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  #51  
Old 12-18-2016, 01:10 AM
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Folks wanting to improve their skiing should consider taking lessons -- even if it means selling the shirt off your back, take lessons. Seriously, if you learn good technique, you will improve the more you ski. If you do not learn good technique you will repeat the same mistakes over and over every time you ski.
  #52  
Old 12-18-2016, 02:26 PM
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Moved from Park City to Houston last summer. Between this thread and getting the Wasatch Snow Forecast updates about the fluff piling up, well its making me cranky. Hope to get back to PC for the spring break.


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  #53  
Old 12-18-2016, 02:35 PM
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My condolences. If worst comes to worst, you could do a Koch.
  #54  
Old 12-19-2016, 12:22 AM
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Alas houston doesn't even have anything high or steep enough for that.
Anyways, looks like a decent set if storms for utah/colorado.
Speed is overrated, although I did end up getting a set of piste carving planks for those days when bullet proof groomed ice is all that was available. Pines, Aspens are where it is at. My go to setup is a pair of BD Amperage with AT bindings. There are numerous other setups and retired planks but I still find I break out the old XScreams , the bindings are probably done but they are just fun resort skis.


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  #55  
Old 12-19-2016, 02:55 AM
Novelty Bobble Novelty Bobble is offline
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Nearly ready for the off.

A quick look at our destination this morning shows that, although not too much natural snow has fallen so far at low levels there is lots of man-made snow on all the pistes.

The Schmittenhohe is the rightmost mountain in that view and there are full runs open from the top to village level which is about a 1300m (4000+ft) vertical.

Looking good. Plus the glacier smack-bang in the centre of the picture has plenty of the natural stuff with another 20-30 cm to come later this week.

Last edited by Novelty Bobble; 12-19-2016 at 02:56 AM.
  #56  
Old 12-19-2016, 07:14 AM
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Cat; my wife and kids ski in Filzmoos, Austria. My oldest was three when he started with lessons (though he didn't go off on his own or anything) and #2 son will start at the same age when he goes this February. We have a small apartment out there so accommodation is not a factor, but you have to calculate ski hire cost for their kit as it's not worth while to buy anything but clothes while they're still growing like weeds.

I expect they'll be taking lessons in the mornings for a few more years, with increasing amounts of skiing in the afternoons. We fly to Salzburg and rent a car there for the rest of the way. Usually the absolutely smallest, cheapest econo-box into which we'll all fit, as we don't expect to really need the car once we're at the village.
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For folks with wee ones, consider cross-country skiing while towing them (warmly dressed) in a pulk. If they can walk they have the coordination necessary for skiing, but might not have the strength until approaching three years of age They'll take to it like a duck to water if they have the opportunity to ski regularly throughout a season (for them, learning to ski will just be and extension of learning to walk).

The hardest thing for little kids to handle is the weight of skis and boots. Cross-country skis and boots are far lighter than alpine skis and boots, so very young kids take to cross-country more easily. As far as skill development goes, skiing is skiing is skiing. You'd be surprised at how all disciplines of skiing share the same basic skills, with each discipline focusing more on some skills and less on other skills. Any kid who has learned to ski on cross-country skis will have no difficulty at all picking up telemark or alpine skiing once he or she is physically strong enough to handle the heavier gear.

Save cash on growing kids by purchasing skis, boots and poles for the tots on an annual buy-back /exchange plan, or rent for the season rather than by the day. Also keep your eyes open for ski swaps -- most clubs have them in the fall. Most importantly, ensure they wear properly fitting helmets and that their bindings are set appropriate to their weight.

Once your kids are zipping about on skis, consider learning how to tune and wax skis for your family, for you can save quite a bit by doing it yourself, and the performance difference will be significant compared to skis that don't get enough lovin'.
Thank you both, I'll remember to check back to this thread for your advice if/when the time comes.

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Nearly ready for the off.

A quick look at our destination this morning shows that, although not too much natural snow has fallen so far at low levels there is lots of man-made snow on all the pistes.

The Schmittenhohe is the rightmost mountain in that view and there are full runs open from the top to village level which is about a 1300m (4000+ft) vertical.

Looking good. Plus the glacier smack-bang in the centre of the picture has plenty of the natural stuff with another 20-30 cm to come later this week.
Enjoy!
  #57  
Old 12-19-2016, 03:38 PM
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So any particular songs you have for your playlist ? Any particular song /snow activity combinations you find go well together.

Side country / backcountry, I forego as I like to hear any squeaks or cracks, same for piste cruising as I like to hear other people.

After an in bounds hike I like to kick off with Lord Huron ‘Time to run ‘ when setting up and getting going .

