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  #51  
Old 06-05-2016, 08:41 PM
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Red is the new Yellow Brown
That works, too.


For the record, I'm a M+K, or plane-no-condiments, guy.
I'll do either.
  #52  
Old 06-05-2016, 08:45 PM
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This weirdly makes sense to me.
Having just tried a peanut butter dog, they aren't bad but they taste weird. Not bad, just strange. I guess it is something you have to eat many times before you start to really like it.
  #53  
Old 06-05-2016, 08:48 PM
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Peanut butter is also good with salami.
  #54  
Old 06-05-2016, 09:21 PM
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Peanut butter is excellent with salami. Better than with bologna, which is how I ate it as a kid.
  #55  
Old 06-05-2016, 09:31 PM
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The bit I can't understand: The region of the world where ketchup is considered such an abomination is also the same region where they habitually bury their dogs under so much salad that you can't even find the meat. I mean, I could understand a hot dog purist, who liked them plain, or with only one or two specific condiments. But if you're dumping the entire garden on it, what difference does one more topping make?
Exactly.
According to Wikipedia
"The hot dog is topped with yellow mustard, chopped white onions, bright green sweet pickle relish, a dill pickle spear, tomato slices or wedges, pickled sport peppers and a dash of celery salt"

Really, after 7 condiments, 5 of which are vegetables, declaring ketchup as beyond the pale is ridiculous. Your food, your condiments.

I myself never put ketchup on my hot dogs (I'm more of a mayo, mustard, and matchstick fries), but if you like it, splurge on.
  #56  
Old 06-05-2016, 10:30 PM
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The hell did I just write? I mean onions, mustard, and relish. Jimmy's (in Chicago proper, and another one of the hot dog kings) is the same, but they also provide you with a pickle spear.
Actually, never mind. They don't. For some reason, I thought they did, but they do the other standard traditional Chicago dog, onions, relish, and mustard.

Last edited by pulykamell; 06-05-2016 at 10:35 PM.
  #57  
Old 06-05-2016, 10:37 PM
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The Seattle Dog: cream cheese (that's right, you heard me!), grilled onion, jalapeńo peppers and Rooster (Sriracha) Sauce.

Don't judge me!
  #58  
Old 06-05-2016, 10:46 PM
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Originally Posted by Chronos View Post
The bit I can't understand: The region of the world where ketchup is considered such an abomination is also the same region where they habitually bury their dogs under so much salad that you can't even find the meat. I mean, I could understand a hot dog purist, who liked them plain, or with only one or two specific condiments. But if you're dumping the entire garden on it, what difference does one more topping make?
Ketchup is just that much stronger than everything else. I suspect it's because it has so many of the flavors: salty, sweet, sour, and umami. Only bitter really isn't there.

It's hard to use the right (small) amount of ketchup while also making sure it's evenly spread.

That said, I think putting kraut on a dog is also dumb, for the same reason. That stuff overpowers everything. And yet it's really just sour.

Then again, I don't tend to like sour without enough sweet to balance it out.

Last edited by BigT; 06-05-2016 at 10:47 PM.
  #59  
Old 06-06-2016, 12:37 AM
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Really, after 7 condiments, 5 of which are vegetables, declaring ketchup as beyond the pale is ridiculous. Your food, your condiments.
The argument against ketchup isn't that it's a vegetable but that it's largely sugar. That's why kids put it on everything; because it makes stuff sweeter. The sweetness overpowers the other flavors. Besides, the relish already serves a sweet & vinegar flavor better than ketchup could plus gives some additional texture.

This shouldn't be mistaken for me caring about what you put on your hot dog, of course. Go wild with the ketchup if that's what steams your buns.
  #60  
Old 06-06-2016, 01:20 AM
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I've always preferred ketchup on my hot dogs, along all the rest of the condiments you can throw at them. Hot dogs are so salty that the sweetness of the ketchup helps tone down the saltiness enough to render them edible. Otherwise, they're just too salty to be palatable for me.
  #61  
Old 06-06-2016, 01:27 AM
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The passion some people have over the "correct" way other people should consume food will always intrigue and amaze me.
  #62  
Old 06-06-2016, 01:53 AM
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heh best weinerschnitzel non chilly dog is the old western dog it had bacon and and bbq sauce on it and I was fine with that
tho

funny thing tho as a kid I hated hot dogs........
  #63  
Old 06-06-2016, 02:38 AM
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Originally Posted by Ají de Gallina View Post
"The hot dog is topped with yellow mustard, chopped white onions, bright green sweet pickle relish, a dill pickle spear, tomato slices or wedges, pickled sport peppers and a dash of celery salt"
You forgot "a sprinkling of Tabasco sauce."
  #64  
Old 06-06-2016, 02:42 AM
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Sauerkraut with Bavarian mustard is good, provided the kraut is well drained and applied sparingly. The hot dogs/sausages should be steamed in the kraut juice. Ausgezeichnet!
  #65  
Old 06-06-2016, 04:50 AM
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Originally Posted by GuanoLad View Post
The passion some people have over the "correct" way other people should consume food will always intrigue and amaze me.
I have to believe that virtually all of the It-Must-Be-As-Such declarations - at least in this thread - are good natured trash talk.

