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  #501  
Old 06-06-2010, 05:00 PM
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Originally Posted by SteveG1 View Post
I could easily unsolder each of the pots and measure across the outer terminals to get the value (thereby avoiding the issue of good/bad/stuck wipers.
Ah, good point. I'd forgotten that can just stick an ohm meter on the outer connectors to get max resistance.
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I checked the Carvin site (no help of course), but in the forums, it seems people using other models found their pots were linear. I would prefer to have the correct taper, but if push comes to shove, parts is parts.
This has come up before. Based on that post, you may want a log pot for the master volume (and gain?), if nothing else.
  #502  
Old 06-06-2010, 05:20 PM
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Ah, good point. I'd forgotten that can just stick an ohm meter on the outer connectors to get max resistance.
This has come up before. Based on that post, you may want a log pot for the master volume (and gain?), if nothing else.
Thanks for the link to the other thread. I think then, that even if the original volume pots do turn out to be linear, an audio taper may be a better choice. The amp is supposedly rated as 250W. I sure don't want the problem of having to choose between "off" and "full blast" when I go from a setting of 0 to 2.

As to the bass and treble controls, I may have to take measurements at off, full, and half settings to see if they are linear or not. I will probably order a schematic online, but right now I'm chafing at the 20$ price. It's not exactly a complicated thing, so I am still thinking "wtf. 20 bucks for what's most likely a reprint schematic that is probably only one sheet?"
  #503  
Old 06-06-2010, 06:45 PM
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Once again, guys, that $200 Rondo seems to have a good reputation. You really might consider it.
  #504  
Old 06-06-2010, 07:16 PM
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Originally Posted by E-Sabbath View Post
Once again, guys, that $200 Rondo seems to have a good reputation. You really might consider it.
Are they mail-order only? GC doesn't seem to carry them (or at least I can't find it on the site -- if I search for "rondo", the search engine gives me 90 hits on "round" ). Buying a guitar by mail order isn't going to work for me -- I won't buy a guitar I haven't played, so I avoid mail-order-only brands (e.g. Carvin). I'm sure its a nice guitar, but I gotta follow my gut.
  #505  
Old 06-06-2010, 07:23 PM
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Originally Posted by Le Ministre de l'au-delà View Post
Most guitar shops I've been to have been entirely honest about whether it is or isn't a solid top - that's a pretty big point for most folks.
That does seem to be the case. First thing on the feature-lists I see online is what kind of wood and if it's a "solid"-top. Although "solid" seems like a spongy word -- plywood is "solid", isn't it? It's not a gas, liquid, plasma or Bose–Einstein condensate, so it's solid! But it seems like "solid" means "not-plywood" in those descriptions, I guess.
  #506  
Old 06-07-2010, 04:53 AM
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They are mail order only.
  #507  
Old 06-07-2010, 06:19 AM
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you guys have have been busy...a few thoughts:

- SteveG1 - my two recommendations: look for the amp's schematics on line and call Carvin. I suspect that at Carvin's website or at an unaffiliated fan site there are amp circuits and discussions about the pots and other components - such is the web. And if not, Carvin is a direct-to-consumer business, so they must have to deal with service issues like yours and may even sell replacement components - or can point you in the direction of places that do. Do some research.

- squeegee - it sounds like your mindset is right: get a decent inexpensive acoustic and start working your way up if you get traction with it. I have played Seagulls and like them; same with Takamines. Nothing substitutes giving a few a test drive.

- Tele with .11's - yeah, they're not nearly as scary as folks think they are, especially if you tune down a bit. I like both the tone I get and the resistance they provide when I am plucking with my middle and ring fingers along with flat-picking. Doing something like Cold Shot by SRV with the sharp note attack and his unique Texas shuffle is much easier on a heavier gauge.

- Solid tops - yeah, for the most part, they matter - or at least have become a code word for better quality. What's funny is that the boutique luthiers now offer "double-tops" - two laters of super-highly-desirable top material, like "sinker redwood" (i.e., wood harvested from old logs found in an old shipwreck in a lake somewhere) with a special polymer web material in between - they are all the rage. And a form of sophisticated plywood.

Last edited by WordMan; 06-07-2010 at 06:22 AM.
  #508  
Old 06-07-2010, 11:55 AM
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Originally Posted by WordMan View Post
you guys have have been busy...a few thoughts:

- SteveG1 - my two recommendations: look for the amp's schematics on line and call Carvin. I suspect that at Carvin's website or at an unaffiliated fan site there are amp circuits a...
After several days of searching, I found it. Needless to say, I downloaded it so I won't have to hunt again, and I will be keeping a blown up copy (in a protective envelope) inside the amp cabinet from now on.
Now that I know the part values, it's gonna be easy
  #509  
Old 06-07-2010, 04:47 PM
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After several days of searching, I found it. Needless to say, I downloaded it so I won't have to hunt again, and I will be keeping a blown up copy (in a protective envelope) inside the amp cabinet from now on.
Now that I know the part values, it's gonna be easy
So were the pots log or linear?
  #510  
Old 06-07-2010, 07:47 PM
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So were the pots log or linear?
The diagram doesn't indicate which, so I'm gonna get audio/log taper for the volumes, and linear for all the others - bass, treble, reverb, tremolo.
  #511  
Old 06-08-2010, 11:25 AM
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Tubes


I was wondering what kind of life I can expect out of the tubes in my Blues Junior. Is it a function of the number of hours they've been powered up, or how much you drive them, or on/off cycles, or ...?

I've left the amp on overnight accidentally a few times, I assume this takes away some of their lifetime, although they were just idling. It sounds like one of them is going a little microphonic; I've gotten some odd whistle/squeel a few times but it went away almost immediately. I have not yet popped the cabinet cover and tapped the preamp tubes to see which one it is getting flakey.
  #512  
Old 06-08-2010, 11:56 AM
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Originally Posted by squeegee
I've left the amp on overnight accidentally a few times, I assume this takes away some of their lifetime, although they were just idling.
The valves, sorry, tubes mainly get stressed by heating/cooling so leaving them on is good for lifetime, not so good for you electic bill. Bigger amps have a 'standby' setting where the high-tension voltage is off but the heaters are left on. So you're not stressing the valves* in between sets/takes whatever if you'd otherwise be powering down.

