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  #751  
Old 07-30-2010, 02:07 AM
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Slee -
Thanks for all the info about recording mic'd amps/gutiars. I've pretty much only ever recorded using some sort of direct input, never with actual mics + gear, so this is all new territory for me. The basics are easy to understand -- mic your amp and record that, duh -- but there's a lot of devils in the details, especially with monitoring. Thanks for the shared expertise.

Last edited by squeegee; 07-30-2010 at 02:08 AM.
  #752  
Old 07-30-2010, 06:50 AM
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This has to be the world's simplest tab :

12-12-10-12 7 6 5 0 3~ 0
Then the same thing on the next string up. Or if you really insist on using one string, just move the whole thing up 5 frets.
Okay, that was worth trying. No effects on the amp, and the first four notes sound perfect, with that weird "I always thought that was an echo" effect. Oddly, when I try this to go further: http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/tabs/...e_ver3_tab.htm it all goes to hell shortly, but that's probably just me.

And it sounds very different on the humbucker. It's not nearly as clear and bright. I think I've learned something. Dunno what, yet.
(For what it's worth, this also counts as my first excursion past the first five frets - I havn't gotten to barre chords yet. When I do, I kind of expect me to be posting about 'You know, this kind of hurts.')
  #753  
Old 07-30-2010, 06:53 AM
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MrHaggis wants to know about the blues. Anyone feel like helping edumacate him up a bit?
  #754  
Old 07-30-2010, 07:31 AM
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MrHaggis wants to know about the blues. Anyone feel like helping edumacate him up a bit?
I took a shot.

E-Sabs - if Sunshine sounded correct to your ear, you are getting a sense for what the neck pickup can do - and with the gain up and the Tone rolled down to get Clapton's Woman Tone, you are pretty much at the extreme end of the tonal spectrum. Mess around and get a feel for how different things sound.

Now, switch to Bridge pickup, just as gained up amp-wise, on-board guitar's Volume at about 8.5, Tone backed off to somewhere between 6 and 8.5. Play Smoke on the Water (link to youtube lesson, with Tab showing frets).

Hear the difference? How Smoke is hard and edgy, with more high-end, nasal bite and Sunshine is rich, warm, kinda "tubey" sounding (like you are making an "oooooo" sound with your mouth)?

A key decision when learning a song is figuring out what basic tone the part requires. If you start to be able to hear that, and adjust your settings accordingly, it can really help...
  #755  
Old 07-30-2010, 07:35 AM
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I havn't gotten to barre chords yet. When I do, I kind of expect me to be posting about 'You know, this kind of hurts.'

My tips for starting with barre chords, FWIW:

- Do not start with F, or any chord on the lower frets. A lot of people start with F because it is missing from the open chords that everybody learns (also I guess people are nervous of the uncharted territory of the higher frets). But the action is a little higher and stiffer down there close to the nut, and obviously the frets are further apart. Consequently, F is one of the hardest barre chords to play. It would be better to start with B or Bb, at the 6th or 7th fret. Easier to play, and still useful because it is another one that is missing from the open chords.

- There's lots of advice out there about correct hand and arm position, how much pressure to apply for barre chords, and how to apply it. Heed that advice. Avoid getting into the habit of using a death-grip for barre chords. You will tire your hand out, possibly injure yourself, and grow to hate barres. I would recommend taking it slowly and being very particular about your technique. The advice I like is that your hand should be fairly relaxed, and you should apply pressure mostly by pulling with the stronger muscles in your forearm, holding the guitar to your body with the other arm.
Of course, like most people, I rushed it, and for ages could only play barre chords briefly before my hand started to ache. Mind you, that was an acoustic with .13 strings. Maybe I made it hard for myself.
  #756  
Old 07-30-2010, 10:37 AM
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Slee -
Thanks for all the info about recording mic'd amps/gutiars. I've pretty much only ever recorded using some sort of direct input, never with actual mics + gear, so this is all new territory for me. The basics are easy to understand -- mic your amp and record that, duh -- but there's a lot of devils in the details, especially with monitoring. Thanks for the shared expertise.
Sure thing. You are right that the devil is in the details. Here are a couple hints.

