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  #601  
Old 01-09-2010, 02:02 PM
Peter Morris Peter Morris is online now
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It took me a long time to realise that the opening notes of the Madness song Cardiac Arrest sound like a heartbeat.

Nor did I notice the clock strike midnight at the start of Danse Macabre.

Last edited by Peter Morris; 01-09-2010 at 02:05 PM.
  #602  
Old 01-09-2010, 02:30 PM
Lethal Babydoll Lethal Babydoll is offline
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If a map is a creative work ...

A friend of mine was bitching years back about how the Japanese were "taking over Hawaii."

I said it was understandable that it'd be a popular destination for Japanese tourists since it was a close to Japan as it was to the U.S.

He called me an idiot and got out a map ... which clearly showed Hawaii just off the coast of Southern California.

In a handy box

Last edited by Lethal Babydoll; 01-09-2010 at 02:31 PM.
  #603  
Old 01-09-2010, 04:08 PM
Wendell Wagner Wendell Wagner is offline
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Lethal Babydoll, while your friend may have been an idiot for not realizing that places in boxes on maps are not actually at that location, you are incorrect when you claim that Hawaii is as close to Japan as to the U.S. It's distinctly closer to the U.S. The distance from San Diego to Honolulu is 4195 miles, while the distance from Tokyo to Honolulu is 6196 miles.
  #604  
Old 01-09-2010, 11:54 PM
Rala Rala is offline
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I once read a short story called "Carol Oneir's 100th Dream" by Diana Wynne Jones. Years later, I was in the middle of and English Lit exam when I described a novel as 'oneiric' (dreamlike). "Hey, that was a pun! Cool. I wonder if there are any more of those in her stories? ... Oh, right, the exam."
  #605  
Old 01-10-2010, 01:47 PM
MarkF MarkF is offline
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When I was younger, I saw an ad for a Tshirt depicting two vultures sitting on a branch and one say's to the other, "Patience, my ass, I'm gonna kill somethin!'" I just never understood it at all.

It was years later when, probably watching something involving vultures, that the penny dropped and I just giggled to myself for about 10 minutes. Not 'cos the joke was so funny, just my not getting it.

Just in case you don't either, here's why...

SPOILER:
Vultures usually wait for things to die...
  #606  
Old 01-10-2010, 03:16 PM
Kimstu Kimstu is offline
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The big reveal about the last line of "Do-Re-Mi" (the "Do, a deer" song) from The Sound of Music hit me sometime in my 30's:

Quote:
Ti [tea], I drink with jam and bread---
That will bring us back to do!
"Do" is a pun not just on "doe", a female deer, but "dough", hence the connection with "bread". D'oh, so to speak.
  #607  
Old 01-10-2010, 03:48 PM
Rrose Selavy Rrose Selavy is offline
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Its only when I recently bothered to Google it that I found out that Pink Floyd's Piper at the Gates of Dawn takes its title from a Wind in the Willows chapter.

Last edited by Rrose Selavy; 01-10-2010 at 03:49 PM.
  #608  
Old 01-22-2010, 11:37 AM
ministryman ministryman is offline
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So I am watching Kimba the White Lion with my son, and I hear the names of two of his friends: Bucky and Dodi (sp).

BLAM! Buck (Male Deer) y and Doe (Female Deer) dy.......
  #609  
Old 01-22-2010, 11:46 AM
Skald the Rhymer Skald the Rhymer is offline
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Originally Posted by bup View Post
Oh yeah. Wizard of Oz is just a series of embarrassments for me.

I was probably 13 before I realized the farmhands were the same actors as the traveling companions in Oz.

I was in college I think when I realized Scarecrow was smartest, Tin Man the most loving, and the lion was the bravest.

I was a couple years out of college when I realized the wizard sent them on a quest because he wanted them to die, or at least be taken prisoner by the witch, so they wouldn't be his problem.
I will defend the Wizard. Well, sort of.

The Wizard knew that the Wicked Witch of the West had genuine magical power and that he did not. He also knew that the safety of Emerald City depended on the Witch not realizing this. Therefore, since he had no power to defend Dorothy if it came to it, but dared not be exposed as impuissant or pusillanimous, he had to send her and her fellow questers on a mission which would result in the WWoE killing them, but nonetheless still thinking him too great a power to oppose. Remember, as the Wizard does not have genuine magical knowledge, he probably doesn't realize that he's sending the WWoE a mystic totem she covets greatly.

