  #95  
Old 02-01-2019, 02:36 PM
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Dung Beetle Dung Beetle is offline
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Started today on Ghost Wall by Sarah Moss, a novel about a young girl and her family participating with a group of students who are reenacting life as it was lived in the Iron Age. I'm really liking it so far, although it's one of those books that leaves out the quotation marks.
  #96  
Old 02-01-2019, 05:02 PM
ivylass ivylass is online now
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I re-read Shogun and Gai-Jin by James Clavell over the holidays, and I just read another Amazon Prime free release, True Places. I keep stumbling into what I call suburban gothic, ie a seemingly perfect, upper middle class (if not wealthy) family with deep dark secrets. This one had an interesting twist but I felt the twist could have been explored a bit better.
  #97  
Old 02-02-2019, 05:10 PM
Dendarii Dame Dendarii Dame is offline
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Finished Fashion Climbing: A Memoir with Photographs, by Bill Cunningham, which I enjoyed. It had some funny anecdotes.

Now I'm reading Boy, Snow, Bird, by Helen Oyeyemi.
  #98  
Old 02-02-2019, 07:37 PM
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pohjonen pohjonen is offline
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Almost finished with Taken By Bear in Yellowstone. I was on a Bear v. Human reading binge and my library was kind enough to procure this one for me. I love my library. If something is available to purchase and they don't have it, they take requests. Yay.
  #99  
Old 02-03-2019, 08:32 PM
Siam Sam Siam Sam is offline
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Haven't read Ragtime in a while, but really liked it when I read it a while back. I haven't been moved much by Doctorow's other novels; this one was terrific.
Finished Ragtime, by EL Doctorow. Fictional and historical characters interact in the greater New York City area largely from 1902-12, with brief scenes continuing to 1917 at the very end. The main story is a black man takes matters into his own hands when a bunch of Irish firefighters vandalize his car and indirectly lead to the death of his fiancee/mother of his child. I especially liked the Harry Houdini story line. Ranked No. 86 on the Modern Library's top 100 novels of the 20th century. This is a great book. I remember watching the 1981 film when it came out and enjoying that. It was 80-something-year-old James Cagney's last movie role, as the NYC police commissioner, although I think he did appear in a TV movie after that. He had not acted in a movie in something like 20 years, and he was terrific. Pat O'Brian's last film too. Like Ulf above, I had read only Doctorow's Billy Bathgate before and found itt only so-so. Ragtime is fantastic.

Next up is The Dead Zone, by Stephen King.

EDIT: Is there a February link? I don't see one.
__________________
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Last edited by Siam Sam; 02-03-2019 at 08:33 PM.
  #100  
Old 02-04-2019, 10:50 AM
zimaane zimaane is online now
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The Ancestors Tale Richard Dawkins and Yan Wong

History of life on earth, told as a series of natural history tales, working backwards from the evolution of humans, primates, mammals, etc

The first edition of this book was written around 2004. A lot has been discovered since then, so there is a fair amount of new material

Highly recommend even if you read the first edition already
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