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Old 03-23-2020, 08:10 PM
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Japan is pretty nonchalant about COVID-19--and that's OK?!


My ex is Japanese, and she's there with my kid, so I am getting reports on the ground. There are only about 1,000 cases, excluding cruise ships, so far:

https://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/20...es-japan-1000/

But the things we are self-flagelleting for not having done sooner they don't seem to be doing either. People are riding public transportation. Restaurants are open. Most schools are closed, by my kid's (private) school is planning to reopen in like a week.

Don't forget that Japan has one of the world's oldest populations!

So Japan seems to be in "We got this" mode, while here our economy is melting down and we are anticipating a monumental amount of deaths.

Something doesn't seem to match up with all that. Any ideas?
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Old 03-23-2020, 08:13 PM
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Oh and my ex is working in a computer education school as well, and they are continuing to hold classes. Etc. etc. Like it ain't no thang.
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Old 03-23-2020, 08:34 PM
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Give it a couple of weeks.

Analysis based on real data from China and Italy.

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  #4  
Old 03-23-2020, 08:48 PM
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Linked from the OP's article:
Infections in Osaka and Hyogo projected to hit 3,300 by April 3
Here's what seems like the money quote:
Quote:
“The figures presented by the ministry are concrete and realistic, so we need to take them seriously,” Osaka Gov. Hirofumi Yoshimura told reporters after the meeting, calling on citizens to refrain from nonessential outings during the three-day weekend including Friday, a national holiday.
Harsh request. I have a feeling Japan will not flatten the curve, as they say.
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Old 03-23-2020, 09:05 PM
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Yeah....now that the Olympics are postponed I fully expect that Japan's numbers will "suddenly" jump within the week.
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Old 03-23-2020, 09:08 PM
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Yeah....now that the Olympics are postponed I fully expect that Japan's numbers will "suddenly" jump within the week.
Right, I've heard speculation that the government was fudging the numbers to keep the Olympics on. I wouldn't put it past them.
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Old 03-23-2020, 09:21 PM
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Yeah....now that the Olympics are postponed I fully expect that Japan's numbers will "suddenly" jump within the week.
Not official yet.
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Old 03-23-2020, 09:54 PM
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Not nonchalant. Events are being cancelled, store hours are reduced, companies are teleworking or shifting working hours, people are cancelling trips and reservations for both hotels and restaurants. Government and transit authorities are asking for cooperation to keep daily travel to bare minimum but there arenít any ghost towns yet.

One thing Iíve noticed is that stores and restaurants during the week are dead. People who have to show up at work do so and go straight home afterwards. But during the weekend, after being cooped up for a week, go out eating, drinking, shopping to relieve some of that stress. And now with the weather warming up and just around the corner from flower viewing season, more people are outside enjoying the weather. This does not bode wellÖ

Interestingly, Japan is having the same problem as the USA in terms of low number of testing. However itís not for lack of testing capability. Thereís political and medical (research) reasons for that which I wonít get into now, but people who want to be tested are being turned away unless a doctor or health official deems it necessary. Thereís definitely more infected people out there and itís probably a matter of time until they show up.
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Old 03-24-2020, 11:57 AM
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There's a really interesting article in the Asia Times today:

Japanís winning its quiet fight against Covid-19

There are multiple reasons why the virus has had so little effect in Japan, and the article is definitely worth reading.
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Old 03-24-2020, 12:08 PM
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There's a really interesting article in the Asia Times today:

Japanís winning its quiet fight against Covid-19

There are multiple reasons why the virus has had so little effect in Japan, and the article is definitely worth reading.
Interesting. My takeaway from the article is that the Japanese government is full of shit.
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Old 03-24-2020, 12:19 PM
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Interesting. My takeaway from the article is that the Japanese government is full of shit.
Probably...

On the other hand, their hospitals haven't been overloaded with cases...

Routine vaccination of the elderly against one form of pneumonia may be a factor. It may be having a protective effect against the coronavirus as well.

Last edited by GreenWyvern; 03-24-2020 at 12:20 PM.
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Old 03-24-2020, 12:26 PM
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Or maybe they are about to explode, like every where else. I mean, you saw some of the notes in that article?

Quote:
Tokyo has lied in the past and bureaucrats do cover up scandals. Unsurprisingly, at one time roughly 90% of the Japanese population did not believe their government’s statistics, according to an opinion poll taken in the Nikkei Shimbun.
Quote:
Japan appears to be severely and deliberately under-testing for the coronavirus, although it has stepped it up in recent weeks. On March 2, the number of tests per million people in neighboring South Korea averaged 4,099. In Japan, that figure was a mere 72.
Quote:
So what are the latest figures for pneumonia deaths?

The Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare told Asia Times: “We only issue those numbers [in a comprehensive survey] every three years.” And the ministry’s latest nationwide hospital admissions data date back to November, before the pandemic struck.
I think Japan is implementing the plan Trump would prefer: keep everything normal and just ride out the death toll. Maybe it'll solve some of their "too many old people" problem.
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Old 03-24-2020, 12:32 PM
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Interesting. My takeaway from the article is that the Japanese government is full of shit.
Not in that article but I also would suspect that there's a certain level of antipathy to the elderly among the people - and even to their own peers - so they're probably pretty ambivalent to whether or not 9% more older folks die this year than a normal year, or not.
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Old 03-24-2020, 12:46 PM
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I think Japan is implementing the plan Trump would prefer: keep everything normal and just ride out the death toll. Maybe it'll solve some of their "too many old people" problem.
The problem is you can't just quietly "ride out the death toll," which is why I'm so baffled by what the Lt Governor said on Tucker Carlson yesterday. He said, "If I get sick, I'll go and try to get better, but if I don't, I don't." Well guess what, if everyone who gets sick goes and tries to get better, the hospital system collapses. If that happens, you won't be able to "go and try to get better." It's messy and highly visible to have old people dying on the sidewalks outside hospitals.

Maybe Japan has some far more sinister plan...
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Old 03-24-2020, 12:57 PM
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I'm not there so I can't comment with great degree of authority but I frequently watch news in Japanese on the ANN YouTube channel and Japan seems to have taken it seriously from the start.

Japan could be putting their thumb on the numbers a little but if they were having a full-on Italy or Wuhan-like crisis, we'd surely know about it. You can't hide that kind of carnage. Keep in mind Japan was one of the first countries with multiple exposures.

Japan, like other Asian countries, has kept SARS in its consciousness. They got testing started right away, and unlike the US it didn't take them weeks just to produce and distribute test kits and it doesn't take days to get results once tested.

And unlike the Italians, Spanish, British, and Americans, the Japanese don't have a "Fuck you, I'll do what I want" mentality when authorities tell them to self-isolate. There's a healthy degree of civic peer pressure.
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Old 03-24-2020, 01:13 PM
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I'm not there so I can't comment with great degree of authority but I frequently watch news in Japanese on the ANN YouTube channel and Japan seems to have taken it seriously from the start.

Japan could be putting their thumb on the numbers a little but if they were having a full-on Italy or Wuhan-like crisis, we'd surely know about it. You can't hide that kind of carnage. Keep in mind Japan was one of the first countries with multiple exposures.

Japan, like other Asian countries, has kept SARS in its consciousness. They got testing started right away, and unlike the US it didn't take them weeks just to produce and distribute test kits and it doesn't take days to get results once tested.

And unlike the Italians, Spanish, British, and Americans, the Japanese don't have a "Fuck you, I'll do what I want" mentality when authorities tell them to self-isolate. There's a healthy degree of civic peer pressure.
You're saying Japan wouldn't be able to conceal a larger number of deaths. But you seem to feel that the Japanese people are somehow self-isolating without there being any public signs of it. How can that possibly be true?

The OP says Japanese people are riding public transportation, eating in restaurants, and going to classes. They are not self-isolating. That means the disease is spreading throughout Japan. And pretty soon the people who have been exposed to Covid-19 will become sick.
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Old 03-24-2020, 01:25 PM
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You're saying Japan wouldn't be able to conceal a larger number of deaths. But you seem to feel that the Japanese people are somehow self-isolating without there being any public signs of it. How can that possibly be true?

The OP says Japanese people are riding public transportation, eating in restaurants, and going to classes. They are not self-isolating. That means the disease is spreading throughout Japan. And pretty soon the people who have been exposed to Covid-19 will become sick.
How many elderly are on the trains?
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Old 03-24-2020, 01:26 PM
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You're saying Japan wouldn't be able to conceal a larger number of deaths. But you seem to feel that the Japanese people are somehow self-isolating without there being any public signs of it. How can that possibly be true?

The OP says Japanese people are riding public transportation, eating in restaurants, and going to classes. They are not self-isolating. That means the disease is spreading throughout Japan. And pretty soon the people who have been exposed to Covid-19 will become sick.
Is the OP in Japan? What's his evidence?