Actually the sound track to Higher ( Jeremy Jones / Teaton Gravity Research ) is pretty damn good. (There is a Spotify playlist link there.)
http://www.tetongravity.com/story/sn...her-soundtrack

Sir Psycho Sexy is great for the bumps (Red Hot Chili Peppers, if you had to ask) probably not one for the kids.

Massive Attack, Blue Lines works for me for Pines and Aspens.


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  #58  
Old 12-19-2016, 04:43 PM
Novelty Bobble Novelty Bobble is offline
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So any particular songs you have for your playlist ? Any particular song /snow activity combinations you find go well together.
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Tradition dictates AC/DC. Back in Black or Thunderstruck. Or a personal fave is "Taste" by ride or "dead bodies" by Air.

Last edited by Novelty Bobble; 12-19-2016 at 04:44 PM.
  #59  
Old 12-19-2016, 05:45 PM
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I never listen to music while skiing. Too much going on around me.
  #60  
Old 12-19-2016, 05:51 PM
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That's because of all that telemarking comedy going on


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  #61  
Old 12-19-2016, 08:52 PM
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[Arnold] You make me laugh. I pass you last. [/Arnold]
  #62  
Old 12-19-2016, 09:42 PM
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I have complete respect for tele skiiers, there is just too much stuff and chaos going in for my simple brain. Although it does seam a bit of a cheat to get face shots in 3 inches .


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  #63  
Old 12-19-2016, 09:51 PM
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Tunes on populated runs? Unsafe. Tunes when sharing the lift? Antisocial. Tunes in the backcountry? Sacrilege deserving of Dante's sixth level of hell.

But then there's night skiing at my home hill, with my favourite fast cruising run in Ontario, which is often nearly empty of skiers on cold nights. Time for tunes, for the in-run before hitting the main pitch takes about twenty seconds. Of course after that I can't hear a thing, but for the lonely lift and the in-run, the tunes are a good motivator.

3 Doors Down: Kryptonite
Jesus Jones: Right Here, Right Now
Machinehead: I Mother Earth
Marilyn Manson: Sweet Dreams
Gorillaz: Clint Eastwood
and a bunch of other crap.
  #64  
Old 12-19-2016, 10:21 PM
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I have complete respect for tele skiiers, there is just too much stuff and chaos going in for my simple brain. Although it does seam a bit of a cheat to get face shots in 3 inches.
I suspect that a lot of it has to do with programming our brain and muscles to react in certain ways. I started telemarking over three decades ago, but only took up fixed heel skiing in '09. Despite the fundamentals of tele and fixed-heel being the same, despite usually using the same skis (Dobermann GSRs ski me to my on-piste happy place), and despite excellent coaching and lots of gate time with very good fixed-heel skiers, I've never really mastered it, for my reactions are tele-based, whereas for fixed-heel, I still occasionally have to think, and having to think usually means something quite unpleasant is in my immediate future. All the more reason to keep on keeping on practicing fixed-hellheel skiing.

Last edited by Muffin; 12-19-2016 at 10:24 PM.
  #65  
Old 12-26-2016, 06:17 PM
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The Last King (a movie about the Birkibeinar's winter of 1205-1206 epic long distance ski journey that was key to a succession struggle) is out on Netflix now. Lots of skiing, although the boots and bindings are not period authentic.

Last edited by Muffin; 12-26-2016 at 06:18 PM.
  #66  
Old 12-26-2016, 08:23 PM
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First couple of days on snow this year, and my thighs are screaming. Short day on Sunday, longer day today with a bunch of top-to-bottom runs chasing my wife who was in GS heaven.
  #67  
Old 12-26-2016, 08:48 PM
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Sweet!
Nothing a beverage or two won't fix Telemark.

We just finally committed to Texas spring break trip to Utah. Flights are daft, so 24 drive here we come. On the plus side it does mean we can bring the full quiver of skis for what ever early march conditions await.
Thus begins 8 weeks of leg work.


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  #68  
Old 12-26-2016, 11:02 PM
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First couple of days on snow this year, and my thighs are screaming. Short day on Sunday, longer day today with a bunch of top-to-bottom runs chasing my wife who was in GS heaven.
There's a lot of painful truth to the "earn your turns" adage.
  #69  
Old 12-29-2016, 05:51 PM
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Up in Bethel, ME, watching the snow puking on down and laying out the powder boards for tomorrow.
  #70  
Old 12-30-2016, 08:45 AM
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Two more days skiing left until we head for home.

We've been very lucky with the early season weather, three days at the beginning of the holidays when it was bright and cold, two rather grim days when a front came through dumping rain, snow and yo-yoing temperatures, but then clear and cold again after that.

