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Old 09-11-2019, 12:07 AM
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Asian Takeout Mustard: what dish is it great in?


It’s packed in nearly every Chinese takeout I order. Chopsticks, sweet n sour, soy sauce and fortune cookies, ok. What is the Asian dish mustard really shines in?

Last edited by Sitnam; 09-11-2019 at 12:09 AM.
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Old 09-11-2019, 12:14 AM
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It's a hot mustard, usually with horseradish or wasabi, and it's a good dipping sauce for egg rolls and wantons and such.

mc
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Old 09-11-2019, 12:17 AM
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Its excellent with dim sum.
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Old 09-11-2019, 06:49 AM
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Put it on egg rolls, crab rangoons, etc. I've never actually used it in a dish.
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Old 09-11-2019, 08:41 AM
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Originally Posted by mikecurtis View Post
It's a hot mustard, usually with horseradish or wasabi, and it's a good dipping sauce for egg rolls and wantons and such.

mc
You've been to Chinese takeouts where they give you the actual horseradish or wasabi mustard in a packet to go?

Every Chinese takeout I've ever been to, the take-out mustard packets were just crappy regular mustard.
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Old 09-11-2019, 09:12 AM
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You've been to Chinese takeouts where they give you the actual horseradish or wasabi mustard in a packet to go?

Every Chinese takeout I've ever been to, the take-out mustard packets were just crappy regular mustard.
I've never seen "regular" mustard at a Chinese restaurant. You mean like French's yellow mustard? Never seen that. This mustard is yellow, but it's not regular mustard. It's like a hot mustard. I sometimes use it as a dip for my spring rolls/egg rolls.
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Old 09-11-2019, 09:16 AM
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It's medium hot mustard. I don't know what they do to it to make it so freaking bland.

I know the whole "I can make it better at home" thing has become an SDMB meme, but seriously, plain ordinary powdered mustard, slowly add plain old tap water, stir, taste a little periodically until you get the consistency that flies up your nose and makes you do a sharp intake of breath.

I can squeeze the contents of an entire commercial hot mustard packet onto an egg roll and pop it in my mouth and it scarcely has any bite whatsoever. That's just wrong.
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Old 09-11-2019, 09:27 AM
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I've never seen "regular" mustard at a Chinese restaurant. You mean like French's yellow mustard? Never seen that. This mustard is yellow, but it's not regular mustard. It's like a hot mustard. I sometimes use it as a dip for my spring rolls/egg rolls.
No, it's not like French's mustard. But it's decidedly NOT the awesome wasabi-type mustard that actual Chinese restaurants have. There is nothing "hot" about it at all. I too like to dip spring/egg rolls into the real hot mustard, but the take-out packets just suck

Here is a picture of what I usually get from take out places. Note the ingredients.
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Old 09-11-2019, 09:54 AM
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plain ordinary powdered mustard, slowly add plain old tap water, stir, taste a little periodically until you get the consistency that flies up your nose and makes you do a sharp intake of breath.
Yep.
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Old 09-11-2019, 10:01 AM
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Egg rolls. When I was 20 or so and just acquainting my palate with Chinese food, the great irony of it all to me at the time was that I hated cabbage and I hated hot/spicy food*, but I loved egg rolls with Chinese mustard.

* I see some real fire-breathers here don't think it's hot. What I had at the places I went was plenty hot for me.
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Old 09-11-2019, 10:11 AM
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I like mustard, and I like spicy food, but to me that stuff tastes like it uses gasoline as the base.
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Old 09-11-2019, 10:30 AM
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I like mustard, and I like spicy food, but to me that stuff tastes like it uses gasoline as the base.
W.Y. Industries, Inc., probably just uses low-quality mustard. Or maybe it’s the water in North Bergen, New Jersey.

I have no qualm with it. If I’m eating egg rolls, shrimp toast, wonton, and lo mein from my local fave Chinese takeout joint, I have no illusions of haute cuisine., just yummy tasty guilty-pleasure fried crap with lashings of MSG.

