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Old 08-11-2019, 10:19 AM
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Explain English Money to Me


So I’m watching Peaky Blinders, and I have no idea how British money works. How much is a 1921 pound worth in modern dollars? Also, how many pounds in a Guinea. or a Sovereign?
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Old 08-11-2019, 10:42 AM
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So I’m watching Peaky Blinders, and I have no idea how British money works. How much is a 1921 pound worth in modern dollars? Also, how many pounds in a Guinea. or a Sovereign?
At that time there were 12 pence in a shilling and 20 shillings in a pound. A sovereign is a name of a gold coin worth a pound. A guinea was originally a gold coin worth a pound, but as the price of gold and silver fluctuated, this changed. By the time you're speaking of, there were essentially no guinea coins. It was an amount worth 21 shillings Items sometimes had prices listed as guineas to make them seem not so expensive. An item costing 100 guineas cost not 100 pounds but 105 pounds.

In 1921 a pound was worth a bit less than $4 US which adjusted for in flation is about $52 today.
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Old 08-11-2019, 12:21 PM
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At that time there were 12 pence in a shilling and 20 shillings in a pound. A sovereign is a name of a gold coin worth a pound.
And, bear in mind that "at that time" is the key here -- modern English money doesn't work this way.

In 1971, England instituted decimalization -- they abolished the shilling, and subdivided the pound into 100 pence.
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Old 08-11-2019, 10:51 AM
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"Guineas" were used to denote supposedly luxury/high quality goods and services, so, professional fees (lawyers, doctors, architects and so on), posh(or would-be posh) clothes, cars, radio sets and gramophones, etc.
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Old 08-14-2019, 05:24 PM
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"Guineas" were used to denote supposedly luxury/high quality goods and services, so, professional fees (lawyers, doctors, architects and so on), posh(or would-be posh) clothes, cars, radio sets and gramophones, etc.
AFAIK this went on until decimalization. I once read an early interview with Paul McCartney in which he said his violin-shaped bass guitar cost sixty guineas, going on to say he could afford a better one, but he was a skinflint.
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Old 08-11-2019, 11:05 AM
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£1 in 1921 is equivalent in purchasing power to about £48.55, which is around $58.44. These calculations are distorted by different ways of calculating inflation. My preferred method is to compare the value of an hour's labour: In the 1920's a labourer would earn around £2 (40 shillings, or 480 pence)for a 60 hour week, compared to £400 (around £340 nett) today for 40 hours.

There are 12 pennies in a shilling and 20 shillings in a Pound and a Guinea is 21 shillings. Even today you might hear of racehorses being auctioned in Guineas.

A Sovereign is a gold coin with a face value of £1.00 - naturally, it would have a far higher intrinsic value. They are still made today as commemorative coins.

Slang terms for coins:
Farthing - a quarter of a penny
Ha'penny - half a penny
Thruppence - three pence
tanner - sixpence
Bob - shilling (a 20th of a Pound)
Half a Crown - two shillings and sixpence. (An eighth of a Pound)
Tenner (a note) - Ten shillings
Fiver - five pounds (a large white note, rarely seen by ordinary workers)