I can't believe any of us seriously gives a tortoise testicle about others' condiment preferences.

Right?


mmm

Last edited by Mean Mr. Mustard; 06-06-2016 at 04:50 AM.
  #66  
Old 06-06-2016, 05:39 AM
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I have to believe that virtually all of the It-Must-Be-As-Such declarations - at least in this thread - are good natured trash talk.
I believe so.

I hope so.
  #67  
Old 06-06-2016, 08:48 AM
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I use ketchup rather sparingly on anyting--eh, not much for sweet condiments--but is there actually antipathy for ketchup among hot dog snobs?
  #68  
Old 06-06-2016, 08:55 AM
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Originally Posted by Earl Snake-Hips Tucker View Post
I use ketchup rather sparingly on anyting--eh, not much for sweet condiments--but is there actually antipathy for ketchup among hot dog snobs?
See the National Hot Dog Council's etiquette guidelines for yourself. Or Cecil's column. Or Dirty Harry.

I suppose it depends on what you mean by "actual antipathy," (it's all a bit jocular) but, yes, there's a thing -- and it's NOT just Chicagoans (for example, Cecil's column is from a discussion in Montreal), although it is most vociferously expressed here -- about not putting ketchup on hot dogs.

Last edited by pulykamell; 06-06-2016 at 08:57 AM.
  #69  
Old 06-06-2016, 08:57 AM
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Obviously what's needed is a constitutional amendment protecting the right of all citizens to put ketchup anywhere they want on anything they want. We ketchup people have rights, too! You'll have to pry the bottle from my cold, dead hand! (But be careful where you stand if it's a squeeze bottle.)
  #70  
Old 06-06-2016, 09:28 AM
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Agreed!

That said, if you put ketchup on falafel, I will cut you.
  #71  
Old 06-06-2016, 09:45 AM
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So now that Ketchup is okay, who can we ostracize? How about those crazy people who put Cole Slaw on their dogs?
  #72  
Old 06-06-2016, 09:51 AM
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^^Yeah, I'm all for that. In fact, cole slaw on any sandwich--but especially hot dogs.
  #73  
Old 06-06-2016, 10:06 AM
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Ketchup on a Hot Dog is an Abomination. Period.

Ask Clint Eastwood.
Hrumpf. He can sit there in front of his empty chair and complain about his empty hot dog all day if her wants.

Me, I'm adding ketchup. Or even catsup.
  #74  
Old 06-06-2016, 12:01 PM
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Obviously what's needed is a constitutional amendment protecting the right of all citizens to put ketchup anywhere they want on anything they want. We ketchup people have rights, too! You'll have to pry the bottle from my cold, dead hand! (But be careful where you stand if it's a squeeze bottle.)
That will just open up the door for pervert men to jump out and squeeze ketchup on the foods of our innocent little girls. If you're in favor of that, you're a monster.



Semi seriously though, I live in Chicago, most of the Chicago hot dog places I've been to will put ketchup on your hot dog with little guff. The traditional Chicago dog doesn't have ketchup and it's on all the posters and all but you're not going to get struck down by a bolt of lightning for putting it on. I see more back and forth on this board about ketchup on hot dogs than I have ever seen in Chicago.

If I'm at a hot dog stand and I order a traditional Chicago dog, I'll have it without ketchup but if I'm at a cook out or something, I usually put ketchup on it.
  #75  
Old 06-06-2016, 12:43 PM
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^^Yeah, I'm all for that. In fact, cole slaw on any sandwich--but especially hot dogs.
Cole slaw with some kick is pretty much required for BBQ pork sandwiches. I refuse to believe otherwise.
  #76  
Old 06-06-2016, 01:16 PM
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I see more back and forth on this board about ketchup on hot dogs than I have ever seen in Chicago.
It's not about Chicago. It's about adulthood.
  #77  
Old 06-06-2016, 01:38 PM
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The Seattle Dog: cream cheese (that's right, you heard me!), grilled onion, jalapeńo peppers and Rooster (Sriracha) Sauce.
I've had cream cheese on a hot dog at Crif Dogs, a hipster joint on the Lower East Side of Manhattan.

