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Old 12-13-2019, 03:58 PM
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Middle America


The term "Middle America" has been used for decades to describe "flyover America, Heartland America", voters and people, predominately white Americans who have moderate views that swing to Republican, Democratic, or Independent.

Richard Nixon won them. Ronald Reagan won them. George HW Bush won them. Ross Perot got a chunk of the votes to get 19 percent in 1992. Bill Clinton won them. George W. Bush won them. A black man named Barack Obama from Middle America won them.

Donald Trump won them.

A lot of people on Twitter, especially left-wing people dismiss Middle America's concerns.

Newsflash: You have to compete in Middle America to win. Yes, white voters are declining overall, but they still count and you have to cobble a coalition.

This would go to all parties.

What do you think about Middle America?
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Old 12-13-2019, 04:02 PM
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There are a lot of non white people in middle America. There are conservatives, liberals, and everything in between in middle America. I’m not sure “middle America” is any more moderate than any other region. I don’t believe either party has “ignored” middle America or their concerns.
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Old 12-13-2019, 04:11 PM
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There are a lot of non white people in middle America. There are conservatives, liberals, and everything in between in middle America. I’m not sure “middle America” is any more moderate than any other region. I don’t believe either party has “ignored” middle America or their concerns.
That is true.
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Old 12-13-2019, 08:05 PM
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A lot of people on Twitter, especially left-wing people dismiss Middle America's concerns.
I would challenge this statement. It is accepted wisdom by many that this is the case, but it seems to me this is more likely a strawman argument.

More likely, I would say that many on the left, particularly those in urban settings, would like to feel they have an equal voice to those that are identified as Middle America. Wishing for an equal voice is in no way dismissing others.
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Old 12-13-2019, 08:12 PM
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I'm from Missouri, and the one thing Middle America agrees on is that we root against the New York Yankees.
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Old 12-13-2019, 09:06 PM
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... A black man named Barack Obama from Middle America won them.
...
Not so fast! Donald Trump, fucking genius, has people in Hawaii digging up the truth about a birth cirtificate. They just haven't reported back yet, because Trump doesn't really deliver. But when they do, in a matter of weeks, you won't believe what they've uncovered- click here!

(Yeah, Obama is a black guy. Lots of black guys in the midwest. Americans are aware of this.)
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Old 12-13-2019, 09:10 PM
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What do you think about Middle America?
I think it's not as crispy as End Piece America, which is sometimes a good thing, provided it isn't soggy and underdone. It's just a nuisance jostling elbows with both Aisle America and Window Seat America.
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Old 12-13-2019, 09:37 PM
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There's always going to be a certain amount of contempt by people in the largest urban areas towards people in the more rural regions. This isn't just America, it's an attitude found in many other nations as well.
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Old 12-13-2019, 09:46 PM
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In one popular scheme (de Blij) of world regional geography, “Middle America” is Mexico, the seven countries in Central America, and the islands of the Caribbean. This scheme is a compromise between physical regions (like “continents”) and human/cultural ones (like “Latin America”).

Last edited by JKellyMap; 12-13-2019 at 09:48 PM.
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Old 12-13-2019, 09:46 PM
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I think "Middle America" has about as much genuine meaning as "East Coast elites" or "West Coast liberals" or "Redneck Southerners."

An autoworker in Detroit, a physician at the Mayo Clinic, a Lutheran minister in Wisconsin, and an IT manager in Chicago are all "Middle America," which proves nothing.
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Old 12-13-2019, 10:10 PM
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Newsflash: You have to compete in Middle America to win. Yes, white voters are declining overall, but they still count and you have to cobble a coalition.
I'm old enough to remember the months after November 2016, when just about the ONLY thing the (coastal) media talked about was "middle America," and how it affected the election. So I don't know why you think this is a "Newsflash" three years later.
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Old 12-13-2019, 10:31 PM
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The term "Middle America" has been used for decades to describe "flyover America, Heartland America", voters and people, predominately white Americans who have moderate views that swing to Republican, Democratic, or Independent.

