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Old 03-14-2019, 11:38 AM
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How long does it take to get diabetes?


My friends say that drinking 6 cans of coke a day (3 cans for break and 3 for lunch) will eventually lead to diabetes. I think not. I'm 5ft 7 and 63kg for a male.

In a day, I'd say I eat about 300g of sugar a day including the 6 cans of coke. Is that really bad?
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Old 03-14-2019, 11:52 AM
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Excess sugar consumption can lead to obesity, which is a risk factor for type 2 diabetes, but sugar consumption does not cause diabetes.
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Old 03-14-2019, 11:53 AM
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My friends say that drinking 6 cans of coke a day (3 cans for break and 3 for lunch) will eventually lead to diabetes. I think not. I'm 5ft 7 and 63kg for a male.

In a day, I'd say I eat about 300g of sugar a day including the 6 cans of coke. Is that really bad?
Eating sugar (carbs) does not necessarily lead to becoming Diabetic. Many people eat large amounts of carbs and never become diabetic. The propensity towards becoming diabetic leans more towards people being over weight or having a history of diabetes in your family.

That being said, drinking coke all day isn't a healthy habit by just about anyone's standards. Loads of empty calories and sugar is bad for your teeth. Then there is the huge amount of caffeine that comes with it.

Last edited by Si Amigo; 03-14-2019 at 11:54 AM.
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Old 03-14-2019, 11:56 AM
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It's complicated.

The punchline is

Quote:
In summary, this meta-analysis has demonstrated that higher consumption of SSBs is significantly associated with development of metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. It provides further support to limit consumption of these beverages in place of healthy alternatives such as water to reduce obesity-related chronic disease risk.

Last edited by GreysonCarlisle; 03-14-2019 at 11:58 AM.
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Old 03-14-2019, 12:10 PM
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In a day, I'd say I eat about 300g of sugar a day including the 6 cans of coke. Is that really bad?
6 cans of coke is 234g of sugar. Do you really think you're only getting another 66g total from everything else you're eating?
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Old 03-14-2019, 12:12 PM
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Maybe you can just do it until you need glasses, or lose a foot.
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Old 03-14-2019, 12:15 PM
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While the actual science is hard, common sense would tell you that too much of anything is not good for you.

Eat varied and moderately, avoid empty calories.
Realize that acidic (carbonated) or sugary beverages (coke is all of those) are bad for your teeth.
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Old 03-14-2019, 12:25 PM
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Other than maintaining an appropriate body weight and staying physically active (even just taking the stairs, going for short walks, etc.), the most important thing you can do to avoid diabetes is to choose your parents carefully.
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Old 03-14-2019, 01:06 PM
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Do you accept the fact that it’s not good for you in general?
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Old 03-14-2019, 01:15 PM
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The recommended daily allowance for added sugar for males is 37g. You may not develop diabetes. You may not harm your teeth. You may be just fine all your born days. But probably not. Maybe not for awhile, but as you get older and your metabolism slows that sort of habit suddenly makes itself felt and seen.
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Old 03-14-2019, 03:38 PM
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Yep, dude quit the coke. It's bad, bad stuff for many reasons. It's basically dirty water. You wouldn't go to Flint, MI and ask for a glass of tap water would you?
I'm t1 diabetic from very early childhood. I would not wish it on my worst enemy. T2 diabetes is avoidable. Avoid it. Drinking coke will not cause it, but it sure won't help.
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Old 03-14-2019, 03:54 PM
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I'm t1 diabetic from very early childhood. I would not wish it on my worst enemy. T2 diabetes is avoidable. Avoid it. Drinking coke will not cause it, but it sure won't help.
I was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes 14 years ago, at age 40, though I undoubtedly was already suffering from the disease for at least a year before that, and probably longer.

Up until then, I drank at least as much sugary soft drinks as the OP does (not to mention a lot of orange juice, which is also full of sugar). I'd gone from being rail-thin in my college years to being overweight (and probably borderline obese, at my heaviest), and was very sedentary.

Diabetes doesn't run in my family, so it seems most likely that, in my case, it was largely a self-inflicted condition. Drinking all of that sugary soda back then probably wasn't *the* reason why I developed diabetes, but I would not be at all surprised if it was a contributing factor.

I'm also damned fortunate. My diabetes was caught while it was still fairly early. I got an excellent endocrinologist who got me onto the right oral meds for my condition (and I don't yet need to take insulin). I also was able to start and maintain an excercise regimen, and lose weight, and get my blood sugar levels into the "normal" range. The phyisical conditions which were accompanying the diabetes at the time of my diagnosis (e.g., peripheral neuropathy, impotence) all went away once I got my blood sugar under control.

