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  #101  
Old 03-12-2019, 11:30 PM
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A USC volleyball coach was arrested here in Waikiki today by the FBI in connection with the scandal. I think the team was here to play the U of Hawaii.

EDIT: The local news is saying something about he was here with the water-polo team, not volleyball. But he seems to be a coach for both.
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  #102  
Old 03-12-2019, 11:41 PM
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Wait a minute, you know a mentally retarded girl who has a masters degree and was also popular, who may or not have been a lesbian and also a high school art teacher, wow that's some accomplished tard right!
I don't know her now. This was a HS classmate.

The "lesbian" thing was an impulsive kind of thing; how would you feel if someone kept touching you and you didn't like it, and they weren't doing it to other people?

She did not look, or on the surface act, mentally disabled, but a brief conversation gave it away.
  #103  
Old 03-13-2019, 12:15 AM
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Wait a minute, you know a mentally retarded girl who has a masters degree and was also popular, who may or not have been a lesbian and also a high school art teacher, wow that's some accomplished tard right!
Moderating:

What the hell? I know you are probably trying to make some other point but knock it off. Do not use the word tard to describe someone with a mental disability.
  #104  
Old 03-13-2019, 12:26 AM
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A couple interesting items I've seen in various news pieces:

Macy is on tape talking about planning to go through with the plan for his younger daughter. Either they decided to not follow through or there is no evidence any money was exchanged for the younger daughter. There is no evidence linking him to the payout for the older daughter.

This all started from information uncovered during a different unrelated investigation. Fake test scores were submitted to three Boston schools but none of those schools were named in the indictment. Apparently they have no evidence that the scheme was successful there. However since the investigation started in Boston that is where the prosecution is occurring.

Last edited by Loach; 03-13-2019 at 12:27 AM.
  #105  
Old 03-13-2019, 01:13 AM
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apparently there was a ringleader and enough people under him for the USAG's office to be able to use the RICO act but the analyst said that was just being used so people would cut deals IE the parents and such
  #106  
Old 03-13-2019, 02:55 AM
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This just confirms something I've believed for a long time: colleges should not have any sports activities. Period.

I mean, if the students want to get some exercise, they definitely should have access to fields or courts or whatever - but they gotta bring their own ball.
  #107  
Old 03-13-2019, 08:27 AM
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Depends on the field of study. UT Austin is considered very prestigious in law and political circles. Univ of MI and Washington U (St Louis) are top med schools. And Univ of PA has the #1 ranked business school. It's not all about the Ivy League any more.
AFAIK, this scandal is about freshman undergraduate admissions, not graduate schools.

UT's a fine school, but IMO, it's not worth bribing anyone to get into, certainly not to the tune of six figures.
  #108  
Old 03-13-2019, 08:35 AM
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I guess I'm trying to think like the rich entitled corrupt parents. I'm well aware that getting admitted to many schools is difficult. If I was going to be bribing with that kind of money I want a school with more cachet.
That's my point- state schools are generally a good value, but if you're going to bribe someone and throw down that much money and take that risk, why would you do so at somewhere like UCLA or UT? Even within Texas, most people are going to be far more awed by a degree from MIT than UT (or any other state school).

That's why I was saying that being named in this suit is a big humongous endorsement for UT- it's basically saying that they're good enough for people to bribe people huge amounts of money for admissions.

Which is kind of funny, because in-state, you can swing a dead cat and hit a half-dozen Longhorns (or Aggies, or Red Raiders, or whatever) at any professional workplace.
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Old 03-13-2019, 08:51 AM
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This just confirms something I've believed for a long time: colleges should not have any sports activities. Period.

