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  #1751  
Old 06-20-2011, 11:48 AM
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No, Shakester - we're good; I know most of that stuff. The Phat Cat was simply described from a "cork sniffer" standpoint on various forums as "a P-90 style pickup designed to fit into a humbucker slot - but that it isn't quite a pure P-90 tone"

Here is the link: http://www.legendarytones.com/duncanphatcat.html

And here's the quote:

Quote:
I compared the Phat Cat Les Paul to a 2004 Gibson Classic SG with stock Gibson P-90’s, (traditional soap bar style). I also compared it to a Les Paul Historic Special Double Cut reissue, (modeled after the 1960 Les Paul Special DC). I found the Gibson P-90’s in both guitars to be both a bit warmer and smoother with greater bottom end. Overall, the Gibson P-90’s had a much fuller and “wider” sound while the Phat Cats seemed more closely aligned with a hotter Fender single coil sound. With that said, the Phat Cats do not sound bad at all. The Phat Cats sounded very good overdriven and with high gain. They were surprisingly quiet and certainly would help cut through the mix in a band setting.
So I wasn't commented on physical construction...
  #1752  
Old 06-23-2011, 09:55 AM
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I recently dug out my Yamaha FG-300 that I hadn't played in a while and changed the strings on it...ALL BY MYSELF! (I'm so proud of myself!) I figured I couldn't take it in to my local shop every time I wanted to switch strings, that would cost too much money. It was not nearly as hard as I thought it would be.

I took off the old silk and steel strings, and replaced them with a new set of standard Phosphor Bronze. I don't know why I didn't do this earlier. It's a little harder on my hands, but Oh. My. God. it sounds AMAZING! So now I've started playing some of the old Carter Family classics, like this one.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YCniF...eature=feedlik

I am having a lot of fun with this now, and it feels less like "practice" and more like "just playing" you know?
  #1753  
Old 06-26-2011, 10:43 AM
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CBEscapee would like to know good songs for a beginner.
http://boards.straightdope.com/sdmb/...d.php?t=613989

And there's a nice long discussion about how the body of a guitar affects the sound here.
http://boards.straightdope.com/sdmb/...php?p=13958315
  #1754  
Old 06-27-2011, 05:11 PM
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My Music Room


I wanted to show y'all my music room where I have my drums, guitars, keyboard and amps set up, but I'll have to do it in segments, because the room is kinda small, so bear with me.

Since I no longer work, I plan to spend an hour every day with each instrument learning to play it or play it better.

The reason I have this room at all is because a few years ago some folks from The Straight Dope (several in this thread) helped me out of a tight spot during what I call "The Troubles", and I'll be grateful for that for the rest of my life.

One word of explanation: my tom-toms aren't seated like I wanted them In one of the pics, and I'm still not satisfied with the way I have them now, but any drummer will tell you that Pearl Forums are tough on toms, seating-wise.

Here are the pics.....

http://i240.photobucket.com/albums/f...icRoom1007.jpg

http://i240.photobucket.com/albums/f...icRoom1004.jpg

http://i240.photobucket.com/albums/f...icRoom1006.jpg

http://i240.photobucket.com/albums/f...icRoom1005.jpg

http://i240.photobucket.com/albums/f...icRoom1003.jpg

http://i240.photobucket.com/albums/f...rboy49/001.jpg

The black things you see on the cymbals and drums are rubber "mutes" to keep the neighbors happy.

Also, we did a test last Sunday with the amps to see at what loudness point they could hear them and I didn't get to turn even one to "11".

I am fortunate, however, that the amps are okay at level 5. As you can see they are small for the guitar and one rock square for the basses (25 watts). I want one for the keyboard, but that's way in the future.

I have a very small amp that plugs into the bottom of the guitar (where the cord goes) and I can use headphones with it. Sounds very good.

I appreciate y'all taking a look.

Quasi

PS: I wanted to add that several of those guitars unfortunately spent some time in the pawn shop. I felt like a douche for having to do that.....

Last edited by Quasimodem; 06-27-2011 at 05:13 PM.
  #1755  
Old 06-27-2011, 07:36 PM
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... Quasi, do you have cattle mutes in your music room? ADMIT IT!

How come your drum throne has arms? I had to take an arm off my chair to practice guitar with.

Is that a shiny new Epi LP, or do you just keep the foam on the switch?

