Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #201  
Old 10-05-2008, 08:55 AM
LurkMeister LurkMeister is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Central NC
Posts: 4,657
I remember a story (actually I think it was part of a series of stories) about time travelers whose mission was to stop the Challenger disaster....but not our Challenger disaster, but the one where the passenger compartment crashed into a school, killing hundreds of children and completely shutting down the American space program. I think part of the plot also involved one of te time travelers being sent back too far - to 1963, just in time to try to prevent JFK's assassination.
  #202  
Old 10-05-2008, 01:31 PM
Andy L Andy L is online now
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Posts: 5,933
Quote:
Originally Posted by LurkMeister View Post
I remember a story (actually I think it was part of a series of stories) about time travelers whose mission was to stop the Challenger disaster....but not our Challenger disaster, but the one where the passenger compartment crashed into a school, killing hundreds of children and completely shutting down the American space program. I think part of the plot also involved one of te time travelers being sent back too far - to 1963, just in time to try to prevent JFK's assassination.

I know this one - it's a series of stories by Paul Levinson "Late Lessons" is one of them - http://www.sff.net/people/paullevinson/books.html
  #203  
Old 10-05-2008, 04:41 PM
LurkMeister LurkMeister is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Central NC
Posts: 4,657
Thanks! SmartAleq's story reminded me of it, but unfortunately all my back copies of Analog and Asimov's are still packed up. At first I thought it might have been the same story he was thinking of, but the more I thought about it there seemed to be too many differences.

I notice in your link that there's a concluding story to the series coming out entitled "Last Calls". As I remember it, the third story, "Late Lessons", pretty much closed up the story line. Now I'm wondering what I might have missed.
__________________
He Who Disregards His Name When He Posts. Thanks, lno
  #204  
Old 12-24-2008, 08:22 PM
Elendil's Heir Elendil's Heir is online now
SDSAB
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: my Herkimer Battle Jitney
Posts: 81,108
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ponderoid View Post
That sounds like Robert Silverberg's World's Fair 1992 but I don't remember the name of the ship in that novel. The first half of the novel concerned the teenager working at the World's Fair Space Station, and then he gets assigned to the Pluto trip because he wrote an insightful essay about what life on Pluto might be like.

*** Ponder
Finally got the book through Amazon and read it, and you're right. The ship isn't named Lodestar, but otherwise I'm 95% sure this is the book I was thinking of. Not a bad read at all, with some interesting debate on xenoanthropological ethics.
  #205  
Old 09-09-2009, 03:39 PM
DiggitCamara DiggitCamara is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Right here. Right now.
Posts: 2,254
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kolga View Post
Unfortunately, my friend remembers very little detail other than what I provided. He stated that he read it back in college, so around 1990, and that the story included a description of a moped from the point of view of the main character (an Aztec or Incan boy), so that the story had to be relatively recent. He doesn't remember if it was a stand-alone piece, or a part of a compilation of Latin American writers, or something else.

Peter Morris, I will ask. Thank you, and thanks to anybody else who can provide suggestions!
Resurrecting zombies here is valid, ain't it? Anyhow, if I remember it correctly, it's a short story by Cortázar. Though it might be one of Borges's (they tend to run together in my mind).
  #206  
Old 09-09-2009, 07:00 PM
PaulLev PaulLev is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: New York City
Posts: 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy L View Post
I know this one - it's a series of stories by Paul Levinson "Late Lessons" is one of them - http://www.sff.net/people/paullevinson/books.html
Just popping in here to say the story trilogy is "Loose Ends," "Little Differences," "Late Lessons."
  #207  
Old 09-09-2009, 07:03 PM
PaulLev PaulLev is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: New York City
Posts: 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by LurkMeister View Post
Thanks! SmartAleq's story reminded me of it, but unfortunately all my back copies of Analog and Asimov's are still packed up. At first I thought it might have been the same story he was thinking of, but the more I thought about it there seemed to be too many differences.

I notice in your link that there's a concluding story to the series coming out entitled "Last Calls". As I remember it, the third story, "Late Lessons", pretty much closed up the story line. Now I'm wondering what I might have missed.
You can get them all on fictionwise.com - just search on my name (Paul Levinson).

And, yes, there will be a fourth and concluding story, "Last Calls," which should blow everything wide open ...
  #208  
Old 09-09-2009, 07:47 PM
BrotherCadfael BrotherCadfael is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Vermont
Posts: 10,079
Quote:
Originally Posted by AHunter3 View Post
You left out "Bottommos" for the low-slung 3rd moon of Mars.
I'll have to confess that I have read and reread that story for years, trying to figure out whatinhell the pun is. Anybody help me out??