That's one interpretation. Another, of course, is that--since portions of the movie in color are all a dream--it is Dorothy's subconcious conjuring up the obstacles in the first place.

Most worrisome of course is the erotic fixation Ms Gale seems to have had with straw. About that, I got nothing.
  #610  
Old 01-22-2010, 11:59 AM
Yllaria Yllaria is offline
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The Wizard could also be hoping that they'll just give up because the quest is too difficult. It isn't necessary that they die, just that they go away.

Last edited by Yllaria; 01-22-2010 at 12:00 PM.
  #611  
Old 01-22-2010, 12:14 PM
bup bup is offline
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Originally Posted by Skald the Rhymer View Post
...he had to send her and her fellow questers on a mission which would result in the WWoE killing them, but nonetheless still thinking him too great a power to oppose.
Well, defend him, but we agree that he's sending them on a suicide mission.

The dumb part is it never occurred to me. How could I watch the movie where they do what he says, and then when they come back he can't help them, and it not occur to me his request of them was so mean? He's even got Dorothy calling him a humbug over and over - maybe because I think of 'humbug' as a Christmas-hating stick in the mud because of Christmas Carol. Maybe because the characters don't react as angrily as they ought to. Maybe it's because I'm so used to the pattern of 'to get X, you must go on this big dangerous journey' that I didn't question that there was nothing to gain from it. I don't know, but they should be screaming 'You tried to KILL US!' while beating him with tire irons.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Yllaria
The Wizard could also be hoping that they'll just give up because the quest is too difficult. It isn't necessary that they die, just that they go away.
There are better ways to do that. He could have even imprisoned them for a while, then released them, and it would have been nicer than what he did.

Last edited by bup; 01-22-2010 at 12:16 PM.
  #612  
Old 01-22-2010, 12:17 PM
Skald the Rhymer Skald the Rhymer is offline
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Well, defend him, but we agree that he's sending them on a suicide mission.
Well, yeah. I'm just justifying his doing so.
  #613  
Old 01-22-2010, 12:26 PM
Peter Morris Peter Morris is online now
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Originally Posted by bup View Post
Well, defend him, but we agree that he's sending them on a suicide mission.
On the other hand, it could be that he expects them to succeed. Dorothy has killed one wicked witch already, and has crossed paths with another and survived. The team has shown themselves to be brave, brainy, resourceful and lucky, so he thinks they have a good chance of success.

Last edited by Peter Morris; 01-22-2010 at 12:27 PM.
  #614  
Old 01-22-2010, 10:23 PM
Antinor01 Antinor01 is offline
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I don't think I posted this before, but I'm not searching for it right now.

My Wizard of Oz 'can't believe I didn't catch that' thing is that my mental image of the map of Oz was reversed. I always pictured the witch of the wests castle as being the eastern side of the map and Munchkin land as being to the west. I really don't know why except that I have a vague recollection of seeing a map of Oz that way...though I could very well be mistaken.
  #615  
Old 01-22-2010, 11:03 PM
Kobal2 Kobal2 is online now
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Which reminds me, it took me forever to realize that the "down" in "fenix down" refers to a feather. I thought it referred to the fact that you used it when one of your characters was down.
Hah, I'd missed this one the first time around. Glad I'm not alone.
In my defense though, English isn't my first language, and I had no idea "down" had another meaning.
Then some day a book I was reading mentionned a character enjoying her "down comforter" very much. I went , thinking it was some kind of euphemism for a dildo or something . So I looked it up. A few minutes later, a cog went "click" and "oooooh, Phoenix down, all riiiight ! So it wasn't Engrish after all."
  #616  
Old 01-22-2010, 11:40 PM
Peter Morris Peter Morris is online now
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"Down" has several meanings in English. One of them is "not very happy. " Could this possibly be the meaning in down comforter? Something that cheers you up when you are not very happy? Without seeing the context it's hard to tell.
  #617  
Old 01-23-2010, 01:25 AM
foolsguinea foolsguinea is offline
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Damn you. Up until your post this had been one of my favorite songs.
Actually, I think Tim is full of shit on this.
  #618  
Old 01-23-2010, 02:06 AM
Leiko Leiko is offline
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I've seen "Hot Fuzz" about 100 times. I thought I knew just about everything about it. But my boyfriend had to point out all the Village of the Year awards visible in the background of several scenes. Somehow I'd just never seen them before.

