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Old 06-23-2019, 12:10 AM
lingyi is online now
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Why do food judges complain about lack of salt?


Okay, I've established that I have an unsophisticated palate with my thread about not understanding layers of flavors in another thread, but what's with food judges constantly complaining about not enough salt?

The other day I watched an episode of Chopped and all the contestants were dinged for not enough salt on their pork chops. I thought one Chef had the perfect answer when she said she tasted the chop and wanted the natural flavor to come through. But nope, she was still dinged for not enough salt.

Maybe it's because my favorite food is Japanese (having grown up with it) and its emphasis on letting the natural flavors of the food come though. When I go to a nice Japanese restaurant and order tempura, my first bite is without any sauce to check that the batter (which has no salt) doesn't mask the flavor of whatever is prepared.

If I get a really good piece of fish and eat it as sashimi, I'll sometimes eat it without seasoning to savor the slight brininess and ocean flavor. Same with a really good piece of rare beef, especially prime rib where the jus shouldn't outshine the flavor of the meat.
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Yes, I understand that salt enhances flavor, but shouldn't GOOD foods shine on their own without it???

Last edited by lingyi; 06-23-2019 at 12:11 AM.
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Old 06-23-2019, 02:36 AM
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People get used to salt and food without salt then becomes very bland and tasteless. I'd think a food judge would be a prime candidate for becoming a bit "immune" to salt and therefore needing more than others might like. That said, you can't just add salt afterwards and get the same effect as if you'd added it at each step along the way. My Mother in law is a terrible one for not adding salt. She eats my food and says how delicious it is, then eats her own food and complains it's a bit tasteless, yes, it's because you don't use any salt and you don't taste along the way.

The ocean is a pretty salty place by the way .
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Old 06-23-2019, 03:34 AM
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If you taste something and it tastes like it needs a little something, what it needs is salt.
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Old 06-23-2019, 07:50 AM
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I'm not one for adding salt and find the claim that salt beings out flavor ludicrous: salt makes things taste salty, just like pepper makes things taste like pepper.

That's ok on some foods like French fries, but I prefer food that you can either actually taste the unsalted flavor, or you use another spice to enhance it.

People are so accustomed to salt that things without it seem wrong. But a grilled steak is delicious with nothing but peppercorns.
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Old 06-23-2019, 07:59 AM
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I'm not one for adding salt and find the claim that salt beings out flavor ludicrous:
Make a loaf of bread from scratch and leave out the salt. Get back to us on the taste.
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Old 06-23-2019, 09:44 AM
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I'm not one for adding salt and find the claim that salt beings out flavor ludicrous: salt makes things taste salty, just like pepper makes things taste like pepper.

That's ok on some foods like French fries, but I prefer food that you can either actually taste the unsalted flavor, or you use another spice to enhance it.

People are so accustomed to salt that things without it seem wrong. But a grilled steak is delicious with nothing but peppercorns.
As noted above, there's adding salt while cooking, and there's adding salt after it's served. The former is science and the latter is preference.
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Old 06-23-2019, 10:06 AM
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When a chef or a cooking show judge talks about adding salt, they are not talking about talking a salt shaker and going to town on a plate of food after it is cooked. They are talking about adding salt (or other seasonings) as part of the cooking process. Adding salt after cooking just makes things taste like salt. Adding salt (or other seasonings) before or during cooking enhances flavors.
Which do you think is more flavorful: marinating a piece of meat for hours before you cook it or cooking it and then dumping the marinating liquid on it? And salt, or brine, is the simplest marinade there is.

You salt meat well before cooking it, the salt draws moisture out of the meat, the salt dissolves into the meat juices, creating a brine, and then the meat re-absorbs the brine, allowing the flavors to penetrate deep into the meat. That prime rib the OP was talking about was almost certainly salted before cooking.

Fish and seafood are not really part of this. Seafood has a "slight brininess and ocean flavor" already (no one talks about salting on oyster), and fish flesh is more delicate and breaks down differently.
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Old 06-23-2019, 10:42 AM
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Make a loaf of bread from scratch and leave out the salt. Get back to us on the taste.
I do that all the time. Not only do I like the results, but I get requests for loaves to take home, from multiple people who otherwise eat various diets.