Nice Fender G-Dec. 30 or 15? How's the modeling sound? I'm still insanely happy with my Vox, though I'm thinking of going to the modeling + tube version, the VT series.

Also, if you want a plug-in modeling headphone amp, I have a Pocket Rockit V2 that I am no longer using, in favor of a Pocket POD. Yours for the asking... allowing for some time for me to find the box, et al.

Last edited by E-Sabbath; 06-27-2011 at 07:38 PM.
  #1756  
Old 06-27-2011, 08:12 PM
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E-buddy!!!!!

That seat you're looking at isn't the throne. You're looking over the drums to the left-hand corner of the room where my computer sits and that's the seat for it. The throne is your every-day run of the mill hemorrhoid antagonist!

That's a G. Dec. 15, and I love the modelling. It's been three years since I've used it because of the packed sardine way of living we've had to do, so I am getting reaquainted with all its toys.

That's a shiny new Epi, just out of the box and not yet played. I forgot to take the foam off , so thanks for the reminder!

"Cattle mutes" - I actually had to look that one up, but no, we have a big back yard, but no mutilated cows as of yet, sorry!

And I'd LOVE to have the V2, E, thanks! Please allow me to pay for it, however!

One more pic: http://i240.photobucket.com/albums/f.../giwdul001.jpg You should know who that is, right? I have him velcro'd down on that rim, so no probs with him falling off.

Thanks again.

Your pal

Quasi
  #1757  
Old 06-28-2011, 05:29 AM
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If you tilt his head back, is there a button to open the Quasi-Pole to the Quasi-Cave? And really, no charge, it's been sitting on my dresser for six months, and therefore has been designated 'useless'. Useless things are to be given to people who can get some use out of 'em.
I enjoy this rule because it allows me to do nice things for people for zero reason.
  #1758  
Old 06-28-2011, 06:54 AM
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Ha! I had to slowly dissect that first sentence, but then I remembered the bust on Batman the TV series! Takes me a while, but I usually get there.

A friend with a rule such as this is to be respected, and so I gratefully accept this very kind gift from my friend E-Sabbath!

I will pm you my address any time you're ready, keeping in mind that there is absolutely no rush, please, okay?

Thanks again for thinking of me.

Bill
  #1759  
Old 06-28-2011, 09:38 AM
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Maguire Car Wax As Guitar Polish


Y'all ever heard of doing this?

When I took the Jasmine for a "tune-up" and pre-amp battery replacement a couple of years ago (my ham-fisted hands won't fit into the sound-hole to do it myself), I remarked on how shiny it was, and my guitar guy told me that is what he uses on all his guitars and those that he fixes and sells.

Thanks

Q
  #1760  
Old 06-28-2011, 09:44 AM
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I've heard of it. Don't see why it wouldn't work just fine. I've also heard of people using nicely scented gun oil to oil the neck with.
  #1761  
Old 06-28-2011, 03:56 PM
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You guys ever hear of using spray-on shielding (like this) to shield a guitars innards? My sons guitar teacher mentioned it to me yesterday, and I was surprised that there was such a thing. Is it worth using? Does it work well?

ETA: nice practice space, Quasi. Thanks for sharing.

Last edited by squeegee; 06-28-2011 at 03:57 PM.
  #1762  
Old 06-28-2011, 03:58 PM
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No clue about car polish on the outside of a guitar, spray on shielding on the inside of a guitar - or spraying car polish on the inside for that matter
  #1763  
Old 06-28-2011, 04:19 PM
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I suppose a guitar covered in spray-on shielding could look interesting.
  #1764  
Old 06-28-2011, 04:25 PM
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I suppose a guitar covered in spray-on shielding could look interesting.
Only after you polish it with car wax.
  #1765  
Old 06-28-2011, 04:32 PM
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Only after you polish it with car wax.
I bet that would cost at least a paraffins.


Since we're being silly, here's another question -- has anyone ever made a "buckier" humbucker by using more than two coils? I bet a six coil humbucker would look badass. And require a woodworking shop to install, but whatever. If you had one on a guitar, you could pick up all of the interesting weirdo harmonics discussed earlier that can normally only be heard on an acoustic.
  #1766  
Old 06-28-2011, 04:35 PM
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I bet that would cost at least a paraffins.


