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  #51  
Old 08-03-2019, 02:32 PM
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'The Lives of Others'. 2006. Gripping film. A crying shame so many people only "know" it through the overuse of the Hitler meltdown scene's use by wags to parody other situations via dubbed subtitiles.
I'm confused about this one. The famous Hitler-losing-it scene comes from a movie called Downfall. Is it referenced in The Lives of Others?
  #52  
Old 08-03-2019, 02:34 PM
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I'm confused about this one. The famous Hitler-losing-it scene comes from a movie called Downfall. Is it referenced in The Lives of Others?
Oops, I meant 'Downfall'.
  #53  
Old 08-03-2019, 03:33 PM
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Alucarda (1977) – Strange and surreal story of young girls getting into devil worship in a repressive convent.

A Stolen Airship (1967) – The usual utterly fantastic Karel Zeman production of boys having a grand adventure. In Mystimation!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CiiBg4QUGWk



The Battle Wizard
(1977) – Outlandish martial arts fantasy; twice the fun and imagination of the same year's Star Wars.

Bed of Roses (1933) – Pre-Code sleaze of two whores on the loose “rooking umpchays.”

The Black Book, a.k.a. Reign of Terror (1950) – French Revolution-set film noir. A b-movie with first-class talent behind the camera.

Challenge of the Ninja, a.k.a. Heroes of the East (1978) – Gordon Liu is forced to marry a crazed Japanese woman who keeps trying to kill him. Then he inadvertently insults her family and has to battle them. Great martial arts action, humor and theme.

Crime Spree
(2003) – Virtually unknown French ensemble comedy of inept crooks set up in Chicago.

Day Watch (2006) – Less bombastic sequel to Night Watch is more entertaining as various odd characters seek the “Chalk of Life.”

Death in the Garden (1956) – Obscure, ironic and largely unheralded Luis Buñuel-directed film of characters on the lam in an unrelenting jungle.

Dog Day (1984) – French-made elegy to the American gangster with Lee Marvin, Tina Louise (small role) and scene-stealing David Bennent (from The Tin Drum), one of the greatest child actors ever.

Dragon Chronicles (1994) – Awesome martial arts fantasy of dying master looking for worthy successor to take on betrayer Ting and his devastating Melting Stance. Almost as good as Swordsman II (1992).

Kongo (1932) – Superior remake of West of Zanzibar (1928) remains one of the most politically incorrect films ever released by a Hollywood studio.

The Last Valley (1971) – Bleak 30 Years War story with no one to root for.

Marquis (1989) – Actors in weird animal masks play out Bastille-based story with lots of philosophy and perversity.

The President Vanishes (1934) – A politically connected judge conspires with leaders of industry to get the U.S. into another war to boost profits…but then the prez vanishes! Prescient and amazing.

Revengers Tragedy (2002) – Updated adaptation of Jacobean-era tragedy retains the (not for passive listening) language in one of director Alex Cox’s best - and least seen - films.

Sleeping Car to Trieste (1948) – Superior remake of Rome Express (1932) with everyone after a stolen diary.

State Secret (1950) – Surgeon in “Vosnia” operates on dictator, who dies, forcing surgeon on the lam. Great cast, suspense, cynicism and a cool subjective camera opening sequence.

The Sword of Doom (1966) – Master swordsmen Tatsuya Nakadai is going nuts in one of greatest samurai movies ever.

Two Seconds (1932) – As E.G. Robinson goes to the e-chair, a flashback reveals how he got there in tawdry pre-Code story.

Vidocq (2001) – Legendary French detective tries to solve weird murders. Brilliant production design, though inclusion of supernatural elements and the super-lame revelation of the killer are regrettable.

Wicked City (1987) – Outlandish fantasy of alien “reptoids” living amongst humans and the Anti-Reptoid Squad cops pledged to bring them down.