Richard Nixon won them. Ronald Reagan won them. George HW Bush won them. Ross Perot got a chunk of the votes to get 19 percent in 1992. Bill Clinton won them. George W. Bush won them. A black man named Barack Obama from Middle America won them.

Donald Trump won them.

A lot of people on Twitter, especially left-wing people dismiss Middle America's concerns.

Newsflash: You have to compete in Middle America to win. Yes, white voters are declining overall, but they still count and you have to cobble a coalition.

This would go to all parties.

What do you think about Middle America?
Middle America is code for rural white America. Rural white America is not politically independent, they have a heavy emotional investment in identity politics and masculinity, both of which the GOP offer them in spades.

Obama didn't win rural whites, he just lost them by smaller margins (25 points vs losing them by 40 points for Hillary).

The problem is, how do democrats actually appeal to rural whites? If rural whites vote GOP due to identity politics, what can the democrats offer them?

To me the only way to win them over is to rebuild the labor movement. Rural whites are overwhelmingly republican, unless they join a labor union. Then they become democrats.
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Old 12-13-2019, 10:34 PM
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I would challenge this statement. It is accepted wisdom by many that this is the case, but it seems to me this is more likely a strawman argument.

More likely, I would say that many on the left, particularly those in urban settings, would like to feel they have an equal voice to those that are identified as Middle America. Wishing for an equal voice is in no way dismissing others.
"When you're accustomed to privilege, equality feels like oppression."

Rural whites have been losing their identity and sense of status in the new globalist, multicultural America. I have no idea how democrats can reach out to them and appeal to them.
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Old 12-14-2019, 12:16 AM
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Originally Posted by Yankees 1996 Champs View Post
A lot of people on Twitter, especially left-wing people dismiss Middle America's concerns.
And a lot of people in Middle America dismiss the rest of the country. There's an attitude among many of them that people in Middle America are "Real Americans" and are therefore entitled to better treatment than all of the other people who happen to live in a country that they feel should belong to them.

I have no problem dismissing that attitude. I feel every American, regardless of where he or she lives in this country, is entitled to the same treatment.
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Old 12-14-2019, 12:22 AM
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A voter in North Dakota or Wyoming already gets a vote that counts three times as much as a voter in California or New York. What does the OP suggest they should be getting? Five times as much? Ten times as much? How many votes are they supposed to get before they feel they have what they deserve?

Last edited by Little Nemo; 12-14-2019 at 12:23 AM.
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Old 12-14-2019, 12:26 AM
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There are a lot of non white people in middle America.
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Originally Posted by Yankees 1996 Champs View Post
That is true.
If it's true then why did you describe them as "predominately white"?
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Old 12-14-2019, 01:21 AM
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What do you think about Middle America?
I think you have a disproportionate amount of power due to the way the Senate and the Electoral College are structured and that this must be rectified.
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Old 12-14-2019, 07:51 AM
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There's always going to be a certain amount of contempt by people in the largest urban areas towards people in the more rural regions. This isn't just America, it's an attitude found in many other nations as well.
"Middle America" is neither New York / San Francisco hipster tech millionaires nor rural hicks.

When I think of "Middle America", I think of the vast suburban areas outside the major cities where people live in single family homes, have 2.2 kids, regular 9 to 5 jobs for mid-level salaries, occasionally enjoy a "night out" at Applebee's. Basically "ordinary" in every way.
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Old 12-14-2019, 08:28 AM
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And a lot of people in Middle America dismiss the rest of the country. There's an attitude among many of them that people in Middle America are "Real Americans" and are therefore entitled to better treatment than all of the other people who happen to live in a country that they feel should belong to them.
I think it goes even farther than that. Certain sectors of "middle America" make the idea of down-home folksy people who are just morally better than the big city folk part of their cultural identity. The cities are decadent, cut-throat, and crime-ridden, while small towns are wholesome and caring.

