View Poll Results: Do you use your Ovan's Broiler and Broiler Pan?
Never 32 19.63%
Only for cheese toast and that's on a baking sheet 22 13.50%
Yes - I love cooking steaks and Chops under the Broiler 34 20.86%
I use the Broiler very rarely for steaks and chops 41 25.15%
What's a broiler pan? 7 4.29%
Other 38 23.31%
Multiple Choice Poll. Voters: 163. You may not vote on this poll

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  #1  
Old 05-08-2012, 07:46 PM
aceplace57 is offline
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Do you use your Oven Broiler?


My first apartment after college had a new oven and broiler pan. I used it maybe three or four times cooking steaks and pork chops. That's all it took to teach me an unpleasant lesson. Spend 10 minutes broiling a steak and then 60 minutes with hot water and a SOS pad. The clean up work makes broilers useless in my life. That's an insane amount of scrubbing for 2 lousy steaks or a couple pork chops. Who wants to spend an hour with an SOS pad? One time I even tilted the broiler pan (getting it out of the oven) and poured grease on my floor. Plus, you got all the grease splatter inside the oven to clean too.

From then on the broiler pan in my apartments got placed on top of the cabinets and out of sight or on the top shelf of the bedroom closet. My kitchen range came with the house I purchased and there was no broiler pan with it. Good riddance.

I use the broiler for one thing. That's making melted cheddar cheese toast. Steaks are cooked on my Foreman grill (2 paper towels wipes it clean) or outside on my Weber with charcoal.

How about you? Do you ever use your broiler?

Last edited by aceplace57; 05-08-2012 at 07:51 PM.
  #2  
Old 05-08-2012, 07:49 PM
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All the time, to make frittatas, broil chicken breast, etc. But it's electric, so it's just the top element in the stove, and whatever you put on the top shelf gets broiled. No special cleaning necessary if you use foil.
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Old 05-08-2012, 07:52 PM
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What cleanup work?
Yes I use mine a lot.
  #4  
Old 05-08-2012, 07:54 PM
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I semi-agree with the OP. I use the broiler lots, about half the time with a broiler pan. I just throw it in the dishwasher. No it's not the cleanest it can be, but good enough. I still use cookie sheets the other part of the time, not only for cleanliness, but also sometimes for laziness, e.g. I already have one that's sort of dirty but not enough to wash, or the rack is in the highest position and I don't want to lower it.
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Old 05-08-2012, 07:55 PM
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I should have said the last Broiler Pan I used was 25 years ago. It didn't have any sort of non stick surface.

If you cover it with aluminum foil what do you do about all those drip slots (there's usually at least 6 on each side, 12 total)? Do you cut the foil so the grease can still drip down into the pan?
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Old 05-08-2012, 08:00 PM
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For those that don't know what a Broiler Pan is. I seem to recall some of my apartments didn't have one with the oven. It either walked off with a previous tenant or the landlord never bothered including one.
http://www.adventurerv.net/imagemagi...pg&w=&h=&page=

Last edited by aceplace57; 05-08-2012 at 08:02 PM.
  #7  
Old 05-08-2012, 08:09 PM
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I use my oven broiler once in a while, but never with a broiler pan. I usually use it to brown up the top of a pizza, so I voted the "cheese toast" option. Now that you mention it, it would make awesome cheese toast - I totally have to try that.
  #8  
Old 05-08-2012, 08:09 PM
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Originally Posted by aceplace57 View Post
I should have said the last Broiler Pan I used was 25 years ago. It didn't have any sort of non stick surface.

If you cover it with aluminum foil what do you do about all those drip slots (there's usually at least 6 on each side, 12 total)? Do you cut the foil so the grease can still drip down into the pan?
I guess the kind of cooking I do doesn't produce much grease.

A frittata is just an omlet in a small frypan, and I put that under the broiler to cook the top. No grease.

If I broil a chicken breast, I just make a small tray from a couple of layers of foil. Not much grease here, either.