Last edited by Dropo; 08-03-2019 at 03:36 PM.
  #54  
Old 08-03-2019, 03:52 PM
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The Revenger's Tragedy is the only movie I've ever seen that rivals Titus for gleeful, over the top old school ultraviolence. I loved it but everyone else watching with me was all "Dafuq did I just watch?!"
  #55  
Old 08-03-2019, 04:49 PM
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"Nebraska" and "About Schmidt" aren't obscure. The former was nominated for six Oscars, while the latter had nominations for best actor (Nicholson) and best actress (Kathy Bates). "Downfall" (which BrickBat meant to name instead of "The Lives of Others") was nominated for best foreign language film. I love "Nebraska" and like the other two, but I don't think they meet the OP's criteria.
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  #56  
Old 08-03-2019, 05:05 PM
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"Nebraska" and "About Schmidt" aren't obscure. The former was nominated for six Oscars, while the latter had nominations for best actor (Nicholson) and best actress (Kathy Bates). "Downfall" (which BrickBat meant to name instead of "The Lives of Others") was nominated for best foreign language film. I love "Nebraska" and like the other two, but I don't think they meet the OP's criteria.
Based on conversations with people over the years, I've run into very few people that actually heard of those films, let alone saw them. It's anecdotal. In any case, the OP didn't use the term obscure, just that movies one thinks not many others have seen.
  #57  
Old 08-03-2019, 05:20 PM
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I'm confused about this one. The famous Hitler-losing-it scene comes from a movie called Downfall. Is it referenced in The Lives of Others?
Good movie.. I thought of a German movie made around 2004, called "The Edukators", pretty cool movie.
  #58  
Old 08-03-2019, 05:30 PM
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I thought I'd posted this, but it must have been in a different, similar thread. Anyways, True Stories. It's a really charming movie David Byrne made about his visiting a small town in Texas about to celebrate its sesquicentennial. That's why it says "A film about a bunch of people in Virgil Texas" on the titlecard.

Auto Focus is another Greatest Movie No One Has Seen. Greg Kinnear plays Bob Crane as he descends into depravity during and after his career on Hogan's Heroes.
  #59  
Old 08-03-2019, 05:32 PM
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Fantastic Planet gave me the heebie-jeebies, but A Town Called Panic was a riot.
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  #60  
Old 08-03-2019, 09:19 PM
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Based on conversations with people over the years, I've run into very few people that actually heard of those films, let alone saw them. It's anecdotal. In any case, the OP didn't use the term obscure, just that movies one thinks not many others have seen.

Good lord. Men in tights. spiderman, batman, superman. Very few people have actually heard of fuck all. Don't know who Bette Davis, Cary Grant, or John Wayne are. No color, 'splosions, CGI? Jesus.
  #61  
Old 08-03-2019, 10:27 PM
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Short Term 12 - Brie Larson plays a staff member in a short-term foster home for children who have no other place to go. Kaitlin Dever is particularly good as a new girl who arrives at the facility.
I concur.


Another movie I like a whole lot is It's Kind of a Funny Story.
  #62  
Old 08-03-2019, 10:31 PM
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The Revenger's Tragedy is the only movie I've ever seen that rivals Titus for gleeful, over the top old school ultraviolence. I loved it but everyone else watching with me was all "Dafuq did I just watch?!"
Ever see Tokyo Gore Police?
  #63  
Old 08-04-2019, 10:17 AM
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"Next Stop, Greenwich Village" is a great movie.
  #64  
Old 08-04-2019, 10:37 AM
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My list could go on a long time:

Mr. 880 -- about a friendly neighborhood counterfeiter.
Screen Door Jesus -- probably shouldn't count, since it was barely released, but a hilarious satire on religious fanaticism.
The Time of Their Lives -- Charming Abbott and Costello movie that isn't a comedy; Costello is quite good as a sad sack hero.
Young and Innocent -- nice Alfred Hitchcock "running man" movie.
Local Hero -- charming film about a small Irish village and how plans to set up a refinery affects them.
Gallipoli -- WWI drama, an early Mel Gibson film
Slither (1973) -- James Caan, Peter Boyle, Sally Kellerman, and Louise Lasser on the hunt for stolen money.
Hearts of the West -- about moviemaking in early Hollywood. Has my favorite movie quote of all time (see below). (I also just learned that Harlan Ellison also loved the quote).
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  #65  
Old 08-04-2019, 11:10 AM
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I don't think many Americans shelled out bux to go see an art film about an East German playwright and the Stasi agent assigned to surveil him, but I found The Lives of Others to be a very touching film.

