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Old 12-03-2018, 12:27 PM
Sparky812 Sparky812 is offline
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Gaming Computer Build advice?

My 13-year old son would like a gaming computer. I agreed he could have one on the condition that we built it ourselves as a learning and father/son project. I'm a DIY computer guy and have been building, maintaining, and upgrading older systems since the early 90s but "cutting edge" is not my specialty.

I have a good idea on what components I'm interested i but would appreciate any advice or input out there.
The idea is to get him up and running but leave room for upgrades later.

PS - EVGA 750W G3 - this should handle anything I put together.

Case - nothing yet. Looking for something with a side (glass) window and 2 external drive bays (for DVD drive and LED fan speed controller) LED fans (can be added later, I suppose) and 2 x USB 3.0. I'm surprised at the limited selections out there. Can anyone point me at one? My eyes are sore from looking at pictured on-line.

CPU - AMD Ryzen 7 2700 or possibly 2700X. Is it worth the extra money?

MB - This is where I get overwhelmed with the variety out there. I'm thinking the GIGABYTE B450 AORUS PRO WIFI Socket AM4 Dual Channel DDR4 3200(OC), 2x M.2 USB 3.1, DVI-D, HDMI, Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, RGB LED ATX Motherboard

Any feedback or other recommendations?

GPU - not an immediate concern AFAIK, I will either use the onboard GPU and/or the 2 Gb PCI-e one I have in his current computer and upgrade later.

HD - looking at M.2 512 GB for OS, etc. and either recycling a HDD or adding another SSD later for media storage.

RAM - considering starting with 16 Gb and adding later.

OS - Windows 10 - I will transfer from current computer.


We plan on adding some bells and whistles later. i.e. bigger GPU, RAM, fan controller, water cooling, LEDs, etc..

Anything I'm missing?
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Old 12-03-2018, 12:33 PM
enalzi enalzi is offline
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Why is GPU not a concern if you are building a "gaming" computer?
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Old 12-03-2018, 12:52 PM
Sparky812 Sparky812 is offline
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Why is GPU not a concern if you are building a "gaming" computer?
It doesn't need to be a gaming computer immediately. As I said, we can work with what we have and add a serious GPU later when cryptocurrency mining and prices settle down.
He has an Xbox One so he can wait.
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Old 12-03-2018, 12:57 PM
Boozahol Squid, P.I. Boozahol Squid, P.I. is offline
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What enalzi said. Unless your son's current rig isn't running off a an SSD, this build is going to either run everything roughly the same as his current build, or go even slower if you don't bring over the GPU you have. An upgrade to the CPU doesn't mean much any more unless it's for an entire generation's worth of architecture. I can understand wanting to build a computer with room to improve as an ongoing project, but upgrading the GPU is going to be about 90% of the improvement you're going to make in terms of his experience of using the thing.

As far as cases go, I'd vote for a Corsair Carbide. They're not too weird looking, they are roomy enough to work on without having elf hands, and they have about a million fan mounts and space for airflow to really help in cooling. It also has your side window and the other specs you're looking for.
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Old 12-03-2018, 01:11 PM
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The graphics card is arguably the most important component of a gaming PC and I’d build around it rather than build a PC and add a card later. It’s unlikely but possible the card you want to get might not be compatible with what you built. About half of the money I spent on my current gaming PC went into the graphics card.
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Old 12-03-2018, 01:23 PM
Sparky812 Sparky812 is offline
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OK, good to know. I'm used to looking from the CPU out.

So... if I'm considering a GPU, what minimum specs should I consider? He plays a lot of Fortnite, LoL, Overwatch, CoD, etc.. so I'm assuming he's wanting to run these on PC.
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Old 12-03-2018, 01:40 PM
MichaelEmouse MichaelEmouse is offline
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If it's a father/son project, perhaps you could expand it to fine-tuning the computer by overclocking it? "Let's assemble a machine and see how fast we can push it" seems like it could trigger some testosterone bonding.