So, yeah, do yourself a favor, kleptomaniac. Earlier posters are exactly right -- you might well never develop diabetes, despite how much Coke you drink. But, why the hell risk it??
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Old 03-14-2019, 04:05 PM
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Yep, dude quit the coke. It's bad, bad stuff for many reasons. It's basically dirty water. You wouldn't go to Flint, MI and ask for a glass of tap water would you?
I'm t1 diabetic from very early childhood. I would not wish it on my worst enemy. T2 diabetes is avoidable. Avoid it. Drinking coke will not cause it, but it sure won't help.
Worse yet, it wreaks havoc on your digestive system, stomach lining, and system pH. A nutritionist at a retirement seminar I attended said that elimination of soda intake was one of the best things you can do for your health. We almost never drink the stuff other than an occasional Limonata.
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Old 03-14-2019, 05:37 PM
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Well, you could get cancer of the pancreas along with gods know where else from a terrible diet and once you have the thing removed becoming diabetic is instant and at that point drinking six cans of coke in a day will be pretty close to a death sentence so there's that.
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Old 03-14-2019, 11:32 PM
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I was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes 14 years ago, at age 40, though I undoubtedly was already suffering from the disease for at least a year before that, and probably longer.

Up until then, I drank at least as much sugary soft drinks as the OP does (not to mention a lot of orange juice, which is also full of sugar). I'd gone from being rail-thin in my college years to being overweight (and probably borderline obese, at my heaviest), and was very sedentary.

Diabetes doesn't run in my family, so it seems most likely that, in my case, it was largely a self-inflicted condition. Drinking all of that sugary soda back then probably wasn't *the* reason why I developed diabetes, but I would not be at all surprised if it was a contributing factor.

I'm also damned fortunate. My diabetes was caught while it was still fairly early. I got an excellent endocrinologist who got me onto the right oral meds for my condition (and I don't yet need to take insulin). I also was able to start and maintain an excercise regimen, and lose weight, and get my blood sugar levels into the "normal" range. The phyisical conditions which were accompanying the diabetes at the time of my diagnosis (e.g., peripheral neuropathy, impotence) all went away once I got my blood sugar under control.

So, yeah, do yourself a favor, kleptomaniac. Earlier posters are exactly right -- you might well never develop diabetes, despite how much Coke you drink. But, why the hell risk it??
What were the signs
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Old 03-15-2019, 12:25 AM
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What were the signs
The symptoms I had were:
- Feeling thirsty frequently (and, by extension, due to drinking more, frequent urination)
- Weight loss (I was trying to eat less, which I thought was helping to drop my weight, but it was likely more a result of the uncontrolled diabetes -- to be honest, I probably wasn't really dieting enough to significantly impact my weight)
- Small injuries (cuts and scrapes on my skin) taking a long time to heal
- Recurring pain in my feet (that turned out to be neuropathy)
- Erectile dysfunction
- Bad breath

The thirst, in particular, was a warning sign that I wound up being in denial about. I'm old enough to have regularly watched the 1970s TV series M*A*S*H; I remembered an episode in which the doctors discover that a helicopter pilot has diabetes (the pilot won't submit to a test, because he's trying to break a record for evacuating patients before he gets grounded). In the episode, one of the symptoms which the pilot admits to is that he's thirsty all the time.

Last edited by kenobi 65; 03-15-2019 at 12:25 AM.
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Old 03-15-2019, 02:44 AM
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What were the signs
You may not have any. I didn't even know I was diabetic until I had blood drawn for a different medical issue.

If my blood sugar gets really high, I pee a lot. That's the only symptom I have ever had.

There are some variations, but type 2 diabetes (the kind you may be heading for) kinda works like this. If you consistently consume a lot of sugar, the cells in your pancreas that regulate your blood sugar have to work harder. You also have a bunch of insulin receptors in your cells. If some of those receptors get clogged up with fat molecules, then your body becomes resistant to insulin, and that makes those insulin producing cells in your pancreas work even harder. Genetics plays a big factor as well. Some people can control their blood sugar with a lot less strain on their pancreas than others.