Last edited by bob++; 08-11-2019 at 11:07 AM.
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Old 08-11-2019, 12:40 PM
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Slang terms for coins:
Farthing - a quarter of a penny
Ha'penny - half a penny
Thruppence - three pence
tanner - sixpence
Bob - shilling (a 20th of a Pound)
Half a Crown - two shillings and sixpence. (An eighth of a Pound)
Tenner (a note) - Ten shillings
Fiver - five pounds (a large white note, rarely seen by ordinary workers)
Five shillings being a crown. Two being a florin.
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Old 08-11-2019, 12:51 PM
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There are 12 pennies in a shilling and 20 shillings in a Pound and a Guinea is 21 shillings. Even today you might hear of racehorses being auctioned in Guineas.
Would a miser be a Guinea Pig?
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Old 08-11-2019, 01:07 PM
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Would a miser be a Guinea Pig?
Is there a portmanteau word that combines “groan” and “applause”?
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Old 08-11-2019, 01:44 PM
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The pound/shilling/penny system was surprisingly durable. It was adopted in Anglo-Saxon times, modeled on the French system established by Charlemagne.
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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/French_livre
The livre was established by Charlemagne as a unit of account equal to one pound of silver. It was subdivided into 20 sous (also sols), each of 12 deniers. The word livre came from the Latin word libra, a Roman unit of weight, and the denier comes from the Roman denarius. This system and the denier itself served as the model for many of Europe's currencies, including the British pound, Italian lira, Spanish dinero and the Portuguese dinheiro.
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Old 08-11-2019, 02:31 PM
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There are 12 pennies in a shilling and 20 shillings in a Pound and a Guinea is 21 shillings. Even today you might hear of racehorses being auctioned in Guineas.
I had no idea ! I thought that bit of shitting on the proles had been strictly Victorian. Do they say Guineas for the "classism" of it but really it's actually Pounds, or do they still really add the one shilling ?
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Old 08-11-2019, 02:42 PM
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I had no idea ! I thought that bit of shitting on the proles had been strictly Victorian. Do they say Guineas for the "classism" of it but really it's actually Pounds, or do they still really add the one shilling ?
They still added the extra shilling the last time I was in England hmmm '99 I think it was.
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Old 08-11-2019, 03:47 PM
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I had no idea ! I thought that bit of shitting on the proles had been strictly Victorian. Do they say Guineas for the "classism" of it but really it's actually Pounds, or do they still really add the one shilling ?
Horse-racing in the UK still uses furlongs as a unit of length, so it is quite traditional in general. In the case of horse auctions - the auctioneer takes the extra shilling as commission.
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Old 08-11-2019, 09:50 PM
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Horse-racing in the UK still uses furlongs as a unit of length, so it is quite traditional in general. In the case of horse auctions - the auctioneer takes the extra shilling as commission.
Far out ! Or, possibly, far back
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Old 08-12-2019, 08:20 AM
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Slang terms for coins:
Farthing - a quarter of a penny
Ha'penny - half a penny
Thruppence - three pence
tanner - sixpence
Bob - shilling (a 20th of a Pound)
Half a Crown - two shillings and sixpence. (An eighth of a Pound)
Tenner (a note) - Ten shillings
Fiver - five pounds (a large white note, rarely seen by ordinary workers)
What about "Tuppence"?

Agatha Christie had a detective character whose nickname was Tuppence. In one book, one of the clues that a letter supposedly from her was a forgery was the fact that the forger had spelled the signature as "Twopence" rather than "Tuppence."
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Old 08-12-2019, 08:42 AM
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What about "Tuppence"?

Agatha Christie had a detective character whose nickname was Tuppence. In one book, one of the clues that a letter supposedly from her was a forgery was the fact that the forger had spelled the signature as "Twopence" rather than "Tuppence."
Also, from Mary Poppins - "Feed the birds, tuppence a bag"

I also made a mistake - A 'tenner' was always £10. Ten shillings was a 'ten bob note' or 'arf a bar'

Last edited by bob++; 08-12-2019 at 08:45 AM.
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Old 08-12-2019, 09:19 AM
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I had at some point gotten the idea that a 'bob' was, post-decimalization, used for a pound. Was I wrong, or did it, in fact, shift like that?
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Old 08-12-2019, 09:23 AM
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I had at some point gotten the idea that a 'bob' was, post-decimalization, used for a pound. Was I wrong, or did it, in fact, shift like that?
You were wrong. I've never heard "bob" used to mean a pound. It was always a shilling.
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Old 08-17-2019, 02:03 PM
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What about "Tuppence"?