For recording amps usually a SM-57 will do the job just fine. You usually want to place the mic about an inch or so from the speaker. Note, if you have a 2x12 try both speakers, sometimes one is better than the other. Anyway, about an inch or so off the speaker and you want it towards the edge. Mine is set about an inch from the rim. Play around with it a bit. The closer you get to the center the more boomy it is going to be. Also try putting the amp in different places/rooms. It took me a couple days to figure out what worked for me.

It is also a pretty good idea to find a placement you like, record some scratch tracks and then come back a a day or two later and check on how it sounds. You can get ear fatigue and something you think sounds brilliant will, a day or two later, sound like crap. I've had this happen more than once when recording acoustic stuff.

You can also play around a bit. If your interface accepts two mic's at once, try one in close to the speaker and another 5 or 10 feet away. Try a condenser for the distant mic. You can get some awesome tone doing this but it does require paying a lot of attention to the mix.

For acoustics it is a bit more complicated, for me anyway. The best setup I've found so far is a 57 pointed at about the 12th fret with a condenser up at the headstock. The 57 gets most of the sound but the condenser can add some great higher end shimmery stuff. Acoustics can be a bitch, they are all a little different and there are tons of places you can put the mics. Screw around until you find what you like.

You also want to record with as little effects as possible. Get the best tone you can before you add any effects. The reason is pretty simple, if you add effects on the recorded track you can't pull them out later. Some stuff you have to use, for example you might have a riff that relies on delay (think the Edge), but in general record the tracks as clean as possible. You can add the effects later on an aux track.

Slee
  #757  
Old 07-30-2010, 04:26 PM
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Thanks for the warm welcome, I admit I was a bit worried since they seemed such basic questions. I've just been really busy at work because it's the end of the month and I need to get all my paperwork in by EOD. I'm not being intentionally rude and ignoring your replies. Again, just wanted to say thanks for taking the time to answer and even the encouragement.
  #758  
Old 08-04-2010, 03:40 PM
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In re: Shot From Guns' Kindle, which I'm picking up, it occurred to me that a Kindle would be really awesome to read sheet music/tab on. Anyone ever tried it?
  #759  
Old 08-06-2010, 06:11 PM
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So here's where I'm at with these. These are all really cool pedals, and they all have good tones in them. If I had to stack them in order, best to less-best, right now I'd say first is the ZVex Distortron, then the Fulltone OCD, and last the Fulltone GT-500.
I forgot to wrap this up: I ended up keeping both the Distortron and the OCD. I really couldn't part with either, especially after I tried driving one with the other -- you can get some really cool, subtle tones doing this, esp using my Tele with it's low-output pickups. The GT-500 however is back in Guitar Center's glass display case.

I'd still like to get my hands on a ZVex Super Hard-on or Super Duper. The player reviews I've read practically gush about this pedal. But nobody carries the damned thing locally and it's a $240 pedal.
  #760  
Old 08-06-2010, 10:09 PM
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One day, I will start mucking with pedals. Is it a bad idea if I start off by building my own from plans?
  #761  
Old 08-11-2010, 12:14 AM
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Boomerwang hurt his hand and needs advice on how to play with a cut on the pinky finger.
A thread on Punk Rock books
And Wordman found some Telecaster porn.

Last edited by E-Sabbath; 08-11-2010 at 12:15 AM.
  #762  
Old 08-11-2010, 12:19 AM
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Boomerwang hurt his hand and needs advice on how to play with a cut on the pinky finger.
A thread on Punk Rock books
And Wordman found some Telecaster porn.
Thanks E-Sabbath. Although the cut is on the hand, roughly under the pinkie.
  #763  
Old 08-11-2010, 02:58 PM
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Update: Gibson has published their list for the Top 50 Guitar Albums of All Time.