Cracked said it best:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cracked
There's this universal shorthand that epic adventure movies use to tell the good guys from the bad. The good guys are simple folk from the countryside ... ... while the bad guys are decadent assholes who live in the city and wear stupid clothes:

In Star Wars, Luke is a farm boy ...... while the bad guys live in a shiny space station:

In Braveheart, the main character (Dennis Braveheart) is a simple farmer ...
... and the dastardly Prince Shithead lives in a luxurious castle and wears fancy, foppish clothes:

The theme expresses itself in several ways -- primitive vs. advanced, tough vs. delicate, masculine vs. feminine, poor vs. rich, pure vs. decadent, traditional vs. weird. All of it is code for rural vs. urban.
Western culture has a very long-running theme of, "the cities are evil and rural people are just better".
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Old 12-14-2019, 02:21 PM
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I think it goes even farther than that. Certain sectors of "middle America" make the idea of down-home folksy people who are just morally better than the big city folk part of their cultural identity. The cities are decadent, cut-throat, and crime-ridden, while small towns are wholesome and caring.

Cracked said it best:



Western culture has a very long-running theme of, "the cities are evil and rural people are just better".
It always comes back to the jews with these types. I would guess that this stereotype comes after the version about the jews. Hell it must. We are only a couple hundred years old. It's no contest.
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Old 12-14-2019, 05:22 PM
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I think you have a disproportionate amount of power due to the way the Senate and the Electoral College are structured and that this must be rectified.
I think California's 55 electoral votes give it a disproportionate amount of clout, since that's more than 10% of the total needed to elect a President, and more than 14 states combined. Maybe we can rectify that by breaking up California.
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Old 12-14-2019, 05:43 PM
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And a lot of people in Middle America dismiss the rest of the country. There's an attitude among many of them that people in Middle America are "Real Americans" and are therefore entitled to better treatment than all of the other people who happen to live in a country that they feel should belong to them.

I have no problem dismissing that attitude. I feel every American, regardless of where he or she lives in this country, is entitled to the same treatment.
This. I here this type of attitude from Trump voters about the “coastal elites” more frequently than the other way around.

Last edited by FlikTheBlue; 12-14-2019 at 05:44 PM.
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Old 12-14-2019, 05:46 PM
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I think California's 55 electoral votes give it a disproportionate amount of clout, since that's more than 10% of the total needed to elect a President, and more than 14 states combined. Maybe we can rectify that by breaking up California.
What would the population of those 14 states be, and what is California's population?
"It's still we the people, right?" -Dave

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Old 12-14-2019, 06:53 PM
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I think California's 55 electoral votes give it a disproportionate amount of clout, since that's more than 10% of the total needed to elect a President, and more than 14 states combined. Maybe we can rectify that by breaking up California.
Those 14 states combined have less than a third of California's population, but control 28 senators to California's two, and 47 electoral votes to California's 55.

The vote of one Californian therefore is worth significantly less on a federal scale than that of a Wyoman.
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Old 12-14-2019, 07:36 PM
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I think California's 55 electoral votes give it a disproportionate amount of clout, since that's more than 10% of the total needed to elect a President, and more than 14 states combined. Maybe we can rectify that by breaking up California.
Breaking up California would give it MORE clout, since it would get 2 additional electoral votes for each way you divide it. Maybe a few of the northern states would go red, but the majority of the population, and thus electoral votes would still go blue.

North and South Dakota are two separate states largely because of those extra 2 electoral votes and senators they got out of the deal.
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Old 12-14-2019, 08:46 PM
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I think California's 55 electoral votes give it a disproportionate amount of clout, since that's more than 10% of the total needed to elect a President, and more than 14 states combined. Maybe we can rectify that by breaking up California.