It is a busy time of year here but no real queues even though the pistes get bashed and lumped up by mid-afternoon. No matter, we are usually ready for a swim and sauna by then anyway.

The kids are coming on in leaps and bounds. My little lad is pretty fearless but his discipline and safety awareness this year has been excellent and my daughter has finally found her confidence and can keep up with her brother easily.

I also gave the family a little treat today when I was performing a slow turn on the edge of the piste and some soft snow gave way allowing my edge to run under an ice boulder which hilariously tipped me over into about three feet of powdery snow that took me three attempts and several minutes to get out of.

Did the family help? did they arse. Did they piss themselves laughing? why yes, yes they did.

We are now finished for the day here as you may have guessed and tonight's treat is a swim and sauna at the Tauern Spa with a cold beer and cocktails served to us while we lounge in the hot, salty pool as the sun goes down and the temperature drops and the stars come out..........lovely!
  #71  
Old 12-30-2016, 01:10 PM
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Sounds like a lovely day! Here's to your next two days being as enjoyable. Are your kids at the "let's try to hip-check dad off to the side" stage of their skiing development yet? (My neighbours' daughter started doing that when she was four -- now she's fourteen and into snowing boarders when they sit in the middle of a run.)
  #72  
Old 12-30-2016, 01:58 PM
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My local lift area opened one of it's nice runs yesterday, so after cross-country skiing I put on the teles and hoped on the lift. Unfortunately, the first pitch sucked The Big Lebowski. We lost our Nov and early Dec snow in a deluge of rain, and a lot of freeze/thaw in the last two weeks has left the run I was interested in starting with a hundred feet of Zamboniski at 30 degrees. I was hoping for something both earlier in the season and lot more relaxing. (It's a bit of a conundrum, for the key to true ice is sensitivity and subtlety, but you sure don't feel like being sensitive and subtle when the ice isn't giving you much to work with.) It made for interesting skiing last night. I shouldn't complain, though, for I had the run entirely to myself -- only me cycling through, getting reacquainted with my dancing partners, lightly holding them on the ice, then rhythmically bending them into the pitch and petite sautéing from arc to arc in the snow.

Last edited by Muffin; 12-30-2016 at 02:00 PM.
  #73  
Old 12-30-2016, 02:16 PM
Novelty Bobble Novelty Bobble is offline
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Sounds like a lovely day! Here's to your next two days being as enjoyable. Are your kids at the "let's try to hip-check dad off to the side" stage of their skiing development yet? (My neighbours' daughter started doing that when she was four -- now she's fourteen and into snowing boarders when they sit in the middle of a run.)
Not so much that but they do like to get a ski-full of powdery show and when I'm not watching flick it up into my face, they are also trying their best to skid-stop a ton of powder in my face as well. They never do it to their mother for some reason.

They also shout "loser" when they go past me. (They are starting to go past me far more often.)

They also seek out the jumps more than I do.

Let's face it, it is a parent's lot in life to be overtaken by their kids and be taunted by them. It is the natural way of things.

Incidentally. we did have beer and cocktails in the pool tonight, very nice it was (though we did have to explain to the kids the concept of "sex on the beach" and why a "safe sex on the beach" didn't have alcohol in it) . There was no moon and when we swam to the far end of the pool away from the lights and most of the steam the stars were incredible.

And for the record I think "accidentally" covering inconsiderate boarders in the middle of the piste is very bad and wrong and could not in any way condone such actions.

What I don't like about boarders more than anything is the noise they make. If they ride close behind it sounds like a catastrophe in progress all the time.
  #74  
Old 01-04-2017, 05:04 PM
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How old would you say the kids have to be to make it a pleasure rather than a chore for you all?
I spoke with one of my friends at the hill today who is an extremely good alpine skier (instructor and racer). Her daughter is a fifth generation skier.

Her daughter skied in utero up until two weeks prior to her birth. My friend said that her daughter kicked and moved about a lot during and after skiing.

Her daughter made her first post-birth attendance at the ski hill at four weeks of age, but stayed inside the clubhouse in the care of other skiers in her family when my friend was on the slopes, only being away from her baby for about fifteen minutes at a time.

Her daughter learned to indoor "ski" at four months of age shortly before she learned to walk. Her mother put her in tiny ski boots and skis on the living room carpet while supporting her upper body. The ski boot and skis provided ankle support, so the daughter was able to shuffle along (with her mother still supporting her upper body) prior to being able to toddle without skis and boots.

At two, the daughter was able to ski on the bunny hill, but still did not have enough strength to ski real hills.

At four, the daughter was comfortably skiing beginner slopes.

