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  #101  
Old 08-10-2019, 05:44 AM
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Last night I stumbled upon, "Blotto" on YouTube, Laurel & Hardy, one I had never seen before & I haven't laughed so much for a long while. It has also been beautifully restored.
  #102  
Old 08-10-2019, 08:06 PM
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Six String Samurai - in the aftermath of a US/Soviet war in which the US lost and was invaded, Buddy Holly is on a pilgrimage to Vegas for maybe a chance to be king, after The King dies. Along the way he has run ins (resolved both with music and the sword) with other guitar wielders of various genres, all of whom are on the same pilgrimage. Russian surf rock, imminently quotable, very bizarre.
Also Slash (not really him, but come on, it's him) is Death. Great fucking movie.
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Old 08-10-2019, 08:50 PM
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--Secret Sunshine. It won an award at Cannes so maybe more folks in the U.S. have seen it than I would think. Stars IMO the best actress of the past 20 years (Do-yeon Jeon). Not the best "Korean actress" but just damn the best in the world. One of the best-acted scenes I've ever watched in a movie is in this film--a scene where for the most part she doesn't even say anything. She conveys everything via an expression--how her world is changing in real time just via a reaction shot.

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I watched this last night on your recommendation and really liked it. As you say, Do-yeon Jeon's acting was excellent. Also, the story line isn't predictable: there are a couple of changes in direction that I didn't see coming at all. One of them happens in the scene you describe.
I'm glad you gave it a shot. And even more glad that you liked it!
  #104  
Old 08-10-2019, 08:54 PM
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Hellzapoppin with Olsen and Johnson. Based on a Broadway show. I saw it as a kid on TV, and when I got the bootleg DVD (not officially released yet) it was better than I remembered. Hilarious, with a mess up the theater production scene better than Night at the Opera.
I'd add the followup film Crazy Street but I haven't been able to find it yet. (Not that I've looked very hard.)

Tampopo about a woman setting up a noodle shop in Japan and a lot more.

Much more recently, Puzzle about a woman liberated by doing jigsaw puzzles.
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Old 08-10-2019, 09:43 PM
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Tapeheads is fucking awesome--executive producer Mike Nesmith of The Monkees and approximately nine billion obscure but hilarious cameos by famous musicians, most notably Devo performing as a sucky European trash band and Jello Biafra as an FBI agent. Insanely great music, trust me on this one.

Along the same lines but even more obscure is Get Crazy which is so unknown it never even got a DVD release--I have it but I had to download a VHS rip, that's how unknown it is. Also an insane number of musical cameos and a great soundtrack and who can resist Malcolm McDowell playing an asshole super rich rock star named Reggie Wanker? Not I!

For something completely different, how about Sirens? I don't understand why this one never got famous, if for no other reason than every woman cast in this film appears naked--go on, go look at the list and tell me that doesn't have some appeal. It's just a genuinely lovely movie though and it makes me feel happy every time I watch it.
Get Crazy is actually the first movie I thought of when I saw the thread title. Lou Reed in what looks like the cover of Dylan's Bringing it All Back Home blew my mind. I also loved King Blues' speech at the funeral of his guitar player; "take good care of him, Lord, cause if you don't I'm gonna wax your ass."
  #106  
Old 08-10-2019, 11:44 PM
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Bubba Ho-Tep. Elvis and JFK fight a soul-sucking mummy in an old age home. Except it’s not what you think. And what you’re thinking now, it’s not that, either. It’s immensely entertaining, and way better than it has any right to be.
  #107  
Old 08-11-2019, 12:57 PM
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Seconding already mentioned (# of IMDb ratings-r):

L'Argent (1983) Robert Bresson (7200r) - masterpiece, everything Bresson, really.
Fear of a Black Hat (1993) Rusty Cundieff (3700r) - I liked this better than This Is Spinal Tap, managing to both out-love and out-skewer the subjects.
Black Robe (1991) Bruce Beresford (6000r) - an Australian sets North Americans straight on a lot of history
Ridicule (1996) Patrice Leconte (6800r) - well worth all the ongoing work into perfecting the English subtitles
Tampopo (1985) Itami Jûzô (13,600r) - over 10K IMDb ratings, but still nowhere near enough. A cinephiles 2-hour Japanese vacation!
everything Aki Kaurismäki - starting to be better known, film buffs are in the seats opening day