I was very well served by an AMD CPU and GPU when I bought my computer in 2011. However, for at least the last half decade, if someone wants high performance and overclocking, Intel CPUs and Nvidia GPUs have been the obvious choices once you research them. Perhaps that's changed since I last took time to learn about it. AMD products often look good on paper because they tend to rely on brute force like having many cores, high frequencies, lots of memory. Yet the actual performance tends to fall short of what the component stats suggest.

An RTX 2060 or 2070 should be sufficient for several years. The Nvidia 60s and 70s are usually the best value for money before you start getting severely diminishing returns. For the CPU, an unlocked i5 with six cores should be good for a decade.

If you're going to overclock, a good air cooler may be a good idea. Even if you don't overclock, good air coolers can make the computer more silent.


All your son's games are going to run well on any 200$+ GPU you buy today. You really don't need to worry about that unless you want 4K 120fps.

Last edited by MichaelEmouse; 12-03-2018 at 01:44 PM.
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Old 12-03-2018, 02:43 PM
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GPU prices settled a while back. Right now, the GTX 1060 (6gb) or RX 580 (8gb) is probably your best bang per buck. Both benchmark close to the same and the 580 is cheaper so I'd go with that. Plus the 580 is coming with a pretty nice free game bundle these days (pick 2: Resident Evil 2, DMC 5 and/or Division 2)

I wouldn't bother with a 2000 series. Too expensive for the bump in power.
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Old 12-03-2018, 03:03 PM
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A few other notes that pop to mind:
The 2700X is a good CPU; the 2700 being a little slower but also no problems. Note that AMD processors don't really overclock like Intel ones. The stock Wraith cooler with the AMD processors is well regarded and likely all you need. I say this as someone with an i5 8600K that can OC stable at 5.0Ghz and an AIO water cooler.

With the AMD processors, fast memory speed is essential. You may need to unlock the memory speed overclocking in your BIOS but these days that's a single toggle (turn on XMP)

I wouldn't bother with the extra cost of an M.2 and, again, that's coming from someone who owns one. If you DO decide to get one, make sure it's NVMe and not just a SATA drive in the "stick of gum" form factor. But I'd really just stick with a standard SSD and save the money for elsewhere. The Crucial MX500 benchmarks extremely well, was very well reviewed and you can get a 1TB drive for around $125. I say this as someone with Samsung Evo SSDs (my point, in case it's not obvious, is that I'm not trying to upsell you on "what you need" from any elitist point of view)
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Old 12-03-2018, 03:20 PM
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I wouldn't bother with the extra cost of an M.2 and, again, that's coming from someone who owns one.
Why is that?
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Old 12-03-2018, 03:33 PM
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Why is that?
Unless you're doing things that require moving large files back and forth off the drive (like video editing), you won't really notice the difference in speed over a good quality traditional SSD. I mean, it is faster but it's likely money that you'd rather spend somewhere else in your build. You can get 1TB of fast SATA storage for less than 500GB of NVMe M.2 storage and you're not going to notice the difference on a gaming PC. You could probably get a 1TB M.2 stick that's actually a non-NVMe SATA drive for the same cost but that defeats the point of the M.2 -- and fills up the slot in case you ever decide to use it in the future.

Last edited by Jophiel; 12-03-2018 at 03:35 PM.
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Old 12-05-2018, 08:19 AM
Sparky812 Sparky812 is offline
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Unless you're doing things that require moving large files back and forth off the drive (like video editing), you won't really notice the difference in speed over a good quality traditional SSD. I mean, it is faster but it's likely money that you'd rather spend somewhere else in your build. You can get 1TB of fast SATA storage for less than 500GB of NVMe M.2 storage and you're not going to notice the difference on a gaming PC. You could probably get a 1TB M.2 stick that's actually a non-NVMe SATA drive for the same cost but that defeats the point of the M.2 -- and fills up the slot in case you ever decide to use it in the future.
OK, understood. My line of thinking was that using the M.2 slots on the motherboard was simple and logical.

I'm just in the research phase right now but appreciate the advice.
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Old 12-05-2018, 11:21 AM
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Sure thing. I assume you're at least somewhat budget-minded (if you were originally skipping the GPU, etc) so spending double the cost on an NVMe M.2 doesn't jive well with that goal.