Over-work those cells in your pancreas, and they start to die off. There are many cells in your body that regenerate. There are some that don't. These cells don't. Once they are gone, they are gone forever. Lose enough of those cells, and your body will no longer be able to regulate your blood sugar properly, and now you have type 2 diabetes. Or at least that's one way to end up with it, and it's probably the most common in the U.S.

I have done a lot of damage to my pancreas, and I never had any symptoms. Once your pancreas is damaged, that's it. It will never heal. You never get "cured" of diabetes.

In my case, I made some fairly drastic changes to my diet, lost some weight, and so far I have been able to keep my blood sugar under control. It's controlled. It's not cured. I will never be cured.

If you cut out sugars and carbs and lose weight (if you are overweight), you might be able to get your diabetes under control, or you might not. It varies from person to person, and a lot depends on exactly how much damage you have done to your pancreas and how insulin-resistant your body naturally is.

The long and short of it is that if you wait until you have symptoms, there is a very good chance that you will probably be well past the point of being able to get your blood sugar under control by diet alone. That means medication and maybe insulin shots, for the rest of your life. Your body never recovers. Those cells in your pancreas will never regenerate.

If you drink that much soda, it's probably a good idea to go to the doctor and have your A1C checked. A1C is a hemoglobin test that happens to be a good indicator for what your average blood sugar levels have been for the past few months.

Long-term, high blood sugar levels eat at your nerve cells and other tissues, causing circulation problems, eye damage, hearing damage, kidney damage, and a whole host of other issues.

If you catch it early, you can probably change your diet and live the rest of your life without any issues. Ignore it, and you might not catch it until you have permanently ruined your body.

The OP isn't obese, and fat clogging up the insulin receptors is a fairly major risk factor. Skinny people can get diabetes too, though. Maybe you were born with fewer insulin-producing cells to start with. Maybe your insulin receptors don't work as well as they do in other folks, making your body naturally more resistant to insulin. There are all kinds of factors that go into it.
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Old 03-15-2019, 08:12 AM
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People are on a curve.

Some people might get diabetes in their 20s, others chug "Cocolas" their entire life and never get it.

The curve has an average but it is unwise to presume that it applies to you.

There are more dangers to eating poorly than just diabetes. Eating right isn't all that hard (and can be cheaper, too).
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Old 03-15-2019, 01:16 PM
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Maybe you'll be one of those people who doesn't show symptoms--until you get a hangnail on your toe and end up with gangrene and an amputated foot. Happens, and more often than you'd like to think. Go to your doctor, get an A1C test and FFS if you're going to drink that much shitwater at least switch over to zero calorie.
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Old 03-15-2019, 03:10 PM
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Maybe you'll be one of those people who doesn't show symptoms--until you get a hangnail on your toe and end up with gangrene and an amputated foot. Happens, and more often than you'd like to think. Go to your doctor, get an A1C test and FFS if you're going to drink that much shitwater at least switch over to zero calorie.
They started with my dad's toe, then the foot, then the leg below the knee. All within a week. My cousin is a nurse and thought she had it under control and followed a low carb diet for the most part but refused to give up her Coca-Cola. She thought she could get away with it. Now she is on a dialysis and is awaiting a kidney transplant and has major eyesight issues.

Have you had your blood sugar checked by a doctor?
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Old 03-15-2019, 03:49 PM
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They started with my dad's toe, then the foot, then the leg below the knee. All within a week. My cousin is a nurse and thought she had it under control and followed a low carb diet for the most part but refused to give up her Coca-Cola. She thought she could get away with it. Now she is on a dialysis and is awaiting a kidney transplant and has major eyesight issues.

Have you had your blood sugar checked by a doctor?
Is the issue with eyesight caused by the nerves of the retina being destroyed or the cornea?

Also can someone explain why diabetes causes toe problems?
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Old 03-15-2019, 04:22 PM
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Is the issue with eyesight caused by the nerves of the retina being destroyed or the cornea?
As I understand it, the damage is mostly to the retina. Part of it is damage to the nerve cells themselves (and swelling to nerve bundles), but a major portion of it comes from high sugar levels blocking the tiny blood vessels that feed the retina or weakening the walls of those blood vessels. The cells in your retina can then be starved to death due to the lack of blood flow, or the blood vessels can swell and leak or even burst.

Damage to blood vessels can cause scar tissue to form, and that scar tissue can actually cause the retina to detach.

New blood vessels can form to circumvent the damage, and those blood vessels can end up accidentally blocking the flow of fluid in and out of the eye, preventing your eye from properly regulating its pressure. This overpressure can damage your eye and can also damage the optic nerve.