Since we're being silly, here's another question -- has anyone ever made a "buckier" humbucker by using more than two coils? I bet a six coil humbucker would look badass. And require a woodworking shop to install, but whatever. If you had one on a guitar, you could pick up all of the interesting weirdo harmonics discussed earlier that can normally only be heard on an acoustic.
Nah - never happened. (a guitar Nigel Tufnel of Spinal Tap has been photographed with...)

Better pic here - scroll down a bit...

Last edited by WordMan; 06-28-2011 at 04:36 PM.
  #1767  
Old 06-28-2011, 04:57 PM
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Nah - never happened. (a guitar Nigel Tufnel of Spinal Tap has been photographed with...)

Better pic here - scroll down a bit...
Wow, that looks as stupidly awesome as I expected. Love the chrome tailpipe and gas gauge.
  #1768  
Old 06-29-2011, 05:20 AM
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Wow, that looks as stupidly awesome as I expected. Love the chrome tailpipe and gas gauge.
If you think that's silly, have a look at these.
  #1769  
Old 06-29-2011, 06:29 AM
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If you think that's silly, have a look at these.
Looks like someone was a Salvador Dali fanboy.

From a business model perspective, I would wonder how to size the market for this guitar...
  #1770  
Old 06-29-2011, 08:11 AM
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There are quite a few 3-coil 'buckers, they've been around since the 70s.

Ibanez used them as standard on a few guitars.

Hamer, too, though it's actually 2+1 according to that page.

Oh, and quadruple 'buckers? Yep.
  #1771  
Old 06-29-2011, 08:35 AM
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There are quite a few 3-coil 'buckers, they've been around since the 70s.

Ibanez used them as standard on a few guitars.

Hamer, too, though it's actually 2+1 according to that page.

Oh, and quadruple 'buckers? Yep.
We all need to step back and acknowledge the dangers of over'bucking. I don't really like to talk about it....just please...be careful.

  #1772  
Old 06-29-2011, 08:44 PM
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If you think that's silly, have a look at these.
Did Dr. Seuss play the guitar?
  #1773  
Old 06-30-2011, 12:24 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shakester View Post
There are quite a few 3-coil 'buckers, they've been around since the 70s.

Ibanez used them as standard on a few guitars.

Hamer, too, though it's actually 2+1 according to that page.

Oh, and quadruple 'buckers? Yep.
Thanks, I guess the hummier bucker is well plowed territory. Ignorance fought.

Warning, FWIW, MS Security Essentials got grumpy after I clicked one of those three links and I had to clean something. I'm not sure which link. It could also have been a click on the Dr Suess guitars above.
  #1774  
Old 06-30-2011, 04:25 AM
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Quote:
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Warning, FWIW, MS Security Essentials got grumpy after I clicked one of those three links and I had to clean something. I'm not sure which link. It could also have been a click on the Dr Suess guitars above.
It's the Ibanez/Iceman link, I get a big scary malware warning. Seems safe to look at the Cat in the Hat's Jellycaster.
  #1775  
Old 06-30-2011, 05:49 AM
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It's the Ibanez/Iceman link, I get a big scary malware warning. Seems safe to look at the Cat in the Hat's Jellycaster.
Sorry, nothing like that happened to me, but I use Firefox with NoScript enabled as default, and I'm on Linux, so malware doesn't exist for me.

ETA: Neither do popups, or (thanks to AdBlock), ads. I don't know how you guys can even use the internet without blocking out all the invasive crap.

Last edited by Shakester; 06-30-2011 at 05:52 AM.
  #1776  
Old 07-14-2011, 10:43 PM
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Still practicing, still playing, still can't change chords fast enough. Need more practice.
  #1777  
Old 07-15-2011, 12:24 AM
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I think I've got all the pieces to rewire my "Xavie e" Les Paul Special clone, and I'm hoping to find time this weekend. I need to pull three wires from the control well at one end of the guitar body to the switch on the upper bout at the other end, and the wire path looks to be weird; if I pop off the pickguard, there's actually a spot underneath where the wires surface from the body momentarily on the way there, which looks pretty hacky, and I'm hoping this won't present too much difficulty. I'm also unsure if the bridge is getting grounded from the control well; there's a wire there that I think does the trick, but I need to pull out my ohm meter from wherever I've lost it to be sure

One odd thing -- I tried ordering vintage-style caps from AllParts and got back-ordered, so I got some ($18! each!) paper-and-oil caps from RS Guitarworks, and the damned things are huge, nearly as big as the last joint on my index finger. Compare these caps to the size of the pots in the first photo link I posted above. They're like something you'd see in a 40's Ham radio. They'll fit in my control well, but it'll be a squeeze. Does this look right?