I also have been trying to find a story for years. I thought it was Bradbury, but I've not found it in any of his collections.

The story opens in a pub in a small village in Ireland, where the locals are having a pint or six. A tour bus pulls up, and a flamboyantly gay tour group disembarks, remarking about how quaint the town is, etc. The locals make various remarks about the newcomers, until one of them points out that they gays are not so unlike the locals - they both drink, are fond of singing, and don't have much to do with women (after all, the locals are all drinking in the pub rather than going home to their wives). So the two groups spend the afternoon drinking, telling stories, and listening to one of the tour singing "Danny Boy" and other tunes in a fine, high tenor. A good time is had by all.

When the gays get back on the bus and head back to Dublin, the locals wave goodbye, invite them to come back soon, etc. As the story ends, one of the locals remarks that, just for a day, "the fairies came back to Olde Ireland".

It sounds offensive as all hell, but it's handled with a fair degree of sensitivity, especially for it's day (it must be at least 30 years old if not more).

Any ideas??
  #209  
Old 09-09-2009, 07:49 PM
Andy L Andy L is online now
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Posts: 5,933
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrotherCadfael View Post
I'll have to confess that I have read and reread that story for years, trying to figure out whatinhell the pun is. Anybody help me out??
Bottomos = "Bottom-most"

Last edited by Andy L; 09-09-2009 at 07:50 PM. Reason: Fixed formatting
  #210  
Old 09-09-2009, 07:57 PM
BrotherCadfael BrotherCadfael is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Vermont
Posts: 10,079
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy L View Post
Bottomos = "Bottom-most"
Hmm... not much of a pun, and not really funny. Big overture, little show.
  #211  
Old 09-09-2009, 08:05 PM
Andy L Andy L is online now
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Posts: 5,933
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrotherCadfael View Post
I'll have to confess that I have read and reread that story for years, trying to figure out whatinhell the pun is. Anybody help me out??

I also have been trying to find a story for years. I thought it was Bradbury, but I've not found it in any of his collections.

The story opens in a pub in a small village in Ireland, where the locals are having a pint or six. A tour bus pulls up, and a flamboyantly gay tour group disembarks, remarking about how quaint the town is, etc. The locals make various remarks about the newcomers, until one of them points out that they gays are not so unlike the locals - they both drink, are fond of singing, and don't have much to do with women (after all, the locals are all drinking in the pub rather than going home to their wives). So the two groups spend the afternoon drinking, telling stories, and listening to one of the tour singing "Danny Boy" and other tunes in a fine, high tenor. A good time is had by all.

When the gays get back on the bus and head back to Dublin, the locals wave goodbye, invite them to come back soon, etc. As the story ends, one of the locals remarks that, just for a day, "the fairies came back to Olde Ireland".

It sounds offensive as all hell, but it's handled with a fair degree of sensitivity, especially for it's day (it must be at least 30 years old if not more).

Any ideas??

This is Bradbury's "The Cold Wind and the Warm", in the collection "I sing the Body Electric" I think.
  #212  
Old 09-09-2009, 08:16 PM
Erdosain Erdosain is offline
BANNED
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Stars Hollow
Posts: 3,358
Quote:
Originally Posted by DiggitCamara View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kolga View Post
A friend of mine and I are in the middle of an IM conversation about SF, and he just sent me a synopsis of a novella he read in college but can't remember the name or author.

The main character is this Aztec kid, running from the scene of a battle. He gets captured, and he's going to be sacrificed. When he sleeps, he has a dream of a huge city, men riding on contraptions that sound like giant insects, or inside self-propelled carriages. In the dream, he gets hit by a car and wakes up as his Aztec self. The story goes back and forth as the hour of his execution approaches,
asleep in one world and is awake in the other and vice versa.