More than 10% of the population lives in California. Seems about right.
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Old 12-14-2019, 08:54 PM
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I think you have a disproportionate amount of power due to the way the Senate and the Electoral College are structured and that this must be rectified.
Sounds like folks need to start working on an amendment. Let me know when it’s finished and when the small states choose to give up power and sovereignty. It’s possible but unlikely and far from a must.

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I think it goes even farther than that. Certain sectors of "middle America" make the idea of down-home folksy people who are just morally better than the big city folk part of their cultural identity. The cities are decadent, cut-throat, and crime-ridden, while small towns are wholesome and caring.

Cracked said it best:



Western culture has a very long-running theme of, "the cities are evil and rural people are just better".
It’s not just western culture who have demonstrated a dislike of the elites and/or urban areas. Class warfare is a dangerous thing to unleash.
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Old 12-14-2019, 09:14 PM
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This. I here this type of attitude from Trump voters about the “coastal elites” more frequently than the other way around.
That's because the "coastal elites" simply dismiss middle America as irrelevant, something that Pete Buttigieg is trying to exploit.

Quote:
I'm the only one living a middle-class lifestyle, in a middle-class neighborhood, in Middle America.
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Old 12-15-2019, 12:45 AM
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Western culture has a very long-running theme of, "the cities are evil and rural people are just better".
Go to a bookstore or a record store (assuming you can still find one) and look for the section labeled "urban". It's a codeword for black. Same thing when people talk about how bad "the inner city" is. They're talking about race not geography.

That's the American version. Apparently when Europeans talk about the problems of "urban people" they're talking about Jews.

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Old 12-15-2019, 01:12 AM
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Haven't a lot of them shifted their contempt towards Muslims? Not that its an improvement.
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Old 12-15-2019, 03:00 AM
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. Apparently when Europeans talk about the problems of "urban people" they're talking about Jews.
Eh? Even as comic exaggeration that's way off the mark.
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Old 12-15-2019, 03:02 AM
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Sounds like folks need to start working on an amendment. Let me know when it’s finished and when the small states choose to give up power and sovereignty. It’s possible but unlikely and far from a must.
We'll just work it into Reconstruction after we win that "second Civil War" the MAGA-heads are always threatening to start.
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Old 12-15-2019, 06:42 AM
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And what are their "concerns" exactly? Oh nos, too many brown peeples?
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Old 12-15-2019, 07:00 AM
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Eh? Even as comic exaggeration that's way off the mark.
Historically, there’s something to LittleNemo’s observation, but nowadays there is a wider variety of “urban” types for Brexiteers/LePenistas/etc. to despise.

In Indonesia in the 60s, it was citizens of Chinese descent who were despised as too urban, too smart, too worldly, too economically comfortable, too likely to be godless commies.

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Old 12-15-2019, 08:11 AM
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Sounds like folks need to start working on an amendment. Let me know when it’s finished and when the small states choose to give up power and sovereignty. It’s possible but unlikely and far from a must.
Give up what "power and sovereignty?"

We just want to revise [eliminate] the Electoral College, not abolish the Senate.
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Old 12-15-2019, 09:24 AM
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That's because the "coastal elites" simply dismiss middle America as irrelevant, something that Pete Buttigieg is trying to exploit.
What, by holding fundraisers hosted by billionaires who nearly destroyed our economy in 2008, and tech billionaires who want to destroy teachers' unions and replace public schools with charters?

Not to mention, who are these coastal elites that dismiss Middle America as irrelevant? While they've certainly stepped up their game since Trump won, stories about WWC angst have been a MSM staple since the 1980s at least.
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Old 12-15-2019, 09:54 AM
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I think California's 55 electoral votes give it a disproportionate amount of clout, since that's more than 10% of the total needed to elect a President, and more than 14 states combined. Maybe we can rectify that by breaking up California.
[off-topic]
It's sometimes said that if California were divided into six states, four of them would be Red. I've just re-checked the numbers and That simply is not true. You can divide California into several states — almost as many as you like! — all with very comfortable Blue majorities, and with very straightforward, compact, non-gerrymander-looking boundaries.