Two tricks to that: one is to use really good quality bread flours; the other is multiple risings over several hours.
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Old 06-23-2019, 12:01 PM
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As noted above, there's adding salt while cooking, and there's adding salt after it's served. The former is science and the latter is preference.
Exactly. Those who don't believe it need to read "Salt, Fat, Acid, Heat" by Samin Nosrat. It completely changed how I use salt, and everything I've made using the knowledge she imparted is delicious. For example, I never wanted to boil vegetables because I thought all the nutrients would disappear in the cooking water. She explains how cooking in SALTED water keeps the vitamins in the veggies, maintains color, and produces an evenly cooked, well-textured result superior to steaming/microwaving. I've adopted her approach and never looked back.
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Old 06-23-2019, 12:16 PM
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Why do food judges complain about lack of salt?


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Originally Posted by thorny locust View Post
I do that all the time. Not only do I like the results, but I get requests for loaves to take home, from multiple people who otherwise eat various diets.



Two tricks to that: one is to use really good quality bread flours; the other is multiple risings over several hours.


Actually, the trick is how you are going to eat the bread. Saltless Tuscan bread is fine dunked in a stew or soup, or dipped in olive oil and spices or eaten with spicy/salty meats and cheeses or made with roasted garlic and herbs. But plain Tuscan bread, eaten on its own is as appetizing as cardboard.

Last edited by doreen; 06-23-2019 at 12:17 PM.
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Old 06-23-2019, 12:19 PM
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I was recently put on a diet that is very restrictive in many respects. I can easily forego animal protein, dairy, eggs, tomatoes, potatoes, brown rice, oranges, etc. But cooking without any salt whatsoever makes everything very bland-tasting. The only way I can live with this diet is to cheat, and add just a small amount of salt while cooking.
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Old 06-23-2019, 02:40 PM
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Actually, the trick is how you are going to eat the bread. Saltless Tuscan bread is fine dunked in a stew or soup, or dipped in olive oil and spices or eaten with spicy/salty meats and cheeses or made with roasted garlic and herbs. But plain Tuscan bread, eaten on its own is as appetizing as cardboard.
Yeah, it's like the difference between salteens and matzos. I only eat matzos in matzobrei or spread with butter (salted).

Oh, and they were venison chops on Chopped, not pork.
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Old 06-23-2019, 02:47 PM
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Yeah, it's like the difference between salteens and matzos. I only eat matzos in matzobrei or spread with butter (salted).
I use the stuff as chips for salsa, which I figure is basically the same point.
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Old 06-23-2019, 03:15 PM
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Yeah, you don' need very much salt. But you do absolutely need some.

The simplest experiment is to take two glasses of water, both with equal amounts of sugar dissolved in them, but a little bit of salt in one, and then ask someone which tastes sweeter. They'll pick the salted one.
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Old 06-23-2019, 04:26 PM
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Restaurants and commercially-processed ready-to-eat foods tend to contain significantly more salt, sugar, and fat than most home cooking, even that prepared according to published cookbooks. A french restaurant's coq au vin will be saltier than what comes out of your kitchen even if you prepare it according to Julia Child (or Louis de Gouy). That actually gave me an idea. Both Child and de Gouy were Paris-trained, both wrote cookbooks, and both books are in front of me now. Assuming no significant differences arise just from the fact that de Gouy's The Gold Cook Book came out in 1947 and Child's Mastering the Art of French Cooking came out in 1961, the big difference, if any, should lie in the fact that Child tested her recipes at home and wrote her book to educate the mass of American home cooks, and de Gouy was a consummate industry professional whose book, while personable and even often funny, is definitely not aimed at amateurs.

I started by looking at sauces, figuring that would be the area where there was the least room for individual variation. Except for the wiggle room provided by the most frequent instructions for salt, i.e., "to taste," which doesn't tell us much, and "pinch," which is also vague (you can pinch salt between thumb and forefinger, or between thumb and two, three or four fingers), the only difference I found was for bearnaise, in which Julia puts a pinch and Louis instructs us to use none at all. So that was frustrating. Louis de Gouy does use a lot more butter. Usually sweet though, so no effect on salt.