I really, really like playing this guitar (more than my AD Tele, on some days for some things), so I'm hoping I can pull off this rewire without too much trouble and go back to playing it.
  #1778  
Old 07-15-2011, 05:04 AM
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Compare these caps to the size of the pots in the first photo link I posted above. They're like something you'd see in a 40's Ham radio. They'll fit in my control well, but it'll be a squeeze. Does this look right?
Yes, that's right, that's how big they are. Obsolete technology. Good luck with the rewire, in my experience a wire that looks like it goes to the bridge generally does go there. There's no other reason for a wire to go in that direction.

With threading the wires through the guitar, it's best if you don't trim the ends first.
  #1779  
Old 07-15-2011, 11:27 AM
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Yes, that's right, that's how big they are. Obsolete technology. Good luck with the rewire, in my experience a wire that looks like it goes to the bridge generally does go there. There's no other reason for a wire to go in that direction.
Right, and I'm sure it reaches some area near the bridge or tailpiece; I just want to make sure they actually attached it in some non-flaky way. The electronics on this guitar were wired very mickey-mouse, so I'm checking everything. Although this check is easy: measure the resistance from ground (or at least from that wire in the control well) to the strings.

Quote:
With threading the wires through the guitar, it's best if you don't trim the ends first.
Good point. I bet that braid can be a pain trying to pull it through right areas.
  #1780  
Old 07-15-2011, 11:36 AM
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Yes, figuring out where to "tuck the cap" in my control cavity given the size of those oil-and-paper vintage-style caps was an added step I hadn't appreciated, but it was do-able.

I tie a piece of stout line - fishing line or even just dental floss - to the end of my wires if there is even a chance of a wire or braid or something getting snagged and hung up. I tie the line then use tape to smooth out the knot and the line pulls right through.

I am not clear on the stray wire - can't tell if you are saying they kinda kluged it together or if, like on most Teles, there was a ground wire that was specifically left bare between the bridge and the body for grounding purposes...
  #1781  
Old 07-15-2011, 12:49 PM
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http://www.hansonguitars.com/t-90.htm

So pretty. I think I want one. But not for a year or two.
  #1782  
Old 07-15-2011, 01:03 PM
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Yes, figuring out where to "tuck the cap" in my control cavity given the size of those oil-and-paper vintage-style caps was an added step I hadn't appreciated, but it was do-able.

I tie a piece of stout line - fishing line or even just dental floss - to the end of my wires if there is even a chance of a wire or braid or something getting snagged and hung up. I tie the line then use tape to smooth out the knot and the line pulls right through.

I am not clear on the stray wire - can't tell if you are saying they kinda kluged it together or if, like on most Teles, there was a ground wire that was specifically left bare between the bridge and the body for grounding purposes...
Back in the 60's (my early drumming days), the strings used an extra stray wire to stick their cigarettes onto. Not healthy, I know, but it looked cool as hell in the dark during the slow dances.

E, I like the Hanson too, but I promised myself that until I got good enough, I'd never spend more than about $350.00 on a guitar, so me too about waiting, buddy!

Q
  #1783  
Old 07-15-2011, 01:08 PM
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Back in the 60's (my early drumming days), the strings used an extra stray wire to stick their cigarettes onto.
Which is how Clapton's Guitar Blackie got these distinctive burns on the headstock...
  #1784  
Old 07-15-2011, 01:19 PM
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Ah, crap. I'm sorry. I meant they used one of the guitar STRINGS from the headstock!

Jesus! I swear, sometimes I can see stuff in my head, but I can't express it in my writings. Apologies.

Quasi

ETA: Y'all got it anyway. Great. I appreciate it.

PS: One more edit. Sorry, they used one of the thinner strings sticking OUT from the headstock. Not like EC, who placed his under the big E .

Last edited by Quasimodem; 07-15-2011 at 01:22 PM.
  #1785  
Old 07-15-2011, 01:25 PM
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PS: One more edit. Sorry, they used one of the thinner strings sticking OUT from the headstock. Not like EC, who placed his under the big E .
Yeah, I know a few who did that, too - EVH was one, I think...here - nope, still under the low E, not stuck on the end of a snipped, thinner string.