Maps dividing California into red/blue counties or precincts are extremely misleading because most of the red areas are mountainous regions with extremely low population density. The redneck votes of mountainous California would be drowned out by Sacramento and Sonoma Counties. Throw in Marin County for a blue landslide. BTW, note that Humboldt County voted for Clinton by almost a 2-to-1 margin! Coastal elites?

In the south, the R votes in the Central Valley (Bakersfield etc.) would be drowned out by Santa Barbara, Ventura, and San Bernardino Counties. (Note that Fresno County voted for Clinton.)

What will it take for this break-up? Fifty Senators and California going along? I propose a Federation of the resultant Northifornia and Southifornia States so these fine new states can share a Governor and get other economies of scale!
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Old 12-15-2019, 11:04 AM
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Haven't a lot of them shifted their contempt towards Muslims? Not that its an improvement.
I thought they had different code words for Muslims. But I'll admit I may be behind on current trends in European xenophobia.
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Old 12-15-2019, 05:41 PM
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What, by holding fundraisers hosted by billionaires who nearly destroyed our economy in 2008, and tech billionaires who want to destroy teachers' unions and replace public schools with charters?

Not to mention, who are these coastal elites that dismiss Middle America as irrelevant? While they've certainly stepped up their game since Trump won, stories about WWC angst have been a MSM staple since the 1980s at least.
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And what are their "concerns" exactly? Oh nos, too many brown peeples?
First off, I said Buttagieg was trying to exploit the sentiment, not that he himself was a gen-you-wine Middle American.

If you want a few "Middle American" concerns that don't have anything to do with skin color, try these:

1) The collapse of blue-collar industries that have been sent overseas.

2) The WalMartization of retailing and the death of small town retailing

3) Consolidation of the farming industry

4) Lack of healthcare outside of anywhere except large cities

5) Infrastructure

6) Education, drug abuse, teenage pregnancy and all those other pesky social problems that some people seem to think only exist in cities.
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Old 12-15-2019, 06:25 PM
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First off, I said Buttagieg was trying to exploit the sentiment, not that he himself was a gen-you-wine Middle American.

If you want a few "Middle American" concerns that don't have anything to do with skin color, try these:

1) The collapse of blue-collar industries that have been sent overseas.

2) The WalMartization of retailing and the death of small town retailing

3) Consolidation of the farming industry

4) Lack of healthcare outside of anywhere except large cities

5) Infrastructure

6) Education, drug abuse, teenage pregnancy and all those other pesky social problems that some people seem to think only exist in cities.
7) Not skin color (Well sort of)
  #41  
Old 12-15-2019, 07:00 PM
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First off, I said Buttagieg was trying to exploit the sentiment, not that he himself was a gen-you-wine Middle American.

If you want a few "Middle American" concerns that don't have anything to do with skin color, try these:

1) The collapse of blue-collar industries that have been sent overseas.

2) The WalMartization of retailing and the death of small town retailing

3) Consolidation of the farming industry

4) Lack of healthcare outside of anywhere except large cities

5) Infrastructure

6) Education, drug abuse, teenage pregnancy and all those other pesky social problems that some people seem to think only exist in cities.
For point 4, when my uncle had a stroke he not only had to wait at the local hospital for hours, but then they had to transfer him to a nearby large city so he could get proper treatment. No idea how much the extra time lost hurt his recovery.

I guess a lot of us are demoralized. I mean the democrats can come up with valid, well thought out policy agendas for all 6 of these items but they're still barely going to win 30% of the white rural vote due to identity politics. I mean for several of those points Hillary Clinton had thoughtful policy ideas, and people voted for the bombastic moron with fake answers instead due to identity politics.

