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Old 01-20-2020, 11:50 AM
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Is the Sound of Music supposed to be a good movie?


My wife turning on The Sound of Music this weekend, and I realized that I had never actually seen it from beginning to end. I remember it being a special Saturday night movie ever year as a kid, but I had only seen bits and pieces. Now musicals aren't my favorite genre, but I figured box-office smash plus Oscar winner meant I was at least in for a decent time.

Hmm... I wouldn't call it a bad movie, but I would call it aggressively not-good. The plot just sort of... happens. Every moves forward because it needs to. The kids don't like Maria, and then they do. The dad is a grump, and then he isn't. The Captain doesn't like Maria, and then they get married. And so on. None of the characters outside of maybe Maria and Max have really any defined personality. Outside of Liesl, all the kids just blend together.

As for the songs, which should really be the star of any musical: It felt like there were really only 4 or 5 songs, each one repeated 2 or 3 times. Do-Re-Mi goes on forever. Edelweiss is good though, as awkwardly lip-synced by Plummer.

Also, I realize it's a product of it's time, but the central question posed at the beginning with "How do you solve a problem like Maria?" is "How do you control a free-spirited woman?" And the answer is "Have her get married." And notice how Julie Andrews has basically nothing to do after the wedding scene. The movie becomes all about Georg.

Anyway, am I crazy? Do people really love this movie?
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Old 01-20-2020, 11:57 AM
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Not one of my favorite things but there are definitely people who love (like in really, really, really love) this film. It definitely scores the hat trick for cute: Songs you can sing along with. Kids. Julie Andrews.
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Old 01-20-2020, 03:12 PM
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It's a 60s style movie musical, not a character drama.
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Old 01-20-2020, 03:27 PM
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The Captain doesn't like Maria, and then they get married.
Apparently that actually does follow real life - Maria von Trapp is on record as saying she wasn't in love with Georg von Trapp, but she really wanted to stay with the kids, which she had come to love. Getting married to their father allowed that. In which case it would hardly be the first marriage of convenience (however you wish to define "convenience") to ever occur.
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Also, I realize it's a product of it's time, but the central question posed at the beginning with "How do you solve a problem like Maria?" is "How do you control a free-spirited woman?" And the answer is "Have her get married."
Even as a young child, when the nuns were singing about how to solve the problem of Maria I supposedly was shouting something along the lines of for goodness sake you can start by getting her out of a convent! Definitely not nun material.

Problem is that until fairly recently there just weren't that many options for women.

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Anyway, am I crazy? Do people really love this movie?
Yes, some really really do love this movie.
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Old 01-20-2020, 03:28 PM
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Not one of my favorite things but there are definitely people who love (like in really, really, really love) this film. It definitely scores the hat trick for cute: Songs you can sing along with. Kids. Julie Andrews.
And, to cut the treacle, Nazi bad guys.

I also never watched the film in order all the way through--just a piece here and a piece there. My mother spent her last 2 years and 3 months at an assisted living center and this movie was playing in the main TV room during 75% of my visits. They also showed other 60s musicals like West Side Story, My Fair Lady, Mary Poppins, and Hello Dolly but Sound of Music was the most shown by far.
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Old 01-20-2020, 03:31 PM
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When 20th Century Fox set out to make TSOM, they put it in the mediocre pile, not expecting much from it. But by golly it's box office was $286 million in 1965, the number on movie of that year.

So yeah, I'd say it was a good movie.
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Old 01-20-2020, 03:37 PM
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I always wondered how well it would have done if it had not been on the heels of Julie Andrews’ Oscar winning performance in Mary Poppins.
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Old 01-20-2020, 03:42 PM
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I can understand, in the movie, why the Captain would fall in love with Maria: She brought music and joy back to his household, and his life, where it was sorely absent. But I couldn't understand why she fell in love with him. Yes, he was rich and handsome, but what was there about him, personally, that she saw?

The real-life story makes much more sense: I can definitely see her loving the children, and therefore marrying him, and then eventually growing to love him over the course of years. IIRC, when the real Maria saw the movie, her reaction was that it was a beautiful story, but that it wasn't her story.