I'd go with an AMD build like you were planning, RX 580 8GB, some fast memory (16GB is fine) and the Crucial MX500 1TB SSD to start. Unless you have a use case that's going to regularly use optical media, I wouldn't worry about having an extra 5.25" bay for a DVD drive and just buy an external one for $20 to plug into the USB when you need it. Heck, I haven't used one at all on my PC built a year ago (installed Windows off a USB) and haven't missed it.

AMD is cheaper for the performance and, if the kid decides he wants to stream or record his games, the multicore performance of AMD will beat out the same tier Intel chip.

It sounds as though you're comfortable inside a case but BitWit has an excellent build tutorial video if your son wants to watch something and have some idea how it's done before getting his hands dirty.

Good luck!
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Old 12-05-2018, 01:51 PM
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Case - nothing yet. Looking for something with a side (glass) window and 2 external drive bays (for DVD drive and LED fan speed controller) LED fans (can be added later, I suppose) and 2 x USB 3.0. I'm surprised at the limited selections out there. Can anyone point me at one? My eyes are sore from looking at pictured on-line.
I wouldn't worry about the 5.25" bays. There's a reason most new cases don't include them. I recently built a new PC inside a Fractal Meshify case. I wanted the extra airflow an all-mesh front provides. The NZXT H500 (or H500i if you want to spend an extra $30 for fan and light controller and some extra lighting in the case) are also good price/performance cases.

Also, stock cooling for the processor is adequate. But if you choose a PC case with a solid front, or if you want to play with overclocking at all, you'll need a better cooler. All-In-One (AIO) water coolers are as easy to install as traditional fan coolers, but for mild overclocks and otherwise good airflow, a good fan cooler will be cheaper.

Agree with most of the other advice. If money is an issue, SSD > M2. GPU is just as important as CPU. MBs are fairly generic among the name manufacturers. Unless you are building in a micro-ATX or mini-ATX case, I'd stick with a (full) ATX board, mostly because an ATX board will have room for more things like fan headers, external USB, RGB controls, and maybe more room for oversized CPU coolers (also consider case size if thinking about some of the really big CPU coolers).
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Old 12-05-2018, 04:22 PM
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Anything I'm missing?
Monitor, keyboard, and mouse. Do you already have a monitor? If so, do you know if it supports Freesync or GSync? What resolution is it?

BTW your idea of make it a joint project is just what I did when I bought my nephew a PC and it worked very well.
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Old 12-07-2018, 07:17 AM
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Monitor, keyboard, and mouse. Do you already have a monitor? If so, do you know if it supports Freesync or GSync? What resolution is it?

BTW your idea of make it a joint project is just what I did when I bought my nephew a PC and it worked very well.
He has an ergonomic Microsoft keyboard and mouse. He uses a a 20" HDTV with another 19" on the side.

They will work fine until he can upgrade himself or with Christmas, BDay, etc. gifts.
He's also interested in a good cam and microphone, if anyone has suggestions?
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Old 12-07-2018, 08:33 AM
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He's also interested in a good cam and microphone, if anyone has suggestions?
Not at 13. He's almost certainly too immature.
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Old 12-07-2018, 09:18 AM
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He's also interested in a good cam and microphone, if anyone has suggestions?
The Blue Yeti line of mics seems to be the standard. Note that a good quality streaming mic will run you over a hundred dollars, plus the camera (I don't have any recommendations there).

I assume he wants the camera and mic for streaming on Twitch in which case the AMD build is really the way to go.
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Old 12-07-2018, 11:19 AM
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My new build has a 2700x with my old 1060 3gb (I didn't feel like buying a new one just yet.) Do you want to output 1080p? 4k? In between?

BFV looks beautiful at 1080p. Fallout 76 struggles. That may be a game-to-game optimization issue.

I do have an M2 for non-game reasons (although when I do put a game on there the load times are very nice) but even my faster HDD works just fine for games. And it was cheap.
  #20  
Old 12-07-2018, 12:04 PM
Sparky812 Sparky812 is offline
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The Blue Yeti line of mics seems to be the standard. Note that a good quality streaming mic will run you over a hundred dollars, plus the camera (I don't have any recommendations there).