Last year at age five the daughter was comfortably skiing intermediate slopes, and occasionally venturing onto an advanced slope (the best GS run in Ontario) when it held snow and was not icy.

This year, at age six, the daughter is not bounced around as much by the snow, and by any adult standards is an intermediate recreational alpine skier who has very good technique, but does not have the strength or the weight that expert alpine skiers have.

The mother says that her daughter's skiing has progressed as her daughter's strength has progressed.

-----------------------

As far as skiing with kids being a chore, see if your hill has a program for ankle biters. It is not uncommon for hills to have programs for kids as young as four. While the tots are having fun learning to ski in a small group, you can have a bit of time on your own on the slopes.

Last edited by Muffin; 01-04-2017 at 05:07 PM.
  #75  
Old 01-04-2017, 06:40 PM
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OK, so much for alpine skiing. Now let's have a look at cross-country skiing for kids. It is aerobically better for you and your kids than alpine skiing, and develops coordination and timing just as well as alpine skiing. The boots and skis are far lighter than alpine gear, which makes it a lot easier for wee ones to ski with the gear being an extension of their bodies rather than heavy platforms to which they are attached.

Perhaps more importantly, I have noticed a difference in ski cultures between cross-country and alpine skiers. The kids I have come across cross-country skiing have all been really nice kids. Happy, playful, polite, well mannered. Unfortunately, I can't say this about all alpine skier kids that I have come across. Yes, by far most of the alpine kids are terrific too, but I have noticed a small minority of them who are assholes in the making -- inconsiderate, rude, vulgar, spoiled brats.

Here in Kanukistan there are instruction programs for cross-country skiers of different ages. The youngest program is for kids four and under. Yes, under, thanks to the gear being so light.

Another big plus for cross-country skiing is that you don't need any infrastructure. If there is snow, go ski it. It really is as simple as that. Want to make it exciting and develop some skills? Find a slight grade, do a bit of shovel work, and build your kids a cross-country playground. Here's a video of just such a playground. Show this to your kids and see what they think.
  #76  
Old 01-04-2017, 07:47 PM
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The fellow who popularized skiing in Canada, Norwegian-Canadian Jackrabbit Johannsen, cut many of North America's first cross-country and alpine trails, and built many of our first ski jumps. He skied with Roald Amundsen (the first person to ski to the south pole), and with Firdtjof Nansen (the first person to ski across the Greenland ice cap). At 93, he worked his way back to Norway as a bosun's assistant, at 95 he climbed and skied in Iceland and Greenland, and recovered from a broken leg. He skied arctic ice fields at 100, and continued to ski until he caught pneumonia and died at 111 years and 204 days, thirty years ago on 5 January 1987.

The first running of the QUEBEC-KANDAHAR CUP DOWNHILL was in 1932, with the Mt. Tremblant course set by Jackrabbit Johannsen, who submitted the race report to the Canadian Amateur Ski Association. The following is an excerpt published in The Canadian Ski Annual 1932, pages 18-22:

“Our party of competitors, officials and friends left Montreal on Saturday afternoon, March 12, and skied in from Lac Mercier station to Manoir Pinoteau, where we spent the night. The following morning at daybreak we started up the mountain, and of course used our skis all the way up. This gave all competitors an equal chance to become acquainted with the terrain.”

“The start was made at the Fire Ranger's tower on top of the mountain with the finish near the lake. The competitors started with one minute intervals. The upper part of the mountain, from the tower to the Fire Ranger's cabin has a slope of about thirty degrees and is covered with a nice stand of spruce and balsam with a few windfalls and other obstacles usually encountered in the Canadian woods. It was left to the competitors to choose their own way down this part of the mountain. The lower part of the run, from the cabin down to the finish at the lake, went through more open country, where more or less the same trail was followed by all contestants, and where most of the heavy timber had been cut or burnt, then over some ledges and finally through some second growth hardwood. The run gave the competitors a splendid test in typical Canadian country.”


Downhill racer Peter Gillespie also made a report to the CASA which included:

“About halfway down the top part I passed someone with his feet in a tree and his head hanging down the hill. He had given up the unequal struggle and was resting quietly.”
. . . .

“About this time everyone began to pile up and I passed two people wrestling together in a heap of rocks. Someone in front of me fell down and I ran over him, then he got up and ran over me. By this time there were bits of equipment strewn all over the place, mitts and caps, broken ski poles and pieces of ski.”


For anyone alpine skiing the Flying Mile at Tremblant, or cross-country skiing the Maple Leaf Trail through the Laurentians, or skiing any number of hills and trails cut by Jackrabbit in eastern North America, you are skiing in the tracks laid by a giant.