You can get cole slaw on a dog at Papaya King on 82nd and Third Avenue. Which I also enjoyed. Isn't slaw a Pittsburgh thing, though?

I had a couple of Chicago-style dogs at Al's Italian Beef on Taylor Street (Chicago) last week, which were kinda blah. I suppose one shouldn't cross that boundary...I would never order a beef at a hot dog place.
  #78  
Old 06-06-2016, 02:56 PM
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I just had two dogs with mustard, onion, tomato, pickle, relish & celery salt and they were heavenly. All you "There's a garden on my hot dog" people are crazy in your heads. A great mixture of tastes and textures. It probably helps that the hot dogs were being served at the butcher's shop who made them.

They did have ketchup on the counter though.
  #79  
Old 06-06-2016, 03:47 PM
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It's not about Chicago. It's about adulthood.
Haven't you heard? It's OK to like kid's stuff now. You can be a card-carrying, tax-paying adult, and still like video games, superhero movies and ketchup on your hot dogs. The Grownup Police won't come and lock you away.
  #80  
Old 06-06-2016, 04:23 PM
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Hrumpf. He can sit there in front of his empty chair and complain about his empty hot dog all day if her wants.

Me, I'm adding ketchup. Or even catsup.
Ha ha, yeah. I might try a dog with ketchup just out of spite. Up yours, Eastwood!
(I'll get another with mustard, onion, and celery salt; you know, as a palate cleanser!)
  #81  
Old 06-06-2016, 04:47 PM
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You can get cole slaw on a dog at Papaya King on 82nd and Third Avenue. Which I also enjoyed. Isn't slaw a Pittsburgh thing, though?
It may or may not be (I don't know), but it's definitely a West Virginia thing, on a chili dog with mustard and onions. I haven't been to West Virginia, but I've tried this variation at home and it's actually quite good. For me, I really don't give that much a shit about the condiments (although I eschew ketchup on a hot dog in most, but not all, cases) -- I just want a natural casing dog. My main exception is hot dogs like Sonoran dogs or Coney Islands or Cincinnati style dogs where the chili and cheese overwhelm the dog and it doesn't matter so much.

Last edited by pulykamell; 06-06-2016 at 04:50 PM.
  #82  
Old 06-06-2016, 06:38 PM
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Quoth standingwave:

The Seattle Dog: cream cheese (that's right, you heard me!), grilled onion, jalapeńo peppers and Rooster (Sriracha) Sauce.

Don't judge me!
I judge you not guilty, because that sounds delicious.

If it's a good dog, my preference is for the afore-mentioned ballpark mustard, plus kraut and grilled onions. Possibly relish, especially if it's my family's recipe for green tomato relish. But if it's the cheap-o kind I usually buy, yeah, ketchup goes on there too.

And seriously, any of you guys who consider yourselves hot dog connoisseurs, you simply must try Cleveland ballpark mustard if you haven't already. We don't have much in the way of signature foods, but by golly, we have that.
  #83  
Old 06-06-2016, 06:54 PM
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My big beef with some of these hot do combos is that in my experience most places don't give a big enough piece of bread to accommodate all of the toppings, so they sorta cascade down the sides. If I were making my own, I'd probably use a hollowed-out baguette.
  #84  
Old 06-06-2016, 08:50 PM
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Back when I used to eat hot dogs, I discovered the ultimate in over-the-top hot dog, the Sonoran Dog.

Truly a messy-dog lover's delight, purists be damned!
  #85  
Old 06-06-2016, 08:52 PM
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Back when I used to eat hot dogs, I discovered the ultimate in over-the-top hot dog, the Sonoran Dog.

Truly a messy-dog lover's delight, purists be damned!
Long beat you to it in post 7, and, I agree, tasty dog!
  #86  
Old 06-06-2016, 09:38 PM
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I just had two dogs with mustard, onion, tomato, pickle, relish & celery salt and they were heavenly. All you "There's a garden on my hot dog" people are crazy in your heads. A great mixture of tastes and textures. It probably helps that the hot dogs were being served at the butcher's shop who made them.