I assume he wants the camera and mic for streaming on Twitch in which case the AMD build is really the way to go.
Yep, Twitch and Discord with his buddies.
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Old 12-09-2018, 12:20 PM
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I'm also looking at computers and as overwhelmed as Sparky by motherboards. How do low end, mid end and high end MBs tend to differ? What does the extra money buy you?

RAM: I'm a little unclear there too about what extra RAM budget will buy in a gaming computer. Should 16 GB be enough for the next decade for gaming purposes? What programs tend to use 10+GB of RAM today?
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Old 12-09-2018, 02:06 PM
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16GB will be plenty. Get a board with four DIMM slots and buy two 8GB sticks so, if you ever do decide you need more, you're golden to upgrade. AMD chips benefit greatly from fast memory and I'd recommend 3000 or better. You'll likely need to unlock XMP in your BIOS/UEFI to gain the full memory speed which is as easy as a single mouse-click on modern boards. Intel chips don't benefit quite so much (or aren't quite as crippled by slow memory depending on your perspective) but fast memory is still better.

The difference between mid and high-end "gaming" boards isn't nearly as substantial as the difference between low and mid end boards. Low end boards tends to have only two DIMM slots, a single PCIe expansion slot, limited SATA/USB connections, little USB 3 support, limited I/O connections and little consideration for heat management. Better boards are (obviously) the opposite of that and also offer things like M.2 slots and faster memory support; high end boards may have two M.2 slots, on-board troubleshooting displays and RGB bells and whistles. Basically stay away from the things I listed for low end boards and you'll likely be okay. Obviously make sure your CPU is compatible.

Unless you have a strong reason for needing one, I'd definitely stay away from micro-ITX boards and try to stay away from mini-ATX boards. Standard ATX boards offer more space which translates to better cooling, often more slots/connections and general ease of access when tinkering.
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Old 12-09-2018, 02:35 PM
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No technical advice here, but just wanted to say that a father-son computer build project sounds like a great idea. I did it once against my better judgment -- had never built a computer before, but did fiddle around with hardware and have a reasonable understanding of the tech -- but my son insisted.

It turned out quite well although I probably got many new gray hairs worrying about the money we were spending with no guarantee of good results. It was ultimately a fun project for the two of us. The experience motivated him later to build a much more powerful one on his own. I got the old one, and until I bought my new desktop computer about a year ago, our old home-built remained the most powerful computer in my house by quite a wide margin, and is still going strong in the rec room in my basement.
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Old 12-09-2018, 04:18 PM
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16GB will be plenty. Get a board with four DIMM slots and buy two 8GB sticks so, if you ever do decide you need more, you're golden to upgrade. AMD chips benefit greatly from fast memory and I'd recommend 3000 or better. You'll likely need to unlock XMP in your BIOS/UEFI to gain the full memory speed which is as easy as a single mouse-click on modern boards. Intel chips don't benefit quite so much (or aren't quite as crippled by slow memory depending on your perspective) but fast memory is still better.

The difference between mid and high-end "gaming" boards isn't nearly as substantial as the difference between low and mid end boards. Low end boards tends to have only two DIMM slots, a single PCIe expansion slot, limited SATA/USB connections, little USB 3 support, limited I/O connections and little consideration for heat management. Better boards are (obviously) the opposite of that and also offer things like M.2 slots and faster memory support; high end boards may have two M.2 slots, on-board troubleshooting displays and RGB bells and whistles. Basically stay away from the things I listed for low end boards and you'll likely be okay. Obviously make sure your CPU is compatible.

Unless you have a strong reason for needing one, I'd definitely stay away from micro-ITX boards and try to stay away from mini-ATX boards. Standard ATX boards offer more space which translates to better cooling, often more slots/connections and general ease of access when tinkering.

Thanks for the information.

I'm going to stay away from small MBs. Is there a point to EATX and other larger-than-ordinary MBs?

Is it possible to get 1 stick of 8GB of RAM? It's a bit on the pricey side right now.