Thank you Jackrabbit, for leaving us with your legacy of skiing. We are better for what you have given us.
  #77  
Old 01-04-2017, 07:55 PM
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We got two semi-epic New England powder days, somewhat moderated by long lift lines because all the upper lifts were on wind hold. But what was open kicked ass, especially in the woods. One day on my new AT setup, the other on tele. The new AT skis are great in soft snow, not great on hardpack. Unfortunately, with the high winds you had to ski through a lot of wind scraped terrain to get back to the lifts.

Tomorrow is tele instruction practice at the 250' hill I learned to ski at many moons ago. Always a fun time.
  #78  
Old 01-05-2017, 09:37 AM
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We had a slow start to the season but things have been picking up. Probably looking at a couple of feet this week.
More like four feet. We're getting pounded.
  #79  
Old 01-05-2017, 09:48 AM
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Snowboarding OK? In my younger days I used to ski really hard. Now I mostly cruise on the board.
I hear the term is "Grays on Trays".
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Old 01-05-2017, 01:33 PM
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More like four feet. We're getting pounded.
We're back home now and I'm sad but looking at the weather right now I realise how lucky we were with the weather.

Where we were this time last week has had two feet in the last day or so and the temperature highs are around -25C and windy...........not nice.

Still, we are back to the same place at easter so if it dumps a load now we should be sitting pretty in April.
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Old 01-05-2017, 08:20 PM
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There was no patrol out today, and the area closed early due to the cold, so being an ever curious sort, I did a sweep. Sure enough, I came across a person at the top of that steep icy pitch that annoyed me last week, with her skis off, trying to George of the Jungle it in the trees beside the run. It all worked out OK, for there was a nice snow covered run nearby that she had been unable to find, so after a few minutes of getting her back to the top, she had an enjoyable ski out. Based on what she said, I wouldn't want to be her brother who led her to the steep drop and then abandoned her. I think his hours are numbered.

That lift had a new liftie working it today who ouch didn't ouch understand ouch the ouch need ouch to ouch briefly ouch retard ouch the ouch chair ouch at ouch loading ouch to ouch reduce ouch the ouch impact ouch of ouch the ouch chair ouch on ouch the ouch rider's ouch calves ouch. The simple solution was for me to hop up and slightly forward when loading to avoid the calf whack, for he didn't get the concept. Just when I figured that the loading problem was solved, he wandered off, and for a couple of runs he stayed in the warm lift hut, leaving me to load without his being in reach of the big red button (unfortunately, the lifts here only have exterior emergency shut-offs). Later, in the parking area, I gave him a boost (he said he could not afford a new battery). He was a nice guy, but too dumb to be left outside on his own. I hope that he learns how to load a lift and that the job works out for him, for he sounded a bit hard on his luck.
  #82  
Old 01-05-2017, 11:40 PM
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I have the Wasatch Snow Forecast feed on facebook. Its making me sad as looks phenomenal. The Utah Avalanche Center feed doesn't look so good for back country. Although i saw a study that indicated there are very few fatalities when the avalanche risk is extreme, high or low. Most fatalities are when the danger is forecasted as moderate to mod/high. Alas this weekend is going to be bluebird weather with a lot of snow on some bad interfaces. Expect poor decision making.


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Old 01-06-2017, 06:19 AM
Novelty Bobble Novelty Bobble is offline
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That lift had a new liftie working it today who ouch didn't ouch understand ouch the ouch need ouch to ouch briefly ouch retard ouch the ouch chair ouch at ouch loading ouch to ouch reduce ouch the ouch impact ouch of ouch the ouch chair ouch on ouch the ouch rider's ouch calves ouch..
Last week I spent an enjoyable morning being cosseted by heated 8-seater bubble chairs with feather-soft loading and automatic everything.
Then we stopped for lunch and ski'd down another run where went through an older 4-man chair. I was in a world of my own and as I stood there waiting for the same gentle pick-up I was smacked on the back of the helmet by the metal bar of the chair.

very, very hard.

Thankfully I had my helmet on, had I not I reckon it would have been hospital time.

So lesson one, danger is everywhere when skiing
lesson two, always wear a helmet
lesson three, don't be a dozy sod and always pay attention.
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Old 01-06-2017, 11:26 AM
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Last week I spent an enjoyable morning being cosseted by heated 8-seater bubble chairs with feather-soft loading and automatic everything.
Sweet! I wish Lutsen would upgrade their six-pack to that, or at least retrofit with bubbles, for it gets nasty cold with the wind sometimes. But to be fair, for this season they replaced their old 1989 gondola with something a lot safer and more comfortable.