For the record, as I said, I'm not there either. But what I've viewed on television indicates that they took it pretty seriously in the early stages and that they asked for the public's cooperation in isolating *before* it reached the crisis stage.

Italy shut down one section of the country *after* it reached the crisis stage. Worse, those who were in the parts of the country that were about to shut down, left and traveled to the rest of the country, taking their viruses with them.

It's not just shutting down that matters. It's the prevailing attitude of the people, both within the population generally and also people calling the shots. This isn't to say that Japan's curve couldn't eventually shoot up at some point. In fact I suspect a number of countries, including China and the US, will experience a second wave of infection as a result of prematurely ending the states of emergency.
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Old 03-24-2020, 01:34 PM
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Is the OP in Japan? What's his evidence?
It's in the OP.... he's getting reports from his ex who's there with his child.
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Old 03-24-2020, 01:40 PM
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Japan, like other Asian countries, has kept SARS in its consciousness. They got testing started right away, and unlike the US it didn't take them weeks just to produce and distribute test kits and it doesn't take days to get results once tested.
That is the opposite of every article linked in this thread so far. They were testing a small fraction of the people that S. Korea has and even people who've had testing recommended by a doctor have been denied.

They can hide this until it's too late and that seems to be what they're doing.

Last edited by CarnalK; 03-24-2020 at 01:44 PM.
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Old 03-24-2020, 01:44 PM
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It's in the OP.... he's getting reports from his ex who's there with his child.
Okay, so it's second-hand anecdotal evidence, which is fine - I'm not discounting it, FWIW.

Up the thread, there's other anecdotal evidence from a poster who says that Japanese people have been self-isolating. I think we can all agree that Japan has not imposed a total shutdown, but let's understand why countries have had to completely shut down everything in the first place: a lack of medical surveillance and a lack of getting people into treatment.

South Korea is another country that, by comparison, has kept its country relatively open. They've fought the virus with transparency. So has Singapore (from what I understand anyway). Italy shut down because by the time it realized it had a crisis, its ERs were on the verge of being overwhelmed.

Nobody can say whether Japan's doing enough at this point - Japan's numbers could surge in the weeks and months ahead, but I do think that if the outbreak were out of control we'd be hearing about it. They have a free press.
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Old 03-24-2020, 01:46 PM
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That is the opposite of every article linked in this thread so far. They were testing a small fraction of the people that S. Korea has and even people who've had testing recommended by a doctor have been denied.

They can hide this until it's too late and that seems to be what they're doing.
It's possible to hide a full-on COVID outbreak but quite difficult - even China couldn't pull that off and they threatened to put doctors and families of patients in jail simply for talking about it on social media. By contrast, Japan has a free press.
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Old 03-24-2020, 01:54 PM
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If you pretend half your pneumonia cases caused by Coronavirus are just "normal" pneumonias and then don't report pneumonia death totals for 3 years, it won't be too tough to hide. Read the quotes in post 12, please.

And you do realize, the Japanese government tried to pretend a meltdown didn't happen at Fukushima, right? You think hiding a nuclear meltdown is less crazy than hiding a disease?
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Old 03-24-2020, 02:04 PM
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If you pretend half your pneumonia cases caused by Coronavirus are just "normal" pneumonias and then don't report pneumonia death totals for 3 years, it won't be too tough to hide. Read the quotes in post 12, please.

And you do realize, the Japanese government tried to pretend a meltdown didn't happen at Fukushima, right? You think hiding a nuclear meltdown is less crazy than hiding a disease?
I'm sure Japan's government is fudging the numbers - I'm not disputing that. I'm disputing whether or not there are no measures being taken - at least one poster here with direct knowledge seems to contradict that. We can debate what level of precautions a country should take, I reckon.

But yeah, Japan's health ministry might be lying - so what? You don't think the US government's trying to put the best spin on the outbreak? China tried to bury the outbreak as well. Guess what? It's hard to bury a pandemic. Not saying it can't be done but it would probably require North Korean, Iranian, or CCP-style suppression of the media and online speech. I don't think Japan has that in place yet.

Japan can try to pretend a COVID outbreak is pneumonia - good luck with that if they do. COVID is not just pneumonia; it's a terrifying disease that sends people of all ages to the hospital even if it doesn't kill them. It would quickly overwhelm ERs if there is no response in teh form of containment or mitigation. It would be very hard to cover that up.