Any help would be greatly appreciated!
Resurrecting zombies here is valid, ain't it? Anyhow, if I remember it correctly, it's a short story by Cortázar. Though it might be one of Borges's (they tend to run together in my mind).
DiggitCamara is correct. It's a short story called "La noche boca arriba" or "The Night Face Up" by Julio Cortázar. Great story, by the way. It's pretty much standard in most college Spanish courses.
  #213  
Old 09-10-2009, 08:34 AM
BrotherCadfael BrotherCadfael is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Vermont
Posts: 10,079
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy L View Post
This is Bradbury's "The Cold Wind and the Warm", in the collection "I sing the Body Electric" I think.
If you are right (I'm off to the library) thank you!
  #214  
Old 09-10-2009, 08:41 AM
BrotherCadfael BrotherCadfael is online now
Guest
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Vermont
Posts: 10,079
Yep, that's the one! Thanks, Andy L!
  #215  
Old 09-10-2009, 09:45 AM
CalMeacham's Avatar
CalMeacham CalMeacham is offline
Member
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 43,288
How about these:

http://boards.straightdope.com/sdmb/...d.php?t=531362

  #216  
Old 09-10-2009, 07:35 PM
Andy L Andy L is online now
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Posts: 5,933
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrotherCadfael View Post
Yep, that's the one! Thanks, Andy L!
No problem.

Say I have a book identification for the SDMB mass mind to help me find.

It's a young adult novel that I read in 1978 or 1979 - about two high school students (who didn't particularly get along at first, partially because one boy was a science type and one was into writing poetry and such), who are transported to a fantasy realm, where magic works. They work together using their skills together to come up with spells that work (spells have to be poems, but figuring out how to make them work requires science). Two features I remember in particular are a bit of doggerel from the poet "The Mathematics of the Heart adds together what's apart" and the fact that the fantasy realm has a school system that uses the term "low school" (in contrast to "high school"). Anyone remember it?
  #217  
Old 09-10-2009, 09:53 PM
Weedy's Avatar
Weedy Weedy is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Sydney, Australia
Posts: 1,662
I wonder if it is worth posting in this thread or if it is just going to get locked.

This is a fantasy story, not sci-fi, but maybe someone will know it. I'm pretty sure it's a short story.

The retired head of the Assassins guild takes in a young orphan(?) boy and trains him as an assassin. Well, it is kind of more about preventing assassinations in some ways. He uses small stones to show if there was a trap or poison in something, so if you find a stone, you're dead. Like maybe you are drinking tea, and look in the teapot and there is a stone there - the tea was poisoned. The story is told from the point of view of the boy, and is mostly about how the training goes, and how totally paranoid the boy becomes. At the end, he goes to the big city with his teacher and they visit the Assassin's Guild. The boy straight away finds some of the more obvious traps (indicated by these small stones) and then tears the place apart looking for more. I seem to remember him searching through the hot coals in the fireplace, and something about a bath.

I would love to know who the author was. I think it was male.
  #218  
Old 09-10-2009, 10:46 PM
De La Rue De La Rue is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 410
Here's a reverse question: I swear, somewhere, that I saw this title of a short story (or maybe novella): "I Polyglot, Who You?" Despite it having an uncommon word, I can't find it mentioned anywhere online. It's both memorable and suggestive, and I'd like to know what the story was.
  #219  
Old 09-10-2009, 11:33 PM
Wendell Wagner Wendell Wagner is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jul 1999
Location: Greenbelt, Maryland
Posts: 14,122
I've heard of that story. The title is "I ____, Who You?". The blank is a nonsense word that's vaguely like "polyglot," but it's something else.
  #220  
Old 09-10-2009, 11:38 PM
Wendell Wagner Wendell Wagner is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jul 1999
Location: Greenbelt, Maryland
Posts: 14,122
I found it using the proper search on the Internet Speculative Fiction Database:

http://www.isfdb.org/cgi-bin/title.cgi?756765

As you can see, it's "I Plinglot - Who You?" by Frederik Pohl.
  #221  
Old 09-11-2009, 08:33 AM
Brainiac4 Brainiac4 is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Maplewood, MN
Posts: 2,002
In hopes this doesn't get locked...

One I've been trying to find for years - has to be at least 20 years old, if not more.

A scientist uses a hollow rubber statuette to hold leftover bits of experimental ooze. The ooze becomes sentient and mobile, and goes on a bit of an adventure. I believe the story ends with the ooze being put into the skull of a body that has lost its brain (or never had one), and becoming human.

Sort of a Pinocchio vibe, I guess. With some Pygmalion, maybe.
  #222  
Old 09-11-2009, 10:54 AM
Andy L Andy L is online now
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Posts: 5,933
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brainiac4 View Post
In hopes this doesn't get locked...

One I've been trying to find for years - has to be at least 20 years old, if not more.