In my experience they last pretty much for ever, certainly years and years, though their performance probably suffers with age. In thirty years I've had maybe three or four preamp valves go microphonic (though they still worked) burned out a couple of EL84s and never had an EL34 fail.



* sorry I just can't write 'tubes' in this context. Toothpaste come in tubes.
  #513  
Old 06-08-2010, 02:13 PM
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The valves, sorry, tubes mainly get stressed by heating/cooling so leaving them on is good for lifetime, not so good for you electic bill.
Ah, that's good to know. So when I turn the thing on for a few minutes to practice, then shutdown, that's the same tube-wear is a leaving it on for hours more, and again shutting it down. Huh, good to know.

Quote:
In my experience they last pretty much for ever, certainly years and years, though their performance probably suffers with age. In thirty years I've had maybe three or four preamp valves go microphonic (though they still worked) burned out a couple of EL84s and never had an EL34 fail.
Yeah, that was my feeling, too, until the amp got that little squeel. FWIW, the amp in question, a Blues Junior NOS, was a GC demo unit before I bought a few months ago, so it's likely gone through many tube power cycles.


Quote:
* sorry I just can't write 'tubes' in this context. Toothpaste come in tubes.
Yeah, but "valves" are for plumbing or car engines. Let's fix this with a different word for these things. How about a portmanteau of the two words: "talves", or "vubes"? Or howzabout "amp-bulbs" ? I like that one.
  #514  
Old 06-08-2010, 04:41 PM
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Once again, guys, that $200 Rondo seems to have a good reputation. You really might consider it.
If that isn't "rich" enough, take a look at this. Warning... try not to spit cooffee, beer, or soda all over your keyboard

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll...m=370388299222
  #515  
Old 06-08-2010, 05:05 PM
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Yeah, but "valves" are for plumbing or car engines. Let's fix this with a different word for these things. How about a portmanteau of the two words: "talves", or "vubes"? Or howzabout "amp-bulbs" ? I like that one.
"Lampes" are what those are called in French, though in Québec they're referred to as "Bulbes" - just to add some more confusion to the mix...

Last edited by Le Ministre de l'au-delà; 06-08-2010 at 05:09 PM.
  #516  
Old 06-08-2010, 06:12 PM
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If that isn't "rich" enough, take a look at this. Warning... try not to spit cooffee, beer, or soda all over your keyboard

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll...m=370388299222
How about drool? Oh, god. All original. First month. 1954 Stratocaster. I was expecting some blinged out acoustic.

Last edited by E-Sabbath; 06-08-2010 at 06:13 PM.
  #517  
Old 06-08-2010, 08:48 PM
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"Lampes" are what those are called in French, though in Québec they're referred to as "Bulbes" - just to add some more confusion to the mix...
Okay, I guess it's hopeless to get everyone on the same page then. Too bad, I like the fr "Lamp" term, because that's what tubes/valves/bulbes look like, little lamps.

I have to admit to some minor GAS over the tube question. I was perusing the Eurotube site, and GASing over a set of Fender Blues Jr High gain option lampe/bulbe/valve/tubes. But I can overdrive the amp with a broad selection of pedals, so it's not a burning issue really, at least until that microphonic tube gets too annoying.
  #518  
Old 06-08-2010, 10:01 PM
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You want some GAS? I'll GIVE you GAS.
http://chrisguitars.com/
This guy sells used stuff. But he's really reputable, and he describes things pretty well.

But that's not the most interesting thing I've found. I found this store on ebay that sells stickers.

for your neck. And for your body, for like fake cutaways.

Apparently, they're so thin they don't bother anything.
http://stores.ebay.com/Jockomo-Inlay...s__W0QQ_sasiZ1
Including, say, some Rosewood colored ones, so you can hide your inlay dots. Or some other interesting patterns.
  #519  
Old 06-09-2010, 09:19 AM
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You want some GAS? I'll GIVE you GAS.
http://chrisguitars.com/
This guy sells used stuff. But he's really reputable, and he describes things pretty well.
minor hijack, but Chris needs a web site overhaul... my eyes are burning from the yellow-on-purple design...
  #520  
Old 06-09-2010, 10:08 AM
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You want some GAS? I'll GIVE you GAS.
http://chrisguitars.com/
This guy sells used stuff. But he's really reputable, and he describes things pretty well.
I bookmarked that site... That guy charges fair prices, much better prices than I've seen elsewhere.
  #521  
Old 06-09-2010, 10:21 AM
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If that isn't "rich" enough, take a look at this. Warning... try not to spit cooffee, beer, or soda all over your keyboard

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll...m=370388299222
One of those guitars that makes me say Wow even while I am glad I can't afford it. It is so minty sweet that one really shouldn't play it - I had a 1955 Gretsch like that and really couldn't afford to use it like the tool it needs to be. I have played a '54 Strat - as I have commented on here before - wonderful guitar; best Strat I've played, but different from what is considered a "typical" Strat tone...

As for tubes - Small Clanger nailed my basic understanding, and he understands more of the underlying electronics stuff than I do. I can say that an expert I spoke with - he runs one of the best high-end amp shops in the country - told me that pre-amp tubes can last 10+ years with no problems given the level of signal they process and heat they produce. The "rule of thumb" is that power tubes should be swapped out once a year if you are actively gigging, but I don't know of anyone who really adheres to that. I haven't swapped out any tubes in my amps and haven't had any problems - but I transport them carefully; no bouncing around in the back of a van.