Last edited by WordMan; 07-15-2011 at 01:26 PM.
  #1786  
Old 07-15-2011, 04:19 PM
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My friend Ed Klein is mentioned as one of the Ten Forward-Thinking Luthiers at the 2011 Montreal Guitar Show. (No, I couldn't make it this year, and now, I'm wishing I'd made more of an effort.) Really cool.
  #1787  
Old 07-15-2011, 10:41 PM
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Yes, figuring out where to "tuck the cap" in my control cavity given the size of those oil-and-paper vintage-style caps was an added step I hadn't appreciated, but it was do-able.
Yeah, it does look doable, I was just taken aback when I saw these huge-ass caps, like I'd ordered the wrong thing. Thanks all for the reassurance.

Quote:
I tie a piece of stout line - fishing line or even just dental floss - to the end of my wires if there is even a chance of a wire or braid or something getting snagged and hung up. I tie the line then use tape to smooth out the knot and the line pulls right through.
Agree - I was figuring on some variation on what electricians do when pulling wire. I hadn't thought of dental floss, nice tip!

Quote:
I am not clear on the stray wire - can't tell if you are saying they kinda kluged it together or if, like on most Teles, there was a ground wire that was specifically left bare between the bridge and the body for grounding purposes...
Well, there's a wire in the control well that presumably goes to the bridge or tailpiece. But given the chancy wiring job on this instrument from the maker, it would surprise me no great deal if it want toward those areas but wasn't hooked up properly. I'm just gonna pull out the multimeter once I take the plunge and unwire/desolder all the old stuff and make sure that the bridge/tailpiece ground actually grounds the strings. I'd bet 99/100 that it's fine, I just want to make sure.
  #1788  
Old 07-15-2011, 10:44 PM
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My friend Ed Klein is mentioned as one of the Ten Forward-Thinking Luthiers at the 2011 Montreal Guitar Show. (No, I couldn't make it this year, and now, I'm wishing I'd made more of an effort.) Really cool.
Congrats to your friend!
Does the quote on his picture, re "this very interesting non-linear nylon-string model" refer to the asymmetry of the bridge/sound hole/waist on the guitar, or some mathematical property? It's a very cool looking guitar.
  #1789  
Old 07-16-2011, 07:18 AM
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Congrats to your friend!
Does the quote on his picture, re "this very interesting non-linear nylon-string model" refer to the asymmetry of the bridge/sound hole/waist on the guitar, or some mathematical property? It's a very cool looking guitar.
I haven't had a chance to play this one, but it looks like he has taken the principles of his earlier 'Ellipse' steel-string and applied them to a classical instrument. The body is a pair of non-parallel ellipses - if you were to draw lines extended from the two pair of foci, those lines would intersect about 18 inches down from the waist. Looking closely, there are small, white dots which outline the other half of each ellipse. The instrument is fan-fretted. The end result is that there's a longer scale length for the bass strings, and more soundboard on the bass side, giving a deeper sound. Fan frets are really interesting to work with, allowing a more efficient use of the left hand. Note that the bridge and the soundhole are at the centre of their respective ellipses, emphasizing the asymmetry.

I'll let you know more when I finally get to play it, probably sometime before the year is out.

The bad news, for me, in all this is that his prices will now go up to reflect the increased value and collectibility of his instruments. That 8- or 9- stringed fan-fretted instrument that I want to commission from him will now have to wait until its cost reflects no more than 30% of my net income from the 'Troubadour' concerts, or until I make so much money in a year that I need the investment to bring my taxes down and/or have so much that I won't notice a guitar that's worth the down-payment on a decent house...
  #1790  
Old 07-16-2011, 02:59 PM
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Aha, I'd forgotten about fan-fretting. That must be so odd to play. And the 'tilted' sound hole makes perfect sense, like the tilted bridge pickup on a strat/tele.

So I've got my Xavier e torn apart, everything unsoldered, ready to shield the control cavity. Aaand the cavity is so rough, particularly on the bottom but also the sides, that my 1" adhesive copper tape won't stick to it, even after liberal hand sanding and blowing out particles with a can of air. It's like trying to tape something to gravel. I'm off to Radio Shack and/or the craft store to find copper foil and some sort of adhesive that I can use to adhere shielding to the cavity.