I mean, if the students want to get some exercise, they definitely should have access to fields or courts or whatever - but they gotta bring their own ball.
From what I understand, the kids were *not* going to join the college team. The sports fraud was more about making the kids look more well rounded by saying they were on a HS team. But they weren't on a HS team and they weren't going to play in college. The bribery to the coaches was so that they would tell the admission board that the coach wanted the student as a recruit so the student would be ranked higher. It's similar to how the parents might have said the kids did charity work and then bribed the president of the charity to forge work records. It was just a way to make the kid look better to the admission board.
  #110  
Old 03-13-2019, 08:58 AM
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That's my point- state schools are generally a good value, but if you're going to bribe someone and throw down that much money and take that risk, why would you do so at somewhere like UCLA or UT? Even within Texas, most people are going to be far more awed by a degree from MIT than UT (or any other state school).

That's why I was saying that being named in this suit is a big humongous endorsement for UT- it's basically saying that they're good enough for people to bribe people huge amounts of money for admissions.

Which is kind of funny, because in-state, you can swing a dead cat and hit a half-dozen Longhorns (or Aggies, or Red Raiders, or whatever) at any professional workplace.
Because 1) bribing your way in to MIT or UCLA would take 8 figures, at least, not 6 and 2) for these parents and kids, it wasn't about trying to max out your educational opportunities or prestige, it was about having the opportunity to have a "fun" or "typical" college experience--lots of parties and road trips and sex and drugs and rock and roll, all in a carefully curated environment where the riff-raff are kept out. The point isn't what happens after school, it's the school experience itself.

And UT/TAMU admissions are an entirely different game now. I can't even begin to describe some of the kids I've seen declined or CAPed in recent years. As I said upthread, it's become unremarkable to have a kid get into MIT or Wash U or Vanderbilt and not get into UT. (It happens the other way, too, of course).
  #111  
Old 03-13-2019, 08:58 AM
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From what I understand, the kids were *not* going to join the college team. The sports fraud was more about making the kids look more well rounded by saying they were on a HS team. But they weren't on a HS team and they weren't going to play in college. The bribery to the coaches was so that they would tell the admission board that the coach wanted the student as a recruit so the student would be ranked higher. It's similar to how the parents might have said the kids did charity work and then bribed the president of the charity to forge work records. It was just a way to make the kid look better to the admission board.
But coaches get a limited number of "recruits," and each one takes up an admission slot. Bribing the coaches deprive students who earned a spot of their rightful place in the admittance process.

This is just starting to unravel. Internal investigations are going to snare any number of university employees who got paid off along the way.

I wonder if a judge could impose a 5 year ban from social media as part of the punishment for these kids/parents? That would kill and chance of Laughlin, for example, monetizing the experience.
  #112  
Old 03-13-2019, 09:08 AM
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People are saying this is a scandal of liberal elites but Loughlin is conservative and Christian, as mentioned above she would go on TV shows like the 700 club.
  #113  
Old 03-13-2019, 09:17 AM
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People are saying this is a scandal of liberal elites but Loughlin is conservative and Christian, as mentioned above she would go on TV shows like the 700 club.
Jesus would definitely support bribing your kids way into college. It's right there in Paul's letter to the Iumentans.
  #114  
Old 03-13-2019, 09:17 AM
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It's not just about prestige. Schools lile UT and USC offer a fantastic, traditional college "experience". Great Greek life, amazing foitball games, night life, lots of fellow elites to go to Europe with. . . I think it's quite possible that mediocre children of the elite would want to go there simply for FUN, not because they think it will impress others or pay off in their professional life. It seems crazy to spend that kind of money for fun, but hey, people go to Disney World and thats probably a higher % of their assets than this is for a lot of those families.
I agree with this, even though I don't drink and wasn't interested in parties. We used to joke that college would be a fun four years if not for the classes that interfered with everything else.
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Old 03-13-2019, 09:58 AM
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I bet that the prosecutors will pressure the parents to plead guilty in exchange for letting the kids off.
  #116  
Old 03-13-2019, 10:00 AM
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But coaches get a limited number of "recruits," and each one takes up an admission slot. Bribing the coaches deprive students who earned a spot of their rightful place in the admittance process.
Right! Some other parent dropped half a million into crew so their kid could get an advantage!