I can't type long, but I continue to enjoy my new overdrive box, so I am comfortable writing it up - might as well give a snippet here. I got a Blackstone Mosfet Overdrive (link to their webpage). They retail for ~$225; I found a used one on eBay for ~$150. I ended up getting it because: a) everybody discussed how touch-responsive it was and how it was a great "always on" pedal; and b) it has two channels, one more overdrivey and one more distortion-y, so I felt like I could cover my existing Rat (distortion) spectrum while getting a better feel for overdrive. Here is a review by one of the founders of the Gear Page - doesn't get much better.

Well, I love it, but not for the reasons I expected. When they said "touch responsive," I was assuming they meant it would react when you changed your pick attack and intensity - and sure it does; but lots of good crunch pedals do this; it is something I love about my 30-year-old Rat. But, in addition, when this pedal is plugged first in your chain after your guitar (pedal order really matters for this box), it just opens up. In the OD channel, the spectrum as you turn your Volume knob on your guitar from about 7 to 10 transforms - at around 7 you get the solid crunch tone you want for classic rock rhythm, but the levels of musical overdrive lead tone you get beyond that are game-changing. Full, round, not buzzy or out-of-control noise, you get a really easy to control level of feedback that sounds warm and musical, not strident. I can dial it up to 10 for dedicated leads, or find a sweet spot between 7 and 10 (yes, twiddling the knobs like BB King does during a song) when I am flowing between a rhythm groove and lead fills. And it really is an always-on pedal - it doesn't feel like a pedal; it feels like I have an excellent old 60's Marshall amp that I am playing through at a manageable volume. Really, really inspiring - I have been digging into Keef lately since I have been listening to the recently re-issued Exile on Main Street re-master and a concert from '73 that a buddy sent to me. Playing Tumbling Dice, Happy, Can't You Hear me Knockin', etc - just so fun.

What's interesting is that the distortion channel is one I haven't been using - I tried it with my homebrew Blackguard Tele and it wasn't a good fit. It is a great fit, however, with P-90's and humbuckers; I tried out my guitars with those pickups and adjusted the setting and got a tone I really like. But I am concentrating on one guitar right now so I can get a feel for the pedal and not be tossed around by different impressions - and what is interesting is that I am hearing the difference between distortion and overdrive as effects - my Rat, the best box I have used, has an edgier high-end, I suspect as the result of its true Distortion circuit doing more "hard clipping" of the signal, cutting off some frequencies. An Overdrive circuit is designed for "soft clipping" leaving a different signal profile - I think that is why the fully-dimed Volume sounds so rich.

Gotta run - but a lot of fun...and I agree with SteveG1 - Chris has got to update his site; too hard to read.

Last edited by WordMan; 06-09-2010 at 10:22 AM.
  #522  
Old 06-09-2010, 10:25 AM
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Yes, the design is horrible, but those look like guitars sold by someone who knows what he's talking about. And the reputation matches.

Whadda think of those stickers? It strikes me as a not-horrible way to visually separate my cheapocaster from the five million identical ones. (I think when I do the electronics, I'll go for black pickups in a white plate, guitar itself is black.)

Edit: My stupid trick on a hard to read site? Ctrl+a to select everything, and presto, inverted text. Much easier to read.

Last edited by E-Sabbath; 06-09-2010 at 10:27 AM.
  #523  
Old 06-09-2010, 10:28 AM
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I am not a big guy for fingerboard fanciness - I like a rosewood board, dot inlays, no binding. No nonsense. I hate non-standard inlays, like someone's name or a dragon fighting an eagle - just

If you go to The Gear Page, you can search on "stickers" and read up - here's a sample thread: http://www.thegearpage.net/board/sho...light=stickers
  #524  
Old 06-09-2010, 11:13 AM
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Thanks. I was thinking going for maybe the playing card motif. Simple, just a little different: spades, clubs, diamonds, hearts, over the existing pips. Also maybe "This Machine Kills Ignorance."

Honestly, what got me started poking about was that I'm really thinking about getting a real Les Paul, a nice one... except I can't stand that bar inlay. And then I noticed that the stickers also come in rosewood, for covering up inlays, for what's his name who wanted a blank fingerboard.

Last edited by E-Sabbath; 06-09-2010 at 11:15 AM.
  #525  
Old 06-09-2010, 11:40 AM
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Thanks. I was thinking going for maybe the playing card motif. Simple, just a little different: spades, clubs, diamonds, hearts, over the existing pips. Also maybe "This Machine Kills Ignorance."

Honestly, what got me started poking about was that I'm really thinking about getting a real Les Paul, a nice one... except I can't stand that bar inlay. And then I noticed that the stickers also come in rosewood, for covering up inlays, for what's his name who wanted a blank fingerboard.
Shouldn't it be "this machine FIGHTS ignorance" like a true Doper?

You know, I have gotten so accustomed to the trapezoidal inlays on a Les Paul Standard that I tend not to notice 'em. Same with Gretsch thumbprint inlays - I just see these as "branded variants" of dots - kinda like brands that make sure they have a unique headstock shape - as long as the shape doesn't get over-the-top or a distraction, I am basically fine.

There is a classic Fender lap steel inlay layout that includes card suits - GE Smith, the guitarist who led the SNL band for years, toured with a ton of top acts, etc., used that motif on his Signature Tele which came out a year or two ago...link to youtube demo vid featuring the man himself...
  #526  
Old 06-09-2010, 02:29 PM
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Mmm. If I went too far away from the classic Guthrie reference, people might not get it. (It was also repeated in an author I rather like, Charles Stross' novels, as 'This Machine Kills Demons')

Actually, I am, for no obvious reason, really attracted to a Space Invaders motif the man had in the store. They're still dots, so the 'not too fancy' still works for me.