They did have ketchup on the counter though.
A lot of the signs and marketing material for Chicago dogs say it was "dragged through the garden."
  #87  
Old 06-06-2016, 09:42 PM
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A lot of the signs and marketing material for Chicago dogs say it was "dragged through the garden."
I've lived in Chicago practically my whole life (I'm 40), and I've never seen them advertised as "dragged through the garden." It is a phrase that is familiar to us, but I've never seen it officially used. For a true "dragged through the garden dog," there's Byron's, which a fully dressed dog is: "All sandwiches served with mustard, relish, onions, lettuce, tomato, green pepper, cucumber, pickle and celery salt. (ketchup & hot peppers on request)" Now that is truly dragged through the garden. I find it terrible but, hey, if you feel like you're not getting enough veggies, go for it. A regular "Chicago dog" is just normal hot dog toppings with the addition of tomatoes and a pickle spear which does not have to be eaten with the dog itself (I almost always remove it and eat it separately, as I would with a normal sandwich.) Then there's celery salt and poppy seed bun, which have nothing to do with vegetable toppings.

Last edited by pulykamell; 06-06-2016 at 09:43 PM.
  #88  
Old 06-07-2016, 01:25 AM
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I've lived in Chicago practically my whole life (I'm 40), and I've never seen them advertised as "dragged through the garden." It is a phrase that is familiar to us, but I've never seen it officially used. For a true "dragged through the garden dog," there's Byron's, which a fully dressed dog is: "All sandwiches served with mustard, relish, onions, lettuce, tomato, green pepper, cucumber, pickle and celery salt. (ketchup & hot peppers on request)" Now that is truly dragged through the garden. I find it terrible but, hey, if you feel like you're not getting enough veggies, go for it. A regular "Chicago dog" is just normal hot dog toppings with the addition of tomatoes and a pickle spear which does not have to be eaten with the dog itself (I almost always remove it and eat it separately, as I would with a normal sandwich.) Then there's celery salt and poppy seed bun, which have nothing to do with vegetable toppings.
Byron's is my favorite hot dog joint in the whole city, but I always remove about half the toppings (especially the pickle spear and the tomato slices, and usually the sport peppers as well) and eat them with a fork like a side salad.

And by the bye, I don't recall ever getting lettuce or green peppers on them. Or cucumber, other than the pickle spear.

Last edited by Tim R. Mortiss; 06-07-2016 at 01:27 AM.
  #89  
Old 06-07-2016, 01:36 AM
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Byron's is my favorite hot dog joint in the whole city, but I always remove about half the toppings (especially the pickle spear and the tomato slices, and usually the sport peppers as well) and eat them with a fork like a side salad.

And by the bye, I don't recall ever getting lettuce or green peppers on them. Or cucumber, other than the pickle spear.
Here's a pic and article for you. I've gotten it, and it came with everything.

Quote:
The stand is famous for topping its dogs with a literal salad of ingredients. Along with the traditional seven toppings (mustard, onion, relish, dill pickle, tomato slices, sport peppers, and celery salt) that you'll find on a classic Chicago dog, lettuce, green pepper, and cucumber are also added.
And another cite. (ETA: And the quote in my last post was directly from Byron's website.)

Last edited by pulykamell; 06-07-2016 at 01:38 AM.
  #90  
Old 06-07-2016, 07:18 AM
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Blasphemers, all you ketchup people!

I can forgive the ketchup, actually. However, not the lettuce, which is probably the evil, disgusting, and worthless iceberg variety. All toppings are a go, but not the lettuce.
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Old 06-07-2016, 07:56 AM
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It's 9 in the morning and all I want right now is a hot dog. Damn you people.

But not any hotdog. A chili-cheese and onion dog from my college hotdog stand Carter's.

He would grab a literal handful of cheese and plop it right on there...God it was so good.
  #92  
Old 06-07-2016, 11:47 AM
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Here's a pic and article for you. I've gotten it, and it came with everything.



And another cite. (ETA: And the quote in my last post was directly from Byron's website.)
Ah, I see the problem. I always ask for "Chicago Style" at Byron's. I forgot that they also offer an "everything on it" dog (for people who think Chicago Style is just to minimalist). That looks like a bit much to me.
  #93  
Old 06-07-2016, 12:26 PM
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Ah, I see the problem. I always ask for "Chicago Style" at Byron's. I forgot that they also offer an "everything on it" dog (for people who think Chicago Style is just to minimalist). That looks like a bit much to me.
Yeah, if you just ask for a hot dog at Byron's, everything, you get the whole salad. Typically, for me, "everything" in Chicago always means at least mustard, relish (not necessarily neon green--few in my area do it with that relish), onions. Then many stands will go the full "Chicago dog" route and add some or all of the rest (fresh tomato, or in Superdawg's case, pickled tomato, pickle spear, celery salt, on a poppy seed bun--sport peppers optional on all dogs--I always specify that I want hot peppers) with a very few (like JR's) including fresh cucumber (JR's does this in lieu of the pickle spear). Note that many of the highly vaunted Chicago-area hot dog stands like Jimmy's Red Hots, Gene and Jude's, Red Hot Ranch, 35th Street Red hots just do the relish, onions, and mustard on a plain bun.) So I was very surprised when an "everything" dog at Byron's included lettuce and green peppers. That is not something I expected, and I believe Byron's is the only hot dog stand that does this. The defunct Harry's mentioned above is another place where I was surprised on the definition of "everything," which included ketchup. I can't think of another typical hot dog stand around here where that's standard on an "everything" dog. (I'm not including places that specialize in Sonoran or other regional dogs, or Home Depots, or things of that nature. I'm just talking your regular Chicago-area hot dog stand.)

Last edited by pulykamell; 06-07-2016 at 12:28 PM.
  #94  
Old 06-07-2016, 12:28 PM
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Cole slaw with some kick is pretty much required for BBQ pork sandwiches. I refuse to believe otherwise.
Coleslaw on your sandwich is fine, but if you get a really good pulled pork barbecue - Wilber's in Goldsboro, or King's in Kinston - you don't need to add anything to it. Not salt, not extra sauce, not even a bun.

Heaven.
  #95  
Old 06-07-2016, 12:32 PM
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Coleslaw on your sandwich is fine, but if you get a really good pulled pork barbecue - Wilber's in Goldsboro, or King's in Kinston - you don't need to add anything to it. Not salt, not extra sauce, not even a bun.

Heaven.
You certainly don't, but I've moved away from my more purist stance on this, as I like the acidic complement of the coleslaw (any type, creamy, mustard, or vinegar slaw) to the fatty richness of the pulled pork. Fatty foods, to me, need an acidic complement. Now, they might be on the side, but if I don't feel like fiddling with utensils, put it on the sandwich for me. I think it was Morris Grocery in Eads, TN that finally convinced me of this. I was going to, in my usual manner, ask for the coleslaw to be left off, but, for whatever reason, I had a change of heart, and I'm glad I did. One of the best and sloppiest sandwiches I've had in my life. I've semi-seriously considered making the 8.5 hour trip down there from Chicago for a weekend getaway just for that sandwich.
  #96  
Old 06-07-2016, 04:59 PM
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I like the acidic complement of the coleslaw (any type, creamy, mustard, or vinegar slaw) to the fatty richness of the pulled pork. Fatty foods, to me, need an acidic complement.
Decent slaw also adds texture.
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Old 06-07-2016, 05:28 PM
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Quote:
Quoth snowthx:

I can forgive the ketchup, actually. However, not the lettuce, which is probably the evil, disgusting, and worthless iceberg variety. All toppings are a go, but not the lettuce.
Iceberg lettuce has no business on or in anything. I still can't figure out why that stuff even exists.
  #98  
Old 06-07-2016, 06:26 PM
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Originally Posted by Peremensoe View Post
It's not about Chicago. It's about adulthood.
I'm in my 50's
I own my own home
I've raised three kids and am now putting them through college
I've been voting since the Reagan era
I don't get carded when buying liquor
My "salt and pepper" beard is more salt than pepper
I spend money on things I don't even want... like vacuum cleaners
I worry about saving for retirement

I like ketchup on my hot dog.

<drops mic>
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Old 06-07-2016, 07:07 PM
Earl Snake-Hips Tucker is offline
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Originally Posted by Peremensoe View Post
Decent slaw also adds texture.
There's the rub. Most cole slaw is Mafia Cole Slaw. You can't always rely on cole slaw being good or the god-awful watery generic stuff.
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Old 06-07-2016, 07:17 PM
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Originally Posted by Slow Moving Vehicle View Post
Coleslaw on your sandwich is fine, but if you get a really good pulled pork barbecue - Wilber's in Goldsboro, or King's in Kinston - you don't need to add anything to it. Not salt, not extra sauce, not even a bun.

Heaven.
Goldsboro, huh...did you ever make it down to Grady's in Dudley? I love the flavor/texture of barbecue and cole slaw, but the slaw tends to dissolve the bun if it's put on a sandwich.

Also, I found a nice smokey barbecue ketchup (no relation to the barbecue discussed above) that's absolutely wonderful on a hot dog.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chronos View Post
Iceberg lettuce has no business on or in anything. I still can't figure out why that stuff even exists.
One of my mom's older cousins loves the stuff, and thinks it's the only basis for any salad -- especially a "toss" salad.
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