Then I just started looking for recipes they had in common. Here are some (I accounted as well as I could for quantity differences in the final product):

Onion Soup. Julia: 1 tsp Louis: to taste

Sauteed Chicken Breasts w/Brown Sauce. Julia: 1/4 tsp. Louis: "very little."

Carottes Vichy. Julia: "Salt and Pepper". Louis: "a few grains salt."

And here I decided two things. First, I use much less salt than I get in restaurants, and I use a lot more salt than either Julia or Louis, going by their books. Second, restaurants don't get the luxury of vague measurements or a line cook's palate. Their food has to be punchy, something that doesn't taste like the leftovers in your refrigerator, and consistent. So, salt, fat, sugar, as much as a recipe will hold, and the same every time. It's also undeniable that some professional cooks just do not like it when people re-season their efforts. I don't know how much that plays into it, but the impetus is to add, not subtract. At the low end, salt fat and sugar are cheap ways to get cheap ingredients to taste like something.

So you have some people who eat out a lot and at both the high and the low end there's lots of salt, and that drags the middle along. And you have people who can't afford to eat out much but eat lots of salty processed foods. And then you have the people who like to cook, and do a lot of it, and follow recipes, and wonder why everybody thinks it's undersalted.
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Old 06-23-2019, 04:41 PM
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Actually, the trick is how you are going to eat the bread. Saltless Tuscan bread is fine dunked in a stew or soup, or dipped in olive oil and spices or eaten with spicy/salty meats and cheeses or made with roasted garlic and herbs. But plain Tuscan bread, eaten on its own is as appetizing as cardboard.
Nope. I have often had the first loaf of a batch disappear more or less instantly if there are several people in the house, straight out of the oven, eaten either entirely plain or with a little bit of butter on it. The rest of the batch gets eaten in a wide variety of fashions.

I can't speak to Tuscan bread. That's not what I'm making. What I'm making involves mostly whole wheat flour; sometimes but not always some unbleached white flour; a cup or so of some other flour, usually either cornmeal or rye; water; yeast; usually but not always a small amount (maybe a tablespoon for three large loaves, I don't measure it) of honey. Oil isn't added directly but the bread bowl and the pans are both oiled (usually with canola oil) so some of that is absorbed by the bread. Rise once as a sponge, add the rest of the flour and knead and let rise again, punch down and let rise a third time, form into loaves and let rise a fourth time in the pans before baking.

Again, use good flour. The flours themselves ought to taste like something.

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The simplest experiment is to take two glasses of water, both with equal amounts of sugar dissolved in them, but a little bit of salt in one, and then ask someone which tastes sweeter. They'll pick the salted one.
If I'm going to drink that water, I don't want either sugar or salt in it. And while I like some things sweet, "sweeter" does not automatically equal "better" to me; for me there's a right amount of sweetness for any particular thing (which depending on the thing might range from 'zero' to 'lots'), and going over that makes it taste worse to me, not better.

-- Certainly people need some salt in their diets, and most people like the flavor, and want that additional flavor on particular items. I like some things salty, myself; at least by my standards of 'salty' -- though I like pickles saltier than most people I know are willing to eat them. But that doesn't translate, to me, into 'everything must have salt added to it.' YMMV.