How about coolers? Without overclocking, are stock coolers usually quiet-ish?
What are the best coolers for overclocking? What are the quietest ones? Anything to look out for?
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Old 12-09-2018, 07:05 PM
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I'm going to stay away from small MBs. Is there a point to EATX and other larger-than-ordinary MBs?
Not really. eATX may have more expansion slots and stuff but you're probably not running a four GPU render farm.
Quote:
Is it possible to get 1 stick of 8GB of RAM? It's a bit on the pricey side right now.
Yes. It will run a little slower than 2x4GB (dual channel) but you can upgrade in the future with another 8GB stick and not face compatibility issues then. Be sure to buy the exact same 8GB stick in the future since two mismatched sticks running dual channel leads to complications.
Quote:
How about coolers? Without overclocking, are stock coolers usually quiet-ish?
What are the best coolers for overclocking? What are the quietest ones? Anything to look out for?
The AMD stock "Wraith" cooler is fine for stock speeds, works well and is relatively quiet. Plus it comes free with the CPU so you can't beat that. For Intel, you'll need to buy a cooler since the higher tier CPUs don't come with one included. The Cooler Master Hyper 212 Evo is sort of the gold standard in affordable air coolers. For overclocking, it depends a bit on what you have and how fast you're trying to go. I use a Corsair H100i v2 AIO water cooler but I used to overclock a different chip with the 212 Evo.

Air flow in the case will also make a difference -- the best cooler doesn't help if your case is a sealed off oven. I have a personal fondness for Cougar Vortex fans to hit a sweet spot of performance and noise (or lack thereof). Other people swear by Noctua fans which cost more and are arguably even uglier than the Cougar black/orange design. I'm currently using a couple Gentle Typhoon fans for pushing air through my radiator but I don't know if you can even buy those any longer (plus they were $25 or $30 a pop). Great combination of static pressure and low noise though.

Last edited by Jophiel; 12-09-2018 at 07:09 PM.
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Old 12-12-2018, 07:59 AM
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*Update* still researching....

Question- onboard Wifi? I don't see a lot of extra slots to add cards on any mobos.

I've done some research on graphics cards, it looks like i can get a RX580 8Gb for a fairly decent price. ~$250 CAD

I'm assuming he will want to run multiple monitors so...

Can he do this off the single card? (I believe this is what he does now)
Or... should I use his old GIGABYTE GeForce GT 610 2Gb alongside the RX580.

I believe he would use one monitor for browsing, etc.. and the other for gaming.

Got a line on a Ryzen 2700X for $350 CAD... stay tuned.
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Old 12-12-2018, 08:28 AM
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You can generally run multiple monitors off one card.
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Old 12-12-2018, 09:12 AM
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In a perfect world, he'd be hooked up via Ethernet but, if that's not happening, then generally PCIe Wifi is slightly preferable to onboard largely because you can upgrade/replace it. Onboard is preferable to a USB Wifi adapter. If you do go USB, get something that'll run off the 3.0 port and not the old 2.0 slot. I wouldn't buy a board just for the extra PCIe slot but I'd buy one with onboard over using an adapter.

Any half decent modern card will run multiple displays and yours certainly will. It has multiple output port for precisely that reason.
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Old 12-13-2018, 08:05 AM
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OK,

So, I picked up a Sapphire Nitro+ Radeon RX 580 for $250 CAD. Looks Awesome BTW!

My son has decided that he could sacrifice some higher end items to lower the cost and go for a cool look.

I'm going today to view a partial system that would nail a couple birds with one stone for an good price.

- Ryzen 7 1800x 4ghz
- 8GB DDR4 RAM
- 120gb M.2 SSD
- 1Tb HDD
- AB350 overclockable motherboard.
- DIYPC Vanguard-RGB Black Dual USB3.0 Steel/ Tempered Glass ATX Mid Tower Gaming Computer Case w/Tempered Glass Panels (Front and Both Sides) and Pre-Installed 4 x RGB LED Fans (7 Different Color in 3 Mode Control)
- 500W 80+ PS

I already have plans to upgrade the PS to the EVGA 750 G3 to accommodate the RX 580.