Agatha Christie had a detective character whose nickname was Tuppence. In one book, one of the clues that a letter supposedly from her was a forgery was the fact that the forger had spelled the signature as "Twopence" rather than "Tuppence."
I just read that book yesterday!
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Old 08-12-2019, 10:21 PM
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Slang terms for coins:
Farthing - a quarter of a penny
Super nit-picky correction, but farthing wasn't really "slang"; that was the official name for the denomination and the word "FARTHING" was actually spelled out on the coins--note that it didn't actually say anything like "1/4 of a penny" (or "1/960 of a pound") anywhere on the farthing coin. Similarly, U.S. dimes actually have the words "ONE DIME" on them, but they don't say "ten cents", or have the Arabic numerals "10" anywhere on them (unless they happened to have been minted in 2010 or something like that), as we Americans (like our British forebears) are kind of bloody-minded about designing money that doesn't confuse the hell out of anybody who isn't already intimately familiar with it.
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Old 08-12-2019, 10:40 PM
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Footnote from Good Omens (recently made into a TV mini-series), by Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman:

"NOTE FOR YOUNG PEOPLE AND AMERICANS: One shilling = Five Pee. It helps to understand the antique finances of the Witchfinder Army if you know the original British monetary system:

Two farthings = One Ha'penny. Two ha'pennies = One Penny. Three pennies = A Thrupenny Bit. Two Thrupences = A Sixpence. Two Sixpences = One Shilling, or Bob. Two Bob = A Florin. One Florin and one Sixpence = Half a Crown. Four Half Crowns = Ten Bob Note. Two Ten Bob Notes = One Pound (or 240 pennies). One Pound and One Shilling = One Guinea.

The British resisted decimalized currency for a long time because they thought it was too complicated."
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Old 08-12-2019, 11:21 PM
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I appreciate your liking for that book, but we had already said all of that before you came in with amazing new knowledge from fiction.
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Old 08-13-2019, 10:50 AM
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I read somewhere (sorry, no cite) that the money system was deliberately kept complicated so that the lower classes, presumably uneducated in mathematics, wouldn't be able to figure it out and would be kept poor. Is that true?
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Old 08-13-2019, 12:30 PM
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I read somewhere (sorry, no cite) that the money system was deliberately kept complicated so that the lower classes, presumably uneducated in mathematics, wouldn't be able to figure it out and would be kept poor. Is that true?
In my experience, the "lower classes" were always very well aware of the value of money. This is surely a universal truth, that those of us with very little tend to be a lot more careful than those with plenty.

I would venture that any reasonably intelligent 10yo could add, subtract and multiply money in their heads in the pre-decimal system.
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Old 08-14-2019, 01:04 AM
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I read somewhere (sorry, no cite) that the money system was deliberately kept complicated so that the lower classes, presumably uneducated in mathematics, wouldn't be able to figure it out and would be kept poor. Is that true?
Poorer people worked almost exclusively in shillings and pence, and the subdivisions and multiples thereof (i.e., the complicated bits) Pounds (and guineas) were something for the better off, and in any case they employed people to look after all that for them.

So no, it isn't true. The system would have arisen from a whole series of successive habits and decisions over centuries, as convenient to the bulk of the people using them.
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Old 08-14-2019, 04:32 AM
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I read somewhere (sorry, no cite) that the money system was deliberately kept complicated so that the lower classes, presumably uneducated in mathematics, wouldn't be able to figure it out and would be kept poor. Is that true?
I guess my family qualified as working class (Dad was a clerk and Mum stayed at home to bring up the kids.)
We never had much money (we never owned a car , our first TV was bought when I was 7 years old), but we knew how to count within the system of 12 pence = 1 shilling; 20 shillings make a pound.) When you handle the coins daily, it soon works out.

My pocket money was 5 pence a week. That may not sound much, but there was candy you could buy for a farthing (i.e. 1/4 of a penny.) Also I don't remember the exact prices, but I could afford to go to the cinema once a week (because the matinee performance was cheaper.)

My parents got me a free library card and I walked everywhere local (we couldn't afford a bicycle.)

Our holidays were either at the sea-side or countryside walking and of course we went by train.