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Originally Posted by Antinor01 View Post
I don't think I posted this before, but I'm not searching for it right now.

My Wizard of Oz 'can't believe I didn't catch that' thing is that my mental image of the map of Oz was reversed. I always pictured the witch of the wests castle as being the eastern side of the map and Munchkin land as being to the west. I really don't know why except that I have a vague recollection of seeing a map of Oz that way...though I could very well be mistaken.
Maps of Oz have often been printed with east and west swapped, deliberately or accidentally. I think it had something to do with a backwards projector slide that had been used in the stage plays.
  #619  
Old 01-23-2010, 06:02 AM
Kobal2 Kobal2 is online now
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Originally Posted by Peter Morris View Post
"Down" has several meanings in English. One of them is "not very happy. " Could this possibly be the meaning in down comforter? Something that cheers you up when you are not very happy? Without seeing the context it's hard to tell.
Nope, from context it was clearly the blanket kind.
  #620  
Old 01-23-2010, 08:42 AM
Trepa Mayfield Trepa Mayfield is offline
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Hah, I'd missed this one the first time around. Glad I'm not alone.
In my defense though, English isn't my first language, and I had no idea "down" had another meaning.
Then some day a book I was reading mentionned a character enjoying her "down comforter" very much. I went , thinking it was some kind of euphemism for a dildo or something . So I looked it up. A few minutes later, a cog went "click" and "oooooh, Phoenix down, all riiiight ! So it wasn't Engrish after all."


And now I just got that! Even though I inspired that example in the first place.
  #621  
Old 01-23-2010, 10:46 AM
E-Sabbath E-Sabbath is offline
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A down comforter, Peter, is a large filled blanket stuffed with bird down. Generally duck down. Eg, fluffy baby duck feathers. Thus, the old joke, "How do you get down from an elephant? You don't. You get down from a duck!"

Last edited by E-Sabbath; 01-23-2010 at 10:47 AM.
  #622  
Old 01-23-2010, 03:39 PM
Mona Lisa Simpson Mona Lisa Simpson is offline
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Originally Posted by E-Sabbath View Post
A down comforter, Peter, is a large filled blanket stuffed with bird down. Generally duck down. Eg, fluffy baby duck feathers. Thus, the old joke, "How do you get down from an elephant? You don't. You get down from a duck!"
And I was about 35 when I got the joke. At home, with my baby, playing peek-a-bo. Something about ducking down, and... click... and I got it.

And I laughed so hard I peed myself. Then called my mom to tell her I just got the old down from an elephant joke. She then proceeded to soak an innocent cordless phone in nose-tea.

This is particularly bad as I am a terrible punster, from a family of terrible punsters. Grew up having duck down mits and vests. Loved elephant jokes when I was nine, and told them incessantly. I just never "got" the down from an elephant one.
  #623  
Old 01-23-2010, 04:02 PM
Lamia Lamia is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter Morris View Post
"Down" has several meanings in English. One of them is "not very happy. " Could this possibly be the meaning in down comforter? Something that cheers you up when you are not very happy? Without seeing the context it's hard to tell.
Unless the author was Piers Anthony (or someone else prone to making horrible contrived puns) then there's no way "down comforter" would mean anything other than a bed cover stuffed with feathers.
  #624  
Old 01-25-2010, 08:26 AM
melodyharmonius melodyharmonius is offline
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I was a big Battlestar Galactica watcher, so my SO and I first watched Caprica when it came out on DVD. We re-watched the "edited for TV" premiere on Friday and it was only after that when I realized this.

It's the focus of two families, the Adams (Adamas) and the Graystones. We know that the Adams/Adamas are the ancestors of Bill Adama. But it took me a minute to lock in that it's not really the Adamas and the Graystones. It's Adama and Zoe. A to Z. And their lifelong connection.