A scientist uses a hollow rubber statuette to hold leftover bits of experimental ooze. The ooze becomes sentient and mobile, and goes on a bit of an adventure. I believe the story ends with the ooze being put into the skull of a body that has lost its brain (or never had one), and becoming human.

Sort of a Pinocchio vibe, I guess. With some Pygmalion, maybe.
"The Smallest God" by Lester Del Rey, published in 1940 (http://www.isfdb.org/cgi-bin/title.cgi?45385). Would have found it faster but I kept thinking Ted Sturgeon or Fred Brown
  #223  
Old 09-11-2009, 02:29 PM
De La Rue De La Rue is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 410
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wendell Wagner View Post
I found it using the proper search on the Internet Speculative Fiction Database:

http://www.isfdb.org/cgi-bin/title.cgi?756765

As you can see, it's "I Plinglot - Who You?" by Frederik Pohl.
AHA! I was thinking it could be something other than polyglot, but "who you" is hard to search for.

Of course, now "I Polyglot" turns up one search result: this thread. Asking to identify a SF story has a kind of quantum observer effect.
  #224  
Old 09-11-2009, 02:41 PM
Snowboarder Bo's Avatar
Snowboarder Bo Snowboarder Bo is online now
Member
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Las Vegas
Posts: 24,903
I asked about this once before on the Dope with no results, but I'll happily try again.

This was a novel. Paperback. Prolly 1970s. I thought it was called Pen Island or Penitentiary Island but I've never been able to find it under that name.

Plot: In the future, crime is bad and society forms a new prison on an island (a la Escape From NY, etc.) Man is sent to an offshore penitentiary (framed for the death of his wife, I think). Guard towers out in the ocean form a perimeter. He has to learn and adapt to life with brutal men and women on the Island, where the most popular past time is either playing or watching a rough and tumble sport that is a cross between football, rugby, and a small riot.

He finds a woman, eventually becomes friends with the nasty guy who he tussled with when newly arrived, and in the end somehow manages to storm a tower and broadcast to the world what was really happening on Pen Island.

I've been trying to find this for more than 25 years now with no luck. I'm pretty sure I read it in the late 70s or very early 80s (no later than 82), and it was a book that I found in boxes of things at my grandparents house while visiting one summer. It was a lot of fun, and I'd love to find it and sit it next to my cherished copy of Walpurgis 3.

Last edited by Snowboarder Bo; 09-11-2009 at 02:43 PM.
  #225  
Old 09-11-2009, 03:12 PM
Elendil's Heir Elendil's Heir is online now
SDSAB
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: my Herkimer Battle Jitney
Posts: 81,108
Sounds a bit like, but probably isn't, Robert Heinlein's short story "Coventry": http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coventry_(short_story)
  #226  
Old 09-11-2009, 03:34 PM
Yllaria Yllaria is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Stockton
Posts: 10,582
Quote:
Originally Posted by Weedy View Post
I wonder if it is worth posting in this thread or if it is just going to get locked.

This is a fantasy story, not sci-fi, but maybe someone will know it. I'm pretty sure it's a short story.

The retired head of the Assassins guild takes in a young orphan(?) boy and trains him as an assassin. Well, it is kind of more about preventing assassinations in some ways. He uses small stones to show if there was a trap or poison in something, so if you find a stone, you're dead. Like maybe you are drinking tea, and look in the teapot and there is a stone there - the tea was poisoned. The story is told from the point of view of the boy, and is mostly about how the training goes, and how totally paranoid the boy becomes. At the end, he goes to the big city with his teacher and they visit the Assassin's Guild. The boy straight away finds some of the more obvious traps (indicated by these small stones) and then tears the place apart looking for more. I seem to remember him searching through the hot coals in the fireplace, and something about a bath.

I would love to know who the author was. I think it was male.
You say fantasy, but I'm remembering something similar, and it was SF. A human ship had been blown up in alien space and one of the aliens was raising a human child in order to give his people someone who might be able to communicate with the next humans that he was assuming would eventually come.

There were movies and such from the ship to expose the child to, so it's not like he thought that all humans would just be able to talk to each other. It wasn't an assassin he was raising the boy to be, but something else, something with status within the alien society. They're used as judges. I remember a flashback with the alien's daughter saying something like, "Decide between me and ____", a request which trapped him into attempting to train her as a whatever, even knowing that she'd fail and die. So what I'm remembering was not told from the boy's perspective, at least no totally.