As I have stated many times on the 'Dope, I place no weight on lists like this other than they are fun to discuss. I will make one comment: Listing John Mayall and the Bluesbreakers Featuring Eric Clapton (aka, "the Beano album") at #36 pretty much invalidates the list for me, especially with Van Halen at #1. Just like VH launched Eruption, whammy bar acrobatics, heavily modded parts-o-guitars, the Brown sound, etc. - Beano launched Hideaway, a Les Paul through a Marshall and all the tone that that implies, use of thinner-gauged strings to get easier bends, etc. Beano *was* VH for its generation 15 years earlier and just as influential. For them to be rated so far apart...nah, doesn't work.
  #764  
Old 08-11-2010, 03:36 PM
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[guitar geekery]

By the way, in response to a PM I received: It is referred to as "The Beano Album" because Clapton is reading the UK comic book Beano on the cover – and the real title is too freakin’ long!

Clapton legendarily played a 50's sunburst Gibson Les Paul - he wanted to because his heroes like Freddie King and Michael Bloomfield played them (watch that clip!!)...and Keef had already brought one across the Atlantic - and Andy Summers, pre-Police, found two at a music store and turned Clapton onto the other one.

Then Clapton's was stolen - and he bugged Andy until he bought his. But that first one was the one he used on Beano and is referred to as the legendary "Beano Burst" - which I discuss in the thread I linked to in terms of how rabidly folks have been trying to hunt it down and its collectibility/value if ever found...

[/guitar geekery]
  #765  
Old 08-11-2010, 09:38 PM
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Update: Gibson has published their list for the Top 50 Guitar Albums of All Time.

As I have stated many times on the 'Dope, I place no weight on lists like this other than they are fun to discuss....
I thought the distribution of that list looked a little skewed so I plotted a histogram. Looking at this list you would have thought that guitarists became an endangered species after 1983 and extinct in 2003.

And, what...does nobody at Gibson realize that there are jazz guitarists? Wes Montgomery, George Benson, Charlie Christian, Pat Martino, Birelli Lagrene, those cats have had some monster guitar albums that just wipe the floor with some of those "Top 50."
  #766  
Old 08-11-2010, 10:45 PM
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Update: Gibson has published their list for the Top 50 Guitar Albums of All Time.

As I have stated many times on the 'Dope, I place no weight on lists like this other than they are fun to discuss....
I thought the distribution of that list looked a little skewed so I plotted a histogram. Looking at this list you would have thought that guitarists became an endangered species after 1983 and extinct in 2003.

And, what...does nobody at Gibson realize that there are jazz guitarists? Wes Montgomery, George Benson, Charlie Christian, Pat Martino, Birelli Lagrene, those cats have had some monster guitar albums that just wipe the floor with some of those "Top 50."
It's interesting, though - it's an illustration of how guitar-centric Rock Music is. Jazz could exist (albeit in a less interesting form, IMHO) without all the brilliant guitarists because Jazz is based around many different instruments, all of which have contributed to the history of the music.

Could Rock Music have survived without guitarists? I submit that it could not; it would have eked out a meagre existence based solely on the works of Stevie Wonder, Jerry Lee Lewis, Ray Charles and Elton John. Outstanding works, I grant you, but that's not the mainstream of Rock'n'Roll. Whereas countless landmark jazz albums have no guitarist on them - Kind of Blue, A Love Supreme, Time Out, Saxophone Collossus (Sonny Rollins), Out to Lunch, anything with Art Blakey and the Jazz Messengers...

That being said, I'll see you on everyone on your list, and I'll raise you some Lenny Breau, Joe Pass, Bucky Pizzarelli, Gene Bertoncini, Joao Gilberto, John Scofield and John Abercrombie.

Not to mention Chet Atkins, Merle Travis, Julian Bream, Andres Segovia, Manuel Barrueco for other non-rock based guitar players...