Maybe strong policy ideas may take 5% of voters who'd normally vote GOP and switch them to democrats. In that case, democrats would only lose the rural white vote by 30 points (65-35) instead of a 40 point margin (70-30). May not sound like much, but its 100,000 net democratic votes for every million white rural voters.
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Old 12-15-2019, 07:20 PM
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Lack of healthcare outside of anywhere except large cities
Well, we have one political party that has pushed for a public health care system that says health care should be a right for every person and we have one political party that supports a private health care system that says health care should be provided based on where the most profit can be made. Which platform do you think is more likely to see health care expanded out into remote rural areas with low populations?
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Old 12-15-2019, 09:13 PM
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Well, we have one political party that has pushed for a public health care system that says health care should be a right for every person and we have one political party that supports a private health care system that says health care should be provided based on where the most profit can be made. Which platform do you think is more likely to see health care expanded out into remote rural areas with low populations?
If anyone in this thread is expecting me to say anything remotely complimentary about the Republican party, they're looking at the wrong poster.

The bigger question is, are Democratic candidates aware of "Middle American" concerns? And will they make the 2016 nominee's fatal mistake of seeming to be unaware that there are voters outside of big cities?
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Old 12-15-2019, 09:16 PM
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The term "Middle America" has been used for decades to describe "flyover America, Heartland America", voters and people, predominately white Americans who have moderate views that swing to Republican, Democratic, or Independent.

Richard Nixon won them. Ronald Reagan won them. George HW Bush won them. Ross Perot got a chunk of the votes to get 19 percent in 1992. Bill Clinton won them. George W. Bush won them. A black man named Barack Obama from Middle America won them.

Donald Trump won them.

A lot of people on Twitter, especially left-wing people dismiss Middle America's concerns.

Newsflash: You have to compete in Middle America to win. Yes, white voters are declining overall, but they still count and you have to cobble a coalition.

This would go to all parties.

What do you think about Middle America?
I dispute your definition of “middle America.” I am a middle-class coastal liberal from the Midwest. I’m middle America. Stop trying to define me out of the mainstream.
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Old 12-16-2019, 12:09 AM
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To me the only way to win them over is to rebuild the labor movement. Rural whites are overwhelmingly republican, unless they join a labor union. Then they become democrats.
Union households were another area where Clinton struggled. Nationwide she was fine but it hid a deeper issue. Trump cut into the normal margin by double digits in those Midwest states that swung in 2016. She even lost the union household vote in Ohio.

Getting them to join unions isn't a panacea when the correlation is that weak.
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Old 12-16-2019, 01:47 AM
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The bigger question is, are Democratic candidates aware of "Middle American" concerns? And will they make the 2016 nominee's fatal mistake of seeming to be unaware that there are voters outside of big cities?
The Democrats are aware of Middle American concerns and are offering proposals and platforms to address them. But it's the old "What's the matter with Kansas?" issue. There are people who will reject the genuine help that the Democrats are offering because they'd rather listen to the lies the Republicans are offering.

The Democrats will say "Yes, the economy is changing and some jobs are disappearing. Vote for us and we will start programs to help you learn the skills to get new jobs."

The Republicans will say "You don't have a job? It's because the Democrats gave your job to a Mexican. The Democrats hate good hard-working Americans like you. Vote for us and we'll stand up to the Democrats and kick out those Mexicans."

The Democrats offer you solutions to your problems. The Republicans offer you somebody to blame for your problems.
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Old 12-16-2019, 09:08 AM
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The Democrats are aware of Middle American concerns and are offering proposals and platforms to address them. But it's the old "What's the matter with Kansas?" issue. There are people who will reject the genuine help that the Democrats are offering because they'd rather listen to the lies the Republicans are offering.

The Democrats will say "Yes, the economy is changing and some jobs are disappearing. Vote for us and we will start programs to help you learn the skills to get new jobs."

The Republicans will say "You don't have a job? It's because the Democrats gave your job to a Mexican. The Democrats hate good hard-working Americans like you. Vote for us and we'll stand up to the Democrats and kick out those Mexicans."