My parents kept a budget and I learnt the importance of interest early on (so as an adult I saved up for a house and never paid credit card interest.)
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Old 08-13-2019, 03:31 AM
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The threepenny bit (before the introduction of the multi-sided copper coin in the 1930s) was known as a "joey" or (because it still had some silver in it) a "silver joey" (my mother still had a couple to put in the Christmas pudding in the 1950s).
I've read that many American servicemen in Britain in World War II, found British currency mildly insane-driving because non-decimal, and definitely on the complicated side -- some never completely got the hang of it. Many of them conceived a special hatred of threepenny coins; possibly contributed to by their being in that era, of -- as per your post -- two very different kinds, both common: old tiny silver-coloured one, and new larger twelve-sided one (as glee says, "yellow with funny straight sides").

The Americans called threepenny bits, "bastard coins": with the celebrated thing of their being much better-paid than British troops -- occasioning much envy -- there are tales of the Yanks on payday, extracting the "bastard coins" from their pay packets and throwing them scornfully on the ground, providing quite a harvest for the local kids. One of those stories which one feels ought to be true, even if they aren't...

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And then there are all the slang terms for different quantities of pounds, like "monkey", "pony" and so on (though might that be a purely London thing).
I have read -- can't give any cite at this point -- that the "monkey" and "pony" names came from British India, of all things, by way of guys who had been out there when in the Army: various-denominations-of rupees-notes in India -- the x-rupee one featured a picture of a monkey, and the y-rupee ditto, a picture of a man on a horse.

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Super nit-picky correction, but farthing wasn't really "slang"; that was the official name for the denomination and the word "FARTHING" was actually spelled out on the coins--note that it didn't actually say anything like "1/4 of a penny" (or "1/960 of a pound") anywhere on the farthing coin.
"Farthing" is an old word meaning a fourth part / quarter of something -- in this case, of a penny. In Tolkien's writings, the hobbits' Shire is divided into four administrative regions, in so far as hobbits "do" administration: the North, South, East, and West Farthings. This is reckoned to be a "nod" by Tolkien to the large English county of Yorkshire, which for many centuries until reorganisation in 1974 was divided into three "Ridings" -- old word for a third part of something -- North, East, and West.
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Old 08-13-2019, 03:46 AM
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I have read -- can't give any cite at this point -- that the "monkey" and "pony" names came from British India, of all things, by way of guys who had been out there when in the Army: various-denominations-of rupees-notes in India -- the x-rupee one featured a picture of a monkey, and the y-rupee ditto, a picture of a man on a horse.
Don't think attempts by me at direct linking, would work; but if one Googles "British money slang monkey pony", various items come up to suggest that it's largely a Cockney thing, and is indeed reckoned to be derived from Indian banknotes and their artwork, when we ruled there: "pony" = 25 pounds / rupees, "monkey" = 500 pounds / rupees. (The "hits" thus made by Googling, imply that this falls under Cockney rhyming slang; but the monkey and the pony are nothing to do with words rhyming.)
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Old 08-17-2019, 12:20 PM
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Don't think attempts by me at direct linking, would work; but if one Googles "British money slang monkey pony", various items come up to suggest that it's largely a Cockney thing, and is indeed reckoned to be derived from Indian banknotes and their artwork, when we ruled there: "pony" = 25 pounds / rupees, "monkey" = 500 pounds / rupees. (The "hits" thus made by Googling, imply that this falls under Cockney rhyming slang; but the monkey and the pony are nothing to do with words rhyming.)
Heyer uses the terms "monkey"'and "pony" in her books, set in the Regency period, which were meticulously researched. The terms are used by upper class characters. I doubt that Cockneys in 1820 would ever have £25, let alone £500, so I'd go with the Indian origins, not Cockney slang.
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Old 08-13-2019, 03:53 AM
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This is reckoned to be a "nod" by Tolkien to the large English county of Yorkshire, which for many centuries until reorganisation in 1974 was divided into three "Ridings" -- old word for a third part of something -- North, East, and West.
Amplifying: "Riding" here, a variation on old word "thriding"= a third part.
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Old 08-13-2019, 04:44 AM
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I was at school when we had 12 pence to a shilling and 20 shillings making a pound (i.e. 240 pence to the pound.)
I discovered that:

- 6 shillings and 8 pence was precisely one third of a pound
- 8 shillings and 4 pence was 100 pence

Neither of these were much use.

