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Old 11-15-2019, 08:51 AM
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Considering getting a dog


So I have been openly invaded this week by mice. My house, being built back in the 70s in what was once a farm field on the then outskirts of a very small farm town has always had mice in the walls.

This is probably the first time in 30 years that there hasn't been a dog or cat residing in the home and so now the mice are openly and brazenly invading the main spaces of my home.

My first thought was to get a cat to discourage the little vermin, but research shows that a dog would probably be better.

So rat terriers, cairn terriers, lakeland terriers et al, way too energetic and demanding for me to deal with.

Dachshund perhaps? Anyone have or once have any of the rodent hunting breeds that care to share experiences and advice?

Interestingly, the German Pinscher is also mentioned as a good dog for rodent control, but that's too big of a dog. Needs to be small enough to be a lap dog, as generally I'm a cat person with dogs being a close second

Last edited by DorkVader; 11-15-2019 at 08:52 AM.
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Old 11-15-2019, 09:34 AM
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Most dogs will chase mice. I have had a German Shepard mix, a corgi, and a chihuahua mix that all chased rodents when given the opportunity.
One of my inlaws got a yorkie because her friend had one that was calm and very obedient, and it turned out to be a yappie little spaz. The best option is to adopt an adult because you don't have to guess what their personality is going to be.
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Old 11-15-2019, 09:47 AM
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I had a Rat Terrier who lived to 20+. No mouse came to her nose, eyes or ears that she did not shred to bits. She would cock her head to the side at a hay bale in the barn and determine where the mouse (really they were proper size rats)was. We would scoot the hay bale rats would run and the chase was on. But...she also caught/killed squirrels, rabbits, frogs and a few birds. She was not particular about her prey. Rat Terriers are murdering beasts. I highly recommend one. If you can live with the idea that they never stop. No off button.
Weenie dogs or a weenie mix sounds perfect.
(I have a Yorkie now, she wouldn't 'rat' if her life depended on it)

Last edited by Beckdawrek; 11-15-2019 at 09:52 AM.
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Old 11-15-2019, 09:57 AM
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To add- Rat Terriers are quite cat like. Very fastidious and clean. I hear you can train them to use a cat litter box. Very smart dogs.

Last edited by Beckdawrek; 11-15-2019 at 09:57 AM.
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Old 11-15-2019, 10:16 AM
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This post is very timely. I have sworn to my other half that I've seen a mouse twice in the kitchen in recent weeks (she didn't believe me). Today she texted to me to say she's found droppings behind the cooker.

My maltese dog is TOTALLY OBLIVIOUS.

I wouldn't trust that a dog is going to solve your problem. I'd place much more reliance on a cat to deliver the goods.

Last edited by SanVito; 11-15-2019 at 10:17 AM.
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Old 11-15-2019, 10:31 AM
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I haven't heard of people getting dogs for the specific purpose of ridding their homes of mice. If this was even a reliable method of control you'd face the possibility of rodent corpses and remnants thereof strewn about, plus canine barfing up of rodent parts.

I've caught something like 30 mice in the kitchen, garage, basement and shed over the past couple months, employing reusable traps and peanut butter as bait. The invasion has slowed or even stopped, since truly cold weather arrived and the little bastids still outdoors have had to seek winter burrows.
  #7  
Old 11-15-2019, 11:27 AM
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Originally Posted by Jackmanii
I haven't heard of people getting dogs for the specific purpose of ridding their homes of mice. If this was even a reliable method of control you'd face the possibility of rodent corpses and remnants thereof strewn about, plus canine barfing up of rodent parts.
Leet the Wonder DogTM is a German Shepherd, and is eager to devour any small critter that comes within range of the Mighty Jaws of Death. And he is both tidy, and efficient in the mortuary field - snap, crunchcrunchgulp and Mr. Mouse is one with Nineveh and Tyre. No blood, no barfing, no fuss, no muss, don't cuss, call us.

But he is a large beast, so probably not what you want.