I've broiled fish filets the same way with no problem.
  #9  
Old 05-08-2012, 08:15 PM
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Crap. I voted "never," but that's wrong. I use it for roasting peppers, sometimes for finishing off pizzas, toasting crostini or bruschetta, and sometimes for creme brulee and things of that nature that require high overhead head. I do not use it for steaks or any other cuts of meat.
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Old 05-08-2012, 08:19 PM
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I voted "other", because the only time I use my broiler is to toast sandwich buns. Now that I think about it, I have used it to melt cheese on top of sandwiches, so I guess the cheese toast option would've worked too.
  #11  
Old 05-08-2012, 09:02 PM
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I use it sometimes - I don't get the problem. If you're using a broiler pan for some reason, the dishwasher gets it plenty clean for me (its going to be, for all intents and purposes, ON FIRE next time...) but mostly I use it to brown off things.
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Old 05-08-2012, 09:03 PM
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I use mine quite a bit with marinated steak. I have a coated broiler pan for it.

I agree about the mess, but usually I spend all of about 2 minutes cleaning the pan, say the hell with it, and put it away, dried/burnt grease and all. Sure, it's not perfectly clean, but it won't kill me to cook off of, either.
  #13  
Old 05-08-2012, 09:21 PM
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I need to try broiling some chicken breasts on a foil covered sheet pan. Musicat has a good idea there.

Now that I'm older, I'm more in control of my perfectionism. Today, I wouldn't waste an hour scrubbing every last mark off that shiny aluminum broiler pan. Get the worst of the grease off and call it a day. I didn't know any better when I was young and dumb.
  #14  
Old 05-09-2012, 06:38 AM
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I said only for cheese toast, but I do use it to brown mac & cheese and other casserole things. Also to grill/brown garlic bread, etc, but I've never used it to cook a steak. That I do on my outside grill.

UT
  #15  
Old 05-09-2012, 07:02 AM
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Since there are just 2 of us, I'm more likely to use my countertop oven/broiler. I always line the pan with foil and I use a small rack to keep the meat out of the grease. After it cools, I carefully wrap the drippings in the foil, and it generally takes just a little hot water and dish detergent to clean the pan and the rack. Even when I use the big oven and the broiler pan, I line the bottom with foil and spray the top with cooking spray. Cleaning isn't all that difficult.
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Old 05-09-2012, 07:08 AM
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You limited it a lot by making the only options for using it Steaks and Chops or Cheese Bread. I voted other because I would never consider using it for Steak and Chops (those go on the grill outside). Cheese bread... sure, sometimes but that isn't the only thing. I use it to crisp up the top of lots of things.

As far as the broiler pan goes... I can't think of the last time I used that.
  #17  
Old 05-09-2012, 07:09 AM
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You mean the grill?

I'm confused.
  #18  
Old 05-09-2012, 08:28 AM
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More trouble than it's worth. I'd rather cook on my charcoal grill which is also a hella lot of trouble, but much better tasting and I can cook a whole lot of stuff over a couple of hours if I time things right.

I've used the George Foreman grill, but it's not the same, don't like the results.

The broiler is useful for top-browning, though.
  #19  
Old 05-09-2012, 08:43 AM
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We rarely use our oven at all (my wife likes to stir fry and I like to grill). When we do use the oven, we don't use the top rack.
  #20  
Old 05-09-2012, 08:58 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GuanoLad View Post
You mean the grill?

I'm confused.
The broiler, in American English, is a heating unit in the oven which is direct or shielded flame (in gas ovens) or heating coils (in electric) and is situated above the cooking area. The broiler may be located in the main area of the oven, or it can be a drawer under the main door of the oven.

Here is a gas broiler in action.

Here is an oven with a drawer-style broiler under the main cooking area.

And here is an electric-style broiler.
  #21  
Old 05-09-2012, 09:04 AM
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All the time. Place tin (aluminum) foil on the top portion, and on the bottom portion.

Cut slits in the foil on the top portion.

Clean up is like 1 minute.
  #22  
Old 05-09-2012, 09:07 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GuanoLad View Post
You mean the grill?

I'm confused.
Quote:
Originally Posted by pulykamell View Post
The broiler, in American English, is a heating unit in the oven which is direct or shielded flame (in gas ovens) or heating coils (in electric) and is situated above the cooking area. The broiler may be located in the main area of the oven, or it can be a drawer under the main door of the oven.

Here is a gas broiler in action.

Here is an oven with a drawer-style broiler under the main cooking area.