D'oh!
  #625  
Old 01-25-2010, 11:05 AM
Shot From Guns Shot From Guns is offline
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Originally Posted by Kobal2 View Post
I went , thinking it was some kind of euphemism for a dildo or something
I think this is going to be my new sex toy euphemism. Thanks!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter Morris View Post
Could this possibly be the meaning in down comforter? Something that cheers you up when you are not very happy? Without seeing the context it's hard to tell.
I'm all curious now--are you a native speaker of English? If so, where are you from? Around here, anyway (Wisconsin), nobody who's a native speaker would possibly be confused about the meaning of "down comforter," context or no. But that's because we generally use comforters, rather than duvets, and they can be down-filled.
  #626  
Old 01-29-2010, 09:40 PM
Rodgers01 Rodgers01 is offline
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Just realized that the name "Pop-Tarts" was inspired by Pop Art...which was popular at the time Pop-Tarts were first made.
  #627  
Old 01-30-2010, 07:03 AM
Peter Morris Peter Morris is online now
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Originally Posted by Shot From Guns View Post
I'm all curious now--are you a native speaker of English? If so, where are you from?
I'm native British, and I've never heard the phrase. I know what a duvet is, but not a comforter. Must be an American thing.
  #628  
Old 01-30-2010, 09:46 AM
zamboniracer zamboniracer is offline
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I just rewatched the Buffy musical, "Once More With Feeling", and didn't realize until then that Spike literally saved Buffy's life. Under the influence of the Demon Sweet, Buffy was going to dance, sing and spin herself to death until Spike intercepted her and stopped her from doing so.

I never liked the Buffy & Spike are in love story line, but I feel so stupid for not realizing the above until now.

Last edited by zamboniracer; 01-30-2010 at 09:47 AM.
  #629  
Old 01-30-2010, 09:51 AM
cerberus cerberus is offline
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I thought that the pop in pop tarts referred to their popping out of toasters.
  #630  
Old 01-30-2010, 11:59 AM
Don Draper Don Draper is offline
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I think I'd seen Monty Python and the Holy Grail about a million times before I noticed that in the witch scene, when we first see Sir Bedevire, he has tied a coconut to an english swallow and attempting to see if it will fly!
  #631  
Old 01-30-2010, 12:08 PM
panache45 panache45 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lethal Babydoll View Post
If a map is a creative work ...

A friend of mine was bitching years back about how the Japanese were "taking over Hawaii."

I said it was understandable that it'd be a popular destination for Japanese tourists since it was a close to Japan as it was to the U.S.

He called me an idiot and got out a map ... which clearly showed Hawaii just off the coast of Southern California.

In a handy box
One of my cousins, who is in her 50s, believes that Hawaii and Alaska are both off the coast of California. I don't know how, in her mind, they get such different weather.
  #632  
Old 01-30-2010, 01:04 PM
Peter Morris Peter Morris is online now
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Originally Posted by The New and Improved Superman View Post
I think I'd seen Monty Python and the Holy Grail about a million times before I noticed that in the witch scene, when we first see Sir Bedevire, he has tied a coconut to an english swallow and attempting to see if it will fly!
Hey, I never noticed that either.
  #633  
Old 02-01-2010, 08:31 AM
Annie-Xmas Annie-Xmas is offline
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As I've posted before, for about a year I thought there was a singer named "Fiancee" that I kept hearing about, and one named "Be-younce" that I kept reading about.

Image my when I put 1+1 together and got one

Last edited by Annie-Xmas; 02-01-2010 at 08:31 AM.
  #634  
Old 02-01-2010, 08:46 AM
Superfluous Parentheses Superfluous Parentheses is offline
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Originally Posted by The New and Improved Superman View Post
I think I'd seen Monty Python and the Holy Grail about a million times before I noticed that in the witch scene, when we first see Sir Bedevire, he has tied a coconut to an english swallow and attempting to see if it will fly!
IIRC there are at least 3 scenes in that movie that involve pointless cruelty against cats.
  #635  
Old 02-01-2010, 10:14 AM
Kobal2 Kobal2 is online now
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IIRC there are at least 3 scenes in that movie that involve pointless cruelty against cats.
Cruelty against cats is never pointless.
  #636  
Old 02-01-2010, 11:10 AM
Chronos Chronos is offline
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Especially not since, as Calvin once observed, cats are pointy on five of their six ends. Cruelty to cats often results in the humans involved getting the point.
  #637  
Old 02-01-2010, 11:30 AM
Malacandra Malacandra is offline
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Originally Posted by Peter Morris View Post
It took me a long time to realise that the opening notes of the Madness song Cardiac Arrest sound like a heartbeat.

Nor did I notice the clock strike midnight at the start of Danse Macabre.
But you noticed the cockcrow at the end.