Last edited by glee; 08-13-2019 at 04:45 AM. Reason: spelling
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Old 08-15-2019, 05:08 PM
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Fiver - five pounds (a large white note, rarely seen by ordinary workers)
I understand this was once about the size of a sheet of letter paper. Was a five-pound note still that big in 1921? I'm just curious.
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Old 08-15-2019, 06:09 PM
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I understand this was once about the size of a sheet of letter paper. Was a five-pound note still that big in 1921? I'm just curious.
They were never that big:

The first £5 notes were introduced in 1793 as a reaction to the war against France and the shortage of gold. The notes were 195 x 120mm (about 7½ x 4¾") in size and were produced in black ink on white paper, later becoming known as the “White Fiver”. These notes were left relatively unchanged (with the exception of some size fluctuations) until 1945 when a metal thread security feature was introduced for the first time.

The White Fiver, which had shrunk somewhat by then, was removed from circulation in March 1961
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Old 08-11-2019, 11:31 AM
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Old 08-11-2019, 04:04 PM
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Slang terms for coins
Couple of extras, which would have been around at the time Peaky Blinders is set:

It wasn't unknown for people to talk about "half a dollar" (meaning half a crown, since at that time a dollar was roughly the same value as five shillings)

The threepenny bit (before the introduction of the multi-sided copper coin in the 1930s) was known as a "joey" or (because it still had some silver in it) a "silver joey" (my mother still had a couple to put in the Christmas pudding in the 1950s).
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Old 08-11-2019, 04:40 PM
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Couple of extras, which would have been around at the time Peaky Blinders is set:

It wasn't unknown for people to talk about "half a dollar" (meaning half a crown, since at that time a dollar was roughly the same value as five shillings)
The 'Dollar' in question was not the American dollar but the Spanish Dollar
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It goes back to the Napoleonic Wars. Britain was short of gold and silver coinage because most of it was used to finance the War abroad. Spanish dollars were imported to fill the gap and given the nominal value of 5 shillings, although, despite being about the same size they were actually worth a little less in terms of silver content. Hence, 5/- was a dollar and 2/6 as a half-dollar.
https://english.stackexchange.com/qu...currency-slang
When I was a teenager, a Pound was worth £2.40. This meant that a US cent and a UK penny were equivalent in value. Would that they were today.

A 'Crown' or five-shilling coin was far too large to be in general use, and I have never heard it being used as a named coin. Five bob or even two half-crowns, yes, but not a 'Crown'.

Last edited by bob++; 08-11-2019 at 04:43 PM.
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Old 08-11-2019, 07:22 PM
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The threepenny bit (before the introduction of the multi-sided copper coin in the 1930s) was known as a "joey" or (because it still had some silver in it) a "silver joey" (my mother still had a couple to put in the Christmas pudding in the 1950s).
There was also, at one time, a fourpenny bit with the alternate name of "groat".