Likewise, Pan's Labyrinth, which I saw around the same time, was brilliant. But I don't think that was all that obscure; most people I've mentioned it to seem to be familiar with it.

A couple of my favorite films aren't really that obscure; but I don't think they were blockbusters, either, so maybe not that many people saw them. I had a coworker who lived in my building, who had a vast collection of obscure Chinese fantasy/sci-fi/martial arts flicks. He showed me Hero, about a year and a half before the U.S. theatrical release (and with, I thought, a much better translation for the English subtitles). Again, not really that obscure - Hero was nominated for the Best Foreign Language Oscar the year it came out over here - but it was a stunning and beautiful film.

As was A River Runs Through It, with Tom Skerritt, Craig Sheaffer, and Brad Pitt. This is the film I've seen that comes closest to being as good as the book upon which it's based. And given that the Norman Maclean novella is IMO one of the finest pieces of American literature from the last century, that's saying something.

Another vote, too, for The Red Violin.


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The Barkley Marathons: The Race That Eats Its Young - hardest footrace on the planet
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Have you seen Where Dreams Go To Die? It's Ethan Newberry ("The Ginger Runner")'s film about Gary Robbins' 2017 Barkley Marathons, when he missed becoming the 16th finisher by an excruciating six seconds (after 60 hours!).
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  #66  
Old 08-04-2019, 11:12 AM
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Double post. The board is acting weird again.
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Last edited by Slow Moving Vehicle; 08-04-2019 at 11:15 AM.
  #67  
Old 08-04-2019, 12:25 PM
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Local Hero is set in Scotland, not Ireland.
  #68  
Old 08-05-2019, 09:52 PM
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Minor hijack for a movie review, if you don't mind...

Harry and Tonto was mentioned a few times in this thread. It had been on my list for a while anyway, so I watched it last night. When I encounter a good film I find I either know it right away, or I don't get it at first and don't know what to make of it. This was the latter.

I found it mildly amusing as I watched it, liked it more as it went. But I didn't think it would be one I'd be revisiting. Kept thinking about it, kept thinking about it. Went to bed and found myself thinking about it some more. Woke up this morning and decided it was a really good film that I will be re-watching. One of the reviews I read, possibly Roger Ebert's, said Art Carney's performance was so deft that you sort of don't notice it. I went back and watched two scenes: The one where he visits an old lover in a retirement home, and the final scene when he's talking to the cat lady at the beach. Both very touching.

I think we're meant to see a bit of ourselves in most main characters, and I aspire to be like Harry when I'm an old man. He's very good-natured, although prone to crankiness when crossed or feels his time is being wasted. And he's very open to new learning and new people. Struck me as young at heart in that way. Glad this thread got me in the mood to watch.

Last edited by Llama Llogophile; 08-05-2019 at 09:55 PM.
  #69  
Old 08-06-2019, 05:03 AM
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I love the slasher film mockumentary Behind the Mask: The Rise of Leslie Vernon

It's very 2006, but its so much fun. It takes place in a world where all the classic slasher movies were real events, and follows an aspiring slasher as a student documentary crew tags along as he gets ready to start his first kill spree. It's so great. I can't even tell you.
I forgot about this one, this is a wonderful parody of serial killer tropes, almost like a supernatural Man Bites Dog (which I don't count as obscure here).

I remember the bit about how supernatural serial killers just walk slowly at around 30 miles per hour, while the victim is running away.