I didn't get far with my own suggestions, noticing early in my list that the two full feature films French actor Jean-Louis Trintignant directed combine for fewer than 500 IMDb ratings. A few more before I start drinking:
Zama (2017) Lucrecia Martel (4200r)
Les convoyeurs attendent (1999) Benoît Mariage (1200r) and Au poste! (2018) Quentin Dupieux (2100r) Biased about these, but Benoît Poelvoorde is the greatest actor.
Prince of Broadway (2008) Sean Baker (386r) I understand if there's little money or talent behind translating gems from other cultures, but this is 100% American!
  #108  
Old 08-11-2019, 01:03 PM
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Have to add: All the Jacques Tati Mr. Hulot films, don't even need translation! Criminally underseen, Criterion has begun rectifying this.

Have to also add: Hirokazu Kore-eda, everything! OK now I'm really angry

Last edited by eunoia; 08-11-2019 at 01:05 PM.
  #109  
Old 08-11-2019, 01:43 PM
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Originally Posted by eunoia View Post
Seconding already mentioned (# of IMDb ratings-r):

L'Argent (1983) Robert Bresson (7200r) - masterpiece, everything Bresson, really.
Fear of a Black Hat (1993) Rusty Cundieff (3700r) - I liked this better than This Is Spinal Tap, managing to both out-love and out-skewer the subjects.
Black Robe (1991) Bruce Beresford (6000r) - an Australian sets North Americans straight on a lot of history
Ridicule (1996) Patrice Leconte (6800r) - well worth all the ongoing work into perfecting the English subtitles
Tampopo (1985) Itami Jûzô (13,600r) - over 10K IMDb ratings, but still nowhere near enough. A cinephiles 2-hour Japanese vacation!
everything Aki Kaurismäki - starting to be better known, film buffs are in the seats opening day

I didn't get far with my own suggestions, noticing early in my list that the two full feature films French actor Jean-Louis Trintignant directed combine for fewer than 500 IMDb ratings. A few more before I start drinking:
Zama (2017) Lucrecia Martel (4200r)
Les convoyeurs attendent (1999) Benoît Mariage (1200r) and Au poste! (2018) Quentin Dupieux (2100r) Biased about these, but Benoît Poelvoorde is the greatest actor.
Prince of Broadway (2008) Sean Baker (386r) I understand if there's little money or talent behind translating gems from other cultures, but this is 100% American!
I don't think Bresson ever made a bad movie.. I like Kaurismaki, too, and I especially love "Shadows in Paradise" and anything with Pellonnpaa and either Kaurismaki (but prefer Aki)
  #110  
Old 08-11-2019, 05:35 PM
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Get Crazy is actually the first movie I thought of when I saw the thread title. Lou Reed in what looks like the cover of Dylan's Bringing it All Back Home blew my mind. I also loved King Blues' speech at the funeral of his guitar player; "take good care of him, Lord, cause if you don't I'm gonna wax your ass."
Everything about that movie is just fun--especially the Electric Larry bits and the evil bad guys of Colin Beverly. It really deserved a lot more notice than it got. Now I'm gonna go watch it again because I CAN!
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Old 08-11-2019, 07:50 PM
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Everything about that movie is just fun--especially the Electric Larry bits and the evil bad guys of Colin Beverly. It really deserved a lot more notice than it got. Now I'm gonna go watch it again because I CAN!
I watched it on YouTube last night and felt a little guilty; we librarians are supposed to be outspoken against copyright violations.
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Old 08-11-2019, 10:07 PM
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If nobody involved with that movie can be arsed to make it available they're basically abdicating any rights because they're forcing anyone who wants to watch it into doing so "illegally." Dog in the manger, if you ask me.
  #113  
Old 08-13-2019, 07:52 PM
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Just back to quickly second True Stories (1986)(4900r!) which I missed first time around and would have thought was much too popular to mention.

Nov 27, 2018 Criterion released a "New, restored 4K digital transfer, supervised by director David Byrne and cinematographer Ed Lachman, with 5.1 surround DTS-HD Master Audio soundtrack, supervised by Byrne, on the Blu-ray."