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When I was a teenager, a Pound was worth £2.40. This meant that a US cent and a UK penny were equivalent in value. Would that they were today.
If the pound goes down in value much more, the pence will be the same value as the cent. Just give it some time (and maybe a Brexit).
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Old 08-11-2019, 08:33 PM
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When I was a teenager, a Pound was worth £2.40.
I'm confused; what does this mean? Doesn't the £ indicate British pounds? It sounds like you're saying a pound was worth 2.4 pounds.
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Old 08-11-2019, 08:40 PM
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I'm confused; what does this mean? Doesn't the £ indicate British pounds? It sounds like you're saying a pound was worth 2.4 pounds.
It's a typo. He means $2.40.
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Old 08-11-2019, 08:45 PM
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I'm confused; what does this mean? Doesn't the £ indicate British pounds? It sounds like you're saying a pound was worth 2.4 pounds.
I believe he's saying that because of inflation and the devaluing of the currency's buying power, the buying power of one pound sterling in 19XX is equivalent to the buying power of 2.4 pounds sterling today.
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  #41  
Old 08-16-2019, 05:00 AM
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I'm confused; what does this mean? Doesn't the £ indicate British pounds? It sounds like you're saying a pound was worth 2.4 pounds.
I think what the writer meant was there were 240 pennies in a pound.
12 pennies (p) in a shilling (s) and 20 shillings in a pound (£).

To get even more difficult there were:
4 farthings = 1 penny
3 pennies = threepence (obviously, but there was a coin)
6 pennies = sixpence " " "
4 pennies = 1 groat (last used in the 16th century)
3 groats = 1 shilling (12 pence)
2 1/2 shillings = 1 half-a-crown
2 half-a-crowns = 1 crown
4 crowns = 1 pound
1 pound + 1 shilling = 1 guinea.

Britain adopted the decimal system almost fifty years ago but myself and folks my age (71) can still instantly add, divide, and multiply in the old currency
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Old 08-16-2019, 05:35 AM
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Britain adopted the decimal system almost fifty years ago but myself and folks my age (71) can still instantly add, divide, and multiply in the old currency
I'm 71 and British; but I can't -- never could. Can't instantly do all that stuff "in decimal" either: I'm self-confessedly hopeless at arithmetic.
  #43  
Old 08-16-2019, 11:20 AM
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Originally Posted by Sleath View Post
4 pennies = 1 groat (last used in the 16th century)
According to Wikipedia, the groat was issued in Britain as late as the middle of the 19th century. And in British Guiana (now Guyana), until they decimalized in the middle of the 20th century.
  #44  
Old 08-14-2019, 08:00 AM
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A 'Crown' or five-shilling coin was far too large to be in general use, and I have never heard it being used as a named coin. Five bob or even two half-crowns, yes, but not a 'Crown'.
I remember reading as a kid a story where a young child was digging for pirate treasure in the garden with a trowel. His grandfather came upon him an on finding out what he was up to, managed to drop a crown and scuff enough dirt over it so the tyke could find it. It was a very big thrill to him but I have no idea any more what the period of the story was nor what class they might have been. I presume upper as they had a garden you could wander around in.

At the time I knew the basics of pounds, shillings, and pence and hapenny and thruppence were obvious, but the 'bastard coins' like quineas, florins, and farthings were a bit vague and I'd never heard of a crown before. I remember trying to look it up but it must have been a small dictionary because the entry for crown talked mostly about a king's headgear and did not mention coinage at all. Very frustrating.

Last edited by DesertDog; 08-14-2019 at 08:01 AM.
  #45  
Old 08-18-2019, 12:24 AM
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Originally Posted by DesertDog View Post
I remember reading as a kid a story where a young child was digging for pirate treasure in the garden with a trowel. His grandfather came upon him an on finding out what he was up to, managed to drop a crown and scuff enough dirt over it so the tyke could find it. It was a very big thrill to him but I have no idea any more what the period of the story was nor what class they might have been. I presume upper as they had a garden you could wander around in.
I read that story! It was in a school reader, about Grade 6. But I remember it a bit differently; it was a half crown, and there were several kids, and when the adult realized that the boy was going to share it with the other kids, he dropped a second half crown, to ensure everyone would get something.
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  #46  
Old 08-11-2019, 04:13 PM
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One of the cute things about decimalization was that, as you'll note, a shilling being a twentieth of a pound meant that it was exactly equal to five "new pence", and two shillings was the same as ten. So nobody bothered to recall those coins, and up to a couple of decades later you would still regularly see one-shilling and two-shilling coins in your change, which were understood to be exactly equal to 5p and 10p. This lasted until a currency redesign in the early nineties, when everything shrank (presumably to match the 20p coin which was introduced some time in the 80s, and always seemed bizarrely titchy next to an older 5p)
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  #47  
Old 08-13-2019, 09:20 AM
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Heavy money