Last edited by Le Ministre de l'au-delà; 08-11-2010 at 10:49 PM.
  #767  
Old 08-11-2010, 11:37 PM
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It's interesting, though - it's an illustration of how guitar-centric Rock Music is. Jazz could exist (albeit in a less interesting form, IMHO) without all the brilliant guitarists because Jazz is based around many different instruments, all of which have contributed to the history of the music.

Could Rock Music have survived without guitarists? I submit that it could not....

...Not to mention Chet Atkins...
Very good points.
Well, at least they could have included Neck and Neck

And I am guilty of overlooking classical music myself though I have recordings by Segovia, John Williams, and Jason Vieaux.
  #768  
Old 08-12-2010, 09:54 AM
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I'm struck by the versatility of the guitar - there are individual players of just about any instrument who have become 'the' jazz bassoonist, 'the' Classical bagpiper, 'the' country and western harp player, 'the' jazz harmonica player/guitarist/whistler, I grant you. But of how many other instruments can you truly say that they have been adopted into every genre of music that has been imagined, while retaining their characteristic voice and even causing the more typical instruments of that genre to sit up and take notes? Piano and its electric cousin the Keyboard Synthesizer, Bass and Drums are the only ones that really come to mind...

And the interesting cross-fertilizations - the fact that Gene Bertoncini is recognized both as a jazz guitarist and a classical guitarist, that Manuel Barrueco and Steve Morse can find enough common ground to do projects together, that Lenny Breau and Ed Bickert both started out in Country and went on to revolutionize jazz, that Classical composers can write things that like 'Hommage to Jimi Hendrix' (Carlo Domeniconi), 'Hommage to Frank Zappa' (Roland Dyens), an hommage to Ritchie Blackmore and John Denver (Leo Brouwer, when interviewed about Estudios Sencillos number 11), that Bucky Pizzarelli and Doug Jernigan could put together a killer album of jazz guitar and pedal steel... We're the salt and pepper of music!

The guitar lives in the trailer park of music history, and we're like some species of ant or cockroach that will adapt and go on long past every other instrument. Even when someone rigs up some kind of Isaac Asimov brain-MIDI interface, some guitarist is going to drop in and jam with it and do something that makes the brain in a box say 'What was that? Play it again...'
  #769  
Old 08-13-2010, 07:53 AM
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Great post, Le Ministre. If you take into account the fact that the guitar:

- occupies the same range - with a bit more above - as a human voice
- can function in a chorded and single-note melodic way
- can be interpreted in a seemingly-infinite variety of ways - materials, uses, electrification, modulation with effects
- enables the player to sing if they choose as well
- enables mobility when performing - the BIG advantage over keyboards (I know, except for keytars...oy)
- is extremely portable and cheap

It is no wonder it took over the world. It's the better mousetrap of musical instruments...well, except for the computer itself. There, you can make sounds with little-or-no training, the one barrier that remains with the guitar: it is hard to get started with...

PS: if you don't see my geeking out for a bit starting tomorrow, chalk it up to a summer vacation...talk to y'all at the end of August...

Last edited by WordMan; 08-13-2010 at 07:53 AM.
  #770  
Old 08-13-2010, 02:14 PM
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I saw Squeeze in concert a couple of weeks ago and decided to learn Black Coffee in Bed. I have got most of it down by watching Tifford's fingers on YouTube videos but the solo eludes me.

Any suggestions on where I might find a tab of it? The usual sources only have the chords and the tab for the riff. I have paid for sheet music in the past only to find that the juicy bits are missing but I would be delighted to pay for a version that has the bit I am looking for.

I have a private tradition that I don't really know a song until I can record it without errors in GarageBand. But I can't record it without the solo!
  #771  
Old 08-13-2010, 03:07 PM
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That being said, I'll see you on everyone on your list, and I'll raise you some Lenny Breau, Joe Pass, Bucky Pizzarelli, Gene Bertoncini, Joao Gilberto, John Scofield and John Abercrombie.