As an aside, my mom absolutely loves this movie, because she sees a lot of herself in Maria: She, too, was in a convent in her younger years, and fit in in that environment about as well as Maria did (which is to say, not at all): She was always the one climbing a tree and skinning her knee, and being late to everything, and so on.
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Old 01-20-2020, 03:42 PM
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Every time I think of "The Sound of Music" I take great pleasure in remembering that as they walk over the mountain at the end of the movie, they are walking into Nazi Germany.
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Old 01-20-2020, 04:00 PM
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It was a major success on Broadway, running over 1400 performances and making it the forth longest running musical in Broadway history at the time it closed. So I think it's safe to say it was a popular musical. And all the musicals that had more performances when it closed (My Fair Lady, Oklahoma, and South Pacific) were made into successful movies. Andrews got the role because of Mary Poppins, but back then people went to movie versions of popular musicals as a matter of course and Rogers and Hammerstein were as popular as you can get.

The movie's success probably surprised everyone. It was expected to do well enough (Broadway remakes were money in the bank), but not on the scale it did. It does have a first-class score, especially in the first act, but the story was extremely bland (which may have been the root of its popularity -- there's nothing unlikeable about it, but there's nothing particularly dramatic or memorable other than their escape, which gets short shrift).
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Old 01-20-2020, 04:10 PM
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A few years ago, I stayed in a hostel in Salzburg where one of the selling points was that they showed the movie every night in the common room, and I can say definitively: There are people who really, really love this movie. Young people. From a whole bunch of different countries. A lot of whom seem to have been visiting Salzburg mostly because they loved this movie.

Personally, I thought it was OK but nothing special, but movie musicals (with the exception of Cabaret, where all of the singing actually makes sense) aren't really my thing.
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Old 01-20-2020, 04:27 PM
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I love movie musicals, but not especially this one. The one I was obsessed with for years was West Side Story.
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Old 01-20-2020, 04:29 PM
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Every time I think of "The Sound of Music" I take great pleasure in remembering that as they walk over the mountain at the end of the movie, they are walking into Nazi Germany.
I thought it was Switzerland?

Georg was a decorated WWI hero. That might have had something to do with why Maria fell in love with him. He'd commanded an Austro-Hungarian U-boat out of Triese, thus answering the perennial question of how a landlocked country (Austria in 1938) could have a navy.

I first saw the movie in Tblisi in July 1975. It was an old print that had been dubbed at Mosfilm studios and was in terrible shape. It had been spliced back together so many times, the kids jumped magically back and forth on the fountain. (The songs were in English with Russian subtitles.)

A month or so after I got back to the US, I was at the house of a friend who owned a copy of the MAD Magazine with "The $ound of Money" in it. I laughed so hard reading it that I literally fell out of the easy chair I was sitting in.

I once made the mistake of bursting into song with "How Do You Make a Movie 'Bout Religion?" at a church function. The vicar was NOT amused!
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Old 01-20-2020, 04:34 PM
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But I couldn't understand why she fell in love with him. Yes, he was rich and handsome, but what was there about him, personally, that she saw?
My guess is, she saw him as a good guy with a bad exterior. (Or a bad guy who was good on the inside.) All kinds of "good woman loves bad man" tropes in cinema for decades or centuries.
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Old 01-20-2020, 04:36 PM
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Next time you see the movie, try spotting the crate of Jaffa oranges from Israel (founded in 1948) at the market.
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Old 01-20-2020, 04:40 PM
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My guess is, she saw him as a good guy with a bad exterior. (Or a bad guy who was good on the inside.) All kinds of "good woman loves bad man" tropes in cinema for decades or centuries.
GEORG: I've been ordered to report for duty with the German navy in Bremerhaven. But I just can't!

MARIA: Poor dear! It's against your principles!

GEORG: No, it's not that. You see, I'm not really a captain. I just have this "thing" for sailor suits!

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Old 01-20-2020, 05:13 PM
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I thought it was Switzerland?
Not the mountains they were walking over!
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Old 01-20-2020, 05:35 PM
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Of course the movie is considerably fictionalized:
Quote:
  • Maria came to the von Trapp family in 1926 as a tutor for one of the children, Maria, who was recovering from scarlet fever, not as governess to all the children.

    Maria and Georg married in 1927, 11 years before the family left Austria, not right before the Nazi takeover of Austria.

    Maria did not marry Georg von Trapp because she was in love with him. As she said in her autobiography Maria, she fell in love with the children at first sight, not their father. When he asked her to marry him, she was not sure if she should abandon her religious calling but was advised by the nuns to do God's will and marry Georg. "I really and truly was not in love. I liked him but didn't love him. However, I loved the children, so in a way I really married the children. . . . [B]y and by I learned to love him more than I have ever loved before or after." [...]