-- King of Soup, I think a whole lot of processed foods, as well as the food in many (not all) restaurants, is filled up with salt and sugar because the ingredients have little or no or even bad flavor on their own. Most people at this point, at least in the USA, are eating food that has been bred and grown/raised for yield alone, with little or no attention paid to what it tastes like -- I've been to a seed company day in which the representatives were extolling yield and to some extent disease resistance but were utterly flabberghasted to be asked about flavor, and had no idea what their varieties tasted like; it wasn't an issue remotely under consideration. (Seed companies catering to home gardeners and/or to farmers' market vendors may have a different attitude; though I've learned to translate terms such as "mild flavor" to mean "tasteless".)
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Old 06-23-2019, 04:56 PM
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The simplest experiment is to take two glasses of water, both with equal amounts of sugar dissolved in them, but a little bit of salt in one, and then ask someone which tastes sweeter. They'll pick the salted one.
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Originally Posted by thorny locust View Post
If I'm going to drink that water, I don't want either sugar or salt in it. And while I like some things sweet, "sweeter" does not automatically equal "better" to me; for me there's a right amount of sweetness for any particular thing (which depending on the thing might range from 'zero' to 'lots'), and going over that makes it taste worse to me, not better.
It looks to me like you're missing the point of Chronos's comment.

The claim being made in this thread is that adding salt to something doesn't just make it taste saltier; it can bring out the something's natural flavors and qualities. Chronos suggestion was a way to test that claim.
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Old 06-23-2019, 04:59 PM
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Make a loaf of bread from scratch and leave out the salt. Get back to us on the taste.
Iíve done this, and the bread went into the trash. I didnít realize what had happened until after i tasted it, and no amount of salt at this point was going to save it.
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Old 06-23-2019, 05:02 PM
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The point is not that sweeter is better, it is that the presence of salt enhances the sweetness, rather than adding saltiness.

The best way I would describe it is that salt fills in the background flavour.

It’s pointless arguing about it though. It is subjective and can vary depending on circumstance. I once had a restaurant steak when I was getting sick and thought it tasted horribly salty. I took it home and tried it the next day, it tasted delicious. Go figure.
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Old 06-23-2019, 07:40 PM
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The point is not that sweeter is better, it is that the presence of salt enhances the sweetness, rather than adding saltiness..
Ah. Sorry for misunderstanding.

I've run into a whole lot of prepared foods, however, that to me just tasted salty; there didn't seem to be much if any other flavor.

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Itís pointless arguing about it though. It is subjective and can vary depending on circumstance.
Definitely true. Maybe running coach and pulykamell would hate my bread; no way of telling, as it's impractical to get them a slice.

What I'm arguing isn't that nobody should put salt in their bread, or that everyone should put in anything only the amount of salt that I'd like in it. What I'm arguing is exactly that it's subjective and can vary depending on circumstance; and therefore that saying in general that unsalted bread is inedible for anybody no matter how it's made, or unsalted vegetables are awful for everybody no matter what variety the vegetables are or how they're grown and handled, or pork chops must have at least a specific amount of salt on them to be any good, is inaccurate.
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Old 06-24-2019, 01:12 AM
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In sushi you're meant to eat the fish with soy sauce, or ponzu, or some type of enhancement.

My daughter just "flubbed" a cake by adding too much salt. Obviously there are limits to this, but the extra salt was incredible with the chocolate and sweet flavors.
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Old 06-24-2019, 08:01 AM
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Oh, certainly if you add too much salt, then the dish will just taste salty. And a lot of convenience foods fall into this category: Even Campbell's "low sodium" soups still have more salt than my grandma's, and still don't have anywhere near as much flavor.