Regarding the stones, not only was there a stone hidden under the fire in the room, (which was built on sand), but there was a stone hidden a foot under the stone hidden under the fire. Sorry that I don't remember more. I think I read it in the late seventies or early eighties.
  #227  
Old 09-11-2009, 09:26 PM
Andy L Andy L is online now
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Posts: 5,933
Quote:
Originally Posted by Snowboarder Bo View Post
I asked about this once before on the Dope with no results, but I'll happily try again.

This was a novel. Paperback. Prolly 1970s. I thought it was called Pen Island or Penitentiary Island but I've never been able to find it under that name.

Plot: In the future, crime is bad and society forms a new prison on an island (a la Escape From NY, etc.) Man is sent to an offshore penitentiary (framed for the death of his wife, I think). Guard towers out in the ocean form a perimeter. He has to learn and adapt to life with brutal men and women on the Island, where the most popular past time is either playing or watching a rough and tumble sport that is a cross between football, rugby, and a small riot.

He finds a woman, eventually becomes friends with the nasty guy who he tussled with when newly arrived, and in the end somehow manages to storm a tower and broadcast to the world what was really happening on Pen Island.

I've been trying to find this for more than 25 years now with no luck. I'm pretty sure I read it in the late 70s or very early 80s (no later than 82), and it was a book that I found in boxes of things at my grandparents house while visiting one summer. It was a lot of fun, and I'd love to find it and sit it next to my cherished copy of Walpurgis 3.
The date doesn't fit, but "The Penal Colony" by Richard Herley sounds close (see here http://www.amazon.com/Penal-Colony-R.../dp/0345358759). Amusingly, when I googled "Peniteniary Island novel" the first item found is this thread.
  #228  
Old 09-11-2009, 09:27 PM
Andy L Andy L is online now
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Posts: 5,933
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wendell Wagner View Post
I found it using the proper search on the Internet Speculative Fiction Database:

http://www.isfdb.org/cgi-bin/title.cgi?756765

As you can see, it's "I Plinglot - Who You?" by Frederik Pohl.
This is a really good story, by the way...
  #229  
Old 09-11-2009, 10:15 PM
Brainiac4 Brainiac4 is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Maplewood, MN
Posts: 2,002
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy L View Post
"The Smallest God" by Lester Del Rey, published in 1940 (http://www.isfdb.org/cgi-bin/title.cgi?45385). Would have found it faster but I kept thinking Ted Sturgeon or Fred Brown
Hey, you are pretty good.

Now to find a copy of it...
  #230  
Old 09-11-2009, 11:27 PM
Weedy's Avatar
Weedy Weedy is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Sydney, Australia
Posts: 1,662
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yllaria View Post
You say fantasy, but I'm remembering something similar, and it was SF. A human ship had been blown up in alien space and one of the aliens was raising a human child in order to give his people someone who might be able to communicate with the next humans that he was assuming would eventually come.

There were movies and such from the ship to expose the child to, so it's not like he thought that all humans would just be able to talk to each other. It wasn't an assassin he was raising the boy to be, but something else, something with status within the alien society. They're used as judges. I remember a flashback with the alien's daughter saying something like, "Decide between me and ____", a request which trapped him into attempting to train her as a whatever, even knowing that she'd fail and die. So what I'm remembering was not told from the boy's perspective, at least no totally.

Regarding the stones, not only was there a stone hidden under the fire in the room, (which was built on sand), but there was a stone hidden a foot under the stone hidden under the fire. Sorry that I don't remember more. I think I read it in the late seventies or early eighties.
Weird, I don't remember anything about aliens. But the bit about the second stone in the fireplace I do remember now that you say it, so it must be the same story. It may not have been mostly from the boy's point of view, but he is really the only character I remember.
  #231  
Old 09-12-2009, 12:58 AM
Snowboarder Bo's Avatar
Snowboarder Bo Snowboarder Bo is online now
Member
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Las Vegas
Posts: 24,903
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy L View Post
The date doesn't fit, but "The Penal Colony" by Richard Herley sounds close (see here http://www.amazon.com/Penal-Colony-R.../dp/0345358759). Amusingly, when I googled "Peniteniary Island novel" the first item found is this thread.
Yeah, I've looked at this book before, and 2 things don't fit: the date, and there's no mention of the brutal brand of football they play. The football thing was a large part of the book, with at least 1 chapter on practices/training and 1 describing a complete game.

I've also seen Desolation Island by Terry Lloyd Vinson when I google, but it's way too recent.