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Also can someone explain why diabetes causes toe problems?
Part of it is that as your nerves get damaged, you lose feeling in your extremities first. Since your toes are the farthest from your brain, they are the first to go. You don't feel pain, so you can injure your toes or have a sore and won't notice it, allowing it to get much worse. If you felt it, you would do something about it, out of instinct if nothing else, just to stop the pain or to prevent it from getting worse. But since you don't feel the pain, the injury or disease worsens completely unchecked.

Your blood flow is also controlled by your nervous system. Your nerves send signals which cause blood vessels to expand or contract. For example, your blood vessels will expand when it's hot out, so that more blood flows to your extremities so that you can cool yourself down more easily. When you are cold, the blood vessels constrict, forcing more blood into your body's core to keep it warm. As diabetes destroys your nerves, your blood vessels lose this ability to expand and contract, resulting in poor circulation. This poor circulation causes a host of other problems. Injuries heal slowly (or not at all) due to the lack of blood flow to the affected area. The lack of blood flow also makes it significantly more likely for you to develop sores in the first place.

Basically, the TL;DR version is it causes damage everywhere, but since your toes are the farthest away from your brain (for nerve damage) and heart (for circulation issues), they get hurt the worst.
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Old 03-15-2019, 05:58 PM
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Sometimes the foot and leg problems take the form of what are called stasis ulcers, large weeping sores on the calves that basically take forever to heal--if they do heal. Had a very large friend with T2 diabetes, poorly controlled, who simply would not give up drinking beer nor would he rest with his feet up during a camping trip. You don't want to know what it smells like when a big guy with festering sores all over his legs from standing around in California Central Valley 100+ degree heat finally decides to hit the medic tent to maybe get those cleaned up a bit. That'll put you off your next five meals, guaranteed.
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Old 03-16-2019, 09:20 AM
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Part of it is that as your nerves get damaged, you lose feeling in your extremities first. Since your toes are the farthest from your brain, they are the first to go. You don't feel pain, so you can injure your toes or have a sore and won't notice it, allowing it to get much worse. If you felt it, you would do something about it, out of instinct if nothing else, just to stop the pain or to prevent it from getting worse. But since you don't feel the pain, the injury or disease worsens completely unchecked.

Your blood flow is also controlled by your nervous system. Your nerves send signals which cause blood vessels to expand or contract. For example, your blood vessels will expand when it's hot out, so that more blood flows to your extremities so that you can cool yourself down more easily. When you are cold, the blood vessels constrict, forcing more blood into your body's core to keep it warm. As diabetes destroys your nerves, your blood vessels lose this ability to expand and contract, resulting in poor circulation. This poor circulation causes a host of other problems. Injuries heal slowly (or not at all) due to the lack of blood flow to the affected area. The lack of blood flow also makes it significantly more likely for you to develop sores in the first place.

Basically, the TL;DR version is it causes damage everywhere, but since your toes are the farthest away from your brain (for nerve damage) and heart (for circulation issues), they get hurt the worst.
This is why, after you are diagnosed, your doctor will do periodic tests on your feet to see if you are losing feeling there. It's a simple poke test to different parts of the soles of your feet.
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Old 03-16-2019, 09:50 AM
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This is why, after you are diagnosed, your doctor will do periodic tests on your feet to see if you are losing feeling there. It's a simple poke test to different parts of the soles of your feet.
And even with perfect care, there is a risk of loss. My daughter's fiance's father is physician and is in near-perfect health. He is my age (60), but passes for 40. But he is diabetic. He recently had an issue with a toe and was put on an antibiotic. Despite aggressive care and state of the art treatment, the toe was amputated.
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Old 03-16-2019, 02:17 PM
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Plus all that pop is HORRID for your teeth. There's the sugar and soda water is highly acidic. Even if you don't end up with diabetes, you probably will end up with dentures at the rate you're going.

Switch to water, and save the coke as a special treat. When I was a kid, pop was something I only got on special occassions. Nowadays it's usually only if I'm at a restaurant, or if I have a migraine, I'll drink ginger ale. Otherwise, I drink plenty of water.