Speakin' of Woody, if anyone's in the New York area...
http://www.clearwaterfestival.org/
STEVE EARLE SHAWN COLVIN DAVID BROMBERG QUARTET PETE SEEGER JOAN OSBORNE BUCKWHEAT ZYDECO

And a _lot_ more. 19th and 20th. I love me some Buckwheat Zydeco.
  #527  
Old 06-09-2010, 09:50 PM
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I have played a '54 Strat - as I have commented on here before - wonderful guitar; best Strat I've played, but different from what is considered a "typical" Strat tone...
I'm curious about this. It's a beautiful guitar, no question about it, but I wonder how different it sounds and feels from modern Stratocasters.

I've owned three Strats in my life. The first was a mid-70s guitar, bought new, when I was in high school. Maple neck. I wasn't enough of a player back then to really get the most out of it, and I don't remember much about it, except that there were some obviously quality-control issues. Neck problems, finish problems. I remember that the finish on the neck made it feel like it was dipped in plastic. I'm sort of amused by the prices Strats from that era command now -- back then, CBS Strats were kind of looked down upon.

At some point in the late 80s I got one of those reissue Strats. Nice guitar. Maple neck. It played well and sounded great.

Then, in 2001, I bought an American Standard Strat. Also a nice guitar. Rosewood fingerboard. Easier to play than the reissue. The neck radius was different and the frets were different. The bridge/tremelo unit definitely worked better.

Of the three, I liked the Standard the best. Great sound, great feel, and excellent quality control.

Would I notice much of a difference between the '54 and the reissue? Or the '54 and the Standard (aside from neck feel)? Would I really be blown away by it? Are the prices commanded by these vintage guitars only based on their historical interest and value to collectors, or do they really sound better than current models? Does the current "reissue" model really sound just like a 50s Strat? And, parenthetically, what about Telecasters (which I actually prefer to Stratocasters)?
  #528  
Old 06-09-2010, 10:11 PM
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Sorry Saint, with all the different models and variations and signature/deluxplayer/notdeluxe/hot/cold/limited/not limited/HSS/Highway/notHighway/clapton/SRV, it's gotten too much for me to keep track of. Too many variations.

I'd probably try for an early 80s "made in Japan" if I was gonna get any. Anything from Japan that is "after CBS". Pre CBS probably is too costly anymore for many people.

Although for a little while I did have a CBS mid 70s Strat that was not bad at all. I guess the CBS suits forgot to fuck that one up
  #529  
Old 06-09-2010, 11:30 PM
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As for tubes - Small Clanger nailed my basic understanding, and he understands more of the underlying electronics stuff than I do. I can say that an expert I spoke with - he runs one of the best high-end amp shops in the country - told me that pre-amp tubes can last 10+ years with no problems given the level of signal they process and heat they produce. The "rule of thumb" is that power tubes should be swapped out once a year if you are actively gigging, but I don't know of anyone who really adheres to that. I haven't swapped out any tubes in my amps and haven't had any problems - but I transport them carefully; no bouncing around in the back of a van.
Thanks, that's all good to know. I remember some players get obsessive about getting the right set of tubes/valves, and there seems to be a lot of voodoo out there about them. It's nice to know that they're probably a set-and-forget part of the amp.

Quote:
And it really is an always-on pedal - it doesn't feel like a pedal; it feels like I have an excellent old 60's Marshall amp that I am playing through at a manageable volume.
Can I ask, with that pedal, how are you setting your amp up and what is it contributing to the tone? You used to (I think) set your amp up with a bit of overdrive, then add the rat and control everything from the guitar, which it sounds like you're also doing here. Is the amp still adding some warmth, or is it straight-on clean using the new OD pedal? How/what does the amp contribute in the new setup? If you ran straight from the new pedal to the mixing board, what would you lose? For that matter, what amp are you using?
  #530  
Old 06-10-2010, 05:07 AM
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Well, the big news today is Rock Band 3. It'll have a Professional Mode. Where you play a Squier Stratocaster with a touch-sensitive neck. Basically, it looks like the game turns into Tab Band, with numbers floating down the 'lane'.

And yes, I mean a real Fender Squier Stratocaster with strings and everything.
  #531  
Old 06-10-2010, 06:58 AM
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Would I notice much of a difference between the '54 and the reissue? Or the '54 and the Standard (aside from neck feel)? Would I really be blown away by it? Are the prices commanded by these vintage guitars only based on their historical interest and value to collectors, or do they really sound better than current models? Does the current "reissue" model really sound just like a 50s Strat? And, parenthetically, what about Telecasters (which I actually prefer to Stratocasters)?
Okay - let's see if I can get this right.

Here is a thread on the Dope about this topic. It is supposed to connect to a thread on The Gear Page - but doesn't any more for some reason.

Here is a new link to the thread in The Gear Page. Not much to add, except maybe: isn't the internet freakin' cool? Not only can we have this kind of conversation, but when you ask "how *do* the older Strats sound?" there's a vertical tasting through the years we can access on the fly. Crazy world.