And here is an electric-style broiler.
So, what's called el grill (del horno, not to be mistaken with a parrilla or grille) in Spain: the coil on the ceiling of the oven, used to "golden" the top of lasagne, moussaka, etc. rather than to cook strips of meat (which is what the info I found on the internet called for). Thanks for the explanation, because what I found assumed that people know wth the broiler is.

Last edited by Nava; 05-09-2012 at 09:10 AM.
  #23  
Old 05-09-2012, 09:13 AM
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We use it occasionally. Normally if we're in too much of a hurry to use the grill, or it's too cold/raining outside. If you line the bottom part of the broiling pan with foil it makes cleanup much easier; you only have to scrub the top part.

I also use it to finish off pizzas/casseroles/whatever needs a litte more browning on top.
  #24  
Old 05-09-2012, 09:19 AM
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So, what's called el grill (del horno, not to be mistaken with a parrilla or grille) in Spain: the coil on the ceiling of the oven, used to "golden" the top of lasagne, moussaka, etc. rather than to cook strips of meat (which is what the info I found on the internet called for).
Yes, exactly, except that here in the US, it is also commonly used to cook meat, too, as it provides a high and concentrated source of heat. I personally prefer to use a cast iron pan heated up high on a stovetop for that sort of application. (Or, of course, a traditional grill, in which the heat comes from below.)

Last edited by pulykamell; 05-09-2012 at 09:22 AM.
  #25  
Old 05-09-2012, 01:11 PM
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I will occasionally use it. Not usually for meats, as I have a cast iron grill pan (I also have a Foreman grill, but I find it worthless for cooking and it sits in its box in the basement). When I use it, I generally use a half-sheet pan with a wire rack. The pan will be foil lined, and the rack sprayed with cooking spray. The rack is still a pain to clean. Occasionally I will just use my cast iron pan under the broiler, heating it up before placing the meat in so that it browns both sides without flipping. I don't use the grill pan that came with the oven...the wire rack allows for much greater airflow around the food.
  #26  
Old 05-09-2012, 01:16 PM
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I voted other because while I use the broiler fairly regularly I never use it for chops or steaks and never with the broiling pan.

I use it to add colour to things I'm baking that are done but need a little colour on top, grilling chicken and for some casserole type dishes.
  #27  
Old 05-09-2012, 01:17 PM
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Originally Posted by GuanoLad View Post
You mean the grill?

I'm confused.
The basic difference between a grill and a broiler is that a grill heats from underneath and a broiler heats from above.
  #28  
Old 05-09-2012, 01:18 PM
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I've never used it for meat, but mexican pizzas, toast, and things like that. I always put down foil, because I'm lazy.
  #29  
Old 05-09-2012, 01:20 PM
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I've done that, and seems easier than messing with the broiler pan and rack. One thing that might make it easier is to wad up the foil on the half-sheet pan and throw it away. (Like FairyChatMom said.) Put the rack upside down on the pan, and making sure its on a flat steady surface pour in a half inch of boiling water - to soak the rack.
  #30  
Old 05-09-2012, 01:43 PM
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I always use foil and a baking sheet. I don't have much need for the drip pan, especially if it's for a tuna or salmon steak or for browning cheese.
  #31  
Old 05-09-2012, 06:04 PM
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The basic difference between a grill and a broiler is that a grill heats from underneath and a broiler heats from above.
I'm still confused. What you guys are calling a broiler, I have always known as a griller. What you guys call a grill I would call the barbecue, or baking.
  #32  
Old 05-09-2012, 06:09 PM
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I use it with the broiler pan all the time, but not often for chops or steaks - chose "other". Most often I broil chicken.
  #33  
Old 05-09-2012, 06:17 PM
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Originally Posted by GuanoLad View Post
I'm still confused. What you guys are calling a broiler, I have always known as a griller. What you guys call a grill I would call the barbecue, or baking.
Colloquially, a grill is often called a barbecue. But speaking precisely, barbecue is not a device but rather is a method of cooking which you do in a pit or a smoker with very low heat, not on a grill (what you call a barbecue), although many grills can be converted into smokers by reducing the number of coals and adding damp wood chips. Grilling, strictly speaking, is done on a grill which is a grate with high heat coming form underneath. Broilimg is done in a broiler, which is an upside down grill, with the heat coming from above.