Not to mention Chet Atkins, Merle Travis, Julian Bream, Andres Segovia, Manuel Barrueco for other non-rock based guitar players...
And Jerry Reed, Brad Paisley, Tommy Emmanuel, George benson, Wes Montgomery, Laurindo Almeida, Roy Clark, Earl Klugh, Django Reinhart, etc.
  #772  
Old 08-15-2010, 11:52 PM
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I... found a thing.
It's an electronic bow for guitars. Seriously. Frampton uses it for his cover of Black Hole Sun.
  #773  
Old 08-16-2010, 01:06 AM
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E-sabs - I'm stuck on BBerry - but yeah; e-bows have been around for 30 years. Kinda like talk boxes - cool toys.
  #774  
Old 08-16-2010, 01:48 AM
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E-sabs - I'm stuck on BBerry - but yeah; e-bows have been around for 30 years. Kinda like talk boxes - cool toys.
Are e-bows useful, or at least as useful as a talkbox? I'm guessing they have pretty stifling limitations or we'd have heard more about them. Having said that, I can't say I've heard a track where an e-bow was used. What's the straight dope?
  #775  
Old 08-16-2010, 02:03 AM
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[QUOTE=squeegee;12805152]
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Are e-bows useful, or at least as useful as a talkbox? I'm guessing they have pretty stifling limitations or we'd have heard more about them. Having said that, I can't say I've heard a track where an e-bow was used. What's the straight dope?
I tried one once. It's an interesting effect, but it's a bit tricky to keep under control. You have to hold it just right, otherwise the sound will either die or take off and just about deafen you. It's not a very precise tool.

Last edited by Kim o the Concrete Jungle; 08-16-2010 at 02:03 AM.
  #776  
Old 08-16-2010, 06:16 AM
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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NIWMrK67_bk

Amazing Grace on EBow. It's... interestin.
  #777  
Old 08-16-2010, 08:13 AM
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E-sabs - I'm stuck on BBerry - but yeah; e-bows have been around for 30 years. Kinda like talk boxes - cool toys.
Are e-bows useful, or at least as useful as a talkbox? I'm guessing they have pretty stifling limitations or we'd have heard more about them. Having said that, I can't say I've heard a track where an e-bow was used. What's the straight dope?
I'm not sure but I think Kim is right - both talkboxes and eBows impose themselves on your playing - with an eBow, you hold with your picking hand over the strings. So you give uo pixking and strumming for the duration, but if you use it right, yu can generate notes and partial chords with infinite sustain.

Its cool and interesting more than useful - I would have to point to the lack of standout hit songs as one key data point - at least talkboxes have a few huge hits identified with them from Jeff Beck, to Frampton to Bon Jovi...

...Hard to geek out on BlackBerry!
  #778  
Old 08-16-2010, 08:40 AM
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Can anyone tell me the exact difference between an e-bow and the Infinite Guitar? I always thought that the e-bow was like plugging in an extra speaker to the aux out jack on your amp and holding its magnet next to the pickup so that the induction fields overlapped. I always meant to try that out when I was doing terrible things to amps in the 70s, but I never got around to it...
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Old 08-16-2010, 10:25 AM
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Can anyone tell me the exact difference between an e-bow and the Infinite Guitar? I always thought that the e-bow was like plugging in an extra speaker to the aux out jack on your amp and holding its magnet next to the pickup so that the induction fields overlapped. I always meant to try that out when I was doing terrible things to amps in the 70s, but I never got around to it...
Sorry, my friend, but you're past me in terms of electronics stuff...
  #780  
Old 08-18-2010, 12:02 AM
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Aceplace wants to know about acoustic guitar string technology changes of the last decade or so.
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Old 08-18-2010, 10:02 AM
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I recently finished resurrecting an old Kay electric guitar. A friend of mine rescued it on its way to the dumpster & gave it to me.