The chairlift at one of the hills near my town was built in 1953 and is still going strong (it might be the oldest in Canada that is still operating), but although it is safe enough, I'm always nervous on it. A 1970 carrier (chair and cage/vertical pole assembly) from another of the hills near town found its way into my living room. It makes for a nice seat when putting on ski boots. But as much as I love old ski equipment, from old lift chairs to solid wood skis to Kandahar bindings to Steincomp boots, I sure appreciate it when resorts invest in safer lifts that travel more quickly, move more people per hour, and do so in comfort. A high speed bubble with heated seats? That's a grade above my vehicle! Where's the envy emoticon?
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Old 01-06-2017, 02:28 PM
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Did a training session last night at the ski area I first learned to ski at, 250' of icy hard vertical under the lights. Can't be beat.
  #86  
Old 01-06-2017, 03:47 PM
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Sweet! I wish Lutsen would upgrade their six-pack to that, or at least retrofit with bubbles, for it gets nasty cold with the wind sometimes. But to be fair, for this season they replaced their old 1989 gondola with something a lot safer and more comfortable.
I liked that gondola

I'll be heading Up Nort with my brothers and the general manager from my old job. He's happy to have someone to carry him down the mountain when he gets hurt. His first time skiing was at Afton by the Twin Cities, where he yelled "PLAY IT SAFE" coming in to a slow area and bailed hard. He dislocated his shoulder and came to work in a sling for weeks. I don't know that it quite matches the back injury and months-long hematoma I got catching a rock in my lower back after a misjudged jump, but it was definitely more visible.
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Old 01-06-2017, 04:27 PM
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You missed the boat gondola. They were selling off the old gondolas at the end of last season.

Tell your old general manager that if he gets injured badly enough, he'll get a helicopter ride all the way back to the Twin Cities.
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Old 01-07-2017, 10:49 PM
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When I was a couple of towers away from the end of the lift, the liftee ran out of his hut and away from me. There was a side-wind, so I figured it wasn't me he was running from. When I got off and skied over to him, he asked me to stop a skier that was about to head down a 32 degree bump run (that's comparable to Sun Valley's Exhibition, only without the lovely soft snow -- all we usually have here is scrapescrapescrape).

So off I went, expecting to have to talk the skier off of the ledge, but certainly not expecting to find what I found: an indigenous Amazonian from equatorial Brazil who had never experienced snow before in his life, and who was on his first ski run.

To get him safely back to the lodge, I took him down a scenic one-and-a-half mile long beginner run. He was pretty sketchy at first, but he was a tolerable learner (and a school teacher by trade), and had a need for speed, reflected in yelps of joy and shouts of fear as he tried to control his turns and keep it between the trees. At the end of the run he had a wonderfully big smile on his face!

Something I truly love is watching the penny drop, when a person transitions from not getting it to getting it, from struggling to soaring. I saw that today on a beginner run by person who now has been bitten by the skiing bug, and even if he never experiences snow again, he'll have a memory that he will never forger.

Last edited by Muffin; 01-07-2017 at 10:53 PM.
  #89  
Old 01-09-2017, 03:44 PM
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So far this season, I have the following trips planned:

Beaver Creek, CO - 3 days over MLK weekend
Breckenridge, CO - 4 days over Super Bowl weekend
Deer Valley, UT - 3 days at a corporate event in Feb.
Keystone, CO - 3 days over President's weekend
Northstar @ Tahoe - 4 days over Spring Break

3 of the trips are with family, 2 of the trips are work related.

We have two daughters and both started taking lessons when they were 3. Our 9 year old is almost to the level, her mom and I are. She can ski anywhere on the mountain. The 6 year old is a bit slower, but can follow most places.

We own all our own gear, and have season passes through Vail, which covers all of the above locations with the exception of Deer Valley. So after the 5th day, it's free skiing. After that, our only expense is food and lodging.
  #90  
Old 01-12-2017, 04:28 PM
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Does anyone else use a GPS tracker? I use Trace Snow on my phone, and it keeps a pretty reliable record of my runs, with associated data like maximum speed, average speed, sustained speed, vertical, etc. I like it, as it gives me a good way to track between days, locations, different runs, and the like.

Also, realizing I bombed a Minnesota double-black and topped out at 68 mph is pretty cool, too.
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Old 01-12-2017, 06:34 PM
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Does anyone else use a GPS tracker? I use Trace Snow on my phone, and it keeps a pretty reliable record of my runs, with associated data like maximum speed, average speed, sustained speed, vertical, etc. I like it, as it gives me a good way to track between days, locations, different runs, and the like.