This should be all the validation and encouragement you need. You'll watch this again and again like a two year-old watches The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh. Criterion is doing the Lord's work, and this is an excellent purchase in support of legit film lovers.
  #114  
Old 08-14-2019, 02:56 AM
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Fear of a Black Hat - basically "This is Spinal Tap" of 90's gangsta rap.
I seem to remember preferring this one to the other rap spinal tap movie, CB4, which starred Chris Rock (before I knew of him). I think it's worth going back and checking again, they both may have merged into one film in my mind...
  #115  
Old 08-14-2019, 03:52 AM
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Ikuru by Akira Kurasawa, starring the great Kanji Watanabe - The leader of the seven samurai

https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0044741...=nm_flmg_wr_48
  #116  
Old 08-14-2019, 07:02 AM
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Angel and the Bad Man - the John Wayne movie that only I seem to have watched. I generally don't like cowboy flicks, but this is one of my all time favorites.
Apparently this was one inspiration for Witness (1985), a favorite film of mine, so I should check it out.
  #117  
Old 08-14-2019, 07:42 AM
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I haven't read the entire thread, so forgive any repetitions (although some are intentional). I've seen several films listed here. Some are weird, but I can't say I love them. Others aren't at all obscure (seriously -- Seven Samurai?). But here's a list of some obscure flicks I like:

The Adventures of Mark Twain -- Will Vinton's only feature-length film in Claymation, and a treat for Twain lovers. It adapts parts of a lot of Twain stories, including obscure ones.

Creation of the Humanoids -- 1960s low-budget science fiction film with some truly awful acting, but very interesting ideas and writing. Definitely worth a look.

The Lost Skeleton of Cadavera and its sequel The Lost Skeleton Returns Again. Not really that obscure, I think. But I can name which movies they're spoofing at which point

Kronos -- 1950s science fiction film about a giant robot that invades the earth. Clearly a big influence on Brad Bird, who used bits of it in The Iron Giant and The Incredibles. The story is mind-numbingly dumb, but the special effects, by much of the same team that did Forbidden Planet, is mind-blowing. You wouldn't believe that a plain cubical shape could be made so visually interesting. Too bad it's only in black and white.

Atomic Submarine -- another 1950s SF flick, about the first nuclear sub fighting invading aliens underwater. How is this film not better known? More effects work from the Forbidden Planet team.

Panic in the Year Zero -- 1960s film. The Russkies (not named, but we know it's them) blow up LA with an atomic bomb, and probably other places. Ray Milland and his family are fortuitously out of town, and have to survive amidst the chaos and rioting. Surprisingly well-made drama. How do you cross a line of traffic refugees fleeing the city when NOBODY wants to let you cross?

Operation Moonbase -- Heinlein wrote the scripts for a 1950s TV series that never made TV, but they mashed together what they had into a movie (which Heinlein hated). There are alternating moments of really good and understated science fiction and extrapolation mixed in with things that make you simply cringe. A weird roller coater ride. It features cordless telephones, the casual use of zero-G, the first astronaut (who is a woman), and a female president of the US. But the way it treats its female characters will make you want to rip your eyes out. Or tear up your monitor.

Angry Red Planet -- interesting trip-to-Mars film with a bullet-shaped spaceship. All the scenes on Mars were filmed in "Cinemagic" (which seems to be extremely solarizing of the film, followed by printing onto red stock). It certainly gives the Mars scenes a different and (dare I say it) "otherworldly" feel. Directed by Moe Howard's (of The Three Stooges) son-in-law, who was actually a pretty talented individual. The film also features the most unexpected and scientifically believable solution to a puzzle that still blows me away. Featuring a female astronaut who screams way too much (but actually does things), a woman-eating plant, a bat-rat-spider, a giant Space Amoeba that ingests one of the crew (and has a giant rotating eye), and a suitably weird-looking Martian. Also, a long-shot of a Martian city.