But "don't add too much" is not the same thing as "don't add any".
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Old 06-24-2019, 09:22 AM
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Originally Posted by thorny locust View Post
I can't speak to Tuscan bread. That's not what I'm making. What I'm making involves mostly whole wheat flour; sometimes but not always some unbleached white flour; a cup or so of some other flour, usually either cornmeal or rye; water; yeast; usually but not always a small amount (maybe a tablespoon for three large loaves, I don't measure it) of honey. Oil isn't added directly but the bread bowl and the pans are both oiled (usually with canola oil) so some of that is absorbed by the bread.
There's a reason I specified "plain Tuscan bread " . Plain Tuscan bread is the simplest of breads- it's unbleached white flour, yeast and water. Once you add other flavors - roasted garlic, herbs, soup , strongly flavored cheese, honey - the lack of salt is much less of an issue. It's not the quality of the flour ( although the type of flour may make a difference ) and it's not the multiple risings ( I don't know of any bread recipe that doesn't involve multiple risings) - it's the additional flavor.
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Old 06-24-2019, 09:43 AM
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Something that I am seeing professional chefs comment on more and more, (I know Samin Nosrat mentions it in her netflix show and the BA editors have also mentioned it in some of their youtube videos) is that they tend to use Diamond brand salt and if a home cook is using Morton's, they should halve the salt in the recipe. Which does explain why I would follow recipes and consistently feel like it wanted me to oversalt the food.
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Old 06-24-2019, 09:56 AM
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Something that I am seeing professional chefs comment on more and more, (I know Samin Nosrat mentions it in her netflix show and the BA editors have also mentioned it in some of their youtube videos) is that they tend to use Diamond brand salt and if a home cook is using Morton's, they should halve the salt in the recipe. Which does explain why I would follow recipes and consistently feel like it wanted me to oversalt the food.
That's specifically for kosher salt, as Diamond Crystal and Morton's are made by different processes. If you have a recipe that calls for table salt , the brand doesn't matter. https://www.tastecooking.com/kosher-salt-question/
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Old 06-24-2019, 10:07 AM
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( I don't know of any bread recipe that doesn't involve multiple risings)
Google "single rise bread." Plenty of them out there. I typically do two rises with my bread, but have done one for certain recipes.

Last edited by pulykamell; 06-24-2019 at 10:07 AM.
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Old 06-24-2019, 10:08 AM
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People have different sensitivities to salt.
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Exactly. Those who don't believe it need to read "Salt, Fat, Acid, Heat" by Samin Nosrat. It completely changed how I use salt, and everything I've made using the knowledge she imparted is delicious. For example, I never wanted to boil vegetables because I thought all the nutrients would disappear in the cooking water. She explains how cooking in SALTED water keeps the vitamins in the veggies, maintains color, and produces an evenly cooked, well-textured result superior to steaming/microwaving. I've adopted her approach and never looked back.
I watched her videos, and while I thoroughly enjoyed them, I was appalled watching her salt some of the food. I'm sure she adds more salt than I enjoy.

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I was recently put on a diet that is very restrictive in many respects. I can easily forego animal protein, dairy, eggs, tomatoes, potatoes, brown rice, oranges, etc. But cooking without any salt whatsoever makes everything very bland-tasting. The only way I can live with this diet is to cheat, and add just a small amount of salt while cooking.
Hmm, that's not the part of your diet that I would find challenging.

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....My daughter just "flubbed" a cake by adding too much salt. Obviously there are limits to this, but the extra salt was incredible with the chocolate and sweet flavors.
I once used baking soda instead of baking powder in a cake. It looked perfect. But it was REALLY SALTY. I ended up throwing it away.

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Originally Posted by Inner Stickler View Post
Something that I am seeing professional chefs comment on more and more, (I know Samin Nosrat mentions it in her netflix show and the BA editors have also mentioned it in some of their youtube videos) is that they tend to use Diamond brand salt and if a home cook is using Morton's, they should halve the salt in the recipe. Which does explain why I would follow recipes and consistently feel like it wanted me to oversalt the food.
I was interested to see how different the salt content per volume is from type of salt to type of salt. I do use Diamond when I make soup, and perhaps that's why I use as much of it as I do.
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Old 06-24-2019, 10:15 AM
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Oh, certainly if you add too much salt, then the dish will just taste salty. And a lot of convenience foods fall into this category: Even Campbell's "low sodium" soups still have more salt than my grandma's, and still don't have anywhere near as much flavor.

But "don't add too much" is not the same thing as "don't add any".
Indeed. Lest anyone think I'm a salt fiend, I find all the canned soups too salty for my liking. But, for me, if I'm using good ingredients and my herbs and spices are relatively correct, and what I'm eating still tastes a bit bland, then what it's missing is almost always salt. And when it's salted to my liking, my wife still adds more salt on top of that.