Quote:
Originally Posted by squeegee
Can I ask, with that pedal, how are you setting your amp up and what is it contributing to the tone? You used to (I think) set your amp up with a bit of overdrive, then add the rat and control everything from the guitar, which it sounds like you're also doing here. Is the amp still adding some warmth, or is it straight-on clean using the new OD pedal? How/what does the amp contribute in the new setup? If you ran straight from the new pedal to the mixing board, what would you lose? For that matter, what amp are you using?
- Tweed Deluxes are funny beasts; they have two inputs: one Bright and one Dark, but they blend, so you can dial up the Volumes of each and adjust the amp's tone that way. I have both set to about 6-7; Tweed circuits (mine is the infamous 5E3 Deluxe circuit, the VW Bug of classic circuits, with full websites devoted to it's glory) are never particularly clean to begin with - my settings adds a bit more fuzz to that without getting farty. Your BJ is not the same circuit, but it is its own form of simple-circuit amp, based on EL84 tubes vs. the more primitive, earlier-gen 6V6 tubes in my Tweed.
- The amp totally matters - I am not sure I am up to the task of articulating how. A good tube amp is the responsive "organ" - you remember that thread about tubes vs. transister amps - the point is that you try to dial up the amp's threshold and use the dynamics of your playing to staying on the relative clean side of the threshold or to push into the distorted side. Tweeds do this really well - they have a simple circuit that is very responsive to changes in your playing. Well, any pedal you use sits "on top" of that fundamentally useful signal, so you increase the likelihood that the pedal will have increased responsiveness, too. So when an amp is described as "pedal friendly" that is a big part of what is being discussed - can the amp's responsiveness make the pedal feel more organic?
- Granted, many pedals fully impose themselves on the signal, so your amp type doesn't matter - if anything you should go for a flat, clean tone for those pedals.
- But many/most pedals are specifically designed only be a layer that sits on top of the amp's characteristics. Finding that balance is why there are bazillions of pedals out there - everybody's ears are different.
- One other point - in terms of going direct into a board - that is a key difference, according to my book on pedals by Dave Hunter - between overdrive and distortion circuits. Distortion circuits apparently impose themselves enough on the signal to have a chance of sounding decent if you went direct. Overdrives are meant to act on the amp circuit and are more unlikely to sound usable going direct. I get this and also find it intersting - my set up for the Rat (considered the first commercially successful true distortion pedal - MXR Distortion +'s are actually overdrives) when I am using it is that the Distortion setting is dialed down as low as possible without affecting volume - maybe at .5 or 1 - and all of the tone I am after is by turning the Level control to 10 - it just pumps more signal into the amp, with enough edge from the distortion to give it a bit...more.

Does that help?

Last edited by WordMan; 06-10-2010 at 07:01 AM.
  #532  
Old 06-10-2010, 11:23 AM
WordMan is offline
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FYI - Gibson has put out a list of the Top 50 Guitarists here.

The Top 20 -

Quote:
From: Gibson.com’s Top 50 Guitarists of All Time
1. Jimi Hendrix
2. Jimmy Page
3. Keith Richards
4. Eric Clapton
5. Chuck Berry
6. Jeff Beck
7. Eddie Van Halen
8. Chet Atkins
9. Robert Johnson
10. Pete Townshend
11. George Harrison
12. Stevie Ray Vaughan
13. Jack White
14. Prince
15. Steve Cropper
16. Mike Bloomfield
17. B.B. King
18. Wes Montgomery
19. Mick Ronson
20. Django Reinhardt
I place no stock in these lists - they are merely an excuse to discuss interesting guitar players - so I am not going to launch into a mouth-foaming attack because X is in the wrong spot or Y is rated too high. I like the fact that Keith Richards is: a) ranked so high; and b) ahead of Clapton - but not for any defensible reason.

Enjoy.
  #533  
Old 06-10-2010, 12:02 PM
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38. Lou Reed

39. Frank Zappa

40. Steve Jones

41. David Gilmour

. . . maybe they could have catagorised somehow, anyhow. Set some criteria? Had some sub-grouping? These guys really don't belong together, definitely not in close proximity. Calling Lou Reed a "guitarist" in a list that includes Hendrix, Django Reinhardt and Les Paul is just sort of. . . wrong.

My browser at the gibson.com site is saying:

Done, but with errors on page.

Can't argue with that.
  #534  
Old 06-10-2010, 12:31 PM
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Clapton is AHEAD of Robert Johnson? That's just wrong.
  #535  
Old 06-10-2010, 12:37 PM
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Originally Posted by E-Sabbath View Post
Clapton is AHEAD of Robert Johnson? That's just wrong.
Well, along the same lines, Keef is ahead of Chuck Berry which would be similarly back-asswards...
  #536  
Old 06-10-2010, 01:47 PM
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So yesterday afternoon, I sat down with my father's acoustic--an early(?) 60s Gibson LG-1--and picked out the intro to Stairway to Heaven, which is what I'm working on at the moment. And then I did a little more with the basic little strummy part from the same song, and then a bit of Pink Floyd's "Wish You Were Here."* Such is my repertoire.

And this feeling came over me--a feeling of wanting to go get myself an acoustic guitar. A feeling like I needed to have an acoustic guitar, in fact. What is this strange sensation? No one told me about this when I decided I was going to learn guitar. Is there some remedy for it?

* Incidentally, how do you guys keep your little and ring fingers from getting sort of... smooshed together in a bad way on this 'cheater' G chord? I guess you could just bar the first and second strings instead of using two fingers, but that felt pretty awkward when I tried it.

Last edited by LawMonkey; 06-10-2010 at 01:50 PM.
  #537  
Old 06-10-2010, 02:08 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LawMonkey View Post
And this feeling came over me--a feeling of wanting to go get myself an acoustic guitar. A feeling like I needed to have an acoustic guitar, in fact. What is this strange sensation? No one told me about this when I decided I was going to learn guitar. Is there some remedy for it?
No - you have G.A.S. (Guitar/Gear Acquisition Syndrome) and there is no cure - except more gear. It ain't pretty. The more you realize how a cool new (to you) guitar or piece of gear can affect/inspire your playing, the more you just need "one more thing" to chase the dragon and get another fix of inspiration.

Not to mention that, IMHO, everyone should have a decent acoustic in their guitarsenal (my favorite stupid word!). The more fluent you get on acoustic the better it serves your electric playing. Acoustic is kinda like learning to drive with a stick shift, even though you will end up doing much of your driving in an automatic - it somehow just grounds you in the fundamentals that much more.

Quote:
So yesterday afternoon, I sat down with my father's acoustic--an early(?) 60s Gibson LG-1--and picked out the intro to Stairway to Heaven, which is what I'm working on at the moment. And then I did a little more with the basic little strummy part from the same song, and then a bit of Pink Floyd's "Wish You Were Here."* Such is my repertoire.
Fun guitar - I have a 1946 LG-2. The biggest difference is that an LG-1 is "ladder braced" - i.e., more primitive and more likely to sound like an old blues guitar; whereas my LG-2 is "X braced" like most full-sized acoustic guitars. Your dad's guitar has some collectibility and value - and while it sounds nothing like a Martin or Taylor, those little Gibsons have quite a following for those in the know. Any chance you could just use it for your acoustic for now?