Also, realizing I bombed a Minnesota double-black and topped out at 68 mph is pretty cool, too.
That wouldn't happen to be Lutsen's Plunge, would it?
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Old 01-12-2017, 07:51 PM
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Does anyone else use a GPS tracker? I use Trace Snow on my phone, and it keeps a pretty reliable record of my runs, with associated data like maximum speed, average speed, sustained speed, vertical, etc. I like it, as it gives me a good way to track between days, locations, different runs, and the like.
I've never felt the need to track inbounds runs, but I've used them in the backcountry a bit.

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Also, realizing I bombed a Minnesota double-black and topped out at 68 mph is pretty cool, too.
No one on recreational gear skis at 68 mph.
  #93  
Old 01-13-2017, 08:22 AM
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That wouldn't happen to be Lutsen's Plunge, would it?
That's the one.

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No one on recreational gear skis at 68 mph.
I never said I was smart.
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Old 01-13-2017, 12:18 PM
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Yeh, 42 degees, ice and hard-pack, off camber to the left, no runout, and a must-make egress trail tangential to the run on the right. What’s not to like? I’m jonesing for it just thinking about it.

Lutsen’s plan is to install one of their old chairs to the south / skier’s left of The Plunge. Although that would solve the problem of the must-make turn up the Valley Run egress trail, I am very concerned that it would cause even further problems, for by removing the very long egress trail, and by changing the direction of that trail from uphill to downhill where it intersects the 39 (Adrenaline), 40 (Freefall) and 42 (The Plunge) degree runs, I expect that there will be a significant increase in use by wofuks who will increase the number of injuries to themselves by slam dancing with trees due to the lack of runouts, and (more to my personal concern) also create a very big new risk of wofuks shooting out of what will then be a downhill egress trail directly into the path of skiers who will be running at high speed on the steep runs. Quite simply, by forcing skiers to earn their turns due to the present uphill and flat sections of the egress trail, and by having a very long egress, the wofuks tend to avoid the steep runs. If egress is McDonaldified, we'll lose the wofuk bug repelant, which will cause ongoing delays waiting for them to clear the slopes, and close the sloops for extended periods (sometimes the entire day) when they are injured, even if they don't take-out another skier in the process.

The first time I skied Adrenaline, I found a fellow wrapped around a tree who has suffered a broken femur. He wasn't an irresponsible skier: he was an competent intermediate skier whom I has seen cruising easier runs earlier that day.

Chisquirrel, you may have heard about a skier from the Cities down your way who tried The Plunge for the first time last year. One of the patrol later told me that the fellow was unresponsive and that at first they thought he was dead. Surprisingly, he lived thanks to the patrol, EMTs, an air ambulance to the Cities, and the medical professionals there, although he was busted up pretty badly with organ, bone and muscle injuries. Friends of his friends told me that he had been skiing with he more skilled friends -- all responsible people, but lost an edge.

These two intermediate skiers were responsible skiers, not wofuks, so I dread the carnage that will ensure once egress from the three steep runs becomes much easier and thereby makes those runs much more enticing for wofuks.

The best analogy that I can think of is that what Lutsen is proposing would be the equivalent of having the front doors of a high-school open directly onto an interstate, and trusting that the teenagers would always stop, look and listen before they walk across the highway rather than just run out into it and play in traffic.

I think the best solution would be to connect with the proposed lift only after creating runouts for the steep runs, closing the present egress trail, and cutting a new gated egress trail with its gates near the end of each runout. There is just enough room to do this without violating the resort's boundaries. In any event, gates are absolutely necessary at the intersections or their will be serious injuries and deaths due to wofuks being where they have no business being.

For me personally, I would prefer that the present layout remain unchanged, for it is ideal for the type of skiing that I prefer. I ski on alpine race skis (Nordica Dobermann GSR World Cup with the old 21m radius), dampening race plates and a 3/4” riser, so they are ideal for making the turn onto the egress trail at speed and coasting along the uphill section past the other two steep runs and along the rest of the long egress trail, and since I use telemark rather than alpine bindings, on slow snow days I have an easy time cross-country skate skiing up the egress trail and along a couple of other flat parts of the egress trail. The very long runout around to the other side of the mountain is very pretty and often has deer and other small critters using it, so scooting along it offers a type of skiing that is very relaxing and in touch with the environment through which I am skiing.

For me skiing is about the exhilaration of literally living on the edge while pushing my mind and body to their limits; the fluid, lyrical, graceful dance in which I express how I feel by how I ski; the tranquility that comes from emotionally melding with the surrounding environment as I flow along quiet trails through it. Lutsen’s Plunge and the its long, occasionally uphill, Valley Run egress, is one of the very few lift area runs that fulfills these three very different dimensions of skiing for me, so I would very much prefer that it be left as it is.