I suppose if you are on a low/no-sodium diet, you do eventually develop a finer sensitivity for salt. But I just cannot imagine going salt-less.
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Old 06-24-2019, 11:34 AM
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I once used baking soda instead of baking powder in a cake. It looked perfect. But it was REALLY SALTY. I ended up throwing it away.
One Thanksgiving maybe 15-20 years ago, my siblings and I were at my mom's. She didn't want to make pies, so she ordered some from Coco's. If I'd known, I'd have made them, or, at least, bought the pies from some place that actually made decent pies. But we had our meal, rested a few hours, then, started to have dessert.

UGH! Someone must have subbed the sugar for salt, because they were inedibly salty.

So disappointing. Thanksgiving Day -- where are we going to get pies now? Raid the neighbors???
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Old 06-25-2019, 07:32 AM
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I suspect it has a lot to do with the fact that food judges take only one or two bites of each presentation, so it has to pop immediately -- there isn't time to savor and let the taste grow on them. I see the same kind of thing on BBQ Pitmasters, where the competitors load up their meats with brines, injections, and heavy rubs because the judges will be taking only a bite or two of each. I don't think non-competition barbeque is that heavily seasoned.
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Old 06-25-2019, 07:53 AM
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Tom Colicchio on Top Chef has said "Salt is the most basic seasoning skill. If a chef can't get that right then he or she needs more study".

I've seen Tom send cheftestants home (pack your knives) for over salting.

Last edited by aceplace57; 06-25-2019 at 07:55 AM.
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Old 06-25-2019, 08:40 AM
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I suspect it has a lot to do with the fact that food judges take only one or two bites of each presentation, so it has to pop immediately -- there isn't time to savor and let the taste grow on them. I see the same kind of thing on BBQ Pitmasters, where the competitors load up their meats with brines, injections, and heavy rubs because the judges will be taking only a bite or two of each. I don't think non-competition barbeque is that heavily seasoned.
I've never been in competition Q, but I have watched a few Youtube videos on it and, man, what they do to a steak gets crazy. (Here's an example of competition ribeye. Suffice to say, it ain't just a little S&P and throw it on the grill.) I've done a couple of informal food contests and, yeah, I do the same thing in amplng up flavors and serving it in a more concentrated form than I would do the food in a non-competition setting, and that approach yields good results, for the reasons mentioned.

That said, oversalting is still oversalting, so you can't just amp up the salt too much.
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Old 06-25-2019, 08:45 AM
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There's a reason I specified "plain Tuscan bread " . Plain Tuscan bread is the simplest of breads- it's unbleached white flour, yeast and water. Once you add other flavors - roasted garlic, herbs, soup , strongly flavored cheese, honey - the lack of salt is much less of an issue. It's not the quality of the flour ( although the type of flour may make a difference ) and it's not the multiple risings ( I don't know of any bread recipe that doesn't involve multiple risings) - it's the additional flavor.
There are lots of bread recipes that don't call for four risings.

I looked up Tuscan bread. The recipes I found generally called for two risings, not four; and some of them said it was purposely nearly tasteless. A couple were enthusiastic about the flavor; both of those called for long risings, one of them very long, overnight.

In any case, I wasn't originally responding to 'Tuscan bread is tasteless if made without salt.' I was responding to 'bread in general is tasteless if made without salt'.

I think quality as well as type of flour makes a difference, in that using poor quality flours may produce poor results even if the types of flours used would have produced good bread if they had been good quality flours.
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Old 06-25-2019, 09:29 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lingyi View Post
Maybe it's because my favorite food is Japanese (having grown up with it) and its emphasis on letting the natural flavors of the food come though. When I go to a nice Japanese restaurant and order tempura, my first bite is without any sauce to check that the batter (which has no salt) doesn't mask the flavor of whatever is prepared.
I recall some years ago Consumer Reports had an article comparing a typical Japanese 'fast lunch' with an American. The Japanese was a bento box with cold tea, the American was a McD's quarter pounder with cheese, medium fries, and a soda.

The Japanese was superior nutrition in every way save one. It was lower in fat, had a better carbohydrate to protein ratio, and more fiber than the American. The one failing was sodium. Between shoyu and pickled vegetables, it was more than two times higher than the already high Mickey D meal.