    Georg, far from being the detached, cold-blooded patriarch of the family who disapproved of music, as portrayed in the first half of The Sound of Music, was actually a gentle, warmhearted parent who enjoyed musical activities with his family. [...]

    The family did not secretly escape over the Alps to freedom in Switzerland, carrying their suitcases and musical instruments. As daughter Maria said in a 2003 interview printed in Opera News, "We did tell people that we were going to America to sing. And we did not climb over mountains with all our heavy suitcases and instruments.
    We left by train, pretending nothing."

    The von Trapps traveled to Italy, not Switzerland. Georg was born in Zadar (now in Croatia), which at that time was part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. Zadar became part of Italy in 1920, and Georg was thus an Italian citizen, and his wife and children as well. The family had a contract with an American booking agent when they left Austria. They contacted the agent from Italy and requested fare to America.

[...] Maria tutored young Maria [von Trapp] and developed a caring and loving relationship with all the children. She enjoyed singing with them and getting them involved in outdoor activities. During this time, Georg fell in love with Maria and asked her to stay with him and become a second mother to his children. Of his proposal, Maria said, "God must have made him word it that way because if he had only asked me to marry him I might not have said yes." Maria Kutschera and Georg von Trapp married in 1927. They had three children together: Rosmarie, 1929– ; Eleonore, 1931– ; and Johannes, 1939–.

The family lost most of its wealth through the worldwide depression when their bank failed in the early 1930s. Maria tightened belts all around by dismissing most of the servants and taking in boarders. It was around this time that they began considering making the family hobby of singing into a profession. Georg was reluctant for the family to perform in public, "but accepted it as God's will that they sing for others," daughter Eleonore said in a 1978 Washington Post interview. "It almost hurt him to have his family onstage, not from a snobbish view, but more from a protective one." As depicted in The Sound of Music, the family won first place in the Salzburg Music Festival in 1936 and became successful, singing Renaissance and Baroque music, madrigals, and folk songs all across Europe.

When the Nazis annexed Austria in 1938, the von Trapps realized that they were on thin ice with a regime they abhorred. Georg not only refused to fly the Nazi flag on their house, but he also declined a naval command and a request to sing at Hitler's birthday party. They were also becoming aware of the Nazis' anti-religious propaganda and policies, the pervasive fear that those around them could be acting as spies for the Nazis, and the brainwashing of children against their parents. They weighed staying in Austria and taking advantage of the enticements the Nazis were offering—greater fame as a singing group, a medical doctor's position for Rupert, and a renewed naval career for Georg—against leaving behind everything they knew—their friends, family, estate, and all their possessions. They decided that they could not compromise their principles and left.
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Old 01-20-2020, 05:35 PM
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I thought it was Switzerland?

Georg was a decorated WWI hero. That might have had something to do with why Maria fell in love with him. He'd commanded an Austro-Hungarian U-boat out of Triese, thus answering the perennial question of how a landlocked country (Austria in 1938) could have a navy.
The Master Speaks (twice).

https://www.straightdope.com/columns...austrias-navy/
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Old 01-20-2020, 05:51 PM
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My wife turning on The Sound of Music this weekend, and I realized that I had never actually seen it from beginning to end. I remember it being a special Saturday night movie ever year as a kid, but I had only seen bits and pieces. Now musicals aren't my favorite genre, but I figured box-office smash plus Oscar winner meant I was at least in for a decent time.

[SNIP]

Anyway, am I crazy? Do people really love this movie?
So you remember that the movie was broadcast on television annually, that it won the Academy Award for Best Picture (and four others) and that it made a lot of money at the box office, but you're not sure that people like it?
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Old 01-20-2020, 06:14 PM
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When 20th Century Fox set out to make TSOM, they put it in the mediocre pile, not expecting much from it. But by golly it's box office was $286 million in 1965, the number on movie of that year.

So yeah, I'd say it was a good movie.
It also saved 20th Century Fox from bankruptcy caused by the financial hit it took from Cleopatra (at least for a few years until Dr. Doolittle and Star! put them back on the brink again).
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Old 01-20-2020, 06:20 PM
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Apparently that actually does follow real life - Maria von Trapp is on record as saying she wasn't in love with Georg von Trapp
Woah! I didn't realize The Sound of Music was based on a real story.

They probably put it at the beginning of the movie, too...