And the little mousies who survive learn to stay up on the counters or otherwise out of reach of the local apex predator. Although LtWDTM will still helpfully point out where the rodent intruder is hiding ("He's behind the microwave, Grampa! Toss him down here and I will take care of everything!") as well as remove the recently deceased from the mousetrap, if he gets a chance.

We had dachshunds while I was growing up, and they are both not terribly bright animals*, and subject to back issues. I don't recall them being particularly good mousers, but we also had a cat, who was quite accomplished in that area. He lasted to be nearly eighteen, had been declawed, was more than half blind, but still brought home mice and laid their dead carcasses adoringly at my mother's feet, expecting (and receiving) lavish praise for his valor. So maybe a cat would work for you.

Regards,
Shodan

*That is to say, they are definitely smarter than a potted plant, but not necessarily a can opener.
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Old 11-15-2019, 11:29 AM
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I was told to report here.

Dachshunds are the perfect dog. Long, low, smart killing machines. Doesn't hurt that they are beautiful and sweet, as well.

They will drive the mice from your house before them, and you will hear the little squeaky lamentations of their women.

I got 5 of them, now, highly recommend them. Go get one this instant, and name him Herbert.
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Old 11-15-2019, 11:37 AM
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I am not breed loyal, nor do any sort of cheerleading about my [breed of dog], but have you considered a Min Pin?

I "accidentally" ended up with one due to an ill-timed visit to the humane society and a delightfully friendly member of the breed. In my experience, he was one of the most ruthlessly efficient critter-removers I've ever seen. In addition, he was an incredibly observant watchdog, and absolutely nothing escaped his notice. You WILL be informed when anything or anyone enters your property, whether JWs or errant squirrels. The mice under the deck? Reduced to corpses almost overnight. Most dogs do the BARK BARK BARK chase and accomplish little. Min Pins begin a quiet, low to the ground stalking approach until they can pounce. And when they pounce it's like lightning. They're more like a cat in some ways.

If mine was typical, you won't have rats any more. But you won't have squirrels, snakes, or other small critters either. They're really intense and fearless dogs, but relatively easy to housetrain.
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Old 11-15-2019, 11:49 AM
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My preference would be a cat. further, sticky traps work VERY well to catch mice. However, I'd be concerned about the cat getting stuck to the traps.
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Old 11-15-2019, 12:02 PM
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Have you ever owned a dog, DV? If not, might hiring an exterminator be a more lasting and less aggravating solution to your rodent problem? Cats might be more your speed too, both barn cat types and indoor kitties.

Dachshunds are sweet? OK, if you say so. I am not sold on the 'sweetness' of any terrier or close cousin to same. At least any that were bred for rodent control and are true to type. (Though I am friendly with the neighbor's long-haired doxie, mainly because I know where to scratch.)
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Old 11-15-2019, 12:04 PM
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Originally Posted by pullin View Post
I am not breed loyal, nor do any sort of cheerleading about my [breed of dog], but have you considered a Min Pin?...

...And when they pounce it's like lightning. They're more like a cat in some ways.

If mine was typical, you won't have rats any more. But you won't have squirrels, snakes, or other small critters either. They're really intense and fearless dogs, but relatively easy to housetrain.
Monumentally dominant too, at least for the two I've personal acquaintance with. I had a Weim, so not a great shock, but the Min Pins were bossy, fearless dogs. Didn't know they were hell on vermin too.
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Old 11-15-2019, 12:07 PM
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For all of you who said cat, that was my first thought, but a little research into what type would be best (Coon and American Shorthair Domestic btw) shows that cats are actually not as good as dogs for mousing. I need/want an animal that will not only discourage the pests with their presence but actually work to eliminate the current infestation. I want/need a partner in this battle of beasts who will tell me where to look if they can't get to the rodent directly. Not an animal that may or may not decide to do more than look at the mouse as it scurries about. You only ever see 1 mouse, there is never only one mouse.