They both sound like good reads, tho, so maybe the search hasn't been totally in vain, eh.
  #232  
Old 09-12-2009, 11:11 AM
Peter Morris Peter Morris is online now
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: The far canal
Posts: 12,243
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy L View Post
Bottomos = "Bottom-most"
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrotherCadfael View Post
Hmm... not much of a pun, and not really funny. Big overture, little show.

You have to know the names of Mars' other two moons, Phobos and Deimos. Then you get a third moon keeping the -os ending.
  #233  
Old 09-12-2009, 11:25 AM
Wendell Wagner Wendell Wagner is offline
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jul 1999
Location: Greenbelt, Maryland
Posts: 14,122
De La Rue writes:

> I was thinking it could be something other than polyglot, but "who you" is hard
> to search for.

O.K., here's an opportunity for a learning experience. The SDMB is not just a place to get questions answered, it's a place to learn how to answer those questions yourself. It hasn't been easy for me to say this at times. There have been occasions when I point out to a poster that they could easily have answered their question themselves with an easy search on the right website, but they reply (in effect), "Screw you. It's not my job to do any searching. It's your job. I'm far above that sort of work. That's why I come to the SDMB, to make you do my work for me." Sorry, this isn't aimed at you, De La Rue, but I've got nasty replies from other posters when I try to explain to them how to answer questions themselves.

Look at the Internet Speculative Fiction Database:

http://www.isfdb.org/cgi-bin/index.cgi

Click on "Advanced Search."

Since I was fairly sure that the title was "I _____, Who You?," I entered the word "I" into "Term 1," the word "who" into "Term 2," and the word "you" into "Term 3" (all this in the "Title Search Form"). When I clicked on "Search Query," I get a page of answers. One of them is "I Plinglot - Who You?," written by Frederik Pohl. So it takes less than a minute to answer your question if you realize that the word "polyglot" isn't there, but "I," "who," and "you" are there.
  #234  
Old 09-12-2009, 02:03 PM
Andy L Andy L is online now
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Posts: 5,933
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brainiac4 View Post
Hey, you are pretty good.

Now to find a copy of it...
It's in "The Early Del Rey" which is a nice book to have anyway (that's where I read it). According to ISFDB it's also in a collection called "Classic Science Fiction: The First Golden Age" edited by Terry Carr.
  #235  
Old 09-12-2009, 02:05 PM
Andy L Andy L is online now
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Posts: 5,933
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wendell Wagner View Post
De La Rue writes:

Look at the Internet Speculative Fiction Database:

http://www.isfdb.org/cgi-bin/index.cgi

Click on "Advanced Search."

Since I was fairly sure that the title was "I _____, Who You?," I entered the word "I" into "Term 1," the word "who" into "Term 2," and the word "you" into "Term 3" (all this in the "Title Search Form"). When I clicked on "Search Query," I get a page of answers. One of them is "I Plinglot - Who You?," written by Frederik Pohl. So it takes less than a minute to answer your question if you realize that the word "polyglot" isn't there, but "I," "who," and "you" are there.
Thanks Wendell - I use ISFDB all the time but I didn't know about the advanced features.
  #236  
Old 09-12-2009, 02:46 PM
KneadToKnow KneadToKnow is online now
Voodoo Adult (Slight Return)
Charter Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: Charlotte, NC, USA
Posts: 25,631
Can you tackle a children's story for me?

It was a series, which is to say that there were at least two books by the same author with the same main characters.

One main character was a little boy from Earth. The other was a little boy from the (i.e., Earth's) moon.

The totality of my recollection is that they visited the moon in one of the books and someone commented that while scientists on Earth were busy trying to learn more about the speed of light, scientists on the moon were trying to learn about the speed of darkness.

I read them ca. 1976-78. Been curious about them for several years now.
  #237  
Old 09-12-2009, 06:12 PM
Andy L Andy L is online now
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Posts: 5,933
Quote:
Originally Posted by PaulLev View Post
You can get them all on fictionwise.com - just search on my name (Paul Levinson).