I need to go off and buy this dvd...
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Old 08-06-2019, 05:06 AM
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Hawks (1988), Timothy Dalton and Anthony Edwards as two men dying of cancer stealing an ambulance and having one last fling in Amsterdam, darkly funny, and still not available on dvd.
  #71  
Old 08-06-2019, 06:55 AM
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Some excellent South African films:
Paljas
The Road to Mecca
Boesman and Lena (the 1973 production with the playwright Fugard, not the remake with Danny Glover and Angela Basset, which is ... OK)
Fiela se Kind (there was also a recent remake, haven't seen it)
The Angel, the Bicycle and the Chinaman's Finger
  #72  
Old 08-06-2019, 12:42 PM
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Fear of a Black Hat - basically "This is Spinal Tap" of 90's gangsta rap.
Seconded.

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My contributions:

'Round Midnight
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The Last of Sheila
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  #73  
Old 08-06-2019, 01:41 PM
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Minor hijack for a movie review, if you don't mind...

Harry and Tonto was mentioned a few times in this thread. It had been on my list for a while anyway, so I watched it last night. When I encounter a good film I find I either know it right away, or I don't get it at first and don't know what to make of it. This was the latter.

I found it mildly amusing as I watched it, liked it more as it went. But I didn't think it would be one I'd be revisiting. Kept thinking about it, kept thinking about it. Went to bed and found myself thinking about it some more. Woke up this morning and decided it was a really good film that I will be re-watching. One of the reviews I read, possibly Roger Ebert's, said Art Carney's performance was so deft that you sort of don't notice it. I went back and watched two scenes: The one where he visits an old lover in a retirement home, and the final scene when he's talking to the cat lady at the beach. Both very touching.

I think we're meant to see a bit of ourselves in most main characters, and I aspire to be like Harry when I'm an old man. He's very good-natured, although prone to crankiness when crossed or feels his time is being wasted. And he's very open to new learning and new people. Struck me as young at heart in that way. Glad this thread got me in the mood to watch.
So glad you saw this! The acting is great, and the writing is top notch. It spoke for its time, but it still applies today. Very early on, Harry jokes to the oldster selling the newspapers, "Who is Vice-President this week?" -- "Who cares?" - cynicism.

His friend Jakob is hilarious, and the conversations between the men are spot-on about society, and he shows his humanity towards Harry. We also see the hitchhikers point of view (and everyone he meets), especially his children's relationship, and the idea of wanting to help, but not wanting it to affect them -which is impossible. Even the grandsons were funny, and we can see three generations. Funny, too.

Last edited by MortSahlFan; 08-06-2019 at 01:42 PM.
  #74  
Old 08-06-2019, 01:47 PM
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LOL, I have not and no offense but I think I'll keep it that way. The only reason I watched Revenger's Tragedy was because of the Jacobean theater origin--the violence was a bit of a surprise although it shouldn't have been. They were remarkably bloodthirsty back in the day!
  #75  
Old 08-06-2019, 02:10 PM
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Note, this is from a U.S. perspective. I'm sure plenty of folks have seen these from their respective countries.

--Secret Sunshine. It won an award at Cannes so maybe more folks in the U.S. have seen it than I would think. Stars IMO the best actress of the past 20 years (Do-yeon Jeon). Not the best "Korean actress" but just damn the best in the world. One of the best-acted scenes I've ever watched in a movie is in this film--a scene where for the most part she doesn't even say anything. She conveys everything via an expression--how her world is changing in real time just via a reaction shot.

And another one by Do-yeon Jeon -- The Harmonium in My Memory.

Some more Korean movies that I'm guessing most folks reading this will not have seen:
Sunny (Extrememly funny, thoughtful, and engaging film of 7 girls who form a friendship pact as young high schoolers, and then re-connect as adults.)

M (Amazingly visual dreamlike story of a writer who rediscovers his muse in the memories of his first love, who may or may not be real.)