Those are the precise terms, but there is considerable variation in local usage.
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Last edited by Acsenray; 05-09-2012 at 06:19 PM.
  #34  
Old 05-09-2012, 06:58 PM
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I've never owned a broiler that produced enough heat to really sear a steak or chop into crusty perfection. I was happy when they invented stove-top grill pans, because I can get those babies heated really hot. I once asked a salesman at a restaurant supply place if I couldn't buy a restaurant-grade broiler ("salamander") for home use, and he told me that that would invalidate our fire insurance!

However, home broilers do parmesan cheese toast just fine, as well as blackening tomatoes and tomatillos perfectly for salsas.

So yes I do use my broiler, just not for meat.
  #35  
Old 05-09-2012, 07:59 PM
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hmm, I should have asked in the OP if Ranges/Stoves outside America have a broiler feature. I've always had Electric Ranges in my apartments and home that I bought.

As a kid, several relatives had Gas Stoves, but I never paid much attention to the broiler. All I ever used was the burner to heat up a few things. The pilot lights were bad on my Grandmothers stove, and we had to light the burners or oven with a match.

I've learned a few tricks from this thread. I had never considered using a Broiler to crisp up pizza or casseroles. That's a neat trick I'll start using.

Last edited by aceplace57; 05-09-2012 at 08:01 PM.
  #36  
Old 05-09-2012, 09:46 PM
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Originally Posted by GuanoLad View Post
I'm still confused. What you guys are calling a broiler, I have always known as a griller. What you guys call a grill I would call the barbecue, or baking.
Waitaminit. I just looked at your Wikipedia link. It explains very clearly in the first two sentences the differences in American and British terminology. Why are you still confused?
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  #37  
Old 05-09-2012, 09:54 PM
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I broil a lot of fish. As others have said, I also use it for browning (like finishing a Shepherd's Pie) and melting cheese. I have some leftover sirloin that I will slice and make into a steak sandwich tomorrow night. I will put some provalone on top and put it under the broiler to finish it.
  #38  
Old 05-09-2012, 10:05 PM
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Waitaminit. I just looked at your Wikipedia link. It explains very clearly in the first two sentences the differences in American and British terminology. Why are you still confused?
Fair enough, I probably shouldn't be, I was going for the joke, but even so I don't know why there's such an opposing difference of terms. Your further claim that Barbecue is a cooking style and not a device also seems counter to all evidence, even with your concessions.

Last edited by GuanoLad; 05-09-2012 at 10:05 PM.
  #39  
Old 05-09-2012, 10:46 PM
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Fair enough, I probably shouldn't be, I was going for the joke, but even so I don't know why there's such an opposing difference of terms. Your further claim that Barbecue is a cooking style and not a device also seems counter to all evidence, even with your concessions.
Oh, do we want to get in what is barbecue? Oh, yes, let's.

Ascenray is right. With some qualifications, but he's hinted at them, so I'm sure he knows exactly what they are.

Depending on where you are in the US, barbecue can be a fairly loose or a fairly precise term. Where I'm at, the term "barbecue" can refer to the device you cook on, or to cooking meat over high heat (which is more precisely "grilling.") Traditionally, in the US, barbecue is a low-and-slow cooking method, usually involving wood and smoke. It's basically a type of hot smoking. Even further, in some parts of the US, barbecue is specifically a type of meat (usually pork shoulder or whole hog) prepared in this manner. So, you can order barbecue by the pound in certain places in the US, and you'll get barbecued pork.

Personally, I use the terms precisely. When I make steaks, I get out the grill and grill them. When I make barbecue pork, I get out the smoker and barbecue some shoulder. I never refer to my grill as a barbecue.

Feel free to Google "Grill vs barbecue" for further edification. It can be a very contentious and exhausting subject.

Last edited by pulykamell; 05-09-2012 at 10:47 PM.
  #40  
Old 05-09-2012, 11:56 PM
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I use it all the time but unless I am making gyros or fajitas it is never the focus.

I kinda think it as another sheet pan, just with an extra layer.