A miniature pinscher...had not considered that breed. And such a tough manly looking little dog too, much like its big little brethren the doberman

Last edited by DorkVader; 11-15-2019 at 12:07 PM.
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Old 11-15-2019, 12:23 PM
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Rat Terrier
Rat Terrier
Rat Terrier!!
This is why this breed exists.
I've known many they were all mice murderers.
Mini Pins are nice dogs. Dachshunds are nice dogs. Heck I have a Beagle who would be interested in a mouse, but only to play with.
Get a Ratty.
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Old 11-15-2019, 01:37 PM
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I like cats, but I have to admit that they are hit and miss when it comes to being good mousers. At their best, they can't be beat. (I've had a couple that would pull birds out of the air and bring me two or three mice a day.)

But the rat terriers my friends have are uniformly bloodthirsty little bastards who would kill anything they can locate. It's a bit disturbing to see them shake the life (literally) out of their poor victims.
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Old 11-15-2019, 06:08 PM
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get this, it's cheaper

https://www.amazon.com/s?k=tin+cat&g...l_6xnlr7bwp9_e
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  #17  
Old 11-15-2019, 06:30 PM
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If you humanely trap 'em where are you gonna release them. My ethics are such that I wouldn't throw my pests over the fence toward my neighbors house (I don't have neighbors, but you know what I mean) it's more humane to kill them outright. Or learn to like them, coz where there's one, his approx. 44 cousins are waiting to get in. The better fed they are (off your grub)the more babies they'll make the next time. It never ends until you step up and end it. Get a dog or cat. Get some traps. Poison if you must (responsibly).

ETA: I have nothing against the pet Rat. I understand they are nice pets. But a responsible pet owners Rat wouldn't be in your pantry.

Last edited by Beckdawrek; 11-15-2019 at 06:33 PM.
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Old 11-15-2019, 07:12 PM
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Works better: Jawz plastic traps. (Not necessarily less humane, either: no mice starving because you forgot to check the trap every day, and no fighting/killing each other because they're trapped in close quarters.)
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Old 11-15-2019, 07:47 PM
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Traps are good for the short term and I will be using them. I've used dcon in the past when pets weren't a consideration but not generally comfortable with the idea
I was just telling Beck the other day that historically, my family aligns more with the House of Bau than the House of Bast, how unwittingly prophetic.

what the??? How...I'm not seeing it...a Rottweiler/Dachshund mix?...saw one on one of the local animal shelter adoption page, so I guess? But, HOW? Nah, that can't be right

Last edited by DorkVader; 11-15-2019 at 07:49 PM.
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Old 11-15-2019, 07:50 PM
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Originally Posted by Gatopescado View Post
I was told to report here.

Dachshunds are the perfect dog. Long, low, smart killing machines. Doesn't hurt that they are beautiful and sweet, as well.

They will drive the mice from your house before them, and you will hear the little squeaky lamentations of their women.

I got 5 of them, now, highly recommend them. Go get one this instant, and name him Herbert.
Co-sign. And, aw, my dad's name was Herbert. He was the one who got our family started on dachshunds c. 1949. We've had doxies ever since.

Our previous and current boys were/are finely tuned vermin hunting juggernauts. I never doubt them when they tell me they smell a squirrel. I may not see but it always turns out to be there. Max, our current boy, dragged me to the tree on the corner when I walked him this afternoon. I didn't see anything. Then, I did. Fortunately, he's not a spurlauter like Luc (our previous boy). His I've-found-a-squirrel cry could strip paint.

Last edited by carrps; 11-15-2019 at 07:51 PM.
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Old 11-15-2019, 07:53 PM
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Have you ever owned a dog, DV? If not, might hiring an exterminator be a more lasting and less aggravating solution to your rodent problem? Cats might be more your speed too, both barn cat types and indoor kitties.

Dachshunds are sweet? OK, if you say so. I am not sold on the 'sweetness' of any terrier or close cousin to same. At least any that were bred for rodent control and are true to type. (Though I am friendly with the neighbor's long-haired doxie, mainly because I know where to scratch.)
One of my neighbors claims doxies love butt scritches because they can't reach it to scratch it themselves.
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Old 11-15-2019, 11:03 PM
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Gray Ghost, sorry, missed your post somehow until now. it's been decades since I've owned or been responsible for a dog for any length of time.
I like dogs generally, but as a cat person, this is not a decision or action I do lightly or frivolously.
Pets are not mere accessories. They are members of the household with rights and responsibilities, living creatures with feelings and (some level of) intelligence and thought and awareness. I said traps would be used for short term rodent control because I know my doggy skills are essentially none and I will need to get some training. Plus get the back yard into shape for a dog to play in.