I mean, actually getting up and rowing every morning is certainly way more honorable than pretending that you did, but it's true that "put a ton of money into a hyper-elite sport" has always been a bit of a run-around selective admissions in any case.
  #117  
Old 03-13-2019, 10:06 AM
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I mean, actually getting up and rowing every morning is certainly way more honorable than pretending that you did, but it's true that "put a ton of money into a hyper-elite sport" has always been a bit of a run-around selective admissions in any case.
Always has been. Always has been cheating, too.

I'm not against the old tried and true method of donating a building or three. But that is for the mega-rich. The regular rich have to resort to hyper-elite sports and bribery. Poor dears!
  #118  
Old 03-13-2019, 10:12 AM
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From what I understand, the kids were *not* going to join the college team. The sports fraud was more about making the kids look more well rounded by saying they were on a HS team. But they weren't on a HS team and they weren't going to play in college. The bribery to the coaches was so that they would tell the admission board that the coach wanted the student as a recruit so the student would be ranked higher. It's similar to how the parents might have said the kids did charity work and then bribed the president of the charity to forge work records. It was just a way to make the kid look better to the admission board.
Then the problem is that there was a team in the first place, and a coach. And hell, that there are teams in high school, too. IMHO, beyond PE class, education and sports should be kept completely separate.
  #119  
Old 03-13-2019, 10:14 AM
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From what I understand, the kids were *not* going to join the college team. The sports fraud was more about making the kids look more well rounded by saying they were on a HS team. But they weren't on a HS team and they weren't going to play in college. The bribery to the coaches was so that they would tell the admission board that the coach wanted the student as a recruit so the student would be ranked higher. It's similar to how the parents might have said the kids did charity work and then bribed the president of the charity to forge work records. It was just a way to make the kid look better to the admission board.
I thought it was about getting the kid admitted under the lower standards for student athletes?
  #120  
Old 03-13-2019, 10:35 AM
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From what I understand, the kids were *not* going to join the college team. The sports fraud was more about making the kids look more well rounded by saying they were on a HS team. But they weren't on a HS team and they weren't going to play in college. The bribery to the coaches was so that they would tell the admission board that the coach wanted the student as a recruit so the student would be ranked higher. It's similar to how the parents might have said the kids did charity work and then bribed the president of the charity to forge work records. It was just a way to make the kid look better to the admission board.
"Well-rounded" is meaningless here. It has nothing to do with the kid's past. Basically, what happens is that coaches are tasked with developing a great team. So they want the best kids, and a big part if their authority is the ability to pick their students. So basically, the admissions people give the coaches a (relatively low) minimum standard, and then the coaches do their thing. They give the admissions people a list of recruits, each of which meets that minimum standard, and the admissions people rubber-stamp the application.

In this case, the parents paid College Board people to get their kids up to the minimum standard. Then they paid the coaches to put their kids on the list--and gave them a bunch of fake photos to put in the admissions file so that the admissions people wouldn't notice anything when they rubber stamped the application. Then the kids enrolled in school and didn't play on the team, but no one noticed because there's no sports scholarships at these schools. And admissions people don't have a lot of contact after kids enroll. If they happened to notice someone wasn't actually on a team . . .well, kids scrub out or get injured.

So it wasn't paying for a chance to look better. It was paying for a sure thing.
  #121  
Old 03-13-2019, 10:41 AM
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In some of the cases, such as Laughlin, they were allegedly bribing officials in the schoolsí athletics departments, to have their kids accepted into the schools as athletes, when, in fact, the kids werenít actually going to be members of those teams (and may not have actually competed in those sports at all).
Well at least it's not accepting students who have to be passed through their courses because the are inept at scholastics but excel in earning income for their schools through sports (college football, I'm looking at you).
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  #122  
Old 03-13-2019, 11:18 AM
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Loughlin's daughter, who has something like 2 million followers on Instagram, has said she'd much rather make beauty tutorials than go to classes. Considering her SAT score, it seems obvious she wasn't college material in the first place, and with the fallout from the bribery scheme, she'll probably end up dropping out soon anyway. None of this will hurt her popularity. She'll probably go on to "create" (actually just sign her name to) a line of cosmetics and maybe a fashion line.