Last edited by MaltLiquor; 05-09-2012 at 11:56 PM.
  #41  
Old 05-10-2012, 12:45 AM
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I never refer to my grill as a barbecue.
You can call it whatever you want, but similarly I can call it whatever I want. I live in Australia - believe me, these are definitely barbecues.
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Old 05-10-2012, 12:56 AM
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You can call it whatever you want, but similarly I can call it whatever I want. I live in Australia - believe me, these are definitely barbecues.
Those are grills. In my circle Grill=gas, BBQ=wood or charcoal.

You can fake a BBQ on a grill if you burn up some wood chips, but you can tell.
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Old 05-10-2012, 08:17 AM
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You can call it whatever you want, but similarly I can call it whatever I want. I live in Australia - believe me, these are definitely barbecues.
Why do you think anyone is arguing with you? As I said, many people here call those barbecues, too. It's okay, relax, nobody is telling anyone what words to use. I'm explaining the differences in American terminology because I thought you were interested in how people use the word. Likewise, MaltLiquor's post is interesting to me, as that's one distinction I haven't heard.

Last edited by pulykamell; 05-10-2012 at 08:18 AM.
  #44  
Old 05-10-2012, 08:32 AM
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Originally Posted by MaltLiquor View Post
Those are grills. In my circle Grill=gas, BBQ=wood or charcoal.

You can fake a BBQ on a grill if you burn up some wood chips, but you can tell.
Huh. BBQ is a type of flavoring to me. It's added as you grill the meat.
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Old 05-10-2012, 08:51 AM
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Huh. BBQ is a type of flavoring to me. It's added as you grill the meat.
Yeah, that's the one use of the word that actually does annoy me. I've been disappointed at a couple of restaurants that serve "BBQ ribs" or "BBQ pork," only to get something that's been oven braised and just doused in barbecue sauce. I'm much more careful these days and know what questions to ask when I'm at an establishment that seems like it might be using the word BBQ in this way.
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Old 05-10-2012, 02:49 PM
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No. But I live alone and rarely even use my oven. If there were more here, I might be tempted to do "real" cooking more often.
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Old 05-10-2012, 03:08 PM
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All the time, to make frittatas, broil chicken breast, etc. But it's electric, so it's just the top element in the stove, and whatever you put on the top shelf gets broiled. No special cleaning necessary if you use foil.
I think broiling (well, and frying) is pretty much the only way I haven't tried making chicken yet. The only time I use my broiler is for salmon fillets. (I have tried using it to brown potatoes in Shepard's Pie-type dishes, but it never seems to come out right.)

Speaking of broilers, has anyone ever tried using it with the oven door closed? (My range says to keep it open slightly when broiling.)

And as for broiler vs. grill vs. barbecue, I go by:
Broiler - inside an oven
Grill - uses electricity (as in, for example, "George Foreman grill")
Barbecue - uses charcoal or propane
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Old 05-10-2012, 03:32 PM
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I use the broiler for fish, chicken, steaks, vegetables... whatever.

Use foil with slits cut in for the holes, and a layer of foil in the catch part.
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Old 05-10-2012, 04:03 PM
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Originally Posted by aceplace57 View Post
My first apartment after college had a new oven and broiler pan. I used it maybe three or four times cooking steaks and pork chops. That's all it took to teach me an unpleasant lesson. Spend 10 minutes broiling a steak and then 60 minutes with hot water and a SOS pad. The clean up work makes broilers useless in my life. That's an insane amount of scrubbing for 2 lousy steaks or a couple pork chops. Who wants to spend an hour with an SOS pad? One time I even tilted the broiler pan (getting it out of the oven) and poured grease on my floor. Plus, you got all the grease splatter inside the oven to clean too.
This sounds like one of those commercials that shows how ineptly you are doing something simple and need to buy the advertised gadget to make your life oh so much easier and avoid all this hassle.
  #50  
Old 05-10-2012, 04:06 PM
Kimballkid is offline
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Join Date: Dec 2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FairyChatMom View Post
Since there are just 2 of us, I'm more likely to use my countertop oven/broiler. I always line the pan with foil and I use a small rack to keep the meat out of the grease. After it cools, I carefully wrap the drippings in the foil, and it generally takes just a little hot water and dish detergent to clean the pan and the rack. Even when I use the big oven and the broiler pan, I line the bottom with foil and spray the top with cooking spray. Cleaning isn't all that difficult.
^ This. Easy peasy.
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