Marathon (Fantastic true story movie about a boy with autism and the dedication of his mother who pulls out all the stops to see that he lives his dream of running a marathon race.)

No Blood, No Tears (Really fun heist action/comedy. Also stars...wait for it...Do-yeon Jeon)

Wanee and Junha (romantic drama with a bit of a twist)

A Moment to Remember (the best romantic melodrama I've ever seen)

I better stop or my Korean list will become unwieldy. (But it won't include any Ki-duk Kim! My reaction to his films mostly ranges from really hate to outright detest).

A couple of 5-star Japanese films:
The Mystery of Rampo (A mystery writer creates a story where a woman murders her husband by allowing him to suffocate in a trunk. But he burns the manuscript before it ever gets published. The next day, he reads a story in the newspaper where a woman murders her husband by allowing him to suffocate in a trunk. Lots of fantastical mystery elements in this one.)

Angel Dust (Detective tries to figure out a serial killer who is elusive despite his predictability: every Monday at 6:00 PM a 20-something girl drops dead right in the middle of the crowded Tokyo subway).

Sure, why not. A couple of worthy HK films
Men Suddenly in Black (extremely funny comedy with some spoof elements)

C'est la Vie, Mon Cheri (good romance)

and a guilty pleasure...A Chinese Torture Chamber Story (Category III spectacle with the added bonus of being funny as hell)
  #76  
Old 08-06-2019, 04:21 PM
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Let me narrow things down, quite specifically: Early films of Kim Dickens.

Palookaville with William Forsythe is a hoot.
Truth or Consequences, N.M. is not a hoot. Very gritty.
Things Behind the Sun with a lot of good people. Eerie/dreamy/non-standard.
Zero Effect. While a SDMB fave, not known to most people in the real world.
  #77  
Old 08-06-2019, 04:24 PM
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The Reflecting Skin - (1990)

After that, it really isn't a disgusting gore movie at all. Viggo Moretensen is in it, by the way. It's more about the types of trauma and things that happen out in the country.

Worth it.
I saw this movie as a teenager and... well it definitely sticks with you. I still remember it pretty distinctly 20 years later.
  #78  
Old 08-06-2019, 04:30 PM
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My suggestion is Clockwatchers (1997), starring Toni Collette, Parker Posey, Alanna Ubach and Lisa Kudrow. It starts out like an indie comedy but takes a turn for the more dramatic when you start to get a glimpse of who people really are behind the facade. It is an extremely realistic portrayal of working a shitty office job (I'm not really selling it, am I?)

One of my all-time favorites that seemingly slipped through the cracks... whenever I mention it, people get it confused with the completely unrelated Clockstoppers (2002)
  #79  
Old 08-06-2019, 04:50 PM
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My suggestion is Breaker Morant (1988).

Set during the Boer War in South Africa and featuring a trio of British Colonial soldiers on trial for war crimes, it examines the nature of the contract between soldiers and the government they fight for.

It got 100% on Rotten Tomatoes.
  #80  
Old 08-06-2019, 04:54 PM
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I Saw The Devil

This is currently the best movie I've watched this summer. Intense, brutal, immensely well made and satisfying. Very intense and sometimes violent, but just a masterpiece.

It is a well known Korean movie, but I don't know anyone who talks about it and I'd never seen it. It might be better than Oldboy, honestly.

(streamed on Hulu, by the way)

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I saw this movie as a teenager and... well it definitely sticks with you. I still remember it pretty distinctly 20 years later.
Oh, yes. It's almost Twin Peaks like in its eeriness and ability to stick in your mind. Kind of off-putting.
  #81  
Old 08-06-2019, 04:55 PM
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Ha, here's one obscure enough that I have literally never met anyone who's seen it unless I basically forced them to--Barry McKenzie Holds His Own. Fucking hilarious with a bizarre left turn into a weird vampire subplot and plenty of Dame Edna. I might be the only non-Aussie who's voluntarily watched this movie--more than once, even!
  #82  
Old 08-06-2019, 06:43 PM
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The Odd Angry Shot - Possibly the best movie on the Vietnam war, from an Aussie perspective.
  #83  
Old 08-06-2019, 07:34 PM
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Two Australian films I fell in love with when we lived overseas. I have no idea how they did anywhere else.