In a Christian Broadcasting Network interview 5 or 6 years ago, Laurie Loughlin said
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I always thought, I donít want to do anything that one day might rear its ugly head and my children have to pay the price for that.
Bitter irony.
She should have thought of that before she did an interview for CBN.
  #123  
Old 03-13-2019, 11:21 AM
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zimaane, I wouldn't call that a nitpick. That would be a complete correction. I had no idea that UPenn was Ivy League. Being a U of IL alum and a long time employee of UCSD, I just assumed it was a public school.

Thanks for the info!

mc
Further nitpick: Being public or private doesn't really have anything to do with the Ivy League. Portions of Cornell are public.
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Old 03-13-2019, 11:23 AM
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I bet that the prosecutors will pressure the parents to plead guilty in exchange for letting the kids off.
The kids aren't charged with anything. And it will be up to the universities in question to decide what to do about their continuing status as students--the prosecutors have no say in that.
  #125  
Old 03-13-2019, 11:34 AM
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The FBI affidavit says that the crimes are "conspiracy to commit mail fraud and honest services mail fraud."

It looks like there were two separate sorts of bribery going on:
- One was bribing athletic administrators to get the kids admitted into elite schools as student-athletes, when they were not, in fact, going to be on those teams.
- The other was bribing entrance exam administrators to facilitate cheating on exams (ACT and SAT).
They should do a movie about this case. I have a title "The Verdict was Mail Fraud". Who can we get to star in it?
  #126  
Old 03-13-2019, 11:34 AM
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The kids aren't charged with anything. And it will be up to the universities in question to decide what to do about their continuing status as students--the prosecutors have no say in that.
The prosecutors could still charge most of the kids. They took part in the scam too. They could agree not to do so to pressure the parents. What the colleges will or wonít do is a different subject but I imagine that falsifying records could be grounds for expulsion.
  #127  
Old 03-13-2019, 11:41 AM
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The prosecutors could still charge most of the kids. They took part in the scam too. They could agree not to do so to pressure the parents. What the colleges will or wonít do is a different subject but I imagine that falsifying records could be grounds for expulsion.
According to reports, many of the kids didn't know. And if the prosecutors were going to use charges against the kids as leverage, I would think they would have included them in the initial indictment, or they would have explicitly said (or hinted) in their press release that it was a possibility.. That's how this kind of leverage is generally applied, so far as I have noticed.
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Old 03-13-2019, 11:53 AM
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Depends on the field of study. UT Austin is considered very prestigious in law and political circles. Univ of MI and Washington U (St Louis) are top med schools. And Univ of PA has the #1 ranked business school. It's not all about the Ivy League any more.

mc
And SC is known for their Dentistry and Cinema programs. Everything else is pretty much meh.
  #129  
Old 03-13-2019, 11:53 AM
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But coaches get a limited number of "recruits," and each one takes up an admission slot. Bribing the coaches deprive students who earned a spot of their rightful place in the admittance process.

This is just starting to unravel. Internal investigations are going to snare any number of university employees who got paid off along the way.

I wonder if a judge could impose a 5 year ban from social media as part of the punishment for these kids/parents? That would kill and chance of Laughlin, for example, monetizing the experience.
From what I can see this has nothing to do with the very limited number of scholarship slots. The coaches are under a lot less scrutiny for trying to recruit freshmen who might not make the team.

Banning someone from social media sounds like a 1st amendment violation to me.