Last edited by DorkVader; 11-15-2019 at 11:03 PM.
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Old 11-16-2019, 12:16 AM
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what the??? How...I'm not seeing it...a Rottweiler/Dachshund mix?...saw one on one of the local animal shelter adoption page, so I guess? But, HOW? Nah, that can't be right
I hereby request and require more details on this doggo. It sounds perfect.
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Old 11-16-2019, 12:37 AM
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A 'Rottshund'. I also am intrigued, but only for the amusement factor.
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Old 11-16-2019, 02:28 AM
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Und here you are, der Vvienerschtiff

A regular dachshund with regular dachshund coloring and marks that some poor schlub not very fsmiliar with the breed decided had to be a rotty mix

And Sunny it would have to be cause a rottweiler sized dachshund is terrifying

Last edited by DorkVader; 11-16-2019 at 02:29 AM.
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Old 11-16-2019, 11:03 AM
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Feet too small to be full Dachs. And, yeah, that is a terrifying dog!

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Old 11-16-2019, 01:01 PM
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I've never seen a mouse in our house (we've always had cats). I've never even seen one in the yard; the one that Ms. P saw was quickly dispatched by our Heeler/Beagle mix. The Lab we had before would have let a mouse sit on her head.
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Old 11-17-2019, 02:10 AM
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Actually, now that I think about it, most of our dogs over the years have happily hunted and dispatched mice, rats, squirrels, skunks, gophers, moles, and the occasional unfortunate bird. I think you could widen your search a bit.


My list includes: Akitas, Rottweiler, GSDs, Golden Retriever, Swiss Mountain Dog, Chihuahua (well, he tries ), lab mix. I don't know if the Newfie would have done it though. Avoid large, water-loving goof balls and you should be fine.
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Old 11-17-2019, 06:31 AM
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Monumentally dominant too, at least for the two I've personal acquaintance with. I had a Weim, so not a great shock, but the Min Pins were bossy, fearless dogs. Didn't know they were hell on vermin too.
Yeah, I forgot to mention the dominance thing. We already had dogs when Herr Pin moved in. The pecking order was reestablished overnight, and we were taking bets on when he'd have the others standing at attention for morning inspection. It should be mentioned the largest outweighed him by a factor of 4.

The fearlessness is difficult to describe if you've never been around them. One afternoon all my dogs were outside doing their business, and a massive thunderclap and lightning strike occurred nearby. The other dogs tore the yard up getting back in the garage -- the Min Pin looked up in the sky, barked back at the thunder, and continued peeing on the fence post.

Last edited by pullin; 11-17-2019 at 06:32 AM.
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Old 11-17-2019, 08:47 PM
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For all of you who said cat, that was my first thought, but a little research into what type would be best (Coon and American Shorthair Domestic btw) shows that cats are actually not as good as dogs for mousing. I need/want an animal that will not only discourage the pests with their presence but actually work to eliminate the current infestation. I want/need a partner in this battle of beasts who will tell me where to look if they can't get to the rodent directly. Not an animal that may or may not decide to do more than look at the mouse as it scurries about.
Think I posted this in the wrong thread somehow, I don't now see it here:

What you want is a cat from a good barn cat family, who stayed with the mother long enough to learn how to hunt. (Or better yet two, to keep each other company.) The problem may be finding barn cats who are socialized to humans -- by the time they're good hunters, they're too old to easily make friends with humans if they haven't done it already. But while many barn cats are semiferal there's often a farmer or two around who doesn't spay their cats (and therefore is overly well supplied with kittens) but who does pet and cuddle them.

Cats who have been living indoors all their lives may not know how to hunt. Cats descended from a long line of cats fed by humans may even have lost the instinct. But barn cats are almost all good mousers -- the ones who aren't don't usually survive.
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