Quote:
Incidentally, how do you guys keep your little and ring fingers from getting sort of... smooshed together in a bad way on this 'cheater' G chord? I guess you could just bar the first and second strings instead of using two fingers, but that felt pretty awkward when I tried it.
eh - just keep faking along; over time it will come together. I struggled mightily with my various G's over the first 5 - 7 years of playing; now I can grab an open-chord G about 4 - 5 different ways with equal proficiency. Sounds like you are doing the right stuff...
  #538  
Old 06-10-2010, 06:45 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Saintly Loser View Post
The first was a mid-70s guitar, bought new, when I was in high school. Maple neck. I wasn't enough of a player back then to really get the most out of it, and I don't remember much about it, except that there were some obviously quality-control issues. Neck problems, finish problems. I remember that the finish on the neck made it feel like it was dipped in plastic. I'm sort of amused by the prices Strats from that era command now -- back then, CBS Strats were kind of looked down upon.
I noticed, they seem to be going for some STUPID prices right now, all things considered.
  #539  
Old 06-11-2010, 12:08 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WordMan View Post
- Tweed Deluxes are funny beasts; they have two inputs: one Bright and one Dark, but they blend, so you can dial up the Volumes of each and adjust the amp's tone that way. I have both set to about 6-7; Tweed circuits (mine is the infamous 5E3 Deluxe circuit, the VW Bug of classic circuits, with full websites devoted to it's glory) are never particularly clean to begin with - my settings adds a bit more fuzz to that without getting farty. Your BJ is not the same circuit, but it is its own form of simple-circuit amp, based on EL84 tubes vs. the more primitive, earlier-gen 6V6 tubes in my Tweed.
- The amp totally matters - I am not sure I am up to the task of articulating how. A good tube amp is the responsive "organ" - you remember that thread about tubes vs. transister amps - the point is that you try to dial up the amp's threshold and use the dynamics of your playing to staying on the relative clean side of the threshold or to push into the distorted side. Tweeds do this really well - they have a simple circuit that is very responsive to changes in your playing. Well, any pedal you use sits "on top" of that fundamentally useful signal, so you increase the likelihood that the pedal will have increased responsiveness, too. So when an amp is described as "pedal friendly" that is a big part of what is being discussed - can the amp's responsiveness make the pedal feel more organic?
- Granted, many pedals fully impose themselves on the signal, so your amp type doesn't matter - if anything you should go for a flat, clean tone for those pedals.
- But many/most pedals are specifically designed only be a layer that sits on top of the amp's characteristics. Finding that balance is why there are bazillions of pedals out there - everybody's ears are different.
- One other point - in terms of going direct into a board - that is a key difference, according to my book on pedals by Dave Hunter - between overdrive and distortion circuits. Distortion circuits apparently impose themselves enough on the signal to have a chance of sounding decent if you went direct. Overdrives are meant to act on the amp circuit and are more unlikely to sound usable going direct. I get this and also find it intersting - my set up for the Rat (considered the first commercially successful true distortion pedal - MXR Distortion +'s are actually overdrives) when I am using it is that the Distortion setting is dialed down as low as possible without affecting volume - maybe at .5 or 1 - and all of the tone I am after is by turning the Level control to 10 - it just pumps more signal into the amp, with enough edge from the distortion to give it a bit...more.

Does that help?
Thanks, that's really useful. I think I didn't state my question very well. I do understand what the amp adds. It's just that in your old setup you'd use a RAT (set really clean but really boosted) to 'push' your amp's preamp, and the rest of the tone came from the amp. So, given that, I wondered in the new setup if or how you set the amp differently compared to RAT-usage.

Basically I was going by this suggestion on your new pedal mfr's site:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blackstone Appliances
The Mosfet Overdrive is designed to provide these sought-after distortion characteristics entirely on its own. It is not a "boost" pedal meant to cause distortion to occur in your amp. The ideal amp to use with it is the one that best gets the clean sound that you like. The Blackstone will take it from there.
It sounds like this is not the approach you're using, because you say
Quote:
Originally Posted by WordMan
Granted, many pedals fully impose themselves on the signal, so your amp type doesn't matter - if anything you should go for a flat, clean tone for those pedals
I think you're trying to say some pedals do this, but not this one? The Blackstone folks feel that the Mosfet is entirely in that category of pedals, which I think is contra to how you use it, but I'm not sure. Hence my question: are you still using the pedal to push the preamp, not delegating (much) tone to the pedal, or following the BlackStone folks positioning that the pedal is primarily the sole tone-maker? I think the answer is the former, that you're still using the pedal as an overdrive of sorts, not as the whole tone enchilada. Is that a fair summary?
  #540  
Old 06-11-2010, 06:17 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by squeegee View Post
Thanks, that's really useful. I think I didn't state my question very well. I do understand what the amp adds. It's just that in your old setup you'd use a RAT (set really clean but really boosted) to 'push' your amp's preamp, and the rest of the tone came from the amp. So, given that, I wondered in the new setup if or how you set the amp differently compared to RAT-usage.