It's much better for your skin, too.
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Old 03-16-2019, 04:50 PM
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And even with perfect care, there is a risk of loss. My daughter's fiance's father is physician and is in near-perfect health. He is my age (60), but passes for 40. But he is diabetic. He recently had an issue with a toe and was put on an antibiotic. Despite aggressive care and state of the art treatment, the toe was amputated.
The best advice my doctor gave me was to wear some sort of shoes at all times, indoor or out, to reduce the possibility of cuts that go unnoticed. I have a pair of slip-on shoes specifically for indoor wear.
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Old 03-16-2019, 05:29 PM
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Diabetes, like most diseases, is a disease of aging fundamentally. The older you get, the more likely you are to have it.

https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/n1/pub/.../c-g02-eng.gif

Supposedly around 25% of people with prediabetes will develop full diabetes within 3-5 years.

Blood glucose needs to go up <26 mg/dl to go from prediabetic to diabetic (prediabetic starts at 100, full blown diabetes at 26).

So if thats your metric, then for about 25% of people, their blood sugar jumps from prediabetic to diabetic. However it isn't like those people all go from 100 to 126. Some of them may go from 115 to 130.

My assumption (if I'm wrong, feel free to correct me) is that among this groups blood sugar may go up 3-5 mg/dl per year. So after a decade, blood sugar levels could be 50mg/dl higher.

FWIW, my dad is a diabetic. He developed the disease about 25 years ago, and on days when he doesn't take insulin his blood sugar is about 250 mg/dl. Which is about 150 higher than normal. And I'm assuming the last time he was having normal blood sugars was over 30 years ago. I assume those numbers aren't too out of the ordinary. A person may have blood sugar of 95 mg/dl at age 36, but then be at 250 mg/dl (untreated) by age 70 or so
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Old 03-16-2019, 05:31 PM
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Plus all that pop is HORRID for your teeth. There's the sugar and soda water is highly acidic. Even if you don't end up with diabetes, you probably will end up with dentures at the rate you're going.

Switch to water, and save the coke as a special treat. When I was a kid, pop was something I only got on special occassions. Nowadays it's usually only if I'm at a restaurant, or if I have a migraine, I'll drink ginger ale. Otherwise, I drink plenty of water.

It's much better for your skin, too.
Root beer is less acidic, so if you switch to that it'll damage your teeth less.

Drinking a large amount of soda in one sitting isn't a big deal. If you chug a liter of coke in 2 minutes your teeth will be fine. The issue is when you sip it all day. Each sip lowers oral pH, which takes 30 minutes to get back to normal. So if you sip it all day, your oral pH is constantly being pulled down and demineralizing your teeth.
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Old 03-16-2019, 05:45 PM
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The best advice my doctor gave me was to wear some sort of shoes at all times, indoor or out, to reduce the possibility of cuts that go unnoticed. I have a pair of slip-on shoes specifically for indoor wear.
That's good advice, for sure. I never went barefoot before (especially not outdoors), and I certainly don't now. I always wear socks, at a minimum, when indoors, and inspect my feet and toes regularly for any cuts.
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Old 03-18-2019, 07:21 PM
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Root beer is less acidic, so if you switch to that it'll damage your teeth less.

Drinking a large amount of soda in one sitting isn't a big deal. If you chug a liter of coke in 2 minutes your teeth will be fine. The issue is when you sip it all day. Each sip lowers oral pH, which takes 30 minutes to get back to normal. So if you sip it all day, your oral pH is constantly being pulled down and demineralizing your teeth.
Root beer doesn't do shit for a migraine, though.

So other than that, pop is a once-in-a-while thing, just like when I was growing up.
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Old 03-18-2019, 10:41 PM
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What were the signs
Screw signs. Go ask your doctor to test your A1C. It's fast and accurate.
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Old 03-18-2019, 10:44 PM
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My friends say that drinking 6 cans of coke a day (3 cans for break and 3 for lunch) will eventually lead to diabetes. I think not. I'm 5ft 7 and 63kg for a male.

In a day, I'd say I eat about 300g of sugar a day including the 6 cans of coke. Is that really bad?
You're going to destroy your pancreas.
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Old 03-19-2019, 08:51 AM
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In a day, I'd say I eat about 300g of sugar a day including the 6 cans of coke. Is that really bad?
Is that just straight up sugar or are you considering starch too? Like bread, potatoes, pasta and rice. The total number of grams of carbs you eat affects your bloodsugar and your insulin production, not just sugar.
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Old 03-19-2019, 03:18 PM
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Aside from the diabetes and tooth decay, six cans of Coke is over 1000 calories. That means either you are gaining weight, or you are only eating roughly half of the regular food a non-coke drinker would eat. Therefore, you are probably at risk for various dietary deficiencies depending on what your actual diet is.
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