What the hell is with projects of any sort that require 5 trips to the store? Home maintenance, car repair, guitar wiring -- everything requires 5 trips to the hardware/auto parts/electronic/craft store. [/rant]
  #1791  
Old 07-16-2011, 03:41 PM
E-Sabbath is offline
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That roughness of the cavity is part of the 'yeah, it's cheap' part of a cheap guitar. Either sand like a motherlover or get some spray shielding.

http://www.guitarnuts.com/wiring/shielding/tele.php
This might be helpful. Actually, the whole site might be helpful. May want to read it a bit.
  #1792  
Old 07-16-2011, 05:28 PM
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Yeah, I saw that page, too Sabs. I had hopes of finding copper foil at a craft store like one of that page's contributors, but Michael's only had gold leaf, far too flimsy. The aluminum foil from the grocery store seems too flimsy as well, it tears very easily. I did manage to find some very light sheets of brass at the hardware store, so if I can figure out a way to make a template, I'll cut something the shape of the bottom of the cavity, and leave 1/5" of "tongues" bent from that shape to cover most of the sides. The craft store did have some adhesive that claims if bonds to wood or metal (and other things, of course), so I can adhere that brass to the cavity with it. I think I can just finish with some of the copper tape to go around the sides of the cavity, since it will stick to the brass, then solder all the pieces to each other and to a ground wire.

So, now I have trip-to-the-store #2: it seems that that 4' of shielded wire I bought from RS Guitarworks ("enough for a Les Paul® or 335 style guitar") is about 6" less than I need to go to the switch on the upper bout 3 times. I just pulled out one of the wires (dragging some dental floss along through the wire route, per WordMan) and tripled that length and it seems I need more wire. I don't think anyone sells that sort of wire around here, so I may have to shelve this project until I can get some via mail-order. Criminy.
  #1793  
Old 07-16-2011, 05:57 PM
Le Ministre de l'au-delà is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by squeegee View Post
Aha, I'd forgotten about fan-fretting. That must be so odd to play. And the 'tilted' sound hole makes perfect sense, like the tilted bridge pickup on a strat/tele.
The weirdest thing is when you switch between a fan-fret and a straight-fret instrument. I'm not sure I could use both instruments in the same concert... That's part of why I'm envisioning an instrument so versatile, it could replace the baritone classical and the regular classical, with a floating low 'A' and 'D' string to boot. What the f*ck, dreams are free.

Quote:
What the hell is with projects of any sort that require 5 trips to the store? Home maintenance, car repair, guitar wiring -- everything requires 5 trips to the hardware/auto parts/electronic/craft store. [/rant]
Around here, we measure the difficulty of a DIY project in Angelos, Angelo being the ancient guy at the really good lumber yard who 'retired' 8 years ago and still hangs around there at least 20 hours a week. Angelo is the guy who knows where everything in the store is, knows exactly why two indistinguishable parts are used for two totally different purposes, and asks you what you intend to use the wood for before he'll sell it to you. It's Angelo who can drill 20 perfectly spaced, perpendicular holes in a piece of oak bullnose by eye, but tells you you'd better use the collared spade bits with the spacer template so you don't fuck up a beautiful piece of wood.

Never mind extra trips to the hardware store - a job that's less that one Angelo can be done by any primate with a pulse. Most jobs are at least a one Angelo, if you want to do them right the first time. Two Angelo jobs usually mean you found some iabdfi in there ('if it ain't broke, don't fix it'. I took thirty Goddamn bins of iabdfi out of this house when we did the total reno in 2007...). Jobs of three Angelos or more probably should have been left to a professional, and a ten Angelo job means you haven't even got a corner left to cry in.

Last edited by Le Ministre de l'au-delà; 07-16-2011 at 05:58 PM.
  #1794  
Old 07-16-2011, 08:21 PM
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Yeah, Ministre, it's always been my maxim when going to the hardware store: find the old guy. Don't even bother with someone who's under 60. The Old Guy At The Hardware Store knows how to mend or repair or build or rebuild damn-near everything, and what this part is that fell off my washing machine last spring, how to replace it, where it goes, and how much torque to use if you install it on a Tuesday. Always find the old guy.

Christ, Radio Shack and OSH both had nothing like that braided wire, so I have to mail-order (well, web-order) $5 of braided wire + $10 shipping, and probably get it in 4 days. AND I was going to look for heavier duty aluminum foil at the grocer, so I jotted down stuff we needed that I could also get, then drove to the grocery store and bought the stuff I'd jotted down. And completely forgot about the heavier-duty foil. Drat. Coming up: trip #3.