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I bet that the prosecutors will pressure the parents to plead guilty in exchange for letting the kids off.
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The prosecutors could still charge most of the kids. They took part in the scam too. They could agree not to do so to pressure the parents. What the colleges will or wonít do is a different subject but I imagine that falsifying records could be grounds for expulsion.
Although you canít go completely by whatís in the media, I read that the FBI believes that most of the kids didnít know there was bribery going on.

The FBI generally doesnít work that way. They donít charge and prosecute with the hopes of pressuring someone into a guilty verdict. They donít like prosecuting unless they feel itís a sure thing. They have this case wrapped up with a big red bow on top. They have all the documents, they have the main conspirator wearing a wire, they have the ringleader already pleading guilty and cooperating, they have several other cooperating witnesses. They donít need to threaten to charge the children. It would at least somewhat surprise me if there were any trials at all. There is a chance that the ultra rich on this list will try to throw enough high-priced lawyers at it to win at trial.
  #130  
Old 03-13-2019, 12:10 PM
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Some of the kids were posed for photos showing them engaged in a sport, so they should have realized something was up. Some were told to take the SAT/ACT at particular, corrupt testing facilities so that should have appeared suspicious to them.
  #131  
Old 03-13-2019, 12:23 PM
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From reading all the posts, I got the impression that USC is not a highly selective school, but their admissions requirements say otherwise: The acceptance rate is 16%. The average SAT score is 1400, meaning, according to this site, that anything lower than that puts you at "below average" by USC's standards. Loughlin's 1020, which is nationally about the 40th percentile, would have put her well below average at USC. The average GPA for entering frosh is 3.73.

For comparison, UT's acceptance rate is 36.5%, the average SAT score is 1275, and the average GPA for admissions is 3.68.

I'm not doubting that USC is a party school or that it offers plenty of opportunities for fun, but it looks like it's more selective than I'd thought.
  #132  
Old 03-13-2019, 12:27 PM
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From what I can see this has nothing to do with the very limited number of scholarship slots. The coaches are under a lot less scrutiny for trying to recruit freshmen who might not make the team.

Banning someone from social media sounds like a 1st amendment violation to me.
It isn't scholarship slots. A lot of these schools don't even offer athletic scholarships. But there are a limited number of admission slots every year, and these people stole theirs.

A social media ban could easily work as a voluntary alternative to say 5 years in prison.
  #133  
Old 03-13-2019, 12:29 PM
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I don't know much about the USC undergrad program, but there is a Computer Engineering Masters program for money which shovels the students in and ejects them a while later with almost identical resumes and absolutely identical course work. I had to wade through about 100 of the damn things each year.
Hey, a former employer bought me one of those! Actually, my masters was in Computer Science, but yeah, it was pretty much a diploma mill. Pass 9 classes with a B- or better, no thesis, no comprehensive exam, here's your "advanced" degree. I got the impression USC's main concern was "is the check from your company good?" At least I had to get admitted competitively - I took my own GRE and had to track down my undergrad professors for letter of recommendation.
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Old 03-13-2019, 01:26 PM
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Hey, a former employer bought me one of those! Actually, my masters was in Computer Science, but yeah, it was pretty much a diploma mill. Pass 9 classes with a B- or better, no thesis, no comprehensive exam, here's your "advanced" degree. I got the impression USC's main concern was "is the check from your company good?" At least I had to get admitted competitively - I took my own GRE and had to track down my undergrad professors for letter of recommendation.
Interesting. The people whose resumes I got paid for themselves, I assume (since they were looking for a job) but I don't know how many were company paid. That makes me feel better. One of the classes was taught by someone I know, who is quite well respected, so I think they are getting a good education, but very assembly line.
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Old 03-13-2019, 01:35 PM
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Some of the kids were posed for photos showing them engaged in a sport, so they should have realized something was up. Some were told to take the SAT/ACT at particular, corrupt testing facilities so that should have appeared suspicious to them.
I read that many of those were photoshopped, so the kids weren't necessarily involved in making the fraudulent photos.
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Old 03-13-2019, 01:47 PM
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According to reports, many of the kids didn't know. And if the prosecutors were going to use charges against the kids as leverage, I would think they would have included them in the initial indictment, or they would have explicitly said (or hinted) in their press release that it was a possibility.. That's how this kind of leverage is generally applied, so far as I have noticed.
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Although you canít go completely by whatís in the media, I read that the FBI believes that most of the kids didnít know there was bribery going on.