Seventh Voyage of Sinbad -- not really obscure, but one of the first fantasy films I saw in the theater. Excellent special effects and animation, and Bernard Herrmann's score is superb. I didn't notice when I first saw it that Sinbad's ship changes from shot to shot from an Arabian dhow with lateen sail to an 18th century European square-rigged three-masted sailing ship. The first appearance of Harryhausen's fighting skeletons. It also has not one but two Cyclops and a Fire-Breathing Dragon, among other animated delights. The four-armed rubber-limbed dancing snake girl is wonderful.

Jack the Giant Killer -- Producer Edward Small (who did the most successful version of Last of the Mohicans, Witness for the Prosecution, and other films) decided he wanted to copy Seventh Voyage of Sinbad, so he hired the same actors who played the hero and the villain (Kerwin Matthwes and Torin Thatcher, respectively) and the same screenwriter (Nathan Juran, who also directed), but skimped in getting Jim Danforth instead of Ray Harryhausen to do the effects. The animation isn't as good, but the film is entertaining, if more puerile. There's a dragon in this one, too, but his face makes him look less threatening than Harryhausen's -- he looks more like an angry puppy dog. Apparently they later added music and turned it into a musical, something I;'m glad I've never seen. Worth a look.
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  #118  
Old 08-14-2019, 08:09 AM
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Just back to quickly second True Stories (1986)(4900r!) which I missed first time around and would have thought was much too popular to mention.
Should have realized to mention this in my Purple Hearts post since it also has Annie McEnroe in it.

Other films she's been in that I like are The Hand and Howling II: Your Sister Is a Werewolf but those are in the "so bad they're good" realm.
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Old 08-14-2019, 08:12 AM
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Ikuru by Akira Kurasawa, starring the great Kanji Watanabe - The leader of the seven samurai

https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0044741...=nm_flmg_wr_48
Ikiru is one of my favorite movies ever.. And the first I saw by Kurosawa, and have been meaning to re-watch it.
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Old 08-14-2019, 08:58 AM
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Ikiru is one of the finest movies ever made. If there is a better "study" (for want of a better word) of human psychology, I've not seen it. And some humorous digs at government bureaucracy as well.

I was gobsmacked when I first watched it. I rewatched it with the commentary (Criterion), which was VERY interesting and informative. The commentary provides a perspective of Japanese culture and politics at the time that really deepened my understanding, and appreciation of, the film.

Ikiru is a masterpiece rarely matched. I would hope it falls well outside of the category of "not many others have seen." It's Kurosawa at his absolute finest.
  #121  
Old 08-14-2019, 09:15 AM
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IKURU Is an object lesson in life & is ironically about death as well. I can feel a tingle when I think about his dignified praying to the official & that haunting song he sings in the snow on the child's swing at the end. I think it is now largely forgotten, searching for the link I placed above, it didn't appear when I typed 'Ikuru' into the IMDB, I had to go to Kurasawa's profile itself & scroll down to the 1950s to find it.
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Old 08-14-2019, 09:40 AM
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I've seen Ikiru a couple of times, and I'll agree that this is a great, rarely-seen film. But, again, I'm a big Kurasawa fan. Most of his films, unfortunately, are rarely seen in the US. Seven Samurai and Rashomon are classics, and his more recent films got a lot of play -- Kagemusha, Ran, Dreams. But for some reason, although it's an acknowledged lassic, Ikiru wasn't shown as often.
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Old 08-14-2019, 09:52 AM
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Ikuru by Akira Kurasawa, starring the great Kanji Watanabe - The leader of the seven samurai
"Kanji Watanabe" is the character's name in Ikiru. The actor is Takashi Shimura.



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Kronos -- ...The story is mind-numbingly dumb, but the special effects, by much of the same team that did Forbidden Planet, is mind-blowing. You wouldn't believe that a plain cubical shape could be made so visually interesting. Too bad it's only in black and white.

Atomic Submarine -- another 1950s SF flick, about the first nuclear sub fighting invading aliens underwater. How is this film not better known? More effects work from the Forbidden Planet team.
In looking at the visual efx crews from these two movies and Forbidden Planet, I see no common names. Nor should that be surprising given the latter was an MGM film and the two former ones came from smaller studios. The trio (Block, DeWitt and Rabin) primarily responsible for visual efx in Kronos and The Atomic Submarine did work on many a low-budget sci-fi/fantasy movie, but Forbidden Planet wasn't one of them.