And, yes, there will be a fourth and concluding story, "Last Calls," which should blow everything wide open ...
Looking forward to it!
  #238  
Old 09-13-2009, 02:54 PM
De La Rue De La Rue is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 410
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wendell Wagner View Post

O.K., here's an opportunity for a learning experience. The SDMB is not just a place to get questions answered, it's a place to learn how to answer those questions yourself. It hasn't been easy for me to say this at times. There have been occasions when I point out to a poster that they could easily have answered their question themselves with an easy search on the right website, but they reply (in effect), "Screw you. It's not my job to do any searching. It's your job. I'm far above that sort of work. That's why I come to the SDMB, to make you do my work for me." Sorry, this isn't aimed at you, De La Rue, but I've got nasty replies from other posters when I try to explain to them how to answer questions themselves.
Excellent point. As one browses or participates in a what-is-this-story thread, one hopefully picks up on useful databases and searches them first before turning to the SDMB in a last resort.

Also, a ISFDB note: any search terms in quotes will be listed as showing no results. Which I think tripped me up before, as I usually start a multiple-word search with the terms in quotes.
  #239  
Old 09-14-2009, 06:11 PM
ianjohnson ianjohnson is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 92
There was a story in Analog in the late '80s sometime. Archeologists where working in an urban landfill (Los Angeles)? Studying relatively recent history. They turned up the skeleton of a little girl, maybe 12 years old. It seemed like a tragic story, some girl gets kidnapped and killed, and buried in the dump. Then they found another skeleton, and another, and another. There were millions of skeletons in the landfill. It turned out the archeologists were the unknowing descendants of a body-snatchers style invasion, and these were the city's former residents.

I'm not sure if there is a way to find this in ISFDB, since story entries don't come with a synopsis (at least not the ones I checked from Analog).
  #240  
Old 09-14-2009, 07:21 PM
Andy L Andy L is online now
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Posts: 5,933
Quote:
Originally Posted by ianjohnson View Post
There was a story in Analog in the late '80s sometime. Archeologists where working in an urban landfill (Los Angeles)? Studying relatively recent history. They turned up the skeleton of a little girl, maybe 12 years old. It seemed like a tragic story, some girl gets kidnapped and killed, and buried in the dump. Then they found another skeleton, and another, and another. There were millions of skeletons in the landfill. It turned out the archeologists were the unknowing descendants of a body-snatchers style invasion, and these were the city's former residents.

I'm not sure if there is a way to find this in ISFDB, since story entries don't come with a synopsis (at least not the ones I checked from Analog).

That one I can answer off the top of my head: "Detritus Affected" by David Brin
  #241  
Old 09-14-2009, 09:05 PM
ianjohnson ianjohnson is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 92
Thanks, I asked about this on Analog's forum, and no one could give me a title or author. It's interesting that it is Brin, he is my favorite (aside from Asimov and Clarke, any discussion of favorites comes after them).
  #242  
Old 09-14-2009, 09:36 PM
Gregor Samsa Gregor Samsa is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canad
Posts: 893
I read a short story sometime around the late 1970s about a scientist (a botanist, maybe) who came across some kind of potion or drug that he took that slowed his metabolism down so much that he could finally see the violence in the plant kingdom. Plants fighting for water, choking each other out, etc. I think at the end of the story he was stuck and about to get choked out by vines or something. My memories are a little vague.

Does that sound at all familiar?
  #243  
Old 09-14-2009, 09:37 PM
Andy L Andy L is online now
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Posts: 5,933
Quote:
Originally Posted by ianjohnson View Post
Thanks, I asked about this on Analog's forum, and no one could give me a title or author. It's interesting that it is Brin, he is my favorite (aside from Asimov and Clarke, any discussion of favorites comes after them).
According to ISFDB it was published in F&SF not Analog (I read it in Brin's collection "Otherness" which is a great book) http://www.isfdb.org/cgi-bin/title.cgi?47159
  #244  
Old 09-14-2009, 09:51 PM
Andy L Andy L is online now
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Posts: 5,933
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gregor Samsa View Post
I read a short story sometime around the late 1970s about a scientist (a botanist, maybe) who came across some kind of potion or drug that he took that slowed his metabolism down so much that he could finally see the violence in the plant kingdom. Plants fighting for water, choking each other out, etc. I think at the end of the story he was stuck and about to get choked out by vines or something. My memories are a little vague.

Does that sound at all familiar?
Amazingly enough, I found this one "Alien Earth" by Edmond Hamilton, published in 1949 http://www.isfdb.org/cgi-bin/title.cgi?41675 (I used some obvious keywords to find a thread on rec.arts.sf.written (USENET), and did some other googling to confirm)

Last edited by Andy L; 09-14-2009 at 09:52 PM. Reason: Added details
  #245  
Old 09-14-2009, 10:03 PM
ianjohnson ianjohnson is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 92
We subscribed to Analog, but once in a while I bought F&SF off the newstand, so this must have been in one of those. No wonder I could never track it down.