Last edited by asahi; 03-24-2020 at 02:06 PM.
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Old 03-24-2020, 02:43 PM
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It's not a particularly terrifying disease, really. I'm taking all precautions because I'm a good social animal but it's not like people who survive are paralyzed, deformed or otherwise permanently harmed. We don't know the exact mortality rate. The only scary thing is we don't know how far it will spread and whether it's with us forever.
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Old 03-24-2020, 03:51 PM
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It's not a particularly terrifying disease, really. I'm taking all precautions because I'm a good social animal but it's not like people who survive are paralyzed, deformed or otherwise permanently harmed.
Nah, they just die or have scarring of the lung tissue, but who needs air?

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We don't know the exact mortality rate. The only scary thing is we don't know how far it will spread and whether it's with us forever.
Actually we do: about 1-3%.

About 15% require prolonged hospitalization. That's 1 in 6 people who are going to be struggling to breathe.

It infects about 2 people for each disease-carrying vector. Hundreds of thousands of people that ERs haven't accounted for are going to just drop by on a Friday or Saturday night, in addition to car accident victims, people with kidney failure, people with heart attacks, stabbings, victims of domestic violence. Take a look at Spain and Italy again: there's a reason people are lying on the floors of hospitals and not in hospital beds.
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Old 03-24-2020, 04:44 PM
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Nobody can say whether Japan's doing enough at this point - Japan's numbers could surge in the weeks and months ahead, but I do think that if the outbreak were out of control we'd be hearing about it. They have a free press.
You seem to be missing the importance of the time element here. By the time you see the outbreak, it's too late. The critical period is before the disease becomes obvious. The only way you can prevent the pandemic is to act while people are still healthy.

So if Japanese people are still holding public gatherings then, yes, we can say Japan is not doing enough.
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Old 03-24-2020, 05:05 PM
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About 15% require prolonged hospitalization. That's 1 in 6 people who are going to be struggling to breathe.

It infects about 2 people for each disease-carrying vector. Hundreds of thousands of people that ERs haven't accounted for are going to just drop by on a Friday or Saturday night, in addition to car accident victims, people with kidney failure, people with heart attacks, stabbings, victims of domestic violence. Take a look at Spain and Italy again: there's a reason people are lying on the floors of hospitals and not in hospital beds.
You really don't get it. I'm not saying they are covering up a full on explosion of covid-19. They are covering up the early warning phase. Did you read any of the posts above your first? I already quoted an article that the Japanese government itself is predicting infections in Osaka and Hyogo alone are projected to hit 3,300 by April 3. The current count for the whole country is currently ~1000. But they aren't closing anything.
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Old 03-24-2020, 05:16 PM
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...The current count for the whole country is currently ~1000. But they aren't closing anything.
They did close all public schools near the end of February, even before Italy did. But they haven't done much else.
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Old 03-24-2020, 05:24 PM
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The way exponential growth works, they can't possibly be covering up the growth rate. The difference between a 5% daily growth rate over a month (roughly what Japan has been reporting) and a 20% rate (very low estimate for Western non-locked-down countries) is a factor of fifty times - or, at the end of two months, well over three thousand times.

If they had case growth like ours, we'd know.

Japan is clearly doing something right that we're not but until we actually know what it is we can't relax the big restrictions. And we'd know if we'd correctly figured out what it is (and could do it), because we'd have a case growth rate of around 5%, like Japan.

By the way, once they do get over a certain threshold of cases, Japan is going to be totally screwed, because according to thishandy little chart of intensive care beds per population compared to other countries (source), they're woefully underserved. Unless they've been spending all of this lead-in time with ramping up ICU facilities, which is possible
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Old 03-24-2020, 05:31 PM
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They did close all public schools near the end of February, even before Italy did. But they haven't done much else.
Yeah, I should have caveated. A few other big events were canceled but it's mostly nothing from what I see.

Btw, even though it's a pretty solid politic move, closing the schools hasn't really been recommended by health authorities for the most part, afaik. Looking at the CDC they seem to only lean that way when there is substantial community spread or a confirmed case entering a specific school.
https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019...r-schools.html
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Old 03-24-2020, 05:37 PM
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You really don't get it. I'm not saying they are covering up a full on explosion of covid-19. They are covering up the early warning phase. Did you read any of the posts above your first? I already quoted an article that the Japanese government itself is predicting infections in Osaka and Hyogo alone are projected to hit 3,300 by April 3. The current count for the whole country is currently ~1000. But they aren't closing anything.
I'm not missing shit - if you want to talk about the topic then stay on the topic.
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Old 03-24-2020, 05:49 PM
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Yeah, I should have caveated. A few other big events were canceled but it's mostly nothing from what I see.
Closing schools impacts families differently in the US and Japan.