Apart from that, your choices show excellent taste, as usual.
  #124  
Old 08-14-2019, 10:08 AM
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Dropo. Correct. I scribbled both names down from IMDB & mixed the in my post - Thanks!
  #125  
Old 08-14-2019, 10:36 AM
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An Everlasting Piece (2000)

It's set in 1980s Belfast. It's about two barbers--one Catholic, one Protestant--in a mental institution who decide to go into the door-to-door men's wig sales business. It's a laugh riot. Bonus, Billy Connolly as an inmate called "The Scalper." And a wild encounter supplying wigs to the I.R.A.
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  #126  
Old 08-14-2019, 10:58 AM
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"Kanji Watanabe" is the character's name in Ikiru. The actor is Takashi Shimura.





In looking at the visual efx crews from these two movies and Forbidden Planet, I see no common names. Nor should that be surprising given the latter was an MGM film and the two former ones came from smaller studios. The trio (Block, DeWitt and Rabin) primarily responsible for visual efx in Kronos and The Atomic Submarine did work on many a low-budget sci-fi/fantasy movie, but Forbidden Planet wasn't one of them.

Apart from that, your choices show excellent taste, as usual.
I stand by my statements. Listings give the chief people, not the whole team.



Block, who did effects for Atomic Sub (His arm was inside the one-eyed alien puppet) and Kronos wrote the story for Forbidden Planet.


Look at the effects used for the destruction of the Krel door at the climax of FP and the scenes of the destruction of Kronos -- there's a great similarity between the appearance and even the philosophy. Things didn't just melt, they decomposed in a characteristic way.
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  #127  
Old 08-14-2019, 12:56 PM
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I stand by my statements. Listings give the chief people, not the whole team.

Block, who did effects for Atomic Sub (His arm was inside the one-eyed alien puppet) and Kronos wrote the story for Forbidden Planet.

Look at the effects used for the destruction of the Krel door at the climax of FP and the scenes of the destruction of Kronos -- there's a great similarity between the appearance and even the philosophy. Things didn't just melt, they decomposed in a characteristic way.

A "team" is more than one person. Please name two or more people who worked on the visual efx team for all three movies. Note that for Kronos, you referred to "much of the same team" as FP's visual efx crew, yet you have already ruled out all of the credited "chief people" who worked on FP's visual efx.

Mr. Block is credited with "based on a story by" for FP. He was not part of the visual efx team for that film. Citing him does not lend credence to your claims ("...but the special effects, by much of the same team that did Forbidden Planet...."; "More effects work from the Forbidden Planet team.")

"...scenes of the destruction of Kronos" is an ambiguous phrase meaning either the destruction Kronos causes or the destruction of Kronos itself. Scenes of destruction by Kronos use miniatures, fire and superimposition. They look nothing like anything in FP. The Krel door getting super-hot bears a passing resemblance to Kronos' final moments, but given the specific phenomena in question is the same (metal overheating), it is a generic resemblance and it comprises a few seconds of screen time at most. Basing a claim of "great similarity" (and "even the philosophy") on those few seconds is specious. Lastly, Kronos and the Krel door do not decompose "in a characteristic way." The Krel door decomposes, bits and pieces falling off. Kronos does not decompose; it just gets super-hot and psychedelic.

Destruction of Kronos - https://youtu.be/e5SbKgLJDjY?t=802

Decomposition of Krel door - https://youtu.be/n0aO1sSILNw
  #128  
Old 08-15-2019, 12:23 AM
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Angel and the Bad Man - the John Wayne movie that only I seem to have watched. I generally don't like cowboy flicks, but this is one of my all time favorites.
I've also seen it and I really like it. When I was deciding on a userid I was contemplating Qwerty Evans as an homage to this movie (John Wayne's character is named Quirt Evans.) Harry Carey is an absolute gem here and I have been known to bust out some of his lines from time to time. No one ever has any idea what I'm talking about.

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Bubba Ho-Tep. Elvis and JFK fight a soul-sucking mummy in an old age home. Except it’s not what you think. And what you’re thinking now, it’s not that, either. It’s immensely entertaining, and way better than it has any right to be.
Agreed.