And if it’s not hot enough, I add more mustard. “No duck sauce, extra mustard” are my signature final words to the nice Asian lady on the phone.
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Old 09-11-2019, 12:31 PM
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People in Hawaii tend to mix the mustard and soy sauce together. It's common for Chinese restaurants there to have both condiments on all tables and give you a little mixing dish next to your chopsticks/napkins.
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Old 09-11-2019, 12:37 PM
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Colman's, water, time. The perfect Chinese mustard in the amount of time it takes to empty the bags of the take-out containers.
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Old 09-11-2019, 12:43 PM
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The chances of there being any real wasabi in Chinese takeout is basically zero. Even the stuff most restaurants call wasabi isn't. If it's a pricey place then there's a small chance of getting the real stuff.
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Old 09-11-2019, 12:48 PM
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I don't even know why anyone would expect wasabi with Chinese food, since wasabi is Japanese.

That's like expecting nigiri with your egg rolls.
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Old 09-11-2019, 04:51 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by manson1972 View Post
No, it's not like French's mustard. But it's decidedly NOT the awesome wasabi-type mustard that actual Chinese restaurants have. There is nothing "hot" about it at all. I too like to dip spring/egg rolls into the real hot mustard, but the take-out packets just suck

Here is a picture of what I usually get from take out places. Note the ingredients.
Like others have said, you can make your own spicy mustard by mixing Colmans mustard power and cold water. That's all it takes. No wasabi or horseradish required. It gets very spicy after a bit and then will become less spicy as more time goes on. I believe adding vinegar is supposed to stop the decline in spiciness from occurring. While the packet you pictured may not be spicy, it contains the ingredients required.
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Old 09-11-2019, 06:01 PM
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Originally Posted by Geek Mecha View Post
People in Hawaii tend to mix the mustard and soy sauce together. It's common for Chinese restaurants there to have both condiments on all tables and give you a little mixing dish next to your chopsticks/napkins.
And vinegar. You need to mix soy sauce with vinegar for the perfect pot sticker dipping sauce.
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Old 09-12-2019, 12:21 PM
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The mixture wasn't just for potstickers. Many people dipped noodles and pretty much anything into it. That's why it was part of the standard table setting and not just brought out when you ordered a specific dish. Some restaurants have chili water (actually vinegar) but it was not commonly mixed with mustard and soy sauce.
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Old 09-12-2019, 12:44 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mikecurtis View Post
It's a hot mustard, usually with horseradish or wasabi, and it's a good dipping sauce for egg rolls and wantons and such.

mc
Quote:
Originally Posted by wguy123 View Post
Like others have said, you can make your own spicy mustard by mixing Colmans mustard power and cold water. That's all it takes. No wasabi or horseradish required. It gets very spicy after a bit and then will become less spicy as more time goes on. I believe adding vinegar is supposed to stop the decline in spiciness from occurring. While the packet you pictured may not be spicy, it contains the ingredients required.
There's no horseradish or wasabi in Chinese mustard. That's what real mustard tastes like, not that turmeric-flavored stuff called American yellow mustard.
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Old 09-12-2019, 02:42 PM
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Our Chinese restaurant, in the USA, guards their in house mustard. If you don't ask for it, they don't give it. It is kept in the refrigerator.

I don't know if it is pricey, or they figure most people don't want it.

But a spring roll without it, is boring.

Thanks for sharing the recipe. I will have to make some. The Chinese restaurant here doesn't have any. Which is surprising given the appeal of spicy food here.
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Old 09-12-2019, 04:52 PM
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I made a mustard in a class one time, as I recall it had brown mustard and cardamon and some sort of vinegar. It tasted pretty blah to me until I added salt to it later. the flavors really bloomed with the addition of salt.
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Old 09-12-2019, 05:09 PM
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Silenus nailed it. Colman’s dry mustard. Prepare and let it bloom. You can adjust the consistency but it’ll be what you are looking for.
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Old 09-12-2019, 05:23 PM
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There's no horseradish or wasabi in Chinese mustard. That's what real mustard tastes like, not that turmeric-flavored stuff called American yellow mustard.
I was wondering about that myself. Mustard, horseradish, and wasabi are all from the same family and derive their spiciness from allyl Isothiocyanate. It's a very different type of spiciness than chile peppers, and I almost wish there was a different word for it, as liking one type of spiciness does not mean you like another (my father could eat the most pungent mustard and horseradish, but couldn't deal with very hot peppers; similarly, his Mexican workmates could eat hot peppers fine, but couldn't deal with my dad's horseradish. They're very different.) Anyhow, a "hot" mustard can taste a lot like it has horseradish in it. Now, there are mustards with horseradish, but it's a very similar flavor and burn. If you take some Colman's English mustard and whip it up yourself, you can get a very similar burn (a quick, breath-taking type of sting, as opposed to a lingering heat that builds as with chiles--the after affects of horseradish and mustard don't last long at all) as you would with grated horseradish.
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Old 09-12-2019, 05:49 PM
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It's a very different type of spiciness than chile peppers, and I almost wish there was a different word for it
Bengali has different words for all the sensations covered by “hot” or “spicy” in English.