The FBI generally doesnít work that way. They donít charge and prosecute with the hopes of pressuring someone into a guilty verdict. They donít like prosecuting unless they feel itís a sure thing. They have this case wrapped up with a big red bow on top. They have all the documents, they have the main conspirator wearing a wire, they have the ringleader already pleading guilty and cooperating, they have several other cooperating witnesses. They donít need to threaten to charge the children. It would at least somewhat surprise me if there were any trials at all. There is a chance that the ultra rich on this list will try to throw enough high-priced lawyers at it to win at trial.
Ok. I stand corrected. A couple of the CEO types have already "stepped down" and a few university employees fired so far. Loughlin's husband had to surrender his passport and put up his house as collateral towards a million dollar bond to get out of the pokey. I am enjoying this way too much.
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Old 03-13-2019, 03:23 PM
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It isn't scholarship slots. A lot of these schools don't even offer athletic scholarships. But there are a limited number of admission slots every year, and these people stole theirs.

A social media ban could easily work as a voluntary alternative to say 5 years in prison.
I didnít make a study of each case and each student but the ones I did see that involved sports were absolutely from schools that have scholarships.

Quote:
Originally Posted by nelliebly View Post
From reading all the posts, I got the impression that USC is not a highly selective school, but their admissions requirements say otherwise: The acceptance rate is 16%. The average SAT score is 1400, meaning, according to this site, that anything lower than that puts you at "below average" by USC's standards. Loughlin's 1020, which is nationally about the 40th percentile, would have put her well below average at USC. The average GPA for entering frosh is 3.73.

For comparison, UT's acceptance rate is 36.5%, the average SAT score is 1275, and the average GPA for admissions is 3.68.

I'm not doubting that USC is a party school or that it offers plenty of opportunities for fun, but it looks like it's more selective than I'd thought.
What may be a factor is that UT is more than twice the size of USC. And since itís public they are political considerations.
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Old 03-13-2019, 03:36 PM
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I didnít make a study of each case and each student but the ones I did see that involved sports were absolutely from schools that have scholarships.



What may be a factor is that UT is more than twice the size of USC. And since itís public they are political considerations.
Undoubtedly. It stands to reason that most rigorously competitive schools would be relatively small in size. I included UT only for the sake of comparison and because it was cited by others in the thread.
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Old 03-13-2019, 03:38 PM
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I didnít make a study of each case and each student but the ones I did see that involved sports were absolutely from schools that have scholarships.



What may be a factor is that UT is more than twice the size of USC. And since itís public they are political considerations.
75% of in-state students at UT have to be auto-admits that earned their place by being in the top 6% of their class. The "holistic review" pool is much more competitive, though I don't think they release those numbers.

College counseling is like half my job and I've overseen a lot of applications to UT and USC. For a non-auto admissions, especially in CS, Engineering, or business, UT is as or more difficult to get into.
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Old 03-13-2019, 03:52 PM
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This comparison of schools is interesting but what those people did was just as wrong as if they bribed people to get their kids into clown or barber college.
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Old 03-13-2019, 03:53 PM
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Not if the clown college was bribed with Monopoly money. Then it would be funny.
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Old 03-13-2019, 04:53 PM
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https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news...-board-n982731

Meet the Harvard graduate who played for the school tennis team who took the ACT test for students for $10,000 a pop. He routinely scored 35 out of a possible 36.
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Old 03-13-2019, 05:13 PM
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Maybe a straight donation of $500K wouldn't guarantee admission to Yale, but I'll bet even Georgetown and Stanford would take a good, hard look before rejecting any member of a family that donated that much.