Any advice or input is appreciated.
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Old 12-13-2018, 11:59 AM
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I’ve owned a couple Sapphire cards (my last card before my current one was that brand). They make good cards for the price.
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Old 12-13-2018, 01:28 PM
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Yeah, I've owned several Sapphire cards (7950 & R9 290X) and they're all still in use, generations later.

Make sure the M.2 used NVMe so you're not just filling the slot with a SATA drive. Otherwise, you could get a 120GB SATA drive for $25.

Is there a reason you're going with the 1700X? The 2600X is about $100 cheaper for virtually the same performance. Unless you have a great lead on a 1700X; I'm just going off Newegg pricing. If they're about the same price, the 1700X is better, at MSRP the 2600X is a better value by a good mark. You're not going "wrong" with either.

Edit: Wait, you're looking at a system? That's different -- I assumed you were still building. If you're going for a prebuilt with those specs, the stuff I mentioned isn't enough to say it's "bad" in any way even if it's not how I'd configure it myself.

Last edited by Jophiel; 12-13-2018 at 01:29 PM.
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Old 12-13-2018, 03:13 PM
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Yeah, I've owned several Sapphire cards (7950 & R9 290X) and they're all still in use, generations later.

Make sure the M.2 used NVMe so you're not just filling the slot with a SATA drive. Otherwise, you could get a 120GB SATA drive for $25.

Is there a reason you're going with the 1700X? The 2600X is about $100 cheaper for virtually the same performance. Unless you have a great lead on a 1700X; I'm just going off Newegg pricing. If they're about the same price, the 1700X is better, at MSRP the 2600X is a better value by a good mark. You're not going "wrong" with either.

Edit: Wait, you're looking at a system? That's different -- I assumed you were still building. If you're going for a prebuilt with those specs, the stuff I mentioned isn't enough to say it's "bad" in any way even if it's not how I'd configure it myself.
Yes, I've changed tack a bit. (with some direction from my wife )


While we began looking at something on the higher end of things, the parts cost was starting to get away from our initial budget of ~$1000. My son also was interested in something that looked cool with the RGB case, fans, etc..

The revised plan is to get something up and running, then we can upgrade specific components as we see fit. We always planned it as a learning exercise so this way the project can continue with this one or even a new one.

Here is the new cost breakdown

Sapphire Nitro+ Radeon RX 580
$250 CAD ~$190 USD

- Ryzen 7 1800x 4ghz
- 8GB DDR4 RAM
- 120gb M.2 SSD
- 1Tb HDD
- Gigabyte - AB350 - Gaming 3 OC motherboard.
- DIYPC Vanguard-RGB Case
$400 CAD ~$300 USD

EVGA 750W SuperNova G3
$100 CAD ~$75 USD

for a total of $750 CAD or ~$560 USD

That's about half of what the custom system I had planned would have cost.

Once we've put it through its paces, we'll see where we're falling short. I suspect RAM
will be the next purchase.

I have 3 kids, so I maybe doing this again ...and again...
  #33  
Old 12-13-2018, 03:28 PM
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Looks really good, especially for the price. And, yeah, looking at more RAM would be my first upgrade.
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Old 12-13-2018, 03:36 PM
Gray Ghost Gray Ghost is offline
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Originally Posted by Jophiel View Post
Looks really good, especially for the price. And, yeah, looking at more RAM would be my first upgrade.
Do you think that he might want a larger SSD, if he's going to be gaming on it a lot? I have an older 250 GB SSD, and it gets crowded with the OS and all of the games I want to store on it. I imagine a 120 GB drive would be even worse.

Haven't upgraded to an Nvme-PCI 3.0 express drive, but when I do, I was looking at something in the 500 GB to 1 TB range for that reason.