Last edited by Muffin; 01-13-2017 at 12:22 PM.
  #95  
Old 01-13-2017, 12:34 PM
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I never said I was smart.
I never commented on your intelligence. I'm saying that it's very close to physically impossible to do so on non-race gear and it's far more likely that your GPS device read incorrectly, which they do all the time.
  #96  
Old 01-13-2017, 02:23 PM
Chisquirrel Chisquirrel is online now
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For me skiing is about the exhilaration of literally living on the edge while pushing my mind and body to their limits; the fluid, lyrical, graceful dance in which I express how I feel by how I ski; the tranquility that comes from emotionally melding with the surrounding environment as I flow along quiet trails through it. Lutsen’s Plunge and the its long, occasionally uphill, Valley Run egress, is one of the very few lift area runs that fulfills these three very different dimensions of skiing for me, so I would very much prefer that it be left as it is.
/snip

I'd be perfectly happy if they never changed it too. I tend to hit a run like that only once or twice - I know where my limits are, and familiarity with a run definitely breeds contempt, for lack of a better phrase. I tend to not focus so much the 7th time down a run, and that can lead to ouch, especially on a run like anything off the back of Moose. I like to do it to say I can, and then go back to the blues and blacks, where I feel comfortable. I did get a surprise run down Koo Koo my first time up when I turned the wrong direction off the lift on Eagle and refused to turn back.

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I never commented on your intelligence. I'm saying that it's very close to physically impossible to do so on non-race gear and it's far more likely that your GPS device read incorrectly, which they do all the time.
That's entirely possible. I commented on my intelligence, since I have absolutely gotten in over my head, which is why I wear a helmet any time I'm on skis. More than once I've looked up the run with a quiet, "There but for the grace of God"
  #97  
Old 01-22-2017, 01:19 AM
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Another Nordica X Balance plate failed today. The mounting bolts held, but the plate ripped out of them. I very much like its ability to dampen vibration in the rear of the ski, but although it works nicely for alpine, it is too flimsy for aggressive telemark. That's the eternal trade-off with ski gear -- responsiveness v. durability. Oh well, more salvage for the parts bucket means more resources come kluge time.
  #98  
Old 01-22-2017, 08:35 AM
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Ouch, did you stay upright? That could have ended up badly depending on when it failed. A guy in NH ended up nearly losing a leg when a Salomon tech fitting failed due to poor design (Salomon has since fixed their boots) at a particular bad place on Mt Washington.
  #99  
Old 01-22-2017, 12:29 PM
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Ouch, did you stay upright? That could have ended up badly depending on when it failed. A guy in NH ended up nearly losing a leg when a Salomon tech fitting failed due to poor design (Salomon has since fixed their boots) at a particular bad place on Mt Washington.
No worries. I had tested my binding release the night before, and it was my second warm-up run getting seated my boots, so I was in the centre of the hill and was not doing anything stupid. The failure took place while initiating a turn, so I shoulder rolled. Thanks to thick wool pants, I didn’t need to use a pole self-arrest, and only slid for about 150' down the fall line, wondering “What the hell just happened?”

Other than a bruised shoulder, I had no problems skiing and walking immediately after the plate failure, and spent the evening on my feet while helping a friend learn how to wax cross-country classic skis. Overnight there was some swelling and pain (MCL? meniscus? too soon to say), so it was RICE in bed for the morning and has been a light Jones bandage for the afternoon in Geppetto’s workshop, rather than skiing. Although I can only slightly bend my knee now (even without Dr. Jones), my guess is that when the medial area of my knee drains, things should be OK and will only need RICE, time, and proportionally more classic and less skate/tele to heal-up.

Since I’m now 0 for 2 with my three sets of Nordica X Balance plates, as much as I very much like their performance, last night I removed my bindings from my skis that have an integrally attached version of those plates. If I am unable to cut and grind that third set of plates off, I won't be skiing on those skis again and instead relegate them to the Dummy Downhill. It’s just not worth the risk.

In the pre-season, I’d been toying with the idea of replacing those Nordica X Balance plates with the much more robust (but not as laterally balanced) Vist World Cup Pro plates. Vist is a supplier of the Royal Tonga Ski Federation, so their stuff has to be good, right?

I should have made my decision earlier upon the first set's failure, so I only have myself to blame for getting spanked yesterday.

Last edited by Muffin; 01-22-2017 at 12:34 PM.
  #100  
Old 01-22-2017, 11:08 PM
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It has been snowing so much round here, that for the first time to my knowledge, Heavenly shut down in the middle of the day! (There have been days when they didn't open at all)

They close individual lifts for wind and other stuff all the time, but they shut the whole mountain down at around noon today.

Webcam: http://www.skiheavenly.com/video-and.../web-cams.aspx
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