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Old 01-20-2020, 07:48 PM
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Woah! I didn't realize The Sound of Music was based on a real story.
Come up to Stowe VT and ski at the Trapp Family Lodge.
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Old 01-20-2020, 08:11 PM
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The movie is still insanely popular. They show it in theaters and bill it as a big singalong and it'll generally sell out. It's like a wholesome Rocky Horror (without throwing stuff). I don't care for the genre so I've never seen any of it other than clips here or there. Thankfully my then wife was kind enough not to drag me along when she went.
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Old 01-20-2020, 08:49 PM
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Austrians have to put up with having Edelweiss played at diplomatic events by people who are convinced that it is a traditional song and/or the national anthem
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Old 01-20-2020, 11:21 PM
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I've always thought of The Sound of Music as a children's movie. Not really my cup of tea, even as a kid.

Christopher Plummer famously called it “The Sound of Mucus”.

Last edited by needscoffee; 01-20-2020 at 11:21 PM.
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Old 01-20-2020, 11:35 PM
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I enjoy watching it from time to time and still get a thrill at the beginning with the horns and the sweep into the meadow with Julie Andrews twirling around.

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It's a 60s style movie musical, not a character drama.
Plus the spectacular alpine scenery and locations in Salzburg. Top notch. Apparently the locals were still sensitive to anything Nazi so the production had some trouble flying the swastika.

Fun fact: Hohenwerfen Castle in the background in the Do-Re-Mi scene was used for the ‘Schloss Adler’ in Where Eagles Dare.
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Old 01-21-2020, 01:04 AM
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I've always thought of The Sound of Music as a children's movie. Not really my cup of tea, even as a kid.

Christopher Plummer famously called it “The Sound of Mucus”.
Yes, you can clearly see that he thought the whole thing was beneath him. Which did nothing for me except him losing any meager respect I had ever had for him as an actor. If you are going to do a movie only for the money, the decent thing to do is to make it look like you want to be there and that you care about the outcome. All he did was look bored.

I seem to be the only one here who is old enough to have seen it in the theater when it was first released. I was in high school. It got a lot of stick from our adolescent intellectuals ("I'm so tired of movies about happy nuns!" was one comment, because The Singing Nun was out around the same time), but everyone else seemed to love it. It was a Very Big Deal. Julie Andrews did have a lot to do with it, I guess, plus the long Broadway run of the play. For most folks, though, I think its influence faded as the ugly realities of the later 60's came to the fore. Within a few years it was dismissed generally as fluffy and inconsequential.
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Old 01-21-2020, 01:54 AM
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Nobody went to see that movie, the theater was too crowded!


I admit the songs are catchy but as presented, it's not a particularly interesting story. It's one of those "I'd really like to see a good documentary about these events" kind of deals.
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Old 01-21-2020, 02:26 AM
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I seem to be the only one here who is old enough to have seen it in the theater when it was first released.
I was in fifth grade when it came out, but didn't get around to seeing it until ten years later, and then it was purely for the novelty effect. I had little interest in doing so, since such movies are not just my cup of tea. (I preferred films like Von Ryan's Express.)

IIRC, it was aired on TV for the first time around Christmas 1976. I watched a few minutes to see how it compared to the cut I saw in Georgia and then switched it off. I couldn't get the MAD satire out of my mind.

I remember talking about movies in class one day when I was in sixth grade. Our teacher (a WWII vet who'd served on the ground in Germany) thought it was a good, clean, family movie.
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Old 01-21-2020, 03:50 AM
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Christopher Plummer famously called it “The Sound of Mucus”.
Damn, I thought I made that up.

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I seem to be the only one here who is old enough to have seen it in the theater when it was first released.
No, you're not. I saw it too.

My Gay Men's Chorus did our own concert version of TSoM, very different from the movie. In one number, about a dozen of us shuffled onstage with walkers, singing "We are sixty, going on seventy."
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Old 01-21-2020, 04:30 AM
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You know who else hated this movie?
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Old 01-21-2020, 05:09 AM
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I think part of the appeal of the movie is because it isn't heavy and dramatic. It's fluffy and sweet and there's a certain audience for that because not everyone wants to watch super hero movies or deep intricate plots about relationships that practically require you to take notes or dystopian worlds or ... well, anything dark.