I have the 1700x---it's about a year old now---and I like it a lot. It gets hot quickly, even with the Arctic air cooler I have. I probably could have better case air management though. OC ing is supposed to be easy, though I haven't really noticed much difference when I did, so I stopped, and it plays nice with the DDR4-3200 RAM sticks.
  #35  
Old 12-13-2018, 06:03 PM
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Jophiel Jophiel is offline
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He'll want an extra, larger, SSD but that's a trivial upgrade and more memory will probably have a more immediate effect. If he didn't even have a SSD boot drive, that would be different. Storing games on the HDD for a while won't kill him

Last edited by Jophiel; 12-13-2018 at 06:04 PM.
  #36  
Old 12-13-2018, 06:12 PM
MichaelEmouse MichaelEmouse is offline
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I don't know if i mentioned it here or in another thread so I'll risk repeating: A hybrid drive is well worth the extra money over an HDD. It runs your most often used programs nearly as fast as an SSD and will last longer.
  #37  
Old 12-14-2018, 08:55 AM
Sparky812 Sparky812 is offline
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I just wanted to say thanks to all of you (especially Jophiel *tips hat*) for all the input and discussion. I used a lot of your input to narrow down my options but more importantly, where I'll go with this system and future builds.

I'm really stoked that I was able to put this together before Christmas, we had initially planned to build it more gradually. Now I gotta get all these parts wrapped and under the tree! We'll put it together and get software sorted out over the holidays. As I said, this is a learning exercise for my 13 year old son who is not sure what he wants to do when he grows up. Maybe this will pique his interest.

I'll keep you all updated on how it goes and future upgrades.... and stay tuned for Sparky's Gaming Computer 2.0 coming in a couple of years for my next son!
  #38  
Old 12-14-2018, 10:08 AM
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Jophiel Jophiel is offline
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Best of luck and I think he'll have a lot of fun with it. It'll be a good system for a long while to come. Make sure it's him doing the 'work' when it comes time to slide a couple more RAM sticks or hook up a new SSD in there

Edit: Oh, and do check to make sure XMP is turned on. It might not be as a default from whoever built the system.

Last edited by Jophiel; 12-14-2018 at 10:11 AM.
  #39  
Old 12-14-2018, 10:14 AM
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Jophiel Jophiel is offline
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https://smallbusiness.chron.com/enab...ard-37024.html

Instructions on how to check/do it in case you weren't sure. Ok, I'm done!
  #40  
Old 12-14-2018, 11:04 AM
Sparky812 Sparky812 is offline
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Originally Posted by Jophiel View Post
https://smallbusiness.chron.com/enab...ard-37024.html

Instructions on how to check/do it in case you weren't sure. Ok, I'm done!
Wow! Thanks again!
  #41  
Old 12-17-2018, 09:42 AM
Sparky812 Sparky812 is offline
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So.... one I have this beast up and running, what game(s) should I be looking at for full effect?


Also, any thoughts on HD monitors? I'm looking at possible getting one new screen.
  #42  
Old 12-17-2018, 11:59 AM
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You should look at getting a Freesync screen so that you can make use of the Variable Refresh Rate ability of your GPU.
  #43  
Old 12-17-2018, 01:19 PM
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Jophiel Jophiel is offline
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Yeah, like Quartz said, find a Freesync monitor. Fortunately, they're not much of a price premium unlike Gsync for Nvidia cards. What it does is adjust the screen refresh rate to match how many frames your GPU is pushing out so you get a smooth image even if the framerate suddenly drops.

I'd go for a 1080p screen or 1440p at most. Your card won't be able to effectively run stuff at 4k and even 1440 will require making choices between lowering graphics quality options or playing at low frame rates. If you want to run things at Ultra, stick with 1080p. If you're okay with running at medium-high and perhaps a lower framerate, you can go with 1440p.

Note that, according to the Steam Hardware Survey, less than 7% of Steam susers are running at over 1080p fpr their primary display so don't feel like you're taking the low road by not jumping to a 1440 or 4k screen.

Last edited by Jophiel; 12-17-2018 at 01:23 PM.
  #44  
Old 12-17-2018, 06:33 PM
carnalito carnalito is offline
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For compuer case, i can recomend getting a case from "Fractal Design", this is my 3rd one now, very high quality to a OK price. Very silent etc.

As some1 else pointed out, you need a GPU if you gonna game

i would go for some mid-tier nvidia card, for like 200 dollars.
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