Hell, I'll bet some of those schools would not only admit your kid, but name a building after you.
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Old 03-13-2019, 05:21 PM
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Maybe a straight donation of $500K wouldn't guarantee admission to Yale, but I'll bet even Georgetown and Stanford would take a good, hard look before rejecting any member of a family that donated that much.

Hell, I'll bet some of those schools would not only admit your kid, but name a building after you.
Not an unqualified kid. $500 k is maybe "put your finger on the scale for my already qualified kid" money. I mean, those kids already pay $275k for 4 years. $500k isn't shocking money.
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Old 03-13-2019, 05:25 PM
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Half a million bucks for Yale or Stanford isn't really very much in terms of a donation. The total cost of attendance at Yale next year is just over $75,000, so if the parents are paying the full bill, Yale's getting more than $300,000 from them over the course of four years. Plus Yale's endowment is about $24 billion and Stanford's is about $20 billion. Half a million bucks is a rounding error.
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Old 03-13-2019, 05:47 PM
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USC said that they are doing a thorough review and will be deciding on a case by case basis what to do with anyone let in by this or any other scam. Anyone admitted for next year in these cases will have their admittance revoked.

https://www.yahoo.com/entertainment/...210653117.html
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Old 03-13-2019, 06:09 PM
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People are saying this is a scandal of liberal elites but Loughlin is conservative and Christian, as mentioned above she would go on TV shows like the 700 club.
She's probably asked God for forgiveness, which He's granted.

(Cue up that commercial: "But that's not how that works!")
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Old 03-13-2019, 06:18 PM
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They can't go after the kids for much. Some of them committed no crime. I assume none of them gave any money to anyone. The feds have restrictions in charging minors, and even if charged and eventually tried they will be sympathetic to a jury because they were doing the bidding of their criminal parents.
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Old 03-13-2019, 06:38 PM
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This comparison of schools is interesting but what those people did was just as wrong as if they bribed people to get their kids into clown or barber college.
Of course. I'm just explaining why it might seem worth doing to people with more money than pride or ethics.
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Old 03-13-2019, 07:14 PM
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As we watch this case play out, we're likely to hear more about other parents who tried to improve their kids' educational chances---and paid particularly heavy prices.

For example, in a 2011 case:

Quote:
Ohio Mom Kelley Williams-Bolar Jailed for Sending Kids to Better School District
... Kelley Williams-Bolar was convicted of lying about her residency to get her daughters into a better school district.

...The district hired a private investigator, who shot video showing Williams-Bolar driving her children into the district.

The school officials asked her to pay $30,000 in back tuition.
Williams-Bolar refused and was indicted and convicted of falsifying her residency records.
https://abcnews.go.com/US/ohio-mom-j...ry?id=12763654

Another case, also from 2011:
Quote:
Kindergartener A.J. Paches was kicked out of Brookside Elementary School earlier this year because his homeless mother used a friendís address to register him in the wealthy district of Norwalk, Connecticut. After expelling A.J., Norwalk authorities charged his mother with first-degree larceny for enrolling her son under a false address, a felony punishable by up to 20 years in prison.
https://www.alternet.org/2011/10/20_..._to_big_risks/

A 2014 case:

Quote:
...A Philadelphia father took a plea deal in January after authorities charged him with using his dadís suburban address to enroll his daughter in a higher-performing, wealthier elementary school across the city line. Hamlet Garcia and his wife, Olesia, had been facing prison time for fraud; they now have to pay more than $10,000 to cover the cost of their childís education.
http://www.takepart.com/article/2014...ol-boundaries/


Most of these cases seem to involve people of color who have limited means. It will be interesting to see how heavily the law comes down on this new batch of accused wrongdoers, in comparison.
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