The 1960's had a lot of bad stuff going on, I think part of the initial appeal was escaping contemporary reality. Rather like the lavish musicals of the 1930's - the world was going to hell, let's watch something that's superficial fun to get away from all the grimdark.
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Old 01-21-2020, 05:39 AM
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It is a popular high school musical.
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Old 01-21-2020, 06:39 AM
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Popular enough movie for Ariana Grande to base a hit pop song on one of its songs!
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Old 01-21-2020, 07:06 AM
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Just about all the points I would have made are already made in the above posts. I'll just add:

1.) Julie Andrews was already a top-rated and highly regarded musical star, who had performed the part of Eliza Doolittle in the Broadway version of My Fair Lady. She had also been Guinevere in Camelot on Broadway. So to say she got the part because of "Mary Poppins" is, at best, misleading. She would've been a (the?) prime candidate regardless of that role. (In the mad satire cited above, in the last panel she sings "When we top Fair Lady, vengeance will be mine!" -- Andrews, who sang her own songs, was famously passed over, despite having played the role on Broadway, in favor of Audrey Hepburn, who had to be dubbed by Marni Nixon. Nixon not only dubbed the singing of the Mother Superior in the film Sound of Music, she also finally got to appear and sing herself as one of the nuns. Maria von trap showed up in the convent, too.)

2.) The film was directed by Robert Wise, who also Directed the musical West Side story. (not to mention the science fiction films The Day the Earth Stood Still, The Andromeda Strain, and Star Trek, the Motion Picture. Not to mention a lot of other flicks.)

3.) When you consider that Christopher Plummer CHOSE top appear as The Emperor of the Universe in the low-budget cheesy SF film Starcrash: The Adventures of Stella Star, not to mention plenty of other questionable projects, it really does say something about his belief that The Sound of Music was beneath him.
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Old 01-21-2020, 07:26 AM
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First movie I remember seeing as a kid. Saw it in a brand new theater the first day it opened. I remember liking it. Have not seen it since then.
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Old 01-21-2020, 07:34 AM
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3.) When you consider that Christopher Plummer CHOSE top appear as The Emperor of the Universe in the low-budget cheesy SF film Starcrash: The Adventures of Stella Star, not to mention plenty of other questionable projects, it really does say something about his belief that The Sound of Music was beneath him.
Plummer also signed a contract to play Dr. Doolittle when Rex Harrison was causing problems for the producers (when Harrison and the producers worked things out, Plummer was paid to not play the role - Dr. Doolittle was a very expensive movie)
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Old 01-21-2020, 08:16 AM
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Austrians have to put up with having Edelweiss played at diplomatic events by people who are convinced that it is a traditional song and/or the national anthem
It *is* the best song in the show...
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Old 01-21-2020, 08:43 AM
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Originally Posted by BrotherCadfael View Post
It *is* the best song in the show...
...and the very last Rodgers and Hammerstein song.
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Old 01-21-2020, 08:56 AM
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I remember seeing TSOM and MP in theaters as a kid. I'm not generally a big fan of musicals, but TSOM has always impressed me as just about as good as any, and better than many.

My eldest was/is a HUGE Julie Andrews fan, so this was in heavy rotation in out house in the 90s/00s. More innocuous than a lot of the kids' fare we were watching. Lots of catchy music.

So yeah, I think I'd call it a good movie. Probably not great, but certainly better than a lot.
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Old 01-21-2020, 09:27 AM
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Quoth Urbanredneck:

It is a popular high school musical.
And junior high. We did it when I was in eighth grade. Remember Admiral von Schreiber, the largest non-singing part in the play? Well, probably not... he wasn't in the movie at all, and even in the play he only got six lines... but anyway, that was me.

One of my friends got the second-largest non-singing part... about a week before opening night. When the director realized that that part existed at all, and that he therefore needed someone on stage to deliver that line.
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Old 01-21-2020, 09:31 AM
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One of the panels in the Mad satire has Maria saying something like "But if he is love with me, that means he wants to marry me. But I can't marry him. That doesn't make any sense, but I didn;'t write this script. Did anyone?"

Someone did -- Ernest Lehman, who'd adapted the stage musicals The King and I and West Side Story for the screen (as well as an unproduced musical adaptation of Zorba the Greek). As in those other cases, he rewrote the plays, re-arranging events and songs, even dropping two songs (although two others were added). So, not only isn't this the original Maria von Trapp story, it's not the story told in the two German films that attracted the attention of Hollywood and Broadway, and it's not even exactly the story told in the Broadway musical. (I have a copy of the script)

Lehman was more familiar to me as the screenwriter of Hitchcock's North by Northwest, which I love. He also wrote the screenplay for Hitchcock's last film, Family Plot, which feels like a tires retread by both Lehman and Hitchcock. But they can't all be winners.