My contribution is a Kenneth Branagh movie from 1995, A Midwinter's Tale. I believe it's called In the Bleak Midwinter in England. A group of actors puts on a production of Hamlet in an old church just before Christmas. I think this was the most I have ever laughed in a theater.
  #129  
Old 08-15-2019, 07:22 AM
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A "team" is more than one person. Please name two or more people who worked on the visual efx team for all three movies. Note that for Kronos, you referred to "much of the same team" as FP's visual efx crew, yet you have already ruled out all of the credited "chief people" who worked on FP's visual efx.

Mr. Block is credited with "based on a story by" for FP. He was not part of the visual efx team for that film. Citing him does not lend credence to your claims ("...but the special effects, by much of the same team that did Forbidden Planet...."; "More effects work from the Forbidden Planet team.")

"...scenes of the destruction of Kronos" is an ambiguous phrase meaning either the destruction Kronos causes or the destruction of Kronos itself. Scenes of destruction by Kronos use miniatures, fire and superimposition. They look nothing like anything in FP. The Krel door getting super-hot bears a passing resemblance to Kronos' final moments, but given the specific phenomena in question is the same (metal overheating), it is a generic resemblance and it comprises a few seconds of screen time at most. Basing a claim of "great similarity" (and "even the philosophy") on those few seconds is specious. Lastly, Kronos and the Krel door do not decompose "in a characteristic way." The Krel door decomposes, bits and pieces falling off. Kronos does not decompose; it just gets super-hot and psychedelic.

Destruction of Kronos - https://youtu.be/e5SbKgLJDjY?t=802

Decomposition of Krel door - https://youtu.be/n0aO1sSILNw


If you want to discuss this further, we can take it elsewhere, because I don't want to derail this thread. Also, I'm insanely busy at the moment, so forgive this brief post.

But you seriously mischaracterize the effects and the way they're done. And, yes, I mean philosophy. Don't be dismissive.

The Krel door doesn't simply melt. Watch the film more carefully. If you wanted to just melt it, you could make a prop door out of solder or eutectic and heat it until it flowed into liquid. That door decomposes, in layers, and that's what makes it visually interesting to watch. As a production designer -- and Block didn't just write the screen story for Forbidden Planet, he was its uncredited Production Designer (see iMDB or any of several websites devoted to the film -- https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0049223...=tt_cl_sm#cast or https://www.fandango.com/people/irvi...7297/biography
) -- Block knew that yopu had to make things visually interesting and exciting. The door heats up, unevenly, with waves of red spreading over its surface. Then regions change to yellow, then to white (following the sequence J.J. Adams had outlined in dialogue). Then it doesn't simply melt, but sort of granularizes, and starts to crumble off in bits. There's a suggestion of layers peeling away, just as the Krel doors exist in separate layers that slide across each other friom different directions. It's wonderfully complex and interesting to watch.


(That "Door That Consists of Different Layers That Slide In From Different Directions" is sort of a Block Hallmark. Again, it doesn't just close -- it seals up in a series of motions that is visually interesting and arresting and makes you want to watch. It also sort of makes sense with the Krel door and that finale. Block used similar doors in the alien spacecraft in Atomic Submarine. I think George Lucas saw these and liked them, and stole them for Star Wars -- the doors on the Death Star in the original film close the same way. Darth Vader just misses being able to pass through one after his light saber duel with Obi-Wan Kenobi, and Luke has shot the controls to close the door. Watch how it closes. In any case, they COULD have made the door just one big sliding panel, a la Star Trek. Or even a big door on hinges, for that matter. They didn't. Block had a philosophy of production and effects design.

Again, look at Kronos. He doesn't just explode, or melt. In lesser hands, he would. But that doesn't fit Block's philosophy of design. Like the Krel door, he doesn't simply melt -- he decomposes in stages. The outer layer of that half-dome on top melts and slides off. Striations appear across the surface of Kronos' body. Those shots looking up at the vastness of his boxy metal body, in other hands, would be boring to look at -- it's just a Big Box, after all. Block made sure it stayed interesting. In fact, as I've maintained elsewhere, Kronos the movie is intellectually vapid. Unlike Forbidden Planet, this is pretty rotten as Science Fiction. But it is visually a treat. Who cares about the actors or the acting? But everyone cites the slick appearance of the robot, and its whacko method of locomotion (using three pistoning feet and one rotating one --- I've never seen anything quite like that, before or since), and its ultimate destruction are all what make this film worth watching.