Right?
  #638  
Old 02-01-2010, 12:24 PM
Shot From Guns Shot From Guns is offline
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Just realized that the name "Pop-Tarts" was inspired by Pop Art...which was popular at the time Pop-Tarts were first made.
I was gonna call false-cognate BS on this, but hrmmm. The Wikipedia article claims it, too, and sources this page. Of course, the page doesn't give any sources, but it's at least plausible.

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I'm native British, and I've never heard the phrase.
Yup, that's it, then. I don't think I've heard the word "comforter" outside of the U.S., and it might not even be used as much outside of the midwest. A comforter is a thick blanket stuffed with some sort of insulator.

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One of my cousins, who is in her 50s, believes that Hawaii and Alaska are both off the coast of California.
Well, if you continue up the California coast, you will hit Alaska eventually...
  #639  
Old 02-01-2010, 12:30 PM
The Man In Black The Man In Black is offline
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The Battle of Wits in Princess Bride: Vizzini isn't trying to reason logically about where the poison is. He's gauging the Man in Black's reaction whenever he says it's in one or the other. Whenever he says the poison is in front of the Man in Black, he tenses up, and whenever he says that it's in front of himself, he relaxes. From there, he just had to figure out whether the Man in Black was bluffing or not, something that Vizzini is very good at.

You called?
  #640  
Old 02-01-2010, 01:08 PM
Don Draper Don Draper is offline
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In 2000, there was an intriguing movie called Shadow of the Vampire. It's a meta-fiction film that posits the idea the F.W. Murnau, director of the legendary silent horror film Nosferatu used a real "live" vampire to act as the vampire in the film.

I don't know if spoiler tags are necessary for a ten year old film, but just in case....

SPOILER:
The 2000 film's climax occurs as Murnau is filming the final scene for the movie. A key plot point is that the actress playing the heroine in "Nosferatu" doesn't know that she's doing a scene with a real vampire, and certainly doesn't know that Murnau has promised the vampire that he can actually drink her blood. She catches on though when she happens to glance into the mirror and see that the 'actor' playing the vampire has no reflection.


Anyway, I happen to buy a DVD copy of "Nosferatu" several days ago, and watched it for the first time in years. I noticed that the set for that final scene, which "Shadow" duplicated precisely, also has a mirror in the very same corner. BUT, in the original film the vampire does have a reflection! Given the amount of research that obviously was done on the original film, I can't imagine that this is a goof. Rather, I think it was a deliberate 'inaccuracy' meant as a wink*wink*nudge*nudge* to all the folks who actually bothered to watch the original film.

(On a small side note, had I known I could have watched the whole film on youtube, I wouldn't even have bothered with the $6.00 DVD.)

Last edited by Don Draper; 02-01-2010 at 01:09 PM.
  #641  
Old 02-01-2010, 01:23 PM
Mister Rik Mister Rik is offline
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Originally Posted by Shot From Guns View Post
Yup, that's it, then. I don't think I've heard the word "comforter" outside of the U.S., and it might not even be used as much outside of the midwest. A comforter is a thick blanket stuffed with some sort of insulator.
I've lived my whole life in the PNW, and though I'm familiar with the word "comforter", most people I know around here just call it a "quilt".
  #642  
Old 02-01-2010, 01:39 PM
CalMeacham CalMeacham is online now
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Quote:
Anyway, I happen to buy a DVD copy of "Nosferatu" several days ago, and watched it for the first time in years. I noticed that the set for that final scene, which "Shadow" duplicated precisely, also has a mirror in the very same corner. BUT, in the original film the vampire does have a reflection! Given the amount of research that obviously was done on the original film, I can't imagine that this is a goof. Rather, I think it was a deliberate 'inaccuracy' meant as a wink*wink*nudge*nudge* to all the folks who actually bothered to watch the original film.
I can easily see it as a goof -- "Dracula" was, at the time, the only fictional work stating that vampires don't have reflections (Stoker seems to have inventing the "ancient tradition"). It's be easy to miss.

To show how easy -- here's something I missed every time I saw the film until a couple of years ago. In Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein Bela Lugosi's Dracula very definitely casts a reflection in the mirror when he bites his assistant. And not only was Bela Lugosi the chief player in countless performances of the play (where his not being visible in the mirror is a key plot point), but he'd done it in the 1931 movie, made at the very same studio.



And nobody caught this?