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Originally Posted by Aspidistra View Post
One of the cute things about decimalization was that, as you'll note, a shilling being a twentieth of a pound meant that it was exactly equal to five "new pence", and two shillings was the same as ten. So nobody bothered to recall those coins, and up to a couple of decades later you would still regularly see one-shilling and two-shilling coins in your change, which were understood to be exactly equal to 5p and 10p. This lasted until a currency redesign in the early nineties, when everything shrank (presumably to match the 20p coin which was introduced some time in the 80s, and always seemed bizarrely titchy next to an older 5p)
British cash always managed to be unduly heavy and not well scaled. I am just old enough to remember farthings and halfpennies, which were relatively big copper coins despite being worth very little. The old penny was huge, about the size of the two shilling coin as was. The threepenny bit was heavy because it was very thick, but easily recognizable as it was brassy-looking and twelve sided.

After decimalization two of the silver coins were still used, the shilling (5 p) and the two shilling coin (florin, now 10 p).A large and heavy seven-sided 50 p coin was introduced to replace the ten shilling note. The pound note went through a couple of mutations before a coin was introduced, at the time Margaret Thatcher, and it unkindly named the Thatcher, because it was "thick, brassy and not really worth much." A somewhat massive two pound coin followed. The smaller coins have changed, the 5 p and 10 p are - thankfully - much smaller.

When the Euro was introduced, I hoped that the weights would be properly scaled and the coins would be easy to distinguish. One out of two isn't bad. The small copper coins are not easy to distinguish, nor the brass-like ones for 10 and 20 cents. Perhaps they should have done what the Japanese did with two of their coins; the brass 5 yen and the silver 50 yen have a hole in the middle. I have to peer closely at the smaller coins to be sure what I am giving. And the same for the smaller British and Polish coins. And to make sure that i have not mixed them up. Especially between Polish zloty and the Euro, some coins are a very close match in size and appearance (but not in value). Curiously, both the zloty and the Euro have bimetallic coins; 2 and 5 zloty, and the 1, 2 and 5 Euro; silver / bronze, but reversed between the two currencies. They are close enough that I can use a 1 or 2 zloty coin in a shopping cart that takes a one Euro coin; I have never tried this in a ticket machine, which would check moire than the diameter.

I don't use English coins all that often, so I have to look hard at them when in the UK. The 20 p is now a multi-sided silver coin. At least a pocketful of change is much lighter now.

I have no interest in collecting coins or banknotes, but odds and ends of change accumulate after traveling. In some cases the currency no longer exists or what I have is no longer valid. For example, I have a few coins from Hong Kong, pre-1997, and a small number of German coins from the Deutschmark era.
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Old 08-11-2019, 09:20 PM
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No, Colibri has the right answer there. In the 60s and 70s there was a fixed exchange rate between the pound and dollar which was £1 = $2.40.
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Old 08-11-2019, 09:36 PM
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As an aside (mild hijack), I found it surprisingly easy to shift from US$ to English money. Back in 1970 I spend a month in Nigeria, where at that time all the money was pounds, shillings, and pence. It took only a matter of a few days before I was thinking in English monetary terms. And then, upon returning to the US, I found myself automatically converting from US money to English money to see how much things really cost.
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Old 08-12-2019, 09:34 AM
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No, Colibri has the right answer there. In the 60s and 70s there was a fixed exchange rate between the pound and dollar which was £1 = $2.40.
Yes - that's exactly what I meant to say. So since there were 240 pennies in a £1, a British penny was equal to a US cent. It follows that 2 bob, would have been roughly equal to a quarter (actually 24¢).

Last edited by bob++; 08-12-2019 at 09:38 AM.
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