Basically I was going by this suggestion on your new pedal mfr's site:It sounds like this is not the approach you're using, because you sayI think you're trying to say some pedals do this, but not this one? The Blackstone folks feel that the Mosfet is entirely in that category of pedals, which I think is contra to how you use it, but I'm not sure. Hence my question: are you still using the pedal to push the preamp, not delegating (much) tone to the pedal, or following the BlackStone folks positioning that the pedal is primarily the sole tone-maker? I think the answer is the former, that you're still using the pedal as an overdrive of sorts, not as the whole tone enchilada. Is that a fair summary?
Yes. I hear what Blackstone is saying on their website, but it is not like you would want to pump the Blackstone direct into a board - you need the "organ" responsive part of the amp. I have the level of the pedal maxed and it does add appreciably to the loudness of the amp, so I am definitely pumping up the signal a bit - there is amp grit in my basic signal since I am just on the sweet spot, and the level boost would add to that. Not sure what else I can add. I will say this - with my Rat, which, as a distortion, even at the absolute lowest setting, imposes itself on the tone a lot. When I play it through a little bullshit amp like a $100 Guitar Center starter, it still sounds pretty damn good. But there is something about a Tweed amp that is the DNA of rock - rides that line between rockabilly and hard rock and with the right pedal, shows how its circuit is what Marshall based his original copycat amps on.
  #541  
Old 06-11-2010, 11:22 AM
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I'm thinking about going out and getting one of these today:

http://www.fulltone.com/fd2.asp

You got any experience with them, Wordman?

I've just joined a new band - my first band in a while - and I'm revamping my pedal board a bit. I was using a Marshall Bluesbreaker II for OD and Boost, but it's just not doing it for me anymore. This is my current signal path:

Guitar --> Wah --> BluesBreaker --> Boss CS-3 Compressor --> Boss TU-2 Tuner --> Amp (Egnater Tweaker head)

I'm a little worried that the boost on the fulldrive doesn't work unless the OD is on, which means I'd have to get a separate boost for my clean channel, but I think I can work around that...
  #542  
Old 06-11-2010, 11:49 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BigShooter View Post
I'm thinking about going out and getting one of these today:

http://www.fulltone.com/fd2.asp

You got any experience with them, Wordman?

I've just joined a new band - my first band in a while - and I'm revamping my pedal board a bit. I was using a Marshall Bluesbreaker II for OD and Boost, but it's just not doing it for me anymore. This is my current signal path:

Guitar --> Wah --> BluesBreaker --> Boss CS-3 Compressor --> Boss TU-2 Tuner --> Amp (Egnater Tweaker head)

I'm a little worried that the boost on the fulldrive doesn't work unless the OD is on, which means I'd have to get a separate boost for my clean channel, but I think I can work around that...
I haven't lived with one, but I circled them for about a year, so got a pretty good sense for them. To my knowledge they have a solid clean boost as well as a crunch - that is what makes them a "Fulldrive 2" - they have, in effect, two channels.

It is pretty funny - squeegee and I have been talking back-channel after I posted about the Blackstone - he was looking for both clean boost and OD and I ended up suggesting he check out an FD2 - squeegee, hope it is okay if I quote from my email reply back to you...note that he mentions a track by Jonny Lang as illustrative of the tone he is looking for:

Quote:
I am not in a position where I can go back and listen critically to Lang and tell you what I hear - my office speakers are not that good. What I can say is that it sounds like you are describing a basic clean boost - i.e., not a distortion and not even an overdrive, but a pedal that acts like an up-front additional pre-amp boost stage. The most "revered" one is the Klon Centaur - they go for hundreds and the maker coats the circuit in epoxy so no one knows its secret .

But there is a maker called Fulltone that has the Fulldrive 2 - a pedal that when through a massive wave of geek popularity a couple-few years ago and it still being discussed and so seems to have endured. It has both a clean boost and a crunchy - so you can get a clean-with-a-bit-of-grit boost and a "normal" crunchy boost. Here is a geeked-out thread on that pedal: http://www.thegearpage.net/board/sho...ight=fulldrive

Bottom line is that if you are looking for a sound, you can find it at a lot of different price points and with a few different features...
Ultimately, I didn't get the FD2 simply because I am playing through a great two-channel gig amp and was able to use an existing pedal for a clean boost as needed - that works with both channels to get me louder for leads. With my Tweed/home amp, I was only looking for a crunch pedal, and my research on the Blackstone suggested it does that one thing a bit better vs. the FD2. But if I needed those features, I would've likely found an FD2 to live with for a while.

There are a TON of clean boost/overdrive/distortion pedals. I really try to avoid getting caught up in all that - find one and done.

Last edited by WordMan; 06-11-2010 at 11:53 AM.
  #543  
Old 06-11-2010, 12:11 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WordMan View Post
It is pretty funny - squeegee and I have been talking back-channel after I posted about the Blackstone - he was looking for both clean boost and OD and I ended up suggesting he check out an FD2 - squeegee, hope it is okay if I quote from my email reply back to you..
Not a problem. The tone in question is from Matchbox, which to me sounds like a straight-up Tele plus Fender-ish amp + some secret sauce, at once searing, yet clean and very articulate. I was poking around the intertubes, I found a site that claims Lang uses a Z Vex Super Hardon and a Hughes & Kettner Rotosphere. The description (and short demo on that site) of the Super Hardon makes me think that this is the "secret sauce" I was hearing in that cut, so WordMan and I started chatting about it, back-channel, and ended up talking about the Blackstone and FD2 pedals as well. Pure geekery.

BigShooter, if you get FD2, please let us know how you like it (or not like it) and any other nerdy details you dig out of it.
  #544  
Old 06-11-2010, 12:13 PM
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Oh - and here is what I wrote about the Zvex pedal:

Quote:
I see your link - okay, that's a Zvex pedal - that explains it. Zach Vex is one of the biggest names on the boutique pedal front. His Fuzz Factory is considered one of the first of the new-gen of handmade pedals (with the first gen being the original pedals from the 60's). If you read Dave Hunter's book on effects pedals (I have linked to it a few times in threads) he holds up Zvex as one of the best - and their prices started high given the hand made, hand painted approach, but now they remain high even though most are now more mass-produced and -painted. I have heard good things about the Fuzz Factory but it sounded like a "unique tone" pedal, not an always-on pedal. They also have the Super Hardon and the Box of Rock - the BoR gets reviewed as a great always-on pedal, but not nearly as well-reviewed as the Blackstone I got. Since I wasn't look to go on a Pedal Quest and try a bunch, I went with the one that folks described in ways that sounds closest to my needs and went the from there.
  #545  
Old 06-11-2010, 06:18 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by squeegee View Post
BigShooter, if you get FD2, please let us know how you like it (or not like it) and any other nerdy details you dig out of it.
Well here's what happened...