Muriel's Wedding

On my top 5 movie list: Strictly Ballroom
  #84  
Old 08-06-2019, 07:58 PM
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Out of the hundreds of DVDs I own, the 2010 film Miss Nobody is one of my favorites. It's an awesome black comedy. Yet I've never met anyone else who has seen it.

Another favorite of mine is the 1991 film Black Robe. Ever seen it?
  #85  
Old 08-07-2019, 12:34 PM
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Out of the hundreds of DVDs I own, the 2010 film Miss Nobody is one of my favorites. It's an awesome black comedy. Yet I've never met anyone else who has seen it.
Yep, seen that. I remember it being quite funny.
  #86  
Old 08-07-2019, 04:37 PM
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Two Australian films I fell in love with when we lived overseas. I have no idea how they did anywhere else.

Muriel's Wedding
I liked this movie.. It was always playing in the US (Sundance channel) around 2007
  #87  
Old 08-08-2019, 05:46 AM
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I love Little Children, House of Games and Local Hero.

Mine are:
A Midnight Clear (WW II American soldiers in a German forest-I think it's based on a true story)
Bad Influence (James Spader and Rob Lowe)
Matchstick Men (Nicolas Cage and Sam Rockwell as con men)
  #88  
Old 08-08-2019, 07:16 AM
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Purple Hearts. Vietnam war movie with Ken Wahl and Cheryl Ladd at their peak as medicos. Trying not to get too romantic 'cause ... war.

The secondary cast is great. Stephen Lee is amazing as one of Wahl's buddies. The always charming Annie McEnroe as Ladd's. James Whitmore Jr.* as the aptly named Bwana. Etc.

Throw in R. Lee Ermey because it's a Viet Nam war movie because who else are you going to cast as Gunny? (And 3 years before Full Metal Jacket.)

Good acting, good dialogue, good story.

* That's his stage name. He is actually III. Which makes his son not III but really IV. Got it?
  #89  
Old 08-08-2019, 11:44 PM
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Hope and Glory (1987)

It's about growing up as a child in London during WWII.

Not sentimental, not conventional, not sanitised, not dumbed down. Not made for American audiences. Brilliant child actor in lead role.

Director John Boorman drew on his own personal experiences. There are many reviews by people who actually grew up in London in WWII who say, 'That's exactly how it really was.' Great scene of children celebrating when their school gets bombed!
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Old 08-09-2019, 01:10 AM
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The Red Shoes (1948)

Absolutely the best ballet movie ever made, whether you care about ballet or not. The original trailer is misleading, and doesn't give a sense of the movie. Anton Walbrook is brilliant as the imperious Russian impresario, Lermontov, who runs the dance company. He cares deeply and passionately about ballet... but not so much about people. Moira Shearer is an incredible dancer in the lead role.

Clips:

Lermontov has hired Vicki Page on a trial basis, and later watches her dance for another company at a small, cheap matinee in tiny hall.

Great scene: Rehearsals for a new ballet.

Last edited by GreenWyvern; 08-09-2019 at 01:15 AM.
  #91  
Old 08-09-2019, 01:26 AM
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Ridicule, in which an 18th-Century French aristocrat learns why people hated 18th-Century French aristocrats.
That was a good mainstay of French class movie day. Versailles Dirty Dozens.
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Fear of a Black Hat - basically "This is Spinal Tap" of 90's gangsta rap.
It came out the same year as CB4, and the latter had Chris Rock so not many people watched FoaBH. They should've, it's way better.
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A Midnight Clear (WW II American soldiers in a German forest-I think it's based on a true story)
The author claims so. I read the book, if I'm not butchering it I recall the dedication is something like "This is a true story. Names have been changed to protect the guilty."
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Old 08-09-2019, 02:22 AM
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The cool ones.Roddy McDowall.Debbie Watson

the shooting Jack Nicolason
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Old 08-09-2019, 07:07 AM
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A Ghost Story - this one streams included with Amazon Prime