Block was like Harryhausen, in a small way -- the special effects guy writes the story to fit the effects he has in mind. Block wrote the stories for Forbidden Planet and for Kronos and for Atomic Submarine.



My copies of Cinefantastique are buried away right now, and I have limited time to search the internet, so I'll have to leave it there. Block is the connecting thread between the films, and I maintain still that this unites the effects appearance and philosophy. I'd be very surprised if he didn't have a team or associates that worked with him on the multiple productions, but who didn't get into the credits (Harryhausen has uncredited helpers, too), but I haven't been able to locate anything yet.
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Old 08-15-2019, 07:38 AM
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The Dish (2000)
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Old 08-15-2019, 08:15 AM
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The Dish (2000)
Very interesting low-budget science flick. I missed it when it first came out, but caught it later at a science fiction convention.
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Old 08-15-2019, 10:31 AM
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If you want to discuss this further, we can take it elsewhere, because I don't want to derail this thread....
Ditto. This will be my last post on this hijack in this thread.


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The Krel door doesn't simply melt.... That door decomposes, in layers....
Agreed 100%.


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Originally Posted by CalMeacham View Post
Again, look at Kronos. He doesn't just explode, or melt....he decomposes in stages. The outer layer of that half-dome on top melts and slides off. Striations appear across the surface of Kronos' body.
Kronos does not decompose. The outer layer of the dome melts and slides off - an effect that looks nothing like the Krel door - then Kronos explodes. At no time do bits and pieces of him flake off like the Krel door.

Both efx involve metal overheating, a well-known phenomena where the color changes as the temperature increases, ultimately leading to decomposition in layers. The last part does not happen in Kronos.



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Those shots looking up at the vastness of his boxy metal body, in other hands, would be boring to look at -- it's just a Big Box, after all.
This part is unrelated to the discussion we are having, but I thought it interesting that there are a couple low angle shots of Kronos at the climax that look remarkably like the monolith in 2001. Pretty much anything can be made to look (more) interesting with the right angle and lighting.


FP was an MGM production. They had an in-house efx unit supervised by A. Arnold Gillespie (who served under Cedric Gibbons). I have no idea how much work Mr. Block did on the production design, but the fact he was uncredited for it suggests it may not have been much or not much of it was actually used. With the conspicuous exception of Joshua Meador - borrowed from Disney to animate the Id Monster - my recollection is that the visual efx of FP were done in-house. But I could be wrong.
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Old 08-15-2019, 11:33 AM
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Twice Upon A Time - I'll keep wishing for the original dialogue track until the day I die, prolly
There are two dialogue tracks on the DVD. Is neither the original?
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Old 08-15-2019, 02:07 PM
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I seem to remember preferring this one to the other rap spinal tap movie, CB4, which starred Chris Rock (before I knew of him). I think it's worth going back and checking again, they both may have merged into one film in my mind...
Fear of a Black Hat is the superior one, but it was sadly over shadowed by the CB4 release with more mainstream black actors.
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Old 08-15-2019, 02:31 PM
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2002’s In America - The entire movie is excellent but that ending especially...gets me every time.
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Old 08-16-2019, 03:10 AM
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Ikiru is a masterpiece, but it has close to 60,000 ratings at IMDb, so the cat is definitely out of the bag. Thanks again Criterion and criterionchannel.com. You may disagree with some of the movies Criterion re-releases, but if you disagree with many, you just don't love movies.
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Old 08-16-2019, 03:28 AM
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"lone star" is a personal favourite of mine. Top ensemble cast, Chris Cooper on top form and Kris Kristofferson plays one of the greatest baddies committed to film. Lots of lovely ambiguity as well.