Brin actually wrote a script based on it, but the production company that bought the option and commissioned it doesn't have it listed as one of their projects in development.
  #246  
Old 09-14-2009, 10:03 PM
Jeu D'Esprit Jeu D'Esprit is offline
Guest
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yllaria View Post
You say fantasy, but I'm remembering something similar, and it was SF. A human ship had been blown up in alien space and one of the aliens was raising a human child in order to give his people someone who might be able to communicate with the next humans that he was assuming would eventually come.

There were movies and such from the ship to expose the child to, so it's not like he thought that all humans would just be able to talk to each other. It wasn't an assassin he was raising the boy to be, but something else, something with status within the alien society. They're used as judges. I remember a flashback with the alien's daughter saying something like, "Decide between me and ____", a request which trapped him into attempting to train her as a whatever, even knowing that she'd fail and die. So what I'm remembering was not told from the boy's perspective, at least no totally.

Regarding the stones, not only was there a stone hidden under the fire in the room, (which was built on sand), but there was a stone hidden a foot under the stone hidden under the fire. Sorry that I don't remember more. I think I read it in the late seventies or early eighties.
Cukoo's Egg, by C J Cherryh?
  #247  
Old 09-15-2009, 05:50 PM
Andy L Andy L is online now
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Posts: 5,933
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeu D'Esprit View Post
Cukoo's Egg, by C J Cherryh?
I haven't read it, but based on the summary here http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cuckoo%27s_Egg_(novel) that might be right
  #248  
Old 09-15-2009, 06:11 PM
Snowboarder Bo's Avatar
Snowboarder Bo Snowboarder Bo is online now
Member
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Las Vegas
Posts: 24,903
I thought of a short story I'd like to read again, prolly from MF&SF or Asimov's or Analog in the late 70s or early 80s.

The story was long-ish, novella size, about a guy who lived inside a huge, planet-size spaceship and his journey thru it for something (power cells? medicine? can't remember). It was so old that it was breaking down, I seem to recall, and travel thru it was rare, almost non-existent. Various levels has different dominant cultures and maybe even life forms. I seem to recall that he had discovered an old elevator system that he was using.

I think the end was that he finally found a way out onto the surface, where he confirmed that he was indeed inside something constructed.

Also pretty sure that artwork on the cover was inspired by this story.

Unfortunately, I lost a lot of my old SF mags while I was in college, and I've been unable to find this story in any compilation about artificial worlds since.
  #249  
Old 09-15-2009, 08:37 PM
Andy L Andy L is online now
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Posts: 5,933
Quote:
Originally Posted by Snowboarder Bo View Post
I thought of a short story I'd like to read again, prolly from MF&SF or Asimov's or Analog in the late 70s or early 80s.

The story was long-ish, novella size, about a guy who lived inside a huge, planet-size spaceship and his journey thru it for something (power cells? medicine? can't remember). It was so old that it was breaking down, I seem to recall, and travel thru it was rare, almost non-existent. Various levels has different dominant cultures and maybe even life forms. I seem to recall that he had discovered an old elevator system that he was using.

I think the end was that he finally found a way out onto the surface, where he confirmed that he was indeed inside something constructed.

Also pretty sure that artwork on the cover was inspired by this story.

Unfortunately, I lost a lot of my old SF mags while I was in college, and I've been unable to find this story in any compilation about artificial worlds since.
Doesn't ring a bell, and I haven't found any useful hints online yet. Let me know if you think of any other facts about it, and I'll keep thinking.
  #250  
Old 09-15-2009, 08:57 PM
Andy L Andy L is online now
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Posts: 5,933
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy L View Post
Doesn't ring a bell, and I haven't found any useful hints online yet. Let me know if you think of any other facts about it, and I'll keep thinking.
Here's a link to a list of books with megastructures - one of them might be your novella (later expanded into a book)http://groups.google.com/group/rec.a...t%22+spaceship
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:47 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

Send questions for Cecil Adams to: cecil@straightdope.com

Send comments about this website to: webmaster@straightdope.com

Terms of Use / Privacy Policy

Advertise on the Straight Dope!
(Your direct line to thousands of the smartest, hippest people on the planet, plus a few total dipsticks.)

Copyright © 2018 STM Reader, LLC.

 
Copyright © 2017