Gist: Casey Affleck plays a husband who die(<--not spoiler) and remains as a ghost. One with a sheet and two eyeholes cut out. He watches his wife go on without him, the world go on without him, time go on without him, and we see the things he sees and hear what he hears. Cheesy sounding, but powerful and haunting. Great movie.
  #94  
Old 08-09-2019, 08:34 AM
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Big Man on Campus a re-telling of Hunchback of Notre Dame. Has some great lines that one friend and I use frequently, but no-one else has ever heard.
  #95  
Old 08-09-2019, 10:24 AM
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Quote:
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--Secret Sunshine. It won an award at Cannes so maybe more folks in the U.S. have seen it than I would think. Stars IMO the best actress of the past 20 years (Do-yeon Jeon). Not the best "Korean actress" but just damn the best in the world. One of the best-acted scenes I've ever watched in a movie is in this film--a scene where for the most part she doesn't even say anything. She conveys everything via an expression--how her world is changing in real time just via a reaction shot.
I watched this last night on your recommendation and really liked it. As you say, Do-yeon Jeon's acting was excellent. Also, the story line isn't predictable: there are a couple of changes in direction that I didn't see coming at all. One of them happens in the scene you describe.
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Old 08-09-2019, 10:36 AM
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The Zero Effect

Bill Pullman is great as a private detective. A master of disguise when pretending to be someone else. A miserable wreck when being himself.

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I always say that the essence of my work relies fundamentally on two basic principles: objectivity and observation, or "the two obs" as I call them. My work relies on my ability to remain absolutely, purely objective, detached. I have mastered the fine art of detachment. And while it comes at some cost, this supreme objectivity is what makes me, I dare say, the greatest observer the world has ever known.
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  #97  
Old 08-09-2019, 12:21 PM
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Ridicule, in which an 18th-Century French aristocrat learns why people hated 18th-Century French aristocrats.
Huh. Not only did I not know that movie had ever left our shores, now I really wonder how they translated it since so much of the esprit in that movie is so very much based on either French culture or its language.
But yes, very good movie. If you'd like to see more of the sort-of-similar, I'd highly recommend Beaumarchais l'Insolent.
  #98  
Old 08-09-2019, 10:56 PM
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Six String Samurai - in the aftermath of a US/Soviet war in which the US lost and was invaded, Buddy Holly is on a pilgrimage to Vegas for maybe a chance to be king, after The King dies. Along the way he has run ins (resolved both with music and the sword) with other guitar wielders of various genres, all of whom are on the same pilgrimage. Russian surf rock, imminently quotable, very bizarre.
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Old 08-09-2019, 11:01 PM
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Six String Samurai - in the aftermath of a US/Soviet war in which the US lost and was invaded, Buddy Holly is on a pilgrimage to Vegas for maybe a chance to be king, after The King dies. Along the way he has run ins (resolved both with music and the sword) with other guitar wielders of various genres, all of whom are on the same pilgrimage. Russian surf rock, imminently quotable, very bizarre.
The Red Elvises are in that! They were great back then, not sure what's become of them lately.
  #100  
Old 08-09-2019, 11:49 PM
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Originally Posted by Eonwe View Post
Six String Samurai - in the aftermath of a US/Soviet war in which the US lost and was invaded, Buddy Holly is on a pilgrimage to Vegas for maybe a chance to be king, after The King dies. Along the way he has run ins (resolved both with music and the sword) with other guitar wielders of various genres, all of whom are on the same pilgrimage. Russian surf rock, imminently quotable, very bizarre.
Reminds me: Bubba Ho-Tep. An evil mummy stalks a retirement home, and only Elvis and John F. Kennedy (who has since been turned into a black man) can stop him.
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