Let's start with the rate of single parent households: the United States has 3 1/2 times the rate of single-parent households. The CDC is likely calculating the impact of having healthcare workers stay at home to take care of children. Not to mention Japanese females are more likely to stop working after they're married and become pregnant. Thus, Japanese schoolchildren are more likely to have someone to stay at home with them.

Let's also consider the rate of child poverty in Japan vs the US. It's about 19X higher in the US. Many schoolchildren get their greatest source of daily nutrition in schools, so there's a reason why the CDC would suggest that closing schools is a potentially counter-productive strategy here.

The response in Country A can be different than the response in Country B.

It's entirely possible that Japan's early efforts were sufficient and that their more recent efforts have not been - I would agree with that. Just like it's entirely possible countries can bungle the initial response, learn from it, and prevent a second wave of infection.

What are we 'debating' again?
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Old 03-24-2020, 05:49 PM
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This isn't some obscure observation of an unknown phenomenon. My ex is saying, "All that shit you're doing in the US? We're mostly not doing it."

We are taking big steps but still beating ourselves up for not having done so on Day 1. In Japan, it's Day Whatever but they are *still* not doing it.

Including the article content (appreciated, thanks), I don't see Japan doing anything particularly special or clever. OTOH, they seem purposely to be covering their eyes and not wanting to test people and know the full extent of how bad things are.

My guess is that a huge percent of that has been a matter of crossing fingers and hoping that the Olympics can go on. Japan has placed a monumental amount of importance on the Olympics, to quite a stupid and almost infantile degree, if you ask me (personally, I think the Olympics are naff). I have no problem imagining Japan sacrificing public health to a certain agree to ensure that the "show goes on."
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Old 03-24-2020, 05:56 PM
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Let's also consider the rate of child poverty in Japan vs the US. It's about 19X higher in the US. Many schoolchildren get their greatest source of daily nutrition in schools, so there's a reason why the CDC would suggest that closing schools is a potentially counter-productive strategy here.
ETA: correction and missed the edit window.

Meant that child 'food insecurity' is about 19X higher in the US, not poverty per se.

https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2017/...child-poverty/
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Old 03-24-2020, 06:03 PM
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And unlike the Italians, Spanish, British, and Americans, the Japanese don't have a "Fuck you, I'll do what I want" mentality when authorities tell them to self-isolate. There's a healthy degree of civic peer pressure.
I recently listened to a podcast that brought up this very point. The Japanese leaders tend not to have long term plans for disasters, because they know they have some leeway in that if there is a crisis the people will be quick to respond in certain ways when asked. It may be that they are simply counting on that to weather the virus.

//i\\
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Old 03-24-2020, 06:26 PM
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What are we 'debating' again?
I haven't a clue what you are debating. Who gives a shit about single parent household rates?
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Old 03-24-2020, 07:34 PM
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Who gives a shit about single parent household rates?
Gee, I don't know, call it a wild-ass guess, but maybe the healthcare workers who, facing a critical shortage during a pandemic, now have to cut their time at work?
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Old 03-24-2020, 10:43 PM
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My ex now tells me that perhaps my favorite Japanese celeb, Ken Shimura, has COVID-19. Wikipedia backs this up:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ken_Shimura
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Old 03-25-2020, 07:31 AM
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Japanese themselves have recognized the problem and there is a word for it, "コロナ慣れ" (get used to Corona). My friend said that some people at her company wanted to have a drinking party and then karaoke afterwards. I'm on a Japanese social media app, and lots of people are posting picture of them drinking on the weekends.
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Old 03-25-2020, 07:41 AM
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It's my understanding that drinking, karaoke and going to your job are all considered essential services in Japan.
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Old 03-25-2020, 09:17 AM
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Lots of people are drinking with friends, clearly not part of work.
  #43  
Old 03-25-2020, 01:42 PM
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They did close all public schools near the end of February, even before Italy did. But they haven't done much else.
That was when there were only a handful of cases in the country. Maybe it will turn out that that was the key. I guess we will find out.
  #44  
Old 03-25-2020, 02:18 PM
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"Japan typically goes through 5.5 billion face masks every year ó 43 per person. Sales of face masks skyrocketed as the virus took hold. Masks have been rationed, and people stand patiently in line waiting for shops to open. Other shops sell strips of fabric and coffee filters, along with instructions for DIY versions."