Went to the local GC and of course the sales boy was new and had no idea what I was asking for. But after a bit of looking around, he found an FD2 and we plugged it in along with a few other OD's: A Tubescreamer, A Delta Labs Tube Drive, a BBE Green something or other (big ugly green pedal), my Marshall Bluesbreaker II, and also the FD2's little brother, the OCD (Obsessive Compulsive Drive).

Now I haven't used a OD pedal for anything but a relatively clean boost for solo's since I was in high school. I just prefer tube driven distortion I get from my amps and I never thought a pedal could match the tone of hot tubes. I was wrong.

I tried the FD2 first - it's a great sounding pedal. Nice, warm tubey type of distortion and the MOSFET settings weren't too noisy like most MOSFET pedals tend to be. I new it was going to be good, but not THIS good. Really responsive and just... aaaahhh

Next was the Tubescreamer. I knew what these sounded like, but I wanted to have one for a/b comparison with the FD2. The FD2 blew it out of the water IMO.

The Delta Labs pedal really sucked. No character whatsoever and just lifeless. It seemed like when I hit an E chord and let it ring, the tone dropped off super quick. Not enough compression in the circuit, I guess.

The BBE pedal wasn't much better. Truly sucky tone. It was like a kids toy compared to the FD2.

Next came the Fulltone OCD. I suspected it would sound a lot like the FD2, and it does - almost exactly, actually - it just doesn't have the MOSFET circuit and the boost channel that the FD2 has. It did have a slightly better tone than the FD2 IMO. It sounded a little fuller, with a little more on the bass frequencies, which I liked.

So it came down to the FD2 or the OCD. The FD2 had the boost channel, but you can only use it when the OD is on, so I wouldn't be able to boost my clean sound from my amp with it. This and the better tone of the OCD was the deciding factor so I went with the OCD.

For the boost, I went with a separate pedal - the Boss GE-7 Equalizer. A nice transparent EQ pedal when all the sliders are in the neutral position. However, it has a +15 db boost slider as well so it gives me enough juice to get over the top for solos - clean and dirty.

I'm pretty happy now. I've being playing with the OCD all afternoon. I can't believe I'm getting this kind of overdrive from a pedal. It's amazing...

http://www.fulltone.com/ocd.asp

So basically, I set up the clean channel on my Egnater with the gain up to right where it starts to break up. Then I use the OCD for a distortion "channel" and the boost gives me volume whether the OCD's on or not. Best of both worlds...

Last edited by BigShooter; 06-11-2010 at 06:23 PM.
  #546  
Old 06-11-2010, 08:36 PM
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I dunno. I've tried fuzz boxes and various distort pedals, and somewhere in the garage is some brand of "tube overdrive something or other". But to be honest, they've always left me underwhelmed. There's just nothing like just driving a tube amp, period.
  #547  
Old 06-12-2010, 08:38 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SteveG1 View Post
I dunno. I've tried fuzz boxes and various distort pedals, and somewhere in the garage is some brand of "tube overdrive something or other". But to be honest, they've always left me underwhelmed. There's just nothing like just driving a tube amp, period.
AMEN! Preach it, brother! I've heard all of (and used a couple of) the digital imitations, and they're okay - but if you want that sound that hits you in chest and the groin at the same time, there's nothing like cranking a good amp to 11 and standing at the edge of the feedback zone...
  #548  
Old 06-12-2010, 08:52 AM
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You guys really should give the Fulltone stuff a try - even if you're not in the market for an OD pedal. They really are quite good sounding.

Actually, I found this:

http://www.oldtonezone.com/distortio...-comparinator/

It compares a bunch of the boutique OD pedals out there a/b-ing them with synced soundclips. Kind of cool. I still think the OCD sounds the best...
  #549  
Old 06-12-2010, 10:03 AM
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Well, got my parts. The new tuners dropped in without a whimper, and now it tunes like a real guitar. Man, that was frustrating.

The new trem? Well, I learned one thing, and I have something else I'm not sure about. Well, two somethings.

First, the thing I learned: Why the cheap stratocaster had brass screws for the claw. Necessary. The new ones aren't _quite_ rounded out, but they're on the way. Got to get new brass screws.

Now, my problems: How tight do you screw down the screws across the bridge? If I screw 'em flat, of course the trem pulls out to full whammy. If I leave a millimeter of free space, it seems okay, I just don't know if I want the screws up in the air or not.

Also, the new trem
http://store.guitarfetish.com/10spiminmebr.html
came with four springs, and a five tooth claw. I have it set up, two left, two right. It kind of needs all four to keep the heel of the bridge on the ground. It's hard to whammy, but I don't mind that at all, as I don't really intend to do that much for a while.

Was that what I was supposed to do?

It sounds fuller, all right. The old trem wasn't even a full block, it's got this cutaway at the bottom. I am one happy camper.

Of course, this other guy went all 'This is your first time luthiering? You'll never get it to stay in tune.' and I am now unreasonably nervous. (Intonation at 12th fret is perfect, except low E and A, which are a quarter note off. The E was worse, but I fixed it to approximate, I'll fix it to perfect later.
  #550  
Old 06-12-2010, 10:15 AM
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I'm probably not enough of a musician to fully participate in this thread, but I thought I'd just mention that I just bought a Danelectro 63. Those of you who read my previous thread on buying an electric for Attacklad will notice that this is, in fact, the same guitar as he has. I found I was playing it almost as much as he was, and, well, it seemed like the thing to do.
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