I think the general consensus is that TSOM of a great Hollywood musical, but REALLY schmaltzy, and not really a great story. It really does deserve the swipes Mad took at it, both in "The Sound of Money" and "The Sound of More Music" in 1970.

My cousin, a year younger than me, apparently had the right idea when he very vocally did NOT want to see the film when it first came out.
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Last edited by CalMeacham; 01-21-2020 at 09:33 AM.
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Old 01-21-2020, 09:36 AM
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Originally Posted by Roderick Femm View Post
I seem to be the only one here who is old enough to have seen it in the theater when it was first released. I was in high school.
No, Father Flynn from my parish brought a group of us from our parochial high school in the Bronx to see it in a big movie house in Manhattan. It was of course made to order as wholesome fare for Catholic kids.

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Originally Posted by silenus View Post
Every time I think of "The Sound of Music" I take great pleasure in remembering that as they walk over the mountain at the end of the movie, they are walking into Nazi Germany.
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Originally Posted by terentii View Post
I thought it was Switzerland?
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Originally Posted by silenus View Post
Not the mountains they were walking over!
He's being oblique about the fact that, according to iMDB:

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The ending scene where the family is walking up and on top of a grassy hill is not Switzerland at all but in Germany itself, the Berchtesgaden, Obersalzburg to be exact, where Hitler's Bavarian hideaway was.
In the movie, they were supposed to be crossing from Austria (technically already part of Nazi Germany) into Switzerland. As mentioned, in actual fact they merely took a train from Austria to Italy.

Of course, since the roles were played by actors instead of the actual von Trapps, one could say that Berchtesgarden was playing the role of the Swiss Alps in the movie.
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Old 01-21-2020, 10:07 AM
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Remember Admiral von Schreiber, the largest non-singing part in the play? Well, probably not... he wasn't in the movie at all, and even in the play he only got six lines... but anyway, that was me.
Me too! Me too! I started with one line and worked my way up as kids kept dropping out of the production.

As I recall the stage book was aimed at a slightly more mature audience than the movie (it didn't have those damn puppets, for one thing)

But the movie had great scenery and Julie Andrews, and that was more than enough for moviegoers.

Last edited by Kent Clark; 01-21-2020 at 10:07 AM.
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Old 01-21-2020, 10:07 AM
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The Sound of Music is a classic Broadway musical adapted to a movie format. It has great songs and the right amount of plot to make things interesting. I'm happy if a musical has two great songs, and tSoM has at least five. Its primary flaw is it doesn't have a proper dance number.

I've never seen it in a movie theater, but have watched it on the small screen innumerable times. And its soundtrack is on my rotation of albums to listen to. I've seen the stage version, but the production I saw got a little too enthusiastic with the Nazi paraphernalia. Even if it was only acting, I'm very uncomfortable with "patriotic" displays of Nazism. The best viewing of the movie is at the annual Hollywood Bowl Sing-A-Long (and costume contest!). Nothing like belting out the songs with ten thousand other fans.
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Old 01-21-2020, 10:49 AM
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Originally Posted by Pleonast View Post
The Sound of Music is a classic Broadway musical adapted to a movie format. It has great songs and the right amount of plot to make things interesting. I'm happy if a musical has two great songs, and tSoM has at least five. Its primary flaw is it doesn't have a proper dance number.
I'm fond of the two (?) songs that are in the stage show but not the movie - "How Can Love Survive?" and "No Way to Stop It" which give the Baroness and Max something to sing (and give Max some chance to grow from the collaborator he is in this song to risking his life by the end).

McSweeney's has some humorous SoM material, by the way

https://www.mcsweeneys.net/articles/...oblem-of-maria
https://www.mcsweeneys.net/articles/...-been-canceled
https://www.mcsweeneys.net/articles/...o-a-geneticist
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Old 01-21-2020, 12:05 PM
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I've never seen a musical with Nazis that I didn't like.
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Old 01-21-2020, 12:28 PM
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Originally Posted by Gatopescado View Post
I've never seen a musical with Nazis that I didn't like.
You know, there are more musicals with Nazis than just Sound of Music, Cabaret, and The Producers.

It would be more correct to say you've never seen a successful musical with Nazis you didn't like. Heck there have been at least two different musicals about Anne Frank.
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Old 01-21-2020, 12:50 PM
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You know who else hated this movie?
Godwin?
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