It wasn't lost on the various award boards and was well nominated but for some reason it flew under pretty much everyone else's radar, vanishingly few people I mention it to have ever heard of it but it is absolutely worth a watch. Francis McDormand is in it.......'nuff said.
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Old 08-16-2019, 06:28 AM
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The "trilogy" by Aaron Moorhead and Justin Benson, which is science fiction with a dash of horror:

Resolution (2012)
A man imprisons his estranged junkie friend in an isolated cabin in the boonies of San Diego to force him through a week of sobriety, but the events of that week are being mysteriously manipulated.

Spring (2014)
A young man in a personal tailspin flees from US to Italy, where he sparks up a romance with a woman harboring a dark, primordial secret.

The Endless (2017)
As kids, they escaped a UFO death cult. Now, two adult brothers seek answers after an old videotape surfaces and brings them back to where they began.


I'm not entirely sure Spring is related to the other two -- it's been years since I saw it -- but I consider these three movies to comprise a trilogy. Resolution and The Endless are so connected that I believe there is actual footage from Resolution in The Endless. (It's possible they re-shot the "re-used" scenes from scratch.) Ironically, Resolution is "resolved" in The Endless, and not the other way around.

Spring is my favorite of the three, and as stated it's fully stand-alone. I wouldn't recommend watching The Endless before Resolution because of the deep connection and callbacks between the two.

Last edited by Ellis Dee; 08-16-2019 at 06:30 AM.
  #139  
Old 08-16-2019, 06:41 AM
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There is a 1982 movie starring Julie Andrews called "Victor Victoria". I thought it was very charming, and I thought she did a great job with the role. She played a woman who was impersonating a man who was supposed to be a female impersonator! LOL

As far as I know, no one I know has seen this movie.
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  #140  
Old 08-16-2019, 06:42 AM
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The "trilogy" by Aaron Moorhead and Justin Benson, which is science fiction with a dash of horror:

Resolution (2012)
A man imprisons his estranged junkie friend in an isolated cabin in the boonies of San Diego to force him through a week of sobriety, but the events of that week are being mysteriously manipulated.

Spring (2014)
A young man in a personal tailspin flees from US to Italy, where he sparks up a romance with a woman harboring a dark, primordial secret.

The Endless (2017)
As kids, they escaped a UFO death cult. Now, two adult brothers seek answers after an old videotape surfaces and brings them back to where they began.


I'm not entirely sure Spring is related to the other two -- it's been years since I saw it -- but I consider these three movies to comprise a trilogy. Resolution and The Endless are so connected that I believe there is actual footage from Resolution in The Endless. (It's possible they re-shot the "re-used" scenes from scratch.) Ironically, Resolution is "resolved" in The Endless, and not the other way around.

Spring is my favorite of the three, and as stated it's fully stand-alone. I wouldn't recommend watching The Endless before Resolution because of the deep connection and callbacks between the two.
I've seen all three and would agree that Spring, which stands alone, is the best one.
  #141  
Old 08-16-2019, 07:28 AM
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There is a 1982 movie starring Julie Andrews called "Victor Victoria". I thought it was very charming, and I thought she did a great job with the role. She played a woman who was impersonating a man who was supposed to be a female impersonator! LOL

As far as I know, no one I know has seen this movie.
One of my favorites. I even remember seeing it in the theater when I was a kid. Today, I regard it as Robert Preston's other great role, next to The Music Man.
  #142  
Old 08-16-2019, 09:02 AM
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"lone star" is a personal favourite of mine. Top ensemble cast, Chris Cooper on top form and Kris Kristofferson plays one of the greatest baddies committed to film. Lots of lovely ambiguity as well.

It wasn't lost on the various award boards and was well nominated but for some reason it flew under pretty much everyone else's radar, vanishingly few people I mention it to have ever heard of it but it is absolutely worth a watch. Francis McDormand is in it.......'nuff said.
Yep, great movie. I saw it twice in the theater: once by myself just before my wife and I started dating, and then I took her to see it.
  #143  
Old 08-16-2019, 11:31 AM
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Bubba Ho-Tep. Elvis and JFK fight a soul-sucking mummy in an old age home. Except it’s not what you think. And what you’re thinking now, it’s not that, either. It’s immensely entertaining, and way better than it has any right to be.
"I'm thinkin' with sand here!"

Great movie. I love movies but I have a small DVD collection and Bubba Ho-Tep is in it.
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