I suppose it's possible that this is a nudge-nudge joke here, too, but that seems wayyyyyy too nuanced for an Abbott and Costello movie.
  #643  
Old 02-01-2010, 01:42 PM
Leiko Leiko is offline
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I've lived my whole life in the PNW, and though I'm familiar with the word "comforter", most people I know around here just call it a "quilt".
Huh. I've lived in the PNW all my life as well, and everyone I know calls the blanket in question a duvet or a comforter. Duvet is more common if the blanket is kept in a covering and sometimes is used to describe the covering rather than the blanket itself. Around here, "quilt" is only used for actual quilts. I'm in the Olympia-Lacey area, if that makes any difference.
  #644  
Old 02-01-2010, 02:01 PM
Mister Rik Mister Rik is offline
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Huh. I've lived in the PNW all my life as well, and everyone I know calls the blanket in question a duvet or a comforter. Duvet is more common if the blanket is kept in a covering and sometimes is used to describe the covering rather than the blanket itself. Around here, "quilt" is only used for actual quilts. I'm in the Olympia-Lacey area, if that makes any difference.
I guess I should narrow the group "people around here" down to "people around here among whom the subject has come up in my hearing", which is, I admit, a rather small group

However, "duvet" is a term I've honestly never heard used (I've read it, just never heard it). Kind of the way I always find it somewhat jarring when somebody around here uses the word "davenport" when referring to their couch/sofa. I immediately think, "You're not from around here, are you?"

Last edited by Mister Rik; 02-01-2010 at 02:02 PM.
  #645  
Old 02-01-2010, 02:27 PM
Shot From Guns Shot From Guns is offline
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Originally Posted by Mister Rik View Post
I've lived my whole life in the PNW, and though I'm familiar with the word "comforter", most people I know around here just call it a "quilt".
To me, those are two different things. A quilt is specifically a blanket made up of pieces of fabric stitched in a pattern.

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Originally Posted by Leiko View Post
Duvet is more common if the blanket is kept in a covering and sometimes is used to describe the covering rather than the blanket itself.
Yes, I'd restrict duvet to a blanket with a removeable cover. Comforters and quilts don't have those.

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Originally Posted by Mister Rik View Post
Kind of the way I always find it somewhat jarring when somebody around here uses the word "davenport" when referring to their couch/sofa.
The only person I know who says "davenport" is my paternal grandmother, who grew up in rural Wisconsin (central or northern).
  #646  
Old 02-01-2010, 03:30 PM
Mahaloth Mahaloth is online now
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Originally Posted by cerberus View Post
I thought that the pop in pop tarts referred to their popping out of toasters.
I thought we made it clear that we should try to always explain the truth in our posts.

I guess pop tarts came from "pop" art.

http://www.wholepop.com/973580985/fe...s/poptarts.htm
  #647  
Old 02-01-2010, 03:40 PM
Shot From Guns Shot From Guns is offline
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Nobody listens to me.

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Originally Posted by Shot From Guns View Post
The Wikipedia article claims it, too, and sources this page.
  #648  
Old 02-01-2010, 04:32 PM
Chronos Chronos is offline
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Quote:
To me, those are two different things. A quilt is specifically a blanket made up of pieces of fabric stitched in a pattern.
To get very technical, there are a number of things that make something a true "quilt". First, there are at least two outer layers of fabric, with some sort of insulation in between. Second, at least one of the outer layers should be made up of smaller pieces of fabric joined together. Third, the whole thing should be stitched together with lines or curves of embroidery, possibly forming a completely separate pattern from the patchwork-- This embroidery itself is the "quilting". I think a comforter only requires that there be the multiple layers with insulation between, but doesn't necessarily have a patchwork pattern or quilting (it might only be joined together with a few knots of yarn, and might even just be a big sack).
  #649  
Old 02-01-2010, 04:39 PM
Shot From Guns Shot From Guns is offline
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Chronos, were you as pissed off as I was by the Quilted Northern toilet paper commercials a number of years back, which featured animated women "quilting" the toilet paper... with knitting needles? (Like, they were sitting around the edges, making knitting motions, and that was somehow making the quilted toilet paper.)
  #650  
Old 02-01-2010, 06:29 PM
Chronos Chronos is offline
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I probably would have been, had I seen that commercial. What was the reasoning there, quilting is something done by little old ladies, and so is knitting, so they must be the same thing?
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