This was borne out by the fact that for the longest time, stroke was the #2 cause of death in Japan, following cancer. I just checked to confirm and it has dropped to fourth, following heart disease and pneumonia (Japan is aging).

Yeah, a piece of sushi is low in salt, but what's the first thing you do after picking up a piece; dip it into that dish of shoyu/wasabi.
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Old 06-25-2019, 09:41 AM
pulykamell is online now
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Originally Posted by DesertDog View Post
Yeah, a piece of sushi is low in salt, but what's the first thing you do after picking up a piece; dip it into that dish of shoyu/wasabi.
As much as I like salting things, I find sushi pretty good on its own, without a dip. If I do dip it in soy, it's fish-side-down to just get a hint of it. Rice-side down is much too salty for me, and I can't taste the fish, just soy sauce.

Last edited by pulykamell; 06-25-2019 at 09:41 AM.
  #36  
Old 06-26-2019, 07:35 AM
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I agree-it's ridiculous! I've watched famous chefs pour on gobs of salt and it's ridiculous. A little seasoning is all any food needs and if a food judge thinks it needs more salt then maybe he or she needs to step away until his taste buds recover from his overuse of salt before he judges again. I never add salt and more often add a little pepper instead. Most food does have a pleasant taste without burying it in salt.
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Old 06-26-2019, 07:52 AM
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Originally Posted by CairoCarol View Post
She explains how cooking in SALTED water keeps the vitamins in the veggies, maintains color, and produces an evenly cooked, well-textured result superior to steaming/microwaving. I've adopted her approach and never looked back.
That depends on how long you boil them. My mother always boiled in salted water but she boiled things until they were all grey and mushy (in the case of vegetables) or coming apart (pasta and rice).
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Old 06-27-2019, 09:07 AM
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My mother always cooked in small amounts of water with a tight lid on the pan -- in effect partly steaming the vegetables. And she used the cooking liquid in soups.

I use the same technique; but I find that I usually don't get around to making the soup, so I usually just drink the bit of cooking liquid.
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Old 06-27-2019, 10:07 PM
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Originally Posted by pulykamell View Post
As much as I like salting things, I find sushi pretty good on its own, without a dip. If I do dip it in soy, it's fish-side-down to just get a hint of it. Rice-side down is much too salty for me, and I can't taste the fish, just soy sauce.

? Who dips their sushi in soy sauce rice-side down? You should only dip the fish side in the sushi. Dipping the rice in the sauce sauce will cause the nigiri to crumble and fall apart, at least if the nigiri is properly made and not too tightly packed.
  #40  
Old 06-27-2019, 10:09 PM
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Originally Posted by bmoak View Post
? Who dips their sushi in soy sauce rice-side down? You should only dip the fish side in the sushi. Dipping the rice in the sauce sauce will cause the nigiri to crumble and fall apart, at least if the nigiri is properly made and not too tightly packed.
Who? Pretty much everyone Iíve ever eaten sushi with. I know thatís not the ďcorrectĒ way, but Iíve only seen my friends dip the rice part.
  #41  
Old 06-27-2019, 10:43 PM
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Originally Posted by RealityChuck View Post
I'm not one for adding salt and find the claim that salt beings out flavor ludicrous: salt makes things taste salty, just like pepper makes things taste like pepper.

That's ok on some foods like French fries, but I prefer food that you can either actually taste the unsalted flavor, or you use another spice to enhance it.

People are so accustomed to salt that things without it seem wrong. But a grilled steak is delicious with nothing but peppercorns.
Except...salt is one the four basic tastes, isn't it? Pepper is not. Salt, sweet, bitter, sour? Sugar doesn't just make things sweet, some things DO indeed need sugar. Why shouldn't it be the same for salt?
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Old 06-28-2019, 04:25 AM
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Originally Posted by running coach View Post
Make a loaf of bread from scratch and leave out the salt. Get back to us on the taste.
It's been a while, but...

After being on a low-salt diet for a year as a child, I found store-bought bread almost inedible because of the saltiness. And later, when I was making bread from scratch every week, yes, I didn't use any salt.
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