গরম - [gɔrom] - garam - gorom - hot, meaning high temperature, as opposed to cold

ঝাল - [d͡ʒʰal] - jhal - meaning the hotness or spiciness of chilies, which burn your mouth, tongue, and lips

মশলা দেওয়া (Among other terms) - [mɔʃla dćowa] - masla deoya - moshla daowa - spiced, made with spices, not necessarily burning or hot

ঝাঁজ - [d͡ʒʰăd͡ʒ] - jhanj - jhăj - the sinus-clearing hotness of mustard or horseradish. This is the burn that shoots upward to your eyes and forebrain.
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Old 09-12-2019, 06:36 PM
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Originally Posted by Geek Mecha View Post
People in Hawaii tend to mix the mustard and soy sauce together.
No mixing bowls on tables, but combining mustard and soy sauce is sometimes done down here in the New Orleans area, as well.

There's a popular ersatz Chinese dish here in New Orleans called "Mandarin Chicken" that comes with a sesame-oil-based brown gravy. I find the hot mustard complements that gravy very well. My understanding is that either (a) this dish is uncommon in the rest of the U.S. or else (b) other places have it under a different name.
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Old 09-12-2019, 09:35 PM
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Bengali has different words for all the sensations covered by “hot” or “spicy” in English.
Nice, I like that. Then there's also that ginger kind of spiciness, which is probably a bit more jhanj than jhal, and Piper peppercorn spiciness, which I find probably more like jhal than jhanj, at least to me. Are those classified along these scales? (Though I guess the spiciness of ginger isn't really experienced in most dishes -- only if you eat it straight or experience it in ginger beer.)
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Old 09-12-2019, 09:43 PM
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I see some real fire-breathers here don't think it's hot. What I had at the places I went was plenty hot for me.
The packaged stuff varies wildly. I've had it at places where it was basically a tan flour paste, and other places where it would eat the finish off the plates. It seems to get hotter as general restaurant quality increases.
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Old 09-15-2019, 03:48 PM
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Our Chinese restaurant, in the USA, guards their in house mustard. If you don't ask for it, they don't give it. It is kept in the refrigerator....
Yup. Even the cheapest strip mall take-out places around here keep the good stuff in a refrigerator and put the plastic packets out on the counter for those who don't know enough to ask for the good stuff.

Good hot Chinese mustard is pretty much the same as good hot English mustard: it's mustard.

Last edited by The King of Soup; 09-15-2019 at 03:49 PM.
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Old 09-15-2019, 08:13 PM
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Yup. Even the cheapest strip mall take-out places around here keep the good stuff in a refrigerator and put the plastic packets out on the counter for those who don't know enough to ask for the good stuff.
Our favorite dim sum joints in the Brooklyn and Manhattan Chinatowns put out bowls of the sinus-clearing stuff and don’t offer packets at all. We’re always the only non-Asians in the place, though.
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Old 09-15-2019, 08:54 PM
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it's a good dipping sauce for egg rolls and wantons and such.
Definitely recommend using a condiment.
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Old Yesterday, 10:23 AM
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plain ordinary powdered mustard, slowly add plain old tap water, stir, taste a little periodically until you get the consistency that flies up your nose and makes you do a sharp intake of breath.
Put a drop or two of white vinegar in that--makes it just a bit more volatile.

As for what's in the take out packets, my guess is strained cat vomit. Or something created by the Sirius Cybernetics Corporation that is almost, but not quite, entirely unlike mustard.
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Old Yesterday, 10:32 AM
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There isn't any horseradish in Asian take-out mustard, but there surely is in Philippe's mustard. The inventors of the French Dip sandwich make a killer hot mustard that will clear your great-grand-kids' sinuses.
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