The Democrats offer you solutions to your problems. The Republicans offer you somebody to blame for your problems.
When is a democrat going to be honest with folks and say, "The reason the "Mexican" got the job is because he is cheaper than a robot for now, but you are already more expensive than the robot. The "Mexican" is going to lose that sweet poverty-dollar an hour job in a few years to the fucking robot as well."

I hate to break it to you guys, but thats whats coming for us all. I just opened up a food laboratory in the Midwest that five years ago would be working at least 5 - 7 people. Its only me here today and a bunch of machines that, due to recent advancements, replaced all of those people and outworks them 4 to 1 on any given day. The only reason I am around still at this laboratory is because I know how to program and repair these robot overlords.

Is there a plan from the Dems on this? I'm sorry but "job retraining" isn't going to cover it. I have the ability to service at least 15 - 20 of these food labs loaded with robots. Robots are way better than they were, they don't break down much anymore, and when they do, parts are way more likely to be on the shelf.

I know that the GOP doesn't really have a plan for this, but if the Dems don't get one and start hammering this hard, we are all screwed. From the front lines of the robot uprising, this seems to me way more important than healthcare or anything else.

(I am using "Mexican" incorrectly in the same fashion that people often do when talking about these things. I mean no offense to any people from Mexico or anywhere else in Latin America.)
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Old 12-16-2019, 10:32 AM
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Translucent Daydream, that’s a fascinating post, right from the “front lines” of the major trend that underlies so much of what gets expressed as support for Trump and in other ways — in the Midwest US and far beyond.
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Old 12-16-2019, 10:53 AM
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Maybe I'm off base on this, but I've never really perceived "middle America" as being a geographic descriptor, or a code-word for "rural".

I always understood it to refer to a certain socio-economic strata of American society that was predominantly if not wholly white, predominantly blue collar skilled labor (factory/plant workers, farmers, tradesmen, firemen/cops). They were mostly somewhere between the middle of the middle class to the upper part of working class- i.e. not economically busted, but not flush either. They aren't overly educated- most are high school and *maybe* a little technical school. They tend to be fundamentally little-c conservative- if it's not broke, don't fix it would be the mantra of this group, and they put a lot of stock in tradition and the way things were- things were good for their parents and grandparents, so they must have been doing things right, would be my interpretation of the worldview. This translates into a rather muscular foreign policy, and a domestic policy that aims to keep things they way they are, or even revert to past ways.

So when confronted with more educated or less insular people, they tend to be dismissive, because a lot of the time, the ideas they're espousing run counter to the tradition and reverence for the past that they value so highly, especially if the new ideas are going to be costly.
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Old 12-16-2019, 11:47 AM
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Originally Posted by bump View Post
Maybe I'm off base on this, but I've never really perceived "middle America" as being a geographic descriptor, or a code-word for "rural".

I always understood it to refer to a certain socio-economic strata of American society that was predominantly if not wholly white, predominantly blue collar skilled labor (factory/plant workers, farmers, tradesmen, firemen/cops). They were mostly somewhere between the middle of the middle class to the upper part of working class- i.e. not economically busted, but not flush either. They aren't overly educated- most are high school and *maybe* a little technical school. They tend to be fundamentally little-c conservative- if it's not broke, don't fix it would be the mantra of this group, and they put a lot of stock in tradition and the way things were- things were good for their parents and grandparents, so they must have been doing things right, would be my interpretation of the worldview. This translates into a rather muscular foreign policy, and a domestic policy that aims to keep things they way they are, or even revert to past ways.

So when confronted with more educated or less insular people, they tend to be dismissive, because a lot of the time, the ideas they're espousing run counter to the tradition and reverence for the past that they value so highly, especially if the new ideas are going to be costly.
hmmm. There certainly are people like that. I've just never heard them referred to as "middle America." More like "white working class." The OP mentioned "flyover country" and "heartland," both of which (I think) are geographic descriptors.
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