Here is how it came to me.

http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y27...g?t=1282139094


Here it is now.

http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y27...g?t=1282139164


The pups, pots, & switches come from an old Teisco. The pickguard design is inspired by the Harmony Roy Smeck model. I cut the control plate from a brass kick plate.

http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y27...g?t=1282139304

I just finished soldering in the electronics yesterday and everything works! It sounds pretty good. I just need to get everything dialed in for playing comfort.
  #782  
Old 08-18-2010, 11:44 AM
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I recently finished resurrecting an old Kay electric guitar. A friend of mine rescued it on its way to the dumpster & gave it to me.
Wow, that's quite a makeover. I like the emblem on the headstock, nice touch.

The fingerboard changed from blonde to black; did you paint/stain it? The fretboard markers and other things look the same, so I assume you didn't replace the neck.
  #783  
Old 08-18-2010, 11:53 AM
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Wow, that's quite a makeover. I like the emblem on the headstock, nice touch.

The fingerboard changed from blonde to black; did you paint/stain it? The fretboard markers and other things look the same, so I assume you didn't replace the neck.

Thanks. I dyed the fretboard black.
  #784  
Old 08-18-2010, 12:00 PM
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minor hijack - can anyone recommend a decent entry-level ukelele that is not a toy?
  #785  
Old 08-18-2010, 12:26 PM
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minor hijack - can anyone recommend a decent entry-level ukelele that is not a toy?
I don't know what is considered entry level for ukes, but you can get an Eastwood Airline Uke for around $350.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lV89NFLBxTM
  #786  
Old 08-18-2010, 02:53 PM
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Actually wouldn't mind knowing about the uke myself, friend wants one after he moves. $350 is a bit high.
  #787  
Old 08-18-2010, 02:58 PM
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I just found Tommy Emmanuel's investiture into the Order of Australia on YouTube.
  #788  
Old 08-18-2010, 05:46 PM
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minor hijack - can anyone recommend a decent entry-level ukelele that is not a toy?
I don't know what is considered entry level for ukes, but you can get an Eastwood Airline Uke for around $350.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lV89NFLBxTM
Ignoring the uke, which I have no comment on as I know diddly-squat about ukes, there's a few interesting looking guitars in that video:

- The one hanging in the corner that looks like half a guitar.
- The teardrop shaped white one with three pickups.
- The bass guitar with the hole in the headstock.
- The gold (lefty?) 'strat' with a Gibson-ish 'mustache' headstock.
- Seems to be a Dan Electro or similar on the right, partially hidden by the combos.

Anyone ID these?
  #789  
Old 08-18-2010, 06:05 PM
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Ignoring the uke, which I have no comment on as I know diddly-squat about ukes, there's a few interesting looking guitars in that video:

- The one hanging in the corner that looks like half a guitar.
- The teardrop shaped white one with three pickups.
- The bass guitar with the hole in the headstock.
- The gold (lefty?) 'strat' with a Gibson-ish 'mustache' headstock.
- Seems to be a Dan Electro or similar on the right, partially hidden by the combos.

Anyone ID these?
You can find some of them at the Eastwood Guitar site.
  #790  
Old 08-18-2010, 07:12 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wedgehed View Post
You can find some of them at the Eastwood Guitar site.
Ah, I didn't realize they were all Eastwoods.
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Old 08-25-2010, 06:30 AM
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Boomerwang wants to talk about alternate tunings.
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Old 08-25-2010, 08:49 AM
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Re: Micing guitars


I was recording a song the other day with my hollow-body electric. It was a pretty simple set-up -- I had a mic for my singing, and I was recording the guitar direct-in through my Vox Tonelab as usual. However, I underestimated how loud the guitar was, and it bled quite a bit into the vocal mic.