I am curious how things will turn out in Japan. I can't imagine widespread use of masks hasn't had some benefit. Could be they dodged a bullet, could be they are walking blithely into the slaughterhouse.
  #45  
Old 03-25-2020, 06:39 PM
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The governor of Tokyo held a press conference last night to announce they had 41 new cases of COVID-19, the largest one-day increase so far for that region and more than double the previous day’s record of 17. Koike advised people to avoid crowded areas (duh) and strongly requested people not to go out unless absolutely necessary. The response on the internet has been overwhelmingly bad. They’re asking for stronger measures, clearer message, and more direct orders with legal teeth (as opposed to requests). Lots of rumblings about lack of leadership and direction.

People are also starting to believe that the numbers were artificially held low because of the Olympics. Even with the comparatively low number of cases compared to other countries, no one is satisfied with the government’s response.

Last edited by Saturn Dreams; 03-25-2020 at 06:40 PM.
  #46  
Old 03-26-2020, 06:26 AM
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The shit is beginning to hit the bamboo and paper folding fan.
  #47  
Old 03-26-2020, 07:42 AM
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Here's a good article on this subject from DW, which is generally a pretty reputable news organization.

https://www.dw.com/en/coronavirus-ho...rol/a-52907069

Here are some of the suspicions that have been aired on this thread:

Quote:
The low numbers of confirmed COVID-19 cases in Japan initially aroused suspicion that the government was covering up the truth.

"After the Fukushima nuclear disaster [in 2011], the government initially refused to admit the reactor meltdowns," said Barbara Holthus, a sociologist with the German Institute for Japanese Studies in Tokyo. "Today, there remains a great distrust of official statements."

Despite having the capacity to make 6,000 diagnostic tests per day, Japan has only tested around 14,000 swabs to date ó 20 times fewer than neighboring South Korea, which has been hit hard by the pandemic. Only patients with the most severe symptoms are tested, said Masahiro Kami, a virologist at the Medical Governance Research Institute. That, he added, means the number of unreported cases is very high.

Political scientist Koichi Nakano said Prime Minister Shinzo Abe likely wanted to present Japan as a safe country in order not to lose the Summer Olympics ó though the International Olympic Committee ended up postponing the event anyway.
And here's the rebuttal, if you will:

Quote:
Experts at the Health Ministry have repeatedly rejected such criticism, saying they were looking for spikes in COVID-19 cases in order to contain the virus, rather than conducting widespread tests. When the epidemic broke out in a primary school on the northern island of Hokkaido, for example, authorities closed all schools in the prefecture and declared a state of emergency. After three weeks the spread of the virus had been stopped.

"The low number of tests was intended to ensure that health care resources remained available for serious cases of infection," Sebastian Maslow, a German political scientist at the University of Tokyo, told DW.
and...

Quote:
Japanese greeting etiquette ó a bow instead of a handshake or a kiss on the cheek ó has also played a part in slowing the outbreak, as has basic hygiene education taught from an early age.

"Washing our hands, gargling with a disinfectant solution and wearing masks are part of our everyday lives. We don't need coronavirus to teach us that," said a Japanese mother of two. As a result, it was easy for society to switch to anti-infection mode in February when the virus first began to spread. Shops and businesses set up hand sanitizers at the entrance, and it became a civic duty to wear a face mask.
I think the OP's ex was probably saying something along the lines of "We Japanese don't need to go to such extremes that you gaijin go to because we Japanese wear masks and are naturally cleaner and more disease-free."

  #48  
Old 03-26-2020, 03:33 PM
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Originally Posted by asahi View Post
I think the OP's ex was probably saying something along the lines of "We Japanese don't need to go to such extremes that you gaijin go to because we Japanese wear masks and are naturally cleaner and more disease-free."

No, she doesn't think that. She was saying that not enough was being done.

BTW, I commuted on some of the busiest trains in Tokyo 1995-1998, and man, I think during winter I had some type of cold or whatever every day. One thing after another.
  #49  
Old 03-26-2020, 04:18 PM
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No, she doesn't think that. She was saying that not enough was being done.

BTW, I commuted on some of the busiest trains in Tokyo 1995-1998, and man, I think during winter I had some type of cold or whatever every day. One thing after another.
I caught numerous colds while in Japan - sometimes two or three a year. Like you, I suspect it was public transit.
  #50  
Old 03-27-2020, 09:35 AM
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Comiket has been canceled.
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