I really do enjoy doing little projects like this. I just hate the 40 minutes of driving around for every 5 minutes I actually work on the project. I also think that think with parts, gas and what-all else, I'm going to end up spending more than the price of this guitar rewiring it to get rid of some hum. But I kinda figured on that going in.
  #1795  
Old 07-16-2011, 10:10 PM
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Aaa-yep. That's the _best_ thing about Xes. You really have no fear of taking them completely apart. I mean, if this was a Gibson, you'd be all 'oh god I spent seven hundred bucks on this thing.'

I consider this part of the entertainment value of the guitar itself.
  #1796  
Old 07-16-2011, 10:49 PM
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Originally Posted by E-Sabbath View Post
Aaa-yep. That's the _best_ thing about Xes. You really have no fear of taking them completely apart. I mean, if this was a Gibson, you'd be all 'oh god I spent seven hundred bucks on this thing.'

I consider this part of the entertainment value of the guitar itself.
I admit, that was part of the attraction. But now I like that axe; I feel like I've got a wounded friend while its apart. And also some small (probably groundless) fear of the neck changing if it's unstrung for too long. But, yeah, it's fun to have an axe to perform eevil experiments on.
  #1797  
Old 07-17-2011, 12:26 AM
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Oh, no doubt you have a wounded friend. But at least you don't have to worry about him being expensive, just hurt.

Anyhow, guys, you have to check this video out. Ministre especially.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature...&v=TKF6nFzpHBU
Guy stuck his iphone in his guitar and played it. Now, part of the result is because of the shutter effect of the CMOS, but I'm wondering if this could be interesting information anyhow. Take this iphone, record a guitar... maybe you can tell if it's true, maybe... I don't know.
  #1798  
Old 07-17-2011, 09:26 AM
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I have a question regarding Fender Telecasters. Specifically the made in Mèxico model vs the American Standard.

On the guitar forums all over the net the usual reasons given for the price difference are build quality, wood quality and hardware quality.

Knowing something about both hardwoods and woodworking machinery makes me wonder about the first 2 reasons. When it comes to build quality, (and I am talking about the above models not a custom shop guitar) these are built mainly using automated machinery, CNC routers etc. Where would the difference therefore lay? Does Fender lower their quality standard and allow for more mistakes in the Mexican model?

The wood species used in building these guitars is ash or alder for the body and maple for the neck. These woods are all more than likely from the USA or possibly Canada. Does Fender have employees going through stacks of hardwoods selecting out which pieces go to Mèxico and which stay in the USA?

I can see where the hardware can make an obvious difference in the price. Fender installs less expensive pickups and tuners etc. in the MZ models but am not so convinced about the other differences claimed.

Anyone have the straight dope?
  #1799  
Old 07-17-2011, 10:06 AM
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I'm on my smartphone and haven't figured out how to paste a link into a post. There was a thread a few years back that squeegee started about Stratocasters and another about Fender's lines at the time. It covered this territory reasonably well.

Last edited by WordMan; 07-17-2011 at 10:07 AM.
  #1800  
Old 07-17-2011, 11:21 AM
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Anyone know anything about Ukuleles?

The reason I ask is that a few weeks ago, I got tired of my toddler smacking my guitar while I was playing it. So I bought him a ukulele. Something cheap, (about $30) that he could smack, carry around with him, drop, leave outside, etc. Well, I tuned it, and the next thing I know I'm saying to myself "Hey, this is lots of fun!"

I mentioned this story to my cousin, and she said her mom (my aunt) still has my great-grandfather's ukulele. She dug it out of the attic and sent it to me. She said it looked to be in good shape, but it has no strings. Supposedly it still has Bumpy's felt pick in it.

I'm now waiting for Bumpy's ukulele to arrive. I have no idea what kind of ukulele is it, or who the manufacturer will be, or really, what the exact condition it will arrive in.

What should I do first? Should I take it to my local music store and see if they can give it a tune up and cleaning? What kind of strings do I need? I'm not even sure how to re-string it, although I assume it's a lot like a classical guitar. How often should I re-string it?

I'll take some pics and post them when it arrives. If it's a decent instrument, I plan to pass it along to my son someday, and he'll be able to play his Great-Great-Grandfather's ukulele. How cool is that?
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