So on the final track, the guitar ended up about 40% direct through the amp simulator, and 60% bleed into the vocal mic. It's actually a pretty cool sound, very different from the amp sound alone. Here's the clip:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cmeq2_1o2dQ

So there's something for you to think about. You can mic the actual guitar as well as the amp.
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Old 08-27-2010, 10:13 PM
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Daddypants wants to know about the earliest use of the crunchy guitar sound and power chords.
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Old 08-29-2010, 02:39 PM
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Originally Posted by E-Sabbath View Post
Daddypants wants to know about the earliest use of the crunchy guitar sound and power chords.
Link Wray maybe?
  #795  
Old 08-29-2010, 05:49 PM
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Originally Posted by Kim o the Concrete Jungle View Post
So on the final track, the guitar ended up about 40% direct through the amp simulator, and 60% bleed into the vocal mic. It's actually a pretty cool sound, very different from the amp sound alone.
[snip]
So there's something for you to think about. You can mic the actual guitar as well as the amp.
Nice piece. And also an interesting tone, almost banjo-like. I guess if you don't want the bleed, a workaround would be to record the guitar first, vocal second. But I'd say it worked out okay in that vid.
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Old 08-29-2010, 07:21 PM
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That was my contribution, but the crunchy guitar sound isn't just him.
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Old 08-29-2010, 10:39 PM
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Ahhh, OK, it was just a wild guess anyway.


On another note, I decided it was time to get a small "practice" amp, so I got a Crate GTD15. It's rated 15 Watts into a 4 Ohm speaker, and has a 8 inch speaker, headphone output, and a speaker out jack, for hooking up to my 2x12 cabinet. There is an "overdrive" channel, but that is not exactly spectacular - at least not to someone who spent his formative years on overdriven tube amps. I haven't had a chance yet, to see how well it takes pedals and effects.
  #798  
Old 08-30-2010, 10:15 PM
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Originally Posted by E-Sabbath View Post
Actually wouldn't mind knowing about the uke myself, friend wants one after he moves. $350 is a bit high.
I'm not a world-class uke player, but I can play them fairly well. And I think the cheap ones sound pretty good if you mic them properly. If you want acoustic, it will cost more, but I'm certain you could get a very nice one for much less than $350.

As an aside, I'm thinking of converting a uke to mandolin tuning - a mandolele, or a ukulin. Anyone else see potential in this or other hybrid instruments?
  #799  
Old 08-30-2010, 10:37 PM
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This Wednesday is New Guitar Day!!!


After much hemming and hawing, I'm getting a 6-string Baritone Classical Guitar. It started life as a 'regular', luthier-made instrument, but its box has always had a very deep voice. And so...

When I wrote my friend Ed Klein about a price for a baritone, he suggested re-fitting the nut and saddle on this instrument and adding a Schatten pickup. Despite him giving me a serious break, it was still more than twice the budget; I was heartbroken and I thought for sure I'd have to turn him down.

It came down to - I need an instrument for this voice and classical guitar project ("21st Century Troubadour" is the working title...) that has the same resonance and response as my regular classical, but down a fourth. (B-E-A-D-F#-B) I've got my laminate top Yamaha strung that way, but it's a beater and it sounds like it. I've played other student/entry level instruments, and they haven't had the depth nor the response. I could take Sergei deJonge's lutherie course, but I haven't got the time for a few years. And a custom built guitar would be easily more than four or five times the budget.

What clinched the deal was that Ed had let me borrow the instrument for a few days. I made my wife listen while I played the same Marschner song on the beater and on the new guitar. We then had a long talk about the upcoming recital, the possibility of touring it as a package deal, the possibility of recording it... The end result was, I emptied the Swear Jar and there was the down payment. Teasing; the end result is, it's a big risk, but I need the right instrument for this project or it's not going to work anyway. Gulp.


Besides, the kids' college funds were just sitting there...

Le Ministre de l'au-delà - Woodshedding. Do Not Disturb.

Last edited by Le Ministre de l'au-delà; 08-30-2010 at 10:38 PM.
  #800  
Old 08-31-2010, 08:38 AM
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How exciting is that? Congratulations Le Ministre - can't wait to get a full report.

Boomerwang - there's a long history of banjo ukes, mando-cellos (8-strings-in-4-courses) acoustics and electrics, piccolo short-scale basses and the like. Just because there are standard formats